Faculty Profiles

African Studies

David Blaney, professor of political science, teaches courses on international politics, global political economy, and development. His research centers on the political theory and political economy of international relations. He is currently working on two edited books that explore the state of international relations as a global discipline. He serves on the editorial board of the Routledge Press series Worlding Beyond the West, and the Iranian Review of Foreign Affairs. Professor Blaney teaches courses on international relations, global political economy, development, political economic thought, and global citizenship.
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Jean-Pierre Karegeye, assistant professor of French and francophone studies, focuses his research and teaching on African francophone literature and genocide studies, especially the Rwandan Genocide. He is particularly interested in the growing body of African francophone literary texts and other artistic works in dialogue with other disciplines. His publications include two edited books and more than 30 articles and book chapters. His recent article, "Rwanda: Litterature post-genocide, ecritures itinerantes: temoignage ou engagement?" was published by the International Journal of Semiotics "Protee." He also serves as director for the Interdisciplinary Genocide Studies Center, an international scholarly association.
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Erik Larson, associate professor of sociology, pursues research in political sociology, economic sociology, and the sociology of law by examining patterns of uniformity and diversity in globalized institutions. To this end, he has studied the formation and operation of new stock exchanges in Ghana, Fiji, and Iceland. A second collaborative project examines political contention and policy formation about indigenous rights, with a focus on economic affirmative action.
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Sowah Mensah, instructor of music, is an ethnomusicologist, composer, and master drummer from Ghana. As director of the popular Macalester African Music Ensemble, he gives private lessons in African drumming, xylophone, singing, and flute.
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Jamie Monson, professor of history, teaches African History, African Environmental History, the Ethics of Volunteer Service, and African Life History Narratives. Her current research studies technology and labor during the construction of Chinese infrastructure projects in Africa during the Cold War. Her book Africa's Freedom Railway was recently re-released in paperback by Indiana University Press. Her latest publication, Maji Maji: Lifting the Fog of War, is a co-edited volume about colonial warfare in German East Africa, published by Brill Press.
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David Chioni Moore, asociate professor of international studies and English, focuses on the literatures and cultures of the Black Atlantic world, with interests in both Africa and African America. He maintains allied interests in post-colonialism, the post-Soviet world, and globalization. He edited Martin Bernal's 2001 Black Athena Writes Back, is currently completing an edition of Langston Hughes's lost 1934 A Negro Looks at Soviet Central Asia, and has been published in journals such as Transition, Diaspora, PMLA, Frontiers, Genre, Research in African Literatures, and Callaloo.
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William Moseley, director of the African Studies Program, as well as professor and chair of geography, is a development and human-environment geographer. He teaches Human Geography; People, Agriculture and the Environment; Geography of Africa; Geography of Development; and Comparative Environment and Development Studies. Most of his fieldwork has been in West and Southern Africa. He is the author of over 70 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and is the editor of five books: An Introduction to Human- Environment Geography; Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial African Issues; Hanging by a Thread: Cotton, Globalization and Poverty in Africa; The Introductory Reader in Human Geography: Contemporary Debates and Classic Writings; and African Environment and Development: Rhetoric, Programs, Realities.
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Ahmed Samatar, James Wallace Professor of International Studies, is the author and editor of five books that include The African State: Reconsiderations; Somalia: State Collapse, Multilateral Intervention, and Strategies for Political Reconstruction; The Somali Challenge: From Catastrophe to Renewal?; African Studies and Undergraduate Education : Ideas Toward the 21st Century; and Socialist Somalia: Rhetoric and Reality, as well as several dozen scholarly articles. He is a member of the editorial board of the International Studies Review and editor of Macalester International and Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies.
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Dianna Shandy, professor of anthropology, is a sociocultural anthropologist whose work spans U.S. and international settings, with broad research and teaching interests in gender, migration, political conflict and violence, human rights and humanitarianism, and research methods. Specific research projects have explored African asylum seekers in Ireland; the Nuer (southern Sudanese) diaspora in Ethiopia, Egypt, and the United States; Darfur; the International Criminal Court; and the representation of violence in Africa. Her 2007 book, Nuer-American Passages: Globalizing Sudanese Migration, was recently re-released in paperback.
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Joelle Vitiello, professor of French and francophone studies, teaches 20th-century French literature; Haitian literature and culture; French, African, and Caribbean cinema; contemporary French culture; women writing in French; as well as French language. She specializes in representations of relationships (love, motherhood, friendship, and transmission of knowledge) in contemporary literature. Besides completing a manuscript on friendship in anthropology, philosophy, and literature, she is working on cinemas of diverse communities in French cities, and on representations of systemic violence (especially in Haiti and Rwanda).
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American Studies

Karin Aguilar-San Juan, associate professor, is an urban sociologist with a special interest in Asian American studies. She is the recipient of a Rockefeller Foundation Humanities Fellowship and a Woodrow Wilson National Foundation Fellowship. She is the editor of The State of Asian America: Activism and Resistance in the 1990s (South End Press, 1994), and author of Little Saigons: Staying Vietnamese in America (University of Minnesota Press, 2009).
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Duchess Harris, professor, teaches courses in African American studies and is a specialist on 20th-century African American political history. Within that broad subject, she is specifically interested in the civil rights movement, the contributions of women of color to feminist theory post-1970, autobiography, and critical legal studies. She is the author of Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Obama (Palgrave Macmillan; Reissue edition, March 2011) and co-editor of Racially Writing the Republic: Racists, Race Rebels, and Transformations of American Identity (Duke, 2009). In 2010, she earned a JD from William Mitchell College of Law, where she held a Bush Foundation Leadership Fellowship.
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Juliana Hu Pegues, is the Consortium for Faculty Diversity pre-doctoral fellow in American Studies. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Minnesota, and her interests include comparative analysis of Asian American and Native American colonial histories, and gender and sexuality studies.


Jane Rhodes is Macalester's Dean for the Study of Race and Ethnicity as well as professor and chair of the American Studies Department. She teaches courses on race, ethnicity, gender, social movements, transnationality, and mass media. As dean she provides leadership on curricular and co-curricular matters related to multiculturalism across the college. Among her publications are Mary Ann Shadd Cary: The Black Press and Protest in the Nineteenth Century (Indiana University Press, 1998) and Framing the Black Panthers: The Spectacular Rise of a Black Power Icon (New Press, 2007).
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Anthropology

Ron Barrett, associate professor, is a cultural and medical anthropologist whose research concerns the social aspects of infectious diseases, religious healing, and the ways that human beings come to terms with their own mortality. He is the author of An Unnatural History of Emerging Infections (with George Armelagos) and Aghor Medicine: Pollution, Death, and Healing in Northern India. He is also co-editor (with Peter Brown) of Understanding and Applying Medical Anthropology. He has conducted fieldwork in Northern and Western India, as well as in the United States.
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Olga Gonzalez, associate professor and chair, teaches courses on Latin America, psychological anthropology, violence, museum anthropology and anthropological theory. Her work studies the relationship between memory and secrecy in the context of war and violence, which she explores in her book Unveiling Secrets of War in the Peruvian Andes. She was also the curator of the exhibit Ayacucho: The Times of Danger. Her current research focuses on memory and visuality in "post-conflict" Peru.
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Arjun Guneratne, professor, teaches courses on South Asian society and culture, the anthropology of development, environmental anthropology, and ethnographic interviewing. His books include Many Tongues, One People: The Making of Tharu Identity in Nepal; Culture and the Environment in the Himalaya and Pathways to Power: The Domestic Politics of South Asia. He is currently working on a book on the history of ornithology in Sri Lanka. He has conducted fieldwork in Nepal and Sri Lanka.
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Scott Legge, associate professor, is a biological anthropologist with research interests in human and non-human primate skeletal biology as well as areas of growth and development in both skeletal and living populations. He has academic and research experience in human variation, human population biology, bioarchaeology, and skeletal biology, as well as extensive experience in historic and prehistoric archaeology.
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Dianna Shandy, professor, is a sociocultural anthropologist whose research projects span southern Sudanese (Nuer) diaspora, African asylum seekers in Ireland, and negotiating work and family in America. She is the author/co-author of three books: Nuer-American Passages: Globalizing Sudanese Migration; Glass Ceilings and 100-Hour Couples (with Karine Moe); and The Cultural Experience: Ethnography in Complex Society, 2nd edition (with David McCurdy and James Spradley), which features the work of 10 Macalester students.
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Jack Weatherford, DeWitt Wallace Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and 2012 recipient of Mongolia's first annual "Jack Weatherford Prize," holds an honorary doctorate from Chinggis Khan College of Mongolia. His most recent book is The Secret History of the Mongol Queens. His book Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World was a New York Times best seller.
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Architecture Program

Stanton Sears, associate professor, teaches sculpture and 3-D design. His recent projects include artworks for the Central Corridor light rail line in St. Paul and the Microbial Sciences Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His mosaic-floor inlays can be seen at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. He designed both the Vietnam War Memorial and the World War II Memorial at the Minnesota State Capitol. He and collaborative partner Andrea Myklebust '95 have completed more than 40 large-scale commissioned works for public spaces. Their 37-acre studio in rural Wisconsin serves as a sculpture lab.
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Gary Erickson, visiting assistant professor, teaches ceramics. He has been awarded both a Minnesota State Arts Board Fellowship and a McKnight Artist Fellowship for ceramic artists. He was one of only four international ceramic artists accepted for a residency at the Taller Cultural in Santiago de Cuba. On a Freeman grant in 2007, he traveled to Sanbao Ceramic Art Institute in Jingdezhen, China, the city where porcelain was invented. His work is included in the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution.
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Art and Art History

Ruthann Godollei, DeWitt Wallace Professor of Art and chair of the Art and Art History Department, teaches printmaking, senior seminar and a course called Dissent. A seven-time resident artist at the Frans Masereel Print Centre in Belgium, her prints about social justice are held by the Denver Art Museum, the Polish National Museum of Art and the Estonian Art Museum KUMU and her work is in the international exhibit Biennial Douro 2014 in Alijo, Portugal. In 2012 her work was in "Art of Democracy," a New York Society of Etchers juried exhibition. The release of her book on D.I.Y. printing, How to Create Your Own Gig Posters, Band T-Shirts, Album Covers, & Stickers, coincided with an exhibit at the Minnesota Museum of American Art. She is co-author with Eric Dregni '90 of Road Show: Art Cars & the Museum of the Streets.
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Eric Carroll, visiting assistant professor, teaches photography and 2-D Design. His work has been shown nationally and internationally, including G.U.T. Feeling at the Highlight Gallery SFCA; New Photogenic Drawings, BOSI Contemporary, NYC; and "What is a Photograph?" at New Orleans Museum of Art. He was the 2012 recipient of the Baum Award for an Emerging American Photographer with an accompanying exhibit at SF Camerawork, San Francisco, Calif.


Gary Erickson, visiting assistant professor, teaches ceramics. He won a Minnesota State Arts Board Grant in 2013. He had a solo exhibition at the Jingdezhen International Academy of Ceramics in China in 2011. Other exhibitions have been at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and Galeria Oriente in Santiago de Cuba. His work has been collected by the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis, and the Cuban Institute of Friendship with the Peoples. He has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and a McKnight Artist Fellowship for Ceramic Artists.
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Joanna Inglot, associate professor and Edith M. Kelso Professor of Art and Art History, has expertise in modern and contemporary art. She received a Fulbright Fellowship and grants and awards from the American Council of Learned Societies, International Exchanges Commission, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Curator and author of several exhibition catalogs, Inglot has also written two books: The Figurative Sculpture of Magdalena Abakanowicz: Bodies, Environments, and Myths and WARM: A Feminist Art Collective in Minnesota.
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Vanessa Rousseau, visiting assistant professor, teaches Art of the West I. She specializes in the art and archaeology of the Ancient and Late Antique Mediterranean. She is also the specialist for wall paintings with the Archaeological Exploration of Sardis, president of the Minnesota chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America, and an antiquities consultant for the Weisman Art Museum.


Stanton Sears, associate professor, teaches sculpture and 3-D design. His recent projects include artworks for the Central Corridor light rail line in St. Paul and the Microbial Sciences Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His mosaic-floor inlays can be seen at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. He designed both the Vietnam War Memorial and the World War II Memorial at the Minnesota State Capitol. He and collaborative partner Andrea Myklebust '95 have completed more than 40 large-scale commissioned works for public spaces. Their 37-acre studio in rural Wisconsin serves as a sculpture lab.
See Selected Works


Kari Sheperdson-Scott, assistant professor, teaches Introduction to Visual Culture and Asian Art History. A recipient of Fulbright grants, she specializes in Japanese visual culture from the 19th and 20th centuries. Her current research examines how Japanese media and exhibitions during the 1930s and early 1940s presented Manchuria. Her work on the art photographer Fuchikami Hakuyo is featured in the anthology, Art and War in Japan and Its Empire: 1931-1960.


Megan Vossler, visiting assistant professor, teaches drawing. In 2014, her work was featured in a solo exhibition at Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame, in Indiana. She made artwork for The Quarry, a collaborative book project with author Miranda Mellis, and her work was featured in diacritics, a journal from Johns Hopkins University Press, in 2012. Her works have been exhibited at Franklin Art Works in Minneapolis, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, and the de Young Museum in San Francisco. She is the recipient of an Artist Initiative Grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, a Jerome Foundation Travel and Study grant and a McKnight Artists Fellowship.
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Christine Willcox, associate professor, teaches painting, figure painting, and the mural. She is the recipient of a 2014 Artist Initiative Grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board as well as a Howard Foundation Fellowship for Painting. She recently had two solo exhibitions: "90° South" at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts MAEP Gallery and "Into the Woods," at the Phipps Center for the Arts in Hudson, Wis. She has had many solo and group exhibits including shows at Oberlin College, the University of Minnesota, Soo Visual Arts Center in Minneapolis, and Arthouse gallery in Austin, Texas. She was a Fulbright Scholar and won a 2005 Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative grant.
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Asian Languages and Cultures

Satoko Suzuki, DWitt Wallace Professor and chair, is a specialist in Japanese linguistics and teaches all levels of the language courses as well as Japanese linguistics courses. Her research interests are in linguistic pragmatics and sociolinguistics. She is the editor of Emotive Communication in Japanese and is the author of a number of journal articles and book chapters.
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Patricia Anderson, adjunct professor, teaches intermediate and advanced Chinese. Her research interests include feminist writings, primarily of the 20th and 21st centuries, and issues of translation. Her doctoral work involves a comparative study of Chinese women writers of the modern and contemporary periods, with a focus on how the mother figure is portrayed.


Sachiko Dorsey, vsiting instructor, teaches advanced Japanese and topics courses such as Bad Women: Female Villains in Japanese Literature and Culture; and Love and Death in 18th-20th Century Japanese Literature.


Miaki Habuka, vsiting instructor, teaches upper levels of Japanese courses. Her interests include interactive teaching, reading instruction, content-based instruction, connections with the outside world, learning styles and strategies, and national standards for foreign language education.


Rivi Handler-Spitz, asistant professor, teaches first-year Chinese and Chinese culture courses. She completed her PhD at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on the essay form and global early modernity. She comes to Macalester after teaching at Middlebury College and Brown University.

Arthur Mitchell, assistant professor, spent several years living in Japan where he studied at the Inter-University Center and Sophia University. He received his PhD from Yale University and his courses examine Japanese modern narratives in literature, film, animation, and politics. His research is on literary modernism in Japan as well as Japanese language pedagogy.


Ritsuko Narita, senior lecturer, teaches intermediate and advanced Japanese. Her dissertation is titled "The Effects of Pragmatic Consciousness-Raising Activities on the Development of Pragmatic Awareness and Use of Hearsay Evidential Markers for Learners of Japanese as a Foreign Language."


Jin Stone, vsiting assistant professor, instructs all levels of Chinese. His research interests include Asian American literature, international relations, and foreign language instruction and acquisition. He is particularly interested in exploring dynamic and interactive teaching approaches to develop students' communication skills in Chinese.


Xin Yang, assoociate professor, specializes in modern and contemporary Chinese literature, culture and film, women's writing, cyber fiction, urban culture, and gender and sexuality. Her newest book is From Beauty Fear to Beauty Fever: A Critical Study of Contemporary Chinese Female Writers.
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Biology

Mark Davis, DeWitt Wallace Professor and chair of the Biology Department, is an ecologist with teaching interests in regional and global ecological issues. His research, writings, presentations, and interviews on invasive species have attracted international attention. He has involved more than 70 Macalester students in his research, which has resulted in numerous co-authored publications with students. Currently, he collaborates with students on plant and animal research at Macalester's Ordway Field Station.
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Lin Aanonsen, O.T. Walter Professor of Biology and director of the Health Professions Advisory Committee, is a neurobiologist who regularly teaches Cell Biology, Human Physiology, various neurobiology courses, and additional new non-majors courses exploring science and spirituality. Her research focuses on elucidating the mechanisms of pain transmission in the spinal cord, in particular the molecular changes underlying chronic pain. Students are actively engaged in her research during the summer and academic year and have co-authored publications. She received the 2003 Macalester College Excellence in Teaching Award.
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Mike Anderson, instructor, is an evolutionary ecologist. His research examines the nature of the symbiosis between alder shrubs and the nitrogen- fixing bacterium Frankia, and the effects of this partnership on ecosystem function in Alaskan boreal forests


Sarah Boyer, associate professor, is an evolutionary biologist with interests in animal diversity and biogeography. Her research uses phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences and morphology to reconstruct evolutionary trees. She works closely with undergraduate researchers in both lab and field settings. Her current project, which involves fieldwork in the rainforests of eastern Australia, has been funded by the National Geographic Society and the National Science Foundation.
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Devavani Chatterjea, associate professor, is an immunologist and co-director of the interdisciplinary concentration in community and global health. She teaches courses in cell biology, immunology, and public health. Her research uses a variety of pre-clinical models of inflammation, behavioral measurements, and cellular and molecular analyses to understand the interplay of inflammation and pain. Current projects in her lab focus on the roles of mast cells in the intersection of allergies and chronic pain. She actively engages student collaborators, with eight to ten students working in the laboratory each year.
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Kristi Curry Rogers, associate professor, is a vertebrate paleontologist who also has a joint appointment in the Geology Department. Her research focuses on dinosaur paleobiology, evolution, and biogeography, and she employs a number of techniques including bone histology, comparative anatomy, and phylogenetic analysis. Her research is nationally funded and includes Macalester students in laboratory-, field-, and museum-based projects.
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Jerald Dosch, visting assistant professor and director of Macalester's Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area, is a terrestrial ecologist with interests in ornithology, restoration ecology, and environmental science. His research interests include non-native species, tree biomass and carbon accumulation in forests, post-agricultural succession in abandoned cattle pastures in southern Costa Rica, and historic heavy metal impacts on Common Loons in Minnesota.


Daniel Hornbach, DeWitt Wallace Professor and chair of the Environmental Studies Department, is a freshwater ecologist. His research focuses on factors that influence freshwater mussels in large river systems and involves many students, some of whom have co-authored papers with him. His work also involves collaboration with government agencies on managing and recovering endangered species.


Elizabeth Jansen, adjunct professor of biology, is a neuroscientist with expertise in the areas of neural plasticity and neuroprotective drug therapies. She has employed behavioral, neurochemical, and molecular biology techniques in her research on ischemic stroke. She serves on the steering committee for the interdisciplinary concentration in community and global health, is a health professions advisor, directs the Taylor Fellowship Program, and is academic program director for the Mayo Innovation Scholars Program. Jansen teaches courses in neuroscience and human reproductive biology.
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Mary Montgomery, associate professor, examines the evolution of the molecular genetic pathways that direct the earliest stages of animal development. Grants from the National Science Foundation have allowed her to purchase equipment related to this research. Students participating in her research program often present their work at national conferences. She also serves as a health professions advisor.
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Marcos Eduardo Ortega, assistant professor, is a biochemist who utilizes X-ray crystallography, biophysics, and biochemistry to try to elucidate the connection between protein structure and function in virus replication. Current projects involve trying to understand the molecular interactions of viral proteins and viral DNA to initiate replication through a process called DNA packaging.


Paul Overvoorde, professor, has teaching interests in genetics, cell biology, synthetic biology, genomics, and plant physiology. His research examines the role of the plant hormone auxin during root development. A collaboration with colleagues in the chemistry department and in Ghent, Belgium, involves Macalester students in a "chemical genetics" project that aims to define the role of auxin during lateral root formation. Overvoorde also serves as the program director of a $1.3 million Science Education Award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to Macalester College.
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Steve Sundby, instructor and laboratory supervisor, is a microbiologist with an emphasis in virology. He has served on the steering committee of the community and global health concentration since its inception, and has a special interest in helping students pursue health-related careers.


Chemistry

Keith Kuwata, professor and chair, has a background in spectroscopy, atmospheric chemistry, and computation. He teaches courses in analytical, general, physical, and computational chemistry. His main research interests include simulations of oxidation reactions in the troposphere and modeling organic and inorganic systems in collaboration with experimentalists. His research students use quantum chemistry and statistical rate theory for these studies, which have been supported by grants from the American Chemical Society, the Dreyfus Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.
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Ronald Brisbois, professor, is a synthetic chemist. His varied research interests include synthetic methodology development, ligand and catalyst design, cyclophane construction, and transition metal-mediated supramolecular self-assembly. On a sabbatical in the Biomaterials Technology Center at 3M, he initiated and continues investigations regarding highly fluorescent hexaazaanthracene derivatives. In 1993, President Clinton designated him a Presidential Faculty Fellow.
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Paul Fischer, professor and 2013 Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, is an organometallic chemist. The National Science Foundation and the Dreyfus Foundation currently fund his research program that targets new transition metal complexes to (1) permit the synthesis of highly reactive molecules as stabilized ligands and (2) facilitate novel transformations of organic substrates. He is co-author (with G. L. Miessler and D. A. Tarr) of the textbook Inorganic Chemistry (Prentice Hall, 2014). He will be on an NSF-funded sabbatical as a visiting scholar in the chemistry department at the University of California-San Diego during the 2014-2015 academic year.
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Susan Green, visiting assistant professor, teaches introductory general chemistry. She is co-author (with Robert M. Hanson) of the textbook Introduction to Molecular Thermodynamics (University Science Books, 2008).
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Rebecca Hoye, professor, is an organic chemist with a background in strained ring chemistry and natural product synthesis. Her current research encompasses new synthetic methodology, natural product synthesis, and the investigation of organic reaction mechanisms. Recently, work in her laboratory has centered on the synthesis of biologically active marine natural products and other small molecules for chemical genetics assays.
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Kathryn Splan, associate professor, is a bioinorganic chemist. Her research studies the effects of copper on biological molecules and seeks to understand factors that control how a protein acquires the correct metal ion. A separate area of research focuses on porphyrins, a class of synthetic compounds that mimic the structure and function of the natural pigments heme and chlorophyll. Grants from ACS, Research Corporation, and NSF have supported these projects. Splan teaches courses in both introductory chemistry and biochemistry.
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Thomas D. Varberg, DeWitt Wallace Professor of Chemistry, is a physical chemist. Trained at MIT, he was a NATO Fellow at Oxford University before coming to Macalester in 1993. He teaches introductory and physical chemistry. His collaborative research with students is focused on the spectroscopy of gas-phase free radicals. To support this work, he has, since 2000, received over $1,000,000 in funding through six different research grants from NSF and ACS.
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Classics

Andrew Overman, Harry M. Drake Distinguished Professor in Humanities and Fine Arts and chair, specializes in religion, culture, and ethnicity in the Greco-Roman world, having earned a PhD at Boston University. His courses include Pagans, Christians, and Jews; India and Rome; Introduction to Archaeology; and Greek language. He directs Macalester's archaeological excavations in Israel, which began in 1999.
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Wessam El-Meligi, visiting assistant professor, has a doctorate from the University of Alexandria in Egypt. He taught Arabic, Comparative Literature, English, and Arabic Translation at Pharos University, the University of Alexandria, and the Middlebury College study abroad program in the Middle East before coming to Macalester in fall 2012. He is the core of Macalester's Arabic language program, and also helps coordinate January in Egypt.


Nanette Scott Goldman, senior lecturer of classics, specializes in Latin poetry, documentary, and literary texts from the Greco-Roman Near East. Her current research focuses on Jewish poetry of crisis in the Second Temple period. Professor Goldman coordinates the Hebrew language program, teaches all levels of Greek, Latin and Hebrew, as well as research seminars in classical literature and archaeology. She is a supervisor at the Omrit archaeological excavation in Israel and, with departmental colleagues Severy- Hoven and Overman, runs January studies abroad in Italy, Turkey and Egypt.
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Brian Lush, assistant professor, completed his PhD in 2008 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on the subject of recognition and epistemology in Euripides. His research deals with issues of identity, perception and recognition in Greek tragedy and epic, and he teaches Greek and Latin language courses; Greek World; Greek Myths; and a seminar on Athenian tragedy.
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Beth Severy-Hoven, professor, has a PhD from the University of California- Berkeley, and degrees from Oxford and Bryn Mawr College. Her research focuses on Rome in the Age of Augustus and the history of gender. She has taught in Rome at the Intercollegiate Center, and at Macalester teaches Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome; Roman World; as well as Greek and Latin courses. She directs January in Rome and helped develop the program in Egypt.
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Computer Science

Susan Fox, (PhD, Indiana University) works in the area of artificial intelligence, programming robots that can navigate in the world and learn from their experiences. She enjoys working one-on- one with students from both MSCS and the neuroscience studies program, doing independent projects, capstone projects, and summer research.
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Bret Jackson, (PhD, University of Minnesota) works in the area of interactive graphics, where he combines methods from computer graphics, visualization, and human computer interaction to investigate spatial interaction. He teaches courses in data structures, Internet programming, and interactive graphics.


Shilad Sen, (PhD, University of Minnesota) helps people become more effective contributors to online communities such as Facebook, Wikipedia, and YouTube. Professor Sen teaches a variety of classes including object-oriented programming, algorithms, Internet programming, and collective intelligence.
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Libby Shoop, (PhD, University of Minnesota) conducts research with students in bioinformatics, data visualization, and parallel computation over very large datasets, using cluster and cloud computing. She teaches courses in software development, parallel computing, databases, operating systems, and computational biology.
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Economics

Karine Moe, F. R. Bigelow Professor and chair, has research and teaching interests in labor and demographic economics. She teaches courses on economics of gender, economics of poverty in the United States, and labor economics.
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Paul Aslanian, professor emeritus, is a former treasurer of Macalester College. He teaches Principles of Economics, Economics of Not-For-Profit, and Applied Economics.


Amy Damon, assistant professor, has research interests that include investigating the impact of international migration from Central America to the United States and the impact that this migration process has on families living in Central America. She teaches Principles of Economics, International Economic Development, and the Economics of Global Food Problems.
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Liang Ding, associate professor, is a financial economist with research interests in financial economics and monetary economics. He teaches Principles of Economics, Finance, and Capital Markets.
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Karl Egge, F. R. Bigelow Professor Emeritus, is an expert in the area of forensic economics. His primary teaching and research interests involve entrepreneurship and finance. He received the college's Thomas Jefferson Award in 2000 for lifetime teaching, research, and service contributions to the college.


Jeffery Evans, adjunct professor, is a certified public accountant and computerized accounting systems consultant to small businesses throughout the Twin Cities. He teaches Financial Accounting and Managerial Accounting.


Peter Ferderer, Edward J. Noble Professor of Economics, is a macro - economist whose teaching interests include international finance, macro - economics, and behavioral economics. His research is in economic history, financial markets, and business cycles.
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Gary Krueger, Cargill Professor of International Economics, studies reforms in Russian industrial enterprises. He teaches classes in econometrics, comparative economic systems, and the economics of transition.
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Joyce Minor ’88, Karl Egge Professor in Economics, earned her MBA from Harvard Business School in 1993. She has worked at several companies, most recently as a senior vice president, Equity Research, at Lehman Brothers in New York. She teaches classes in investment banking, securities analysis, and business communications.


Raymond Robertson, professor, researches the effects of globalization on labor markets. He teaches courses in international economics, econometrics, and economic restructuring in Latin America.
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Mario Solis-Garcia, assistant professor, has research interests in macroeconomics, business cycles, and economic growth and development. He teaches Intermediate Macroeconomics and Quantitative Macroeconomic Analysis.


Vasant Sukhatme, Edward J. Noble Professor Emeritus, is interested in microeconomics and the economic prospects of developing countries. He was given the college's Thomas Jefferson Award in 2002 for lifetime teaching, research, and service contributions to the college.
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Sarah West ’91, professor, has teaching and research interests in the areas of environmental economics, public finance, and microeconomics. She teaches courses in those areas as well as Principles of Economics.
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Educational Studies

Ruthanne Kurth-Schai, professor and chair, teaches courses on social, philosophical, and political issues in education and teacher preparation. Her scholarly interests include philosophic and policy analyses of the role of public education in addressing social justice, environmental, aesthetic, and spiritual issues, and in promoting democratic civic participation.
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Brad Belbas, visiting assistant professor, teaches a course on education and emerging technologies. His teaching and scholarship include the design and analysis of learning environments, in particular, instructional uses of technology that facilitate social interaction and collaborative knowledge building.


Ann Hite, visiting instructor, teaches Race, Culture, and Ethnicity in Education. She has taught Spanish and world cultures in the Roseville Area school district. As a veteran public educator, her primary interest is to be an active part of creating a truly equitable education system that engages, honors, and values the perspectives of all students.


Tina Kruse, visiting assistant professor, teaches educational psychology as well as other courses focusing on educational theory and classroom practice. Her teaching and research interests include teacher preparation, culturally responsive classrooms, early childhood learning, youth development, and the evaluation of educational programs.


Sonia Mehta, visiting assistant professor, teaches courses on the sociology of education, cross-comparative and global studies in education as well as interdisciplinary, cross-cultural and international issues in teacher education and pedagogy. Her research interests lie in the study of new and collaborative methods of educational inquiry within interdependent and inclusive social contexts; social cartography methods of examining and presenting educational change; and in peace and conflict studies in education.


English

Daylanne English, professor and chair, teaches classes on African American literature, Afrofuturism, the Harlem Renaissance, history of the novel, apocalyptic literature, and detective fiction. She has published essays on African American literature and culture in scholarly journals such as American Literature and Critical Inquiry. She is the author of Unnatural Selections: Eugenics in American Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance (an ALA Outstanding Academic Book in 2004) and Each Hour Redeem: Time and Justice in African American Literature (2013). She is currently working on a book-length digital humanities project on Afrofuturism.
See Selected Works


Peter Bognanni, assistant professor, teaches classes on writing fiction, humor, screen scripts, and film studies. His first novel, The House of Tomorrow, won the L.A. Times Book Award for First Fiction, the Emerging Author Prize at the Iowa Author Awards, and an American Library Association Alex Award. He is a recipient of the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His pieces have appeared in the New York Times Book Blog, The Huffington Post, Large-Hearted Boy, and more. He is a 2008 Pushcart Prize nominee and his work was listed in the "100 Distinguished Stories of 2006" in The Best American Short Stories 2007.


Matthew Burgess, visiting assistant professor, is a novelist who teaches fiction writing, comics and graphic storytelling, and narrative modes. His first novel, Dogfight, A Love Story, was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers pick, an Indie Next selection, a New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice, one of Publishers Weekly's top ten debuts of the season, and a finalist for a Minnesota Book Award. His second novel, Uncle Janice, is forthcoming from Doubleday


James Dawes, professor, teaches American literature; countercultures; human rights; literary and language theory; violence and trauma; literature and philosophy. He is the author of That the World May Know: Bearing Witness to Atrocity; The Language of War; and Evil Men, as well as articles on narrative theory, human rights law, and pedagogy. His teaching interests include interdisciplinary approaches to literary studies (ethics, law, psychology, sociology) and U.S. literature. He is the founder of Macalester's human rights and humanitarianism concentration. The jury of the International Human Rights Book Award awarded Dawes' Evil Men a special prize for its importance in increasing awareness of human rights.
See Selected Works


Lesley Goodman, vsiting assistant professor, works in nineteenth-century literature and culture, women's fiction, the novel, and theories and histories of reading. She is currently working on a book about Victorian readers who became angry at authors for "mistreating" their own fictional characters. Recent articles include "Rebellious Identification, or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Arabella" and "Disappointing Fans: Fandom, Fictional Theory, and the Death of the Author."


Marlon James, assistant professor, teaches classes on creative writing, fiction, post- colonial literature, southern literature, Latin American fiction, criticism and blogs. His first novel John Crow's Devil, was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Commonwealth Writers Prize, and was a New York Times Editors' Choice. His second novel, The Book of Night Women, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the NAACP Image Award, and the Minnesota Book Award, and was New York Magazine's third best book of the year. His next book, A Brief History of Seven Killings, is forthcoming from Riverhead Books.
See Selected Works


Casey Jarrin, assistant professor, teaches courses on modern/postmodern British and Irish literature; postwar film and photography; queer modernisms; prison art/writing; and youth subcultures, with a focus on the ethics and aesthetics of representing violence (particularly responses to the world wars and conflicts in Vietnam, Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Iraq, and Afghanistan). Recent creative projects include a novel, Incarnate; a documentary photography project on urban landscapes of political violence, "Jumping the Fence"; and short films, The Hunt and Share.
See Selected Works


Theresa Krier, professor, teaches and publishes on poetry and poetics; religions and literature; and medieval and Renaissance literature, including a focus on gender, feminism, and psychoanalytic theory. She is the author of Birth Passages: Maternity and Nostalgia, Antiquity to Shakespeare and Gazing on Secret Sights: Spenser, Classical Imitation, and the Decorums of Vision, and articles on ancient, medieval, and Renaissance literature. She is editor or co-editor of Refiguring Chaucer in the Renaissance; Luce Irigaray and Premodern Culture: Thresholds of History; and special issues of Spenser Studies.
See Selected Works


David Chioni Moore, associate professor of English and international studies, focuses on the literatures of the Black Atlantic world (most notably the global Langston Hughes) and has allied interests in postcolonial theory, globalization, and cultural critique. He is widely published in journals such as Transition, Diaspora, and PMLA.
See Selected Works


Kristin Naca, assistant professor, teaches creative writing and 20th- century American, Latino, and Asian American literature. Her first collection of poems, Bird Eating Bird, was a finalist for the Audre Lorde Prize and Lambda Literary Award. It was chosen by Yusef Komunyakaa as winner of the National Poetry Series mtvU Prize. Naca has received fellowships from the Astraea Lesbian Writers Fund, Minnesota Arts Board, Breadloaf Writers Conference, and the Lannan Foundation.
See Selected Works



Wang Ping, professor, teaches creative writing, poetry, and fiction with special interests in environment, public health and social justice; the Chinese-American immigrant experience; footbinding, sexuality and eroticism in Chinese culture; and women in modern China. Her Aching for Beauty: Footbinding in China won the Eugene Kayden Award for the Best Book in Humanities. The Last Communist Virgin won the 2008 Minnesota Book Award and Asian American Studies Award. She is the recipient of numerous grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and New York and Minnesota organizations and fellowships including the Lannan Foundation Fellowship and the Bush Artist Fellowship.
See Selected Works


Sonita Sarker, professor, Women"s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and English departments, has published books and articles on cultural globalization, women's writings, and literary and cultural theory. She has recently published on Gramsci, Foucault, and subalternity and is currently writing on transnational receptions of fascism and empire by women writers of the 1920s and 1930s. She writes blogs for the Minnesota Humanities Association and has received awards from several foundations. She teaches courses in feminist postmodern and postcolonial theories, gender/race/nation in the sciences, and in 20th- and 21st-century transnational comparative women's writing.
See Selected Works


Environmental Studies

Dan Hornbach, DeWitt Wallace Professor of Biology and chair of the Environmental Studies Department, is an aquatic ecologist. His research focuses on freshwater ecology, and he works closely with the National Park Service. He teaches Environmental Science; Lakes, Streams, and Rivers; Ecology; and Aquatic Ecology.
See Selected Works


Louisa Bradtmiller, assistant professor, is a climate scientist and geochemist whose research uses ocean sediments to examine global climate changes since the last ice age. She teaches The Earth's Climate System, Climate and Society, Paleoclimate and a co-taught course on the economics of climate change; she has also taught Environmental Science and the department's senior seminar.
See Selected Works


Jerald Dosch, visiting assistant professor of environmental studies and biology and director of Macalester's Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area, is an ecologist with research interests in non-native species, restoration ecology, and ornithology. He teaches Environmental Science, Outdoor Environmental Education, and Ecology.


Christie Manning, visiting assistant professor of environmental studies and psychology, is an experimental and cognitive psychologist. Her research investigates the role of psychological distance in people's response to information about environmental issues, particularly global climate change. She teaches Environmental Classics, Psychology of Sustainable Behavior, and Psychology in the Material World.


Marianne Milligan, visiting assistant professor of environmental studies and linguistics, does fieldwork on Menominee, an Algonquian language spoken in Wisconsin. She teaches Endangered and Minority Languages; 100 Words for Snow: Language and Nature; and Sociolinguistics.


Roopali Phadke, associate professor, teaches in the area of environmental policy and politics. Her research is at the nexus of environmental studies, international development, and science and technology studies. Her current research focuses on water and wind energy development. She teaches Environmental Politics and Policy, the Environmental Leadership Seminar and Practicum, Water and Power, Science and Citizenship, and Sustainable Development and the Global Future.
See Selected Works


Chris Wells, associate professor, is an environmental historian whose research focuses on 20th-century U.S. environmental history. He combines the perspectives of environmental history, intellectual and cultural history, and the history of technology to examine the history of human interactions with the natural world. He teaches American Environmental History, Environmental Justice, Consumer Nation, Imperial Nature, U.S. Urban Environmental History, Car Country, and Three Rivers Environmental History.
See Selected Works


French and Francophone Studies

Juliette Rogers, associate professor and chair, received her PhD from Duke University. She specializes in 19th- century French literature and in Quebec literature. She is the author of Career Stories: Belle Epoque Novels of Professional Development and the guest co-editor of Eclectic Expressions: Selected Essays of the 2006 Women in French Conference. She is currently working on a book-length manuscript titled Travailler et vivre: Recent Women's Fiction from Quebec and France. She was recently president of the Women in French organization.
See Selected Works


Andrew Billing, assistant rofessor, received his PhD at the University of California-Irvine, and was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Macalester in 2008-09. His current research explores the "animal/human relation" as well as intersections between literary fiction and moral and political philosophy in the French Enlightenment. His teaching interests include 18th-century French literature, Enlightenment political and moral philosophy, colonialism, and critical theory.
See Selected Works


Annick Fritz-Smead, visiting assistant professor, teaches French at all levels. She specializes in 20th-century French literature and culture, with research interests in poetry, women writers, and cinema. She has published a book on the poetry of Francis Ponge, Francis Ponge: De l'ecriture a l'oeuvre.
See Selected Works


Jean-Pierre Karegeye, assistant professor, received his PhD at the University of California-Berkeley, and specialized in African francophone literature. His areas of research and teaching are mostly based on African Francophone literature and genocide studies in dialogue with other disciplines. His work on genocide and child soldiering focuses on testimony and explores both fictional and non- fictional narratives. His current projects explore how genocide and mass violence in Africa imply a reconstruction and/or a relocation of social sciences and humanities and investigate issues related to human origins and what it means to actually "be" a modern human. Karegeye has published and edited several works including Recits du genocide, traversee de la memoire, and Children in Armed Conflicts.
See Selected Works


Martine Sauret, senior lecturer, received her PhD from the University of Minnesota. She has published Les voies cartographiques and "Gargantua" et les delits du corps, as well as the French translation of The Graphic Unconscious in Early Modern French Writing by Tom Conley. She is working on diaries of French Norman explorers and on Montaigne and the New World.


Joelle Vitiello, professor, received her PhD in French and Italian from Stanford University. She specializes in 20th- century French literature and culture. She teaches contemporary French culture and literature; cinema (French, North African, and Caribbean); and Haitian literature and culture. She has co-edited two books/special issues on women writers, including Elles ecrivent des Antilles: Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique, and co-authored a book on American culture. Recent publications include articles and book chapters on Haitian writers and artists, representations of shantytowns in Haitian literature, the teaching of African literature, Algerian women writers, and representations of violence in contemporary literature and cinema.
See Selected Works


Geography

William Moseley, professor and chair, is a development and environment geographer. He teaches Human Geography; People, Agriculture and the Environment; Geography of Development and Underdevelopment; Geography of Africa; and a senior seminar in Comparative Environment and Development Studies. His research focuses on tropical agriculture, food security, environment and development policy, and Africa.
See Selected Works


Holly Barcus, associate professor, is a population geographer with interests in rural environments around the globe. She teaches Population 7 Billion; Rural Landscapes and Livelihoods; Migrants and Migrancy; Introduction to GIS; and GIS and Community Partnerships. Her recent projects focus on the intersection between migration and identity among ethnic minorities in rural Mongolia and the migration-induced changes in ethnic diversity of rural communities in the United States.
See Selected Works


Eric Carter, Edens Professor in Global Health and assistant professor, teaches Medical Geography, Geography of Environmental Hazards, Geography of Latin America, Advanced GIS for Health Applications, and a senior seminar on the human ecology of infectious and vector- borne diseases.
See Selected Works


David Lanegran, John S. Holl Professor of Geography, teaches courses in human and urban geography. His interests have led to extensive studies and comparisons of urban planning processes around the world. He has published several books, including Minnesota on the Map: A Historical Atlas , and articles on urban and cultural geography. He is also the coordinator of the Minnesota Alliance for Geographical Education.
See Selected Works


Ashley Nepp, GIS lab instructor, is a GIS specialist with a particular interest in cartographic design and geovisualization. She teaches the lab component for the introductory and advanced GIS courses, manages the GIS computer laboratory, and works on GIS-related community outreach projects.
See Selected Works


Robert Rose, Macalester's 2014-2015 Hubert H. Humphrey Distinguished Visiting Professor, is the assistant director of the Conservation Support Program at the Wildlife Conservation Society. He will teach courses on remote sensing, and land change science and conservation planning.
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Laura Smith, associate professor, teaches courses in urban economic geography, transportation, the regional geography of the U.S. and Canada, and statistical methods. She also teaches an urban GIS seminar that connects the class with a community project. Her research projects have focused on mortgage foreclosures in the Twin Cities and on issues of American Indian land ownership.
See Selected Works


Daniel Trudeau, associate professor, teaches Urban Social Geography; Qualitative Methods; Political Geography; Introduction to Urban Studies; and Cities of the 21st Century. His research focuses on urban governance, racial segregation and integration, and sustainable urban planning movements.
See Selected Works


Geology

Kelly MacGregor, associate professor and chair, joined the department in 2003. She earned her PhD from the University of California-Santa Cruz, where she studied glacial geomorphology. She regularly conducts fieldwork in Montana, British Columbia and Minnesota.
See Selected Works


John Craddock ’80, professor, came to Macalester in 1989 from the University of Michigan, where he obtained his PhD. He is a structural geologist and his research interests include the mechanics of mountain belt formation, rock strain analysis, the Keweenawan rift, and Antarctic geology.
See Selected Works


Raymond Rogers, professor, received his PhD from the University of Chicago in 1995 and came to Macalester in 1997. He studies the stratigraphy, sedimentology, and taphonomy of fossil-rich rocks, with field areas in Montana and Madagascar.
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Kristi Curry Rogers, associate professor, received her PhD from Stony Brook University in 2001 and came to Macalester in 2008. She is a vertebrate paleontologist specializing in the largest of all dinosaurs, the sauropods. She is also an associate professor in the Biology Department.
See Selected Works


Karl Wirth, associate professor, came to Macalester in 1990 from Cornell University, where he earned his PhD. He is an igneous petrologist with research interests that focus on the origin of igneous rocks and the chemical evolution of the Earth's crust.
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German Studies

Linda Schulte-Sasse, DeWitt Wallace Professor and chair, teaches 18th- and 20th-century literature and specializes in film and cultural studies. She has written widely on German and American cinema and political discourses. In 1996 Duke University Press published her book on Nazi cinema, Entertaining the Third Reich.
See Selected Works


Brigetta Abel, adjunct professor, has research and teaching interests focused primarily on 20th-century film, literature, and culture, with emphasis on exile history and literature, and German and American feminisms. She is also interested in the use of educational technology in both language and culture classes.


Rachael Huener, senior lecturer, teaches late 19th- and early 20th-century literature and culture, and specializes in media studies. She has been active in the areas of computer-assisted language learning and German cultural studies, and she researches pre-World War I German advertising.


Kiarina Kordela, professor and director of the critical theory concentration, writes on and teaches critical theory and the relationships among philosophy, literature, psychoanalysis, social and political theory, cultural studies, ideology, and biopolitics. She has published numerous articles in academic journals, as well as the books Being, Time, Bios: Capitalism and Ontology (SUNY Press, 2013); Surplus: Spinoza, Lacan (SUNY Press, 2007); and the co- edited collection of essays Freedom and Confinement in Modernity: Kafka's Cages (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2011.
See Selected Works


David Martyn, professor, teaches 18th- and 19th-century German literature and cultural studies. He has published numerous articles on German and French literature and philosophy of the romantic period, and on literary theory. His book, Sublime Failures: The Ethics of Kant and Sade, was published in 2003 by Wayne State University Press.
See Selected Works


Gisela Peters, instructor, teaches upper-level grammar and conversation composition courses, as well as courses on media and culture. She specializes in cultural studies and foreign language acquisition.


Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Antonio Dorca, professor and chair, is from Barcelona, Spain. His interests include peninsular prose fiction, modern Catalan literature, Spanish intellectual history, and critical theory and narrative techniques.
See Selected Works


Susana Blanco-Iglesias is a senior lecturer from Bilbao, Spain. Her research focuses on Spanish language acquisition, with an interest in sociolinguistics, dialectology, and language contact issues (Spanish/English in the U.S. and Basque/ Spanish).
See Selected Works


Blanca Gimeno Escudero, visiting assistant professor from Palencia, Spain, teaches all levels of Spanish language and peninsular literature and culture. Her research focuses on exile and the construction of identity through literature.
See Selected Works


Galo Gonzalez, professor, is from Quito, Ecuador. He teaches and researches primarily 20th-century Latin American literatures and cultures, especially social protest movements, race relations in Latin American narrative fiction, and Hispanic/ Latino literature and culture in the U.S.
See Selected Works


Cynthia Kauffeld, associate professor, teaches Hispanic linguistics. Her interests include dialectology, Spanish in the U.S., historical linguistics, and paleography. Her current research focuses on documents relating to colonial settlement of New Mexico.
See Selected Works


Teresa Mesa, senior lecturer from Granada, Spain, specializes in contemporary Latin American literature, especially women writers, subaltern studies of U.S. Latino and Latin American testimonial and cultural production, feminist theory, and research ethics.


Alicia Munoz, assistant professor, teaches 20th-century Latin American literature and U.S. Latino studies. She researches representations of women who kill in Latin American literature and popular culture, and articulations of urban space in Latino literature.
See Selected Works


Margaret (Molly) Olsen, professor, specializes in Trans-Atlantic literatures of the 16th and 17th centuries, as well as Afro-Caribbean texts of the colonial and contemporary periods.
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J. Ernesto Ortiz-Diaz, assistant professor from Monclova, Mexico, studies representations of nature in modern Latin American literature, and contemporary historical events that affect the region.


Rosa Rull Montoya, senior lecturer from Barcelona, Spain, teaches language and peninsular literature and culture. She focuses on women writers in 20th- century Spain, and contemporary Spanish writers and film.


History

Lynn M. Hudson, associate professor and chair, teaches courses on slavery and abolition in the United States, western history, social movements, and the history of gender and sexuality. She specializes in African American history and U.S. women's history. Her recent research investigates legal, cultural, and social manifestations of Jim Crow discrimination in California in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
See Selected Works


Ernesto Capello, associate professor, teaches courses on Latin American cultural and social history, comparative urban history, and transnationalism. He has written a book on the impact of early 20th-century constructions of collective memory on the spatial and social map of his hometown of Quito, Ecuador. His current research concerns the history of geographic science in Ecuador, Latin American visual culture, and transnational imaginaries in the Cold War.
See Selected Works


Jamie Monson, professor, teaches courses on African history and on the history of China-Africa relations. She is currently completing a book and film project on China's Cold War engagement with Africa, and is researching a second project on African women's diplomatic visits to China in the 1960s. She has broader interests in eastern and southern African history, African environmental history, the Maji Maji War, and memory and narrative in African history.
See Selected Works


Yue-him Tam, professor, researches modern Japanese intellectual history and Sino-Japanese relations. He teaches modern and traditional periods of China and Japan, East Asian Civilization, and War Crimes and Memory in East Asia. He holds visiting professorships in China, Japan, and the United States.
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Karin Velez, assistant professor, teaches courses on world history, popular religion, and comparative Atlantic empires. Her research and teaching interests also include first contact at frontier zones, the spread of religion, transoceanic exchange, and the communal formulation of myth.


Peter Weisensel, professor, specializes in modern Russian history. He wrote two monographs on Russia in the 19th century and is at work on another about Central Asia through Russian eyes. In addition to courses in Russian/Soviet history and film in the USSR, he teaches courses in modern German history, the history and philosophy of socialism, and survey courses on Europe.
See Selected Works


Chris Wells, associate professor, is an environmental historian whose research focuses on 20th-century U.S. environmental history. He combines the perspectives of environmental history, intellectual and cultural history, and the history of technology to examine the history of human interactions with the natural world.


International Studies

Nadya Nedelsky, associate professor and chair, specializes in human and minority rights, nationalism, and transitional justice. She has authored multiple articles and book chapters, and co-edited Post- Communist Transitional Justice: Lessons from 25 Years of Experience (forthcoming) and the 3-volume Encyclopedia of Transitional Justice, both with Cambridge University Press. Her book Defining the Sovereign Community: The Czech and Slovak Republics was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press.
See Selected Works


Zeynep Gursel, assistant professor, is a cultural anthropologist. She is currently completing a manuscript, "Image Brokers," on the production, distribution, and circulation of international news images. She is also the director and co- producer of Coffee Futures, the first in a series of short ethnographic films that explore contemporary Turkish politics through the prism of the everyday life of women.


Christy Hanson, distinguished lecturer and dean of the Institute for Global Citizenship, received her MPH from the University of Minnesota, and her PhD in international health systems, with a concentration in health economics, from Johns Hopkins University. Her independent research focuses on the dynamics between poverty, health care- seeking behavior, and health system response, particularly for the care of infectious diseases.


David Chioni Moore, associate professor of international studies and English, focuses on the literatures and cultures of the black Atlantic world, with interests in both Africa and African America. He maintains allied interests in postcoloniality, the post-Soviet world, and globalization. He has published a score of articles and four dozen reviews in journals such as Transition, Diaspora, PMLA, Frontiers, Genre, Research in African Literatures, and Callaloo.
See Selected Works


James von Geldern, professor of international studies and chair of Russian studies, holds a PhD from Brown University and a JD from the University of Minnesota Law School. As a Russianist, he is a widely published author on Soviet mass and popular culture and, more broadly, a cultural historian. As a legal scholar and practitioner, his work focuses on international codes of conduct, immigration, and transborder rights. His courses include focused offerings on the European Union as well as the post-Soviet sphere.
See Selected Works


Ahmed Samatar, James Wallace Professor of International Studies, is the author and editor of five books including The Somali Challenge: From Catastrophe to Renewal?; African Studies and Undergraduate Education; and The State in Africa: Reconsiderations, as well as several dozen scholarly articles. He was a member of the editorial board of the International Studies Review and edited 27 volumes of Macalester International. He is the founding editor-in-chief of Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies housed here at Macalester College. His research interests include leadership in Africa, and Muslims in the age of globalization.


Linguistics

John Haiman, professor and chair (fall), has done research on syntactic change in Germanic languages, the grammar of Hua (Papua New Guinea) and Khmer (Cambodia), iconicity in syntax, and the Rhaeto-Romance languages of Switzerland and Italy. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1989 for the study of sarcasm. His latest book, a grammar of Cambodian, was published in 2011
See Selected Works


Christina Esposito, associate professor and chair (spring), is a specialist in acoustic and articulatory phonetics. She has done fieldwork on Zapotec, a language of Southern Mexico.
See Selected Works


Marianne Milligan, adjunct assistant professor of linguistics, is a phonologist specializing in disappearing languages of Native America. She has done fieldwork on Menomini in Wisconsin.
See Selected Works


Mathematics

Tom Halverson (PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison), MSCS chair, teaches courses in linear and abstract algebra, discrete math, topology, and calculus. His research on interactions between algebra and combinatorics is often done in collaboration with Macalester students and has been sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Simons Foundation.
See Selected Works


Andrew Beveridge PhD, Yale University) is interested in the intersection of combinatorics and probability. He studies random walks, random graphs, and their applications to real-world networks, such as the Internet and ad-hoc wireless networks. He teaches courses in combinatorics, discrete math, linear and abstract algebra and calculus.
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David Bressoud (PhD, Temple University) is past president of the Mathematical Association of America, and author of six textbooks in number theory, combinatorics, vector calculus, and analysis, as well as numerous articles. He is particularly interested in using the history of mathematics to motivate and illuminate its important ideas
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Daniel Flath (PhD, Harvard University) has research and teaching experience ranging from algebra to applications, with research expertise in group representations, and often engages in collaborative projects. He has collaborated in the writing of several popular calculus textbooks.
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Danny Kaplan (PhD, Harvard University) coordinates the applied math and statistics major. He comes from a background in biomedical engineering and is the author of several textbooks on scientific computing, statistical modeling, and nonlinear dynamics.
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Katherine Kinnaird (PhD, Dartmouth) works with high dimensional, noisy data sets at the intersection of network theory and machine learning. She teaches courses in statistics, mathematics, and programming.


Karen Saxe (PhD, University of Oregon) teaches all calculus and analysis courses. She is especially interested in operator theory, functional analysis, the mathematics of elections and voting, and the history of mathematics.
See Selected Works


David Shuman (PhD, University of Michigan) is interested in signal processing and stochastic processes. He teaches courses in calculus, linear algebra, statistics and advanced courses in analysis and linear algebra.


Chad Topaz (PhD, Northwestern University) uses mathematical tools to study spontaneous emergence of patterns in biological swarms, chemical reactions, and other natural systems. He teaches mathematical modeling, differential equations, and calculus.
See Selected Works


Media and Cultural Studies

Leola Johnson, associate professor and chair, teaches courses on representations of Blackness in print journalism and in fictional and documentary film and television. Her most recent publication, in the spring 2010 issue of the International Journal of Communication, is "Barack Obama's Body and the Body Politic." She is currently editing a set of essays on media representations of black women's bodies, including an essay on representations of Michelle Obama's body in conservative media.
See Selected Works


Morgan Adamson, assistant professor, is starting her second year at Macalester having come from Duke University, where she was ACLS (American Council of Learned Societies) New Faculty Fellow in the Literature and Arts of the Moving Image Department. Her interests are in avant-garde film and new media, critical theory and digital video production. She teaches Film Analysis and Visual Culture, a course on oppositional cinema, and this year she will team-teach a course on Cultures of Neo-liberalism with Professor Zeynep Gursel in International Studies.


Michael Griffin, visiting assistant professor, earned his PhD in visual communication and media studies from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also received a CBS Dissertation Fellowship for his work on the industrial shaping of visual aesthetics. Griffin writes and teaches on cultural history, theory and practice of visual representation in film, photography, and television, and regularly teaches Local Media Institutions, where students get the opportunity to do work with local media.

John Kim, ssistant professor, came to Macalester after having taught at the University of San Francisco, Stanford University, and Williams College. He is a new media theorist and artist who writes about the role that the media have in shaping and structuring our relationship to our material surroundings. This year he is part of a team of artists working on a major interactive installation for the new stadium for the minor league baseball team, the St. Paul Saints, in downtown St. Paul. Before returning to teaching, he also worked as a programmer and designer at a handful of Internet startups.
See Selected Works


Howard Sinker, a Macalester graduate, teaches news reporting. He has authored chapters in the textbooks Real Sports Reporting and Real Feature Writing, has run workshops for journalists through the Poynter Institute's National Writers Workshops, the Associated Press and other organizations, and is a frequent contributor to Minnesota Public Radio's Morning Edition program. His areas of interest and expertise include digital media, trauma journalism and media ethics.


Clay Steinman, professor of media and cultural studies, was a journalist for Ralph Nader's Capitol Hill News Service in the early 1970s after studying at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He received his PhD in Cinema Studies from New York University, with a focus on U.S. film history and critical theory. He has worked as an editor and writer for the Associated Press, The Nation, and Xinhua/the New China News Agency, among others. In 2012-2013, he taught U.S. film history in relation to modernity and race as a Fulbright Scholar at Southwest University in Beibei, Chongqing, China.


Music

Chuen-Fung Wong, associate professor, studies the music and culture of the Uyghur people in northwest China. He is recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship. Wong teaches courses in ethnomusicology and world music, and directs the Macalester Asian Music Ensemble.
See Selected Works


Randall Bauer, assistant professor, teaches music theory, ear training, and composition, as well as courses on jazz and improvisation. He holds a PhD from Princeton University, where he completed a dissertation on Keith Jarrett. Bauer is a recognized composer in both Western classical and jazz idioms.


Victoria Malawey, assistant professor and chair, holds a PhD in music theory from Indiana University. Her research interests include analysis of contemporary pop-rock music, the music of Bjork, music theory pedagogy, and gender studies. She has given papers at regional and international conferences on musical borrowing in the music of Paul Simon and Bob Dylan; embodiment and gender in teaching aural skills; and temporal effects in Bjork's Medulla. She teaches music theory, ear training, and topics courses.


Mark Mandarano, assistant professor, is the conductor of the Macalester Orchestra and director of instrumental music. He has conducted numerous orchestras across the U.S. and abroad and has appeared at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, and the Kennedy Center. He has conducted premieres by composers such as John Corigliano, Melinda Wagner, and Karel Husa, and has conducted recordings for Bridge Records and Arabesque Recordings. He holds degrees from the Peabody Institute and Cornell University.


Mark Mazullo, professor, is a musicologist and pianist. His writing on wide-ranging subjects has appeared in The Yale Review, The Musical Quarterly, American Music, Popular Music, and other publications. His book Shostakovich's Preludes and Fugues: Contexts, Style, Performance was published by Yale University Press in 2010. Mazullo appears regularly as a pianist in solo, chamber, and concerto settings in the Twin Cities. He teaches piano as well as courses in the history of Western art music and American popular music.
See Selected Works


Michael McGaghie, assistant professor, conducts the Macalester Concert Choir and Highland Camerata. He holds a DMA in choral conducting from Boston University. His dissertation on Minnesotan composer Dominick Argento received the 2010 Julius Herford Prize from the American Choral Directors Association. Prior to his appointment at Macalester, he taught and conducted ensembles at the Boston Conservatory and Harvard University.


Philosophy

Geoffrey Gorham, professor and chair, specializes in the history of philosophy, metaphysics, and epistemology. His recent articles include "The Theological Foundations of Hobbesian Physics: A Defense of Corporeal God" (British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 2013); "'The Twin-Brother of Space': Spatial Analogy in the Emergence of Absolute Time" (Intellectual History Review, 2012); and "How Newton Solved the Mind-Body Problem" (History of Philosophy Quarterly, 2011). He also published Philosophy of Science: A Beginner's Guide (2009). He enjoys collaborating with students. For example, in summer 2013, he worked with philosophy senior Samuel Eklund on the project, "The Emancipation of Time in the Seventeenth Century," funded by the Keck Foundation.
See Selected Works


Janet Folina, professor, specializes in the philosophy of mathematics. She also works on the philosophy of science and on the epistemological foundations of science. She is the author of Poincare and the Philosophy of Mathematics. Her current research interests include the philosophy of mathematics of the 19th and 20th centuries, and the concept of proof in mathematics.
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Martin Gunderson, DeWitt Wallace Professor of Philosophy, specializes in ethics. He is also interested in the philosophy of law and bioethics and, within these areas, right-to-die issues, civil liberties, and human rights. He is co- author of AIDS: Testing and Privacy and has published numerous articles in the areas of bioethics and ethics.
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joy laine

Joy Laine, adjunct professor, specializes in the philosophy of mind and language. Her work in these areas encompasses both Western and Indian philosophical traditions. She has published articles in the areas of personal identity and Indian philosophy, and has written entries for the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy on topics in Indian philosophy. She is currently working on a book, Philosophical Persons, in which she examines the development of philosophical theories of personal identity and how such theories relate to broader cultural concerns.
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diane michelfelder

Diane Michelfelder, professor and former provost and dean of the faculty at Macalester. Her teaching and research unfold at the intersection of 20th- century European philosophy and the philosophy of technology. Much of her current and published work focuses on the ethical and social implications of emerging technologies, particularly the Internet. A past president of the Society for Philosophy and Technology, she was instrumental in forming fPET (the Forum on Philosophy, Engineering and Technology) and is a member of the scientific advisory board of the journal Philosophy and Technology.
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William Wilcox

William Wilcox, visiting associate professor, specializes in philosophy of law, political philosophy, and ethics. His current research interests are in political philosophy, moral theory, applied ethics, philosophy and psychiatry, and the philosophy of law.


Physics and Astronomy

tonnis ter veldhuis

Tonnis ter Veldhuis, professor and chair, is a theoretical elementary particle physicist. He investigates the basic interactions between the fundamental constituents of matter. Macalester students frequently work with him on research projects using data produced at the Large Hadron Collider and other experimental facilities to test and constrain extensions of the standard model of elementary particle physics.
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John Cannon, associate professor, is an observational astronomer with a focus on nearby, low-mass galaxies. Using data from a variety of ground-based (e.g., the Jansky Very Large Array) and space-based (e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope) observatories, he works with students to understand the nature and evolution of these galaxies in the local universe.
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James Doyle, professor, is an experimentalist in plasma and materials physics with an emphasis on materials used in thin film solar cells. Students are regular participants in his studies of reactive sputtering, computer modeling of plasma systems, plasma- enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and electrodeposition.
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James Heyman, professor, is interested in experimental condensed matter physics and ultrafast laser spectroscopy. Students regularly collaborate with him in his research on ultrafast processes in semiconductors and the generation of picosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation.
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Sung Kyu Kim, professor, is the author of Physics: The Fabric of Reality and co- author of Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers. He directs the Macalester Summer Physics Institute for pre-medical students. He is the recipient of the 1993 Burlington Northern Excellence in Teaching Award.
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Political Science

Andrew Latham, professor and chair, teaches courses on international politics, comparative foreign policy, international security and medieval political thought. His research is currently focused on late medieval international relations and the historical evolution of sovereignty.
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Franklin Adler, G. Theodore Mitau Professor, is interested in political and social theory and the comparative politics of Europe.
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David Blaney, James Wallace Professor, teaches courses on international politics, global political economy, and development. His research centers on the political theory and political economy of international relations.
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Adrienne Christiansen, associate professor, teaches courses on political communication, campaign rhetoric, and the rhetoric of social movements. She has published work on AIDS activists, contemporary conservatism, and the Persian Gulf War.
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Julie Dolan, associate professor, teaches courses on American politics, legislative politics, women and politics, and political participation. Her research focuses on public administration, representative bureaucracy, and women in politics.
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Paul Dosh, associate professor, teaches courses on comparative politics and Latin America. He recently published a book about urban social movements in the shantytowns of Peru and Ecuador.
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Zornitsa Keremidchieva, visiting professor, teaches courses in political communication and feminist political theory. Her published scholarship concerns relationships between women's status, immigration politics, and citizenship.


Lesley Lavery, assistant professor, teaches courses on U.S. politics, and politics and policymaking. Research interests include public and social policy, education policy, political behavior and civic participation.
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Patrick Schmidt, professor, teaches courses on American politics and law. His research focuses on lawyers in America, judicial politics, and the Supreme Court. He is currently writing a book on disclosure laws in the United States.
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Wendy Weber, instructor, teaches courses on global governance, gender and global politics, and humanitarianism. Her research focuses on changing patterns of governance in the contemporary era, especially in the areas of international law and human rights.
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Michael Zis, visiting instructor, teaches American politics, public policy, and health policy. His research focuses on health care and public policy.


Psychology

Joan Ostrove, professor and chair, teaches courses in psychology of gender, and psychology and social structure. Her research addresses the qualities that facilitate building alliances across differences of identity and the role of social class background in students' experience of college.
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Kendrick Brown, associate professor, teaches courses on social psychology, understanding and confronting racism, psychology of multiculturalism, and research methods and statistics. His research interests focus on intergroup contact experiences of people of color, racial prejudice and racism, and the psychological consequences of perceiving oneself to be the target of discrimination.
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E. Darcy Burgund, associate professor, teaches courses on cognitive neuroscience, neuroimaging techniques, and research methods. Her research specializes in high- level visual cognition and memory, with a particular focus on object recognition.
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Cari Gillen O'Neel, assistant professor, teaches courses in developmental psychology, social identity development, and research methods. She studies the social and educational implications of children's collective identities--identities rooted in group membership (e.g., gender identity, ethnic identity, and school identity).


Steve Guglielmo, assistant professor, teaches courses in social psychology, moral judgment, decision-making, and research methods and statistics. His research examines moral and social cognition, specifically focusing on how people make judgments of blame and praise, how people understand others' minds, and how emotions and reasoning play a role in shaping moral judgments.


Brooke Lea, professor, teaches courses in cognitive psychology, psychology of language, and research methods and statistics. He specializes in human cognition. His research interests include theories of discourse comprehension, models of human logical competence, and the interaction between literary devices and memory.
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Jaine Strauss, professor, teaches courses in clinical and community psychology. She studies gender and mental health with a particular focus on body image, eating concerns, and depression. Her recent research focuses on women's internalization of body ideals throughout the lifespan.
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Eric Wiertelak, DeWitt Wallace Professor of Psychology, teaches courses in behavioral neuroscience, drugs and society, and sensation and perception. He conducts behavioral and physiological research to investigate the role of environmental stressors and learning in neurophysiological response mechanisms such as pain modulation.
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Religious Studies

James Laine, Arnold C. Lowe Professor and chair, specializes in the religions of South Asia and Islam. He works with the study abroad program in India sponsored by the Associated Colleges of the Midwest and is writing a book on religion and power in world history.
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Paula Cooey, Margaret W. Harmon Professor of Christian Theology and Culture, teaches courses on the history of Christian traditions, comparative ethics, theory and method, religion and environmental ethics, and religion and globalization. Her scholarly expertise lies at the intersection of history of Christian thought, theory of religion, and gender studies. She is currently working on a project on the role of asceticism in ethics.
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Rabbi Barry Cytron, visiting assistant professor, offers courses on Judaism and also serves as the campus's Jewish chaplain. Previously, he served for 25 years as a congregational rabbi in Des Moines, Iowa, and Minneapolis, Minn. From 1996 to 2009 he directed the Jay Phillips Center, a venture devoted to fostering sustained interfaith education.


Erik Davis, assistant professor, teaches courses on Buddhism, ritual, and the concepts and theories used in the field of religious studies. His research focuses on ritual performance, the social creation of culture, and funeral rituals related to death. His fieldwork has taken place in Cambodia. His book, Deathpower: Imagining Religion in Cambodia, will be published by Columbia University Press.
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Susanna Drake, assistant professor, offers courses in biblical studies and early Christian history. Special interests include early Christian and Jewish relations, the construction of orthodoxy and heresy, and gender studies. Her book, Slandering the Jew: Sexuality and Difference in Early Christian Texts, was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2013.
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Brett Wilson, assistant professor, explores modernization and religious transformation in the Muslim world with a geographic focus on modern Turkey and the eastern Mediterranean. He is the author of Translating the Qur'an in an Age of Nationalism: Print Culture and Modern Islam in Turkey (Oxford University Press, 2014). He received his master's and PhD in religious studies (Islamic Studies) from Duke University. For the 2014-15 academic year, he will be a research fellow at the Central European University School of Public Policy and the Center for Religious Studies.
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Russian Studies

James von Geldern, professor and chair, is an expert on Soviet mass culture and society. He has published a monograph, Bolshevik Festivals, 1917-1920 , and two anthologies, Mass Culture in Soviet Russia and Entertaining Tsarist Russia. His latest project is Seventeen Moments in Soviet History, a digital sourcebook on Soviet history accessible at www.soviethistory.org.
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Julia Bekman Chadaga, assistant professor, works on Russian visual art, architecture, film, and literature from the 18th century to the present day. She has published articles on material culture and the law; illusion and ideology in Soviet subterranean spaces; and mirrors as windows on Russian culture. Her book Optical Play: Glass, Vision, and Spectacle in Russian Culture is forthcoming from Northwestern University Press. She is working on a book on creativity and crime in 19th- and 20th-century Russia.
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Anastasia Kayiatos, visiting assistant professor, explores the conditions of speech and speechlessness under which the Soviet Union's "others"--those marginalized by bodily differences of sexuality, gender, race, and disability--came to be as subjects and came together as socialities within late socialism. Analyzing such styles of "silence" as censorship; deaf theater; and periphrastic poetics in queer and "women's prose," Kayiatos offsets stories of suppressed and strained speech with the counter conduct--that is, creative re/ appropriations of silences--performed by some Soviet actors.


Sociology

Erik Larson, associate professor and chair, specializes in economic sociology, political sociology, and the sociology of law. His research focuses on the emergence and transformation of legal, economic, and political institutions in relation to global and national developments. For this research, he has traveled to Fiji, Ghana, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, China, and Taiwan. Three of his projects have received funding from the National Science Foundation. His publications include "Emerging Indigenous Governance: Ainu Rights at the Intersection of Global Norms and Domestic Institutions" in Alternatives: Global, Local, Political (co- authored with two Macalester students). He is co-editor of Law & Society Reader II (NYU Press 2014).
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Terry Boychuk, associate professor, specializes in comparative-historical sociology, social policies, and nonprofit organizations. His latest publication, The Making and Meaning of Hospital Policy in the United States and Canada, is a comparative study of why movements to establish national health insurance failed in the United States and succeeded in Canada. More recently, he has studied the historical origins of the legal frameworks that define the nature and scope of the charitable nonprofit sector in the United Kingdom, the United States, and the British Commonwealth.
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Mahnaz Kousha, professor, specializes in the sociology of race, ethnicity, and immigration, and sociology of the family. Her latest book, Voices from Iran: The Changing Lives of Iranian Women, explores intimate family relationships between parents and daughters within the context of broader sociocultural changes during the last three to four decades. Her most recent publication is a translation of the novel My Bird, by Fariba Vafi, one of the most acclaimed contemporary Iranian writers. Her current work explores issues regarding men's gender roles and family relationships.
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Khaldoun Samman, associate professor, specializes in world historical-comparative sociology, urban sociology, globalization, the sociology of religion, and classical and modern sociological theory. His latest book is The Clash of Modernities: The Islamist Challenge to Jewish, Turkish and Arab Nationalism. Drawing comparisons between Turkey, Israel, and the Arab World, his research surveys the origins of the present strife in the region and suggests alternative strategies that may help peacefully resolve conflicts in the Middle East.
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Theatre and Dance

Harry Waters, Jr., associate professor and chair (spring), teaches Acting I and II, Community-Based Theatres, Hip Hop Performance, and African American Theatre. In summer 2014, he directed Twelfth Night at the Franconia Sculpture Park.
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Thomas C. Barrett, technical director and adjunct professor of design, teaches Technical Theater, and Make-up Design and Application. He is a professional scenic designer, working regularly in the Twin Cities. This fall, he will be piloting a new version of Tech Theater: "Technologies of Performance: Crafting the Tangible."


Beth Cleary, associate professor, teaches at the intersection of theatre history, performance theory, and playmaking.
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Wynn Fricke, director of the dance program, is a prominent member of the Twin Cities dance community as a choreographer, dancer, director, and teacher. At Macalester, she choreographs new work for concerts and teaches Experiential Anatomy and Cultures of Dance. In spring 2014, she choreographed the Frank Theatre production of The Threepenny Opera in Minneapolis.


Becky Heist, is adjunct faculty in dance and the founder of the dance program.
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Dan Keyser, associate professor, chair and resident designer, has designed over 100 shows at Macalester. A professional scenic and lighting designer, he teaches design courses, and designs for both theatre and dance productions.
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Kanta Kochhar Lindgren will join THDA in January 2015 in performance studies. She holds an MFA in dance and a PhD in performance studies from New York University, and is an esteemed scholar and practitioner in the fields of disability performance, inter-cultural performance and devised work. In fall 2014, her newest work will premiere in Hong Kong.

Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Lin Aanonsen,WGSS chair and O.T. Walter Professor of Biology, focuses her research on spinal mechanisms by which chronic pain is transmitted and induced. She involves students in every aspect of her research. Aanonsen teaches courses in cell biology, neurobiology, human physiology, and pharmacology. She chairs the Health Professions Advisory Committee and was awarded the 2003 Macalester College Excellence in Teaching Award.
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Corie Hammers, assistant professor in WGSS, has published essays in a variety of journals such as Body & Society, Sexualities and The Journal of Contemporary Ethnography. Her main research project has been one of examining lesbian/ queer public sexual cultures and sexual spaces in Canada and the U.S. Her latest project explores lesbian/queer S/M, with a particular focus on sadomasochism's impact on the body and the types of relationality generated through the queer S/M exchange. Her core courses include Race, Sex and Work in the Global Economy; Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies; and Sexuality, Race and Nation: Introduction to LGBT Studies.
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Sonita Sarker, professor in WGSS and the English Department, co-edited Trans- Status Subjects: Gender in the Globalization of South and Southeast Asia (2002) and is sole editor of Sustainable Feminisms (2007). She is currently writing a book on transnational receptions of fascism and empire by women writers of the 1920s and 1930s. She has published essays on Shashi Deshpande, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, and Virginia Woolf in publications by The Feminist Press, in Archiv Orientalni, and in the National Women's Studies Association Journal, Modernism/Modernity, and other journals. She is the recipient of awards from the Ford, Mellon, Bush, Hewlett, and Wallace foundations. She offers courses in feminist postmodern and postcolonial theories, 20th- and 21st-century transnational comparative women's writing, and sociopolitical activism.
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