Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

GEOG 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01;first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on the role of humans in changing the face of the earth and how, in turn, this changing environment influences humans. The course will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Students will explore the fundamentals of environmental science, economics, cultural and political ecology, as well as a number of sectoral issues related to human population growth, agriculture, water resources, biodiversity, forest resources, energy use, climate change, and environmental health. (4 credits)

GEOG 263-01

Geography of Development and Underdevelopment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course introduces students to the geographic study of development around the world, with a particular emphasis on the Global South. The geographic approach emphasizes: the highly uneven nature of development; processes that link and differentiate various areas of the world; connections between development and the natural resource base; and the power relations inherent in development discourse. The course has three main sections: an introduction to development theory; an investigation of various development themes; and an intense exploration of what works and what doesn't in development practice. While much of the development literature has focused on failure, a specific aim of this course will be to uncover and interrogate success stories. (4 credits)

HIST 115-01

Africa Since 1800

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: This course is designed to introduce students to the history of Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It examines major themes relating to change in the colonial period such as European conquest and imperialism, the development of the colonial economy, African responses to colonialism and the rise of nationalist movements that stimulated the movement towards independence. Students will examine these themes by applying them to case studies of specific geographic regions of the continent. (4 credits)

MUSI 73-01

African Music Ensemble

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 06:30 pm-08:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Sowah Mensah

Notes: *Register in person with the ensemble director. Check the Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*


SOCI 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

THDA 22-01

African-Based Movement II

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: THEATR 6
  • Instructor: Patricia Brown

Notes: This course focuses on dance inspired by West African and other African regions, the Caribbean, and the Americas. It is rooted in a communal environment and is supported and accompanied by a live musician/drummer. Students continue building on fundamental principles and technique, including more complex polyrhythmic aspects of the movement, while deepening the inter-connected relationship with the drums. They also create in-class dance projects and presentations. Spring semester. (1 credit)

Fall 2016

ANTH 111-01

Cultural Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: Introductory Course

Open to first year students. The cultural perspective on human behavior including case studies, often illustrated by ethnographic films and slides, of non-Western and American cultures. May include some field interviewing. Includes the cross cultural treatment of economic, legal, political, social and religious institutions and a survey of major approaches to the explanation of cultural variety and human social organization. (4 credits)


ANTH 246-01

Refugees/Humanitarian Response

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: This course provides an overview of issues related to refugees and humanitarian response in U.S. and international settings. Students explore the meaning of "humanitarian" and inherent issues of power, ethics, and human rights in responses to conflict by examining the roles of those who engage in humanitarian work. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)


ANTH 258-01

Dynamic Africa

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: Africa has long been a continent on the move. This course introduces students to concepts associated with systems, process, and change in Africa by juxtaposing classic and contemporary ethnography that aims to get at how lives, subjectivities, and intimacies on the continent mediate and are shaped by global historical processes and how anthropologists have inhabited and tried to grasp such contexts. Toward this end, we draw on diverse representations of Africa that include fiction, film, and more traditional forms of scholarship. (4 credits)


ENVI 477-01

Comparative Environment and Development Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; cross-listed with GEOG 477-01 and INTL 477-01*

A concern for the relationship between nature and society has been one of the pillars of geographic inquiry and has also been an important bridge between other disciplines. By the 1960s, this area of inquiry was referred to variously as "human ecology." Over the last decade, certain forms of inquiry within this tradition have increasingly referred to themselves as "political ecology." The purpose of this seminar is to review major works within the traditions of cultural and political ecology; examine several areas of interest within these fields (e.g., agricultural modernization, environmental narratives, conservation, ecotourism); and explore nature-society dynamics across a range of geographical contexts. Towards the end of the course we will explore how one might begin to think in practical terms about facilitating development in marginal environments. Cross-listed with Geography 477 and International Studies 477. (4 credits)

FREN 194-01

Food in French and Francophone Cultures: the Local and the Global

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Joelle Vitiello

Notes: *First Year Course only; first day attendance required*


FREN 320-01

Francophone Theater of Exile and Immigration

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: THEATR 204
  • Instructor: Juliette Rogers

Notes: *Cross-listed with THDA 394-02; taught in French*

This course is a survey of francophone theater and film from 1975 to 2014. The plays and films will cover three main topics: the development of colonial and post-colonial subjects, the act of writing and performing while living in exile, and the idea of the Other in francophone film and theater. We will study a variety of plays and films that were written in and take place in all parts of the francophone world, including Quebec, Lebanon, Algeria, Belgium, Cameroon, Senegal, Mali, Martinique, Romania, and France. The form of each work varies widely, from classical French dramatic techniques to minimalist contemporary staging and characterization. Students will study blocking and staging techniques and explore contemporary performance theory in addition to writing literary and cultural analyses. Authors and filmmakers studied include Abla Farhoud, Wajdi Mouawad, Edouardo Manet, Michel Azama, Michele Cesaire, Anca Visdei, Pierre Gope et Nicolas Kurtovithc, and Moussa Toure. Taught in French. (4 credits)

FREN 394-01

Representations of Immigration and Border-Crossings in Contemporary Europe

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Joelle Vitiello

Notes: *First day attendance required* Global media have long been fascinated with images of migrants from the South enduring perilous journeys in their attempts to enter Europe through land or sea. These images have produced series of standard narratives, especially since the 2010s, rather than a deep understanding. With the help of theorists such as Giorgio Agamben, Etienne Balibar, Isotina Ballesterros, Nina Glick-Schiller, Alec Hargreaves, or Sarah Mekdjian, this course will critically analyze mass media images of immigration, juxtaposing them with more nuanced representations from European cinema and literature. Works from France, Germany, Greece, Italy, and Spain will be examined to study specific issues (from detention camps in and out of the Schengen space to integration and citizenship of several generations, from cultural exclusions to hospitality, love, and success stories). Each of the major European countries has a different historical, geographical, and economic relationship with the migrants' countries of origin, and the course will proceed comparatively, seeking not just commonalities but also significant differences among the European countries receiving migrants. Questions of race, ethnicity, gender, race, religion and differences will be important concerns.

The materials for the class are diverse. They include written memoirs and fiction, films, graphic novels, critical essays, and interactive and creative maps such as euborderscapes projects. Starting with classics that deal directly with immigration such as Werner Fassbinder's Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1974), the course will carry its analysis forward to current fiction films such as Terraferma (2011) and Samba (2014). In addition, some documentary films (or excerpts from them) such as Kal Touré's Victims of our Riches (2006) will be screened for background information. Narratives include short works by Igiaba Scego, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Laila Lallami, Alexander Maksik, Donato Ndongo-Bidyogo, Amara Lakhous, Tahar Ben Jelloun among others.

GEOG 243-01

Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *First Year Course only; first day attendance required*

This class seeks to go beyond the superficial media interpretations of the vast African continent. As geographers, students will attempt to place contemporary African developments in a historical and global context. The course provides a basic background in African history and geography, leading to discussion of advanced topics in contemporary African studies. The course takes a systematic rather than regional approach, examining sets of issues, rather than regions or countries of Africa. The course covers a broad range of topics, including: Africa in historical perspective; physical geography (physical landscapes, climate, vegetation, soils); human-environment interactions (forest degradation, desertification); population dynamics (population growth, distribution and mobility); culture and change (religion, modernization); development (ideology and economic development, Africa in the global economy); social geography (African women and development, education); medical geography (disease, health care and policy); agricultural development (traditional farming systems, cash crops, policy); urban economies (evolution of the urban structure, industry, housing); and political geography (democratization, conflict). (4 credits)

GEOG 477-01

Comparative Environment and Development

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and INTL 477-01*

A concern for the relationship between nature and society has been one of the pillars of geographic inquiry, and has also been an important bridge between other disciplines. By the 1960s, this area of inquiry was referred to variously as “human ecology” or “cultural ecology.” Over the last decade certain forms of inquiry within this tradition have increasingly referred to themselves as “political ecology.” The purpose of this seminar is to review major works within the traditions of cultural and political ecology; examine several areas of interest within these fields (e.g., agricultural modernization, environmental narratives, conservation, ecotourism); and explore nature-society dynamics across a range of geographical contexts. Towards the end of the course students will explore how one might begin to think in practical terms about facilitating development in marginal environments. Note: Completion of GEOG 232 prior to registering for this seminar is strongly encouraged. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 477 and International Studies 477. (4 credits)

HIST 114-01

History of Africa to 1800

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: A study of the history of Africa before 1800, this course covers the major themes relating to the development of African societies and cultures from the earliest times. Students will engage with themes of state-building, trade and religion as catalysts for change and learn how historians have reconstructed the history of early Africa. This course will provide students with knowledge of specific case studies from North, South, East, West, and Central Africa. (4 credits)

HIST 154-01

African Life Histories

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: In this course we will learn about African history through the stories that Africans themselves have told about their own lives. We will use oral history, songs of West Africa's griots; slave narratives; political autobiographies; theatre and film to explore the personal narration of lived experience. To guide our class discussions we will also consult scholarly essays about life history as a genre, to help us understand the methodology behind the production of these important texts. Class activities will include seminar discussions, writing workshops, a field trip and intermittent background lectures. Each student will carry out an individual research project on their topic of choice. (4 credits)

HIST 256-01

Transatlantic Slave Trade

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: *First Year Course only*

Cross-listed with American Studies 256. This class examines the Atlantic commerce in African slaves that took place roughly between 1500 and 1800. We will explore, among other topics, transatlantic commerce, the process of turning captives into commodities, the gendered dimensions of the slave trade, resistance to the trade, the world the slaves made, and the abolitionist movement on both sides of the Atlantic. Students will read a range of primary and secondary sources in order to gain a more complex understanding of the slave trade and how it changed over time. (4 credits)

INTL 282-01

Introduction to International Public Health

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: This course introduces and explores the major health problems facing developing countries, and the main approaches to remediation. The course considers the social determinants of health, and the need for public health programs to address the root causes of health inequities as well as illness itself. Focus is at the country, international-organization, and donor levels. Attention will be given to major indicators, recent trends, policies, and metrics for monitoring progress. A case study, such as international tuberculosis control, will be used as an applied analysis.

INTL 282-02

Introduction to International Public Health

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: This course introduces and explores the major health problems facing developing countries, and the main approaches to remediation. The course considers the social determinants of health, and the need for public health programs to address the root causes of health inequities as well as illness itself. Focus is at the country, international-organization, and donor levels. Attention will be given to major indicators, recent trends, policies, and metrics for monitoring progress. A case study, such as international tuberculosis control, will be used as an applied analysis.

INTL 301-01

Power and Development in Africa

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 411
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 333-01*

In a notable turn around, a significant number of African societies, in recent years, have experienced both economic growth and renewal of the spirit of women and men acting as citizens. These are commendable achievements. Yet, old quotidian urgencies such as precarious personal safety, hunger, poor health, and political disorder are still prevalent. This is the dialectic of development. This course explores these contradictions. Most of the attention will be given to the concepts of power, politics, and development in contemporary Africa. The course concludes with each student submitting a research paper on a specific problem

(e.g. environment, economic, social, cultural, political) confronting one country of the student's choice. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Cross-listed with Political Science 333. (4 credits)

INTL 477-01

Comparative Environment and Development Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and GEOG 477-01*

A concern for the relationship between nature and society has been one of the pillars of geographic inquiry and has also been an important bridge between other disciplines. By the 1960s, this area of inquiry was referred to variously as "human ecology." Over the last decade, certain forms of inquiry within this tradition have increasingly referred to themselves as "political ecology." The purpose of this seminar is to review major works within the traditions of cultural and political ecology; examine several areas of interest within these fields (e.g., agricultural modernization, environmental narratives, conservation, ecotourism); and explore nature-society dynamics across a range of geographical contexts. Towards the end of the course we will explore how one might begin to think in practical terms about facilitating development in marginal environments. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 477 and Geography 477. (4 credits)

MUSI 72-01

African Music Ensemble

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 06:45 pm-08:15 pm
  • Room: MUSIC 116
  • Instructor: Sowah Mensah

Notes: *Register in person with the ensemble director. Check the Music Department website to see whether auditions are required*


POLI 242-01

Political Economy of Development

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: This course will help you answer questions about politics and economics in the developing world. For example: What explains global disparities in peace and prosperity? Is democracy good for the poor? Does foreign aid work? Our main objective is to use social science to describe and explain development outcomes. Although we will also address what can be done to solve problems such as poverty and civil war, this course will not provide any panaceas. If you finish the term unsatisfied and frustrated, you will have done something right! You will have begun to understand the complexity of development issues, which will equip you to contribute in a sophisticated way to ongoing scholarly and policy-oriented debates. (4 credits)

POLI 333-01

Power and Development in Africa

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 411
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 301-01*

In a notable turn around, a significant number of African societies, in recent years, have experienced both economic growth and renewal of the spirit of women and men acting as citizens. These are commendable achievements. Yet, old quotidian urgencies such as precarious personal safety, hunger, poor health, and political disorder are still prevalent. This is the dialectic of development. This course explores these contradictions. Most of the attention will be given to the concepts of power, politics, and development in contemporary Africa. The course concludes with each student submitting a research paper on a specific problem

(e.g. environment, economic, social, cultural, political) confronting one country of the student's choice. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Cross-listed with International Studies 301. (4 credits)

THDA 394-02

Francophone Theater of Exile and Immigration

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: THEATR 204
  • Instructor: Juliette Rogers

Notes: *Cross-listed with FREN 320-01; taught in French* This course is a survey of francophone theater and film from 1975 to 2014. The plays and films will cover three main topics: the development of colonial and post-colonial subjects, the act of writing and performing while living in exile, and the idea of the Other in francophone film and theater. We will study a variety of plays and films that were written in and take place in all parts of the francophone world, including Quebec, Lebanon, Algeria, Belgium, Cameroon, Senegal, Mali, Martinique, Romania, and France. The form of each work varies widely, from classical French dramatic techniques to minimalist contemporary staging and characterization. Students will study blocking and staging techniques and explore contemporary performance theory in addition to writing literary and cultural analyses. Authors and filmmakers studied include Abla Farhoud, Wajdi Mouawad, Edouardo Manet, Michel Azama, Michele Cesaire, Anca Visdei, Pierre Gope et Nicolas Kurtovithc, and Moussa Toure.

THDA 21-01

African-Based Movement I

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: THEATR 6
  • Instructor: Patricia Brown

Notes: This African Based Movement course focuses on dance inspired by West Africa, as well as other regions of the continent, the Caribbean, Americas, and the African Diaspora at large. This physically rigorous class is rooted in a communal environment and is accompanied by a drummer. Students will learn African- based dance technique, characteristics, and the fundamental connection between the drums and the dance. They will also create in-class movement projects and presentations. Though this class may focus on traditional dance at times, it is not a tradition-specific class. All are welcome. (1 credit)