Course Descriptions

Anthropology

ANTH 101 - General Anthropology

This course is an introduction to the discipline of anthropology as a whole. It presents students with a theoretical grounding in the four major subfields: archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics. In this class the emphasis is on the holistic nature of the discipline. Students will be challenged with some of the countless links between the systems of biology and culture. They will explore key questions about human diversity in the past, present, and future.

ANTH 111 - Cultural Anthropology

The cultural perspective on human behavior including case studies, often illustrated by ethnographic films and slides, of non-Western and American cultures. May include some field interviewing. Includes the cross cultural treatment of economic, legal, political, social and religious institutions and a survey of major approaches to the explanation of cultural variety and human social organization.

Frequency: Every semester.

ANTH 112 - Archaeology and Human Origins

The origin and development of prehistoric peoples and cultures. The concepts, methods, and theories of prehistoric archaeology, human paleontology, and human biology as a framework for examining the fossils and artifacts left by humans. Course includes films and the use of casts and slides to illustrate concepts.

Frequency: Alternate years.

ANTH 115 - Biological Anthropology

This class is a broad survey covering topics such as genetics, evolutionary mechanisms, adaptation, primate studies, the human fossil record, and human variation. All of these areas will be placed within the framework of the interaction of humans within their environment. The course is divided into three sections: human genetics, human ecology and primatology, human evolution and adaptation.

Frequency: Alternate years.

ANTH 123 - Introduction to Archaeology

This course introduces students to archaeology, the study of the material remains of human culture. Students will explore the history of the discipline and profession, its basic methods and theories, and the political and ethical dimensions of modern archaeological practice. Students learn to examine and interpret evidence using specific examples, from artifacts to sites to regions.

Frequency: Every year.

Cross-Listed as

 CLAS 123

ANTH 194 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

ANTH 206 - Endangered and Minority Languages

Language loss is accelerating at alarming rates. In fact, Linguists predict that only five percent of the six thousand languages currently spoken in the world are expected to survive into the 22nd century. In this course, we will examine the historical, political, and socio-economic factors behind the endangerment and/or marginalization of languages in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and North and South America. We will also concentrate on the globalization of English (and other major languages), which plays a primary role in language endangerment and marginalization. Additional topics include: linguistic diversity, language policy, multilingualism (in both nations and individuals), global language conflict, and language revitalization. Students will have the opportunity to learn first-hand about these issues by interviewing speakers of an endangered and/or minority language.

Frequency: Offered every third year.

Cross-Listed as

LING 206

ANTH 230 - Ethnographic Interviewing

An introduction to ethnographic field interviewing learned in the context of individually run student field projects. Focuses on the anthropologist-informant field relationship and the discovery of cultural knowledge through participant observation and ethnosemantic interviewing techniques.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111 and permission of instructor.

ANTH 239 - Medical Anthropology

This course examines issues of health, illness, and healing from a variety of anthropological perspectives. From a cross-cultural perspective, we will examine the diversity of beliefs about human health and sickness, and a variety of healing practices by which people treat them. From the perspective of critical epidemiology, we will wrestle with recurrent problems of socioeconomic inequalities, ecological disruptions, and their impact upon the differential distribution, prevention, and treatment of human diseases. Previous courses in anthropology are recommended but not required.

Frequency: Alternate years.

ANTH 240 - Human Osteology and Paleopathology

The study of the human skeletal system is basic to the disciplines of biological anthropology, forensic science, medicine and even archaeology. This class will examine the fundamentals of osteology. It will also explore numerous pathological conditions associated with both infectious and non-infectious diseases in addition to those caused by traumatic events. Students will learn to identify and analyze human bone and pathological conditions of the skeleton to aid in the reconstruction of life histories from human remains.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111 or ANTH 112 or ANTH 115 or ANTH 123 or BIOL 112 or BIOL 260 or BIOL 265

ANTH 241 - Anthropology of Death and Dying

This course examines the dying process and the ways that humans beings come to terms with their mortality in different societies. We will learn how people die in major illnesses and critically analyze controversial issues regarding brain death, suicide, and euthanasia. We will survey funerary traditions from a variety of cultures and compare the social, spiritual, and psychological roles that these rituals play for both the living and the dying. We will examine cultural attitudes towards death; and how the denial and awareness of human mortality can shape social practices and institutions. Finally, we will consider issues regarding the quality of life, the opportunities and challenges of caregiving, and hospice traditions around the world.

Frequency: Offered alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

ANTH 243 - Psychological Anthropology

This course explores the relationship between self, culture and society. We will examine and discuss critically the broad array of methods and theories anthropologists use to analyze personality, socialization, mental illnes and cognition in different societies. Our aim is to address questions related to the cultural patterning of personality, the self and emotions and to understand how culture might shape ideas of what a person is. We will also seek to understand how cultures define behavior as abnormal, pathological or insane, and how they make sense of trauma and suffering.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

PSYC 243

ANTH 246 - Refugees/Humanitarian Response

This course provides an overview of issues related to refugees and humanitarian response in U.S. and international settings. Students explore the meaning of "humanitarian" and inherent issues of power, ethics, and human rights in responses to conflict by examining the roles of those who engage in humanitarian work.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

ANTH 248 - Magic, Witchcraft and Religions

An introduction to anthropological approaches to the study of religious beliefs and practices, the idea of syncretism, witchcraft, sorcery, shamanism and the practice of magic, the role of religion in bringing about social change and the social and cultural theories that have been put forward to explain religious phenomena.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

ANTH 253 - Comparative Muslim Cultures

An introduction to the diversity of Muslim societies in the Arab world, Europe, Africa, North America, and South and South-East Asia. We trace Islam as a local and transnational lived experience, explore theoretical arguments from the humanities and social sciences, and examine multiple case studies, illuminating ritual, ethnicities, gender, education, the media, travel, migration, citizenship, politics, conflict, social change, and stereotypes about Islam and Muslim societies.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

INTL 253

ANTH 254 - Peoples and Cultures of Native America

A survey of the traditional cultural areas of the Americas and of selected topics related to American Indians. The course introduces the peoples, languages, subsistence patterns, and social organizations in America at the time of European contact, and traces selected patterns of change that have come to these areas.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

AMST 254

ANTH 255 - Peoples and Cultures of Latin America

This course is an introduction to the cultural diversity and complexity of Latin American societies. We will examine regional differences from an anthropological perspective and discus how social institutions and cultural practices and traditions have been shaped, and how they have dealt with continuity and change. Ethnographic case studies will allow us to explore relevant topics related to ethnicity, social stratification, gift-giving/reciprocity, kinship, rural/urban relationships, cosmology and religion, and gender. These issues will be examined within the context of particular histories, considering the legacy of colonialism, the formation of the nation-state, the emergence of social movements, post-colonial nationalism, the impart of migration and urbanization, and the effects of neo-liberalism and globalization. We will conclude with a critical examination of forms of representation of Latin America, which involve notions such as indigenismo .

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

LATI 255

ANTH 256 - Peoples and Cultures of South Asia

Introduces students to anthropological knowledge of the peoples and cultures of South Asia and to the ways in which Western knowledge of that region has been constructed. The course examines the historical and social processes that have shaped the culture and lifeways of the people who live on the subcontinent and that link the modern states of South Asia to the world beyond their frontiers.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

ASIA 256

ANTH 258 - Peoples and Cultures of Africa

This course will present an overview of African cultures and societies as documented in the anthropological literature. Classic and contemporary ethnographies will be used to illustrate the social transformations which are occurring in Africa.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

ANTH 259 - Indigenous Peoples of the Arctic

The Arctic represents one of the most extreme environments to which humans have adapted. These adaptations include both biological and cultural changes required to settle and flourish in this formidable setting. This course looks at some of the cultural practices that appear to be ubiquitous throughout the Arctic, as well as those specializations that have developed as a result of some of the more localized environmental pressures. It also explores the consequences of rapid global climate change as well as modernization on these unique cultures to get a sense of what the future might hold for the indigenous peoples of the Arctic.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111 or consent of instructor

Cross-Listed as

ENVI 259

ANTH 280 - Topics in Linguistic Anthropology

Introduces students to linguistic anthropology, one of the four major subfields of the discipline of anthropology. Students will focus on particular topics within linguistic anthropology including: gender, race, sexuality, and identity. May involve fieldwork in the Twin Cities area. Focus will be announced at registration.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

LING 280

ANTH 285 - Seminar in World Ethnography

The hallmark of anthropology is the cross cultural perspective supported by first hand ethnographic accounts of hundreds of different cultures. In this course students will read, discuss, and compare ethnographies representing diverse cultures as well as a wide range of ethnographic theories and methods.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

ANTH 294 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

ANTH 340 - Human Evolution

An exploration of the interaction between ecology, morphology, and culture in human evolution. Topics include the evolutionary adaptation of non-human primates and hominins to their various ecological and social environments, taxonomic classification systems, and techniques used in the analysis of primate fossils to help determine both their geological age and phylogenetic placement.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 112, ANTH 115ANTH 240 or permission of instructor.

ANTH 358 - Anthropology of Violence

Faced with the escalation of political and ethnic violence in the modern world, anthropologists have become increasingly aware of the need to address these realities which have forced a rethinking of the meaning of violence as a social and cultural phenomenon. This course interrogates the slippery concept of violence in the light of theoretical approaches from different disciplines. The course will begin with a discussion of how anthropologists have reexamined the concept of violence within the context of complex and large-scale societies. It will then address the preponderate weight that the concept of the state has played within the social sciences in interpretation of violence, followed by a consideration of how notions of community and cultural difference figure prominently in the ideology of conflict.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

ANTH 360 - Anthropology of Tourism

This course examines the impact of different kinds of tourism (mass tourism, ecotourism, sand-sea-sun-sex tourism, ethnic tourism) on local peoples, environments and economies. It looks at the historical development of tourism and its links to both travel as a leisure pursuit in the colonial period and to economic developments in industrializing Europe. The course examines the tourist encounter and the models used to analyze it. Issues discussed include cultural mediation, the politics of cultural representation, and the problems of commoditization of culture.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

ANTH 362 - Culture and Globalization

The world is far more interconnected today than ever before, but what does this mean in terms of culture? This course looks at the impact of globalization on cultures and at examples of global cultures such as immigrants, media and popular cultures, world cities, and transnational intellectuals, ethnicities and ideologies. It also looks at the way cultures interact at geographic borders and in the margins of society.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

INTL 362

ANTH 363 - Anthropology of Development

The goal of this course is to develop an anthropological understanding and critique of development. It aims to examine both the discourse of development and its practice. The course focuses on the construction of the Third World as an "underdeveloped" area, and discusses the dominant theoretical paradigms of development and modernization. It assesses the reasons for the general failure of development programs based on these models to bring about meaningful and substantive change in societies in Asia, Africa and Latin America, and discusses possible alternatives to "development" as it is currently practiced.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

ANTH 364 - Political Anthropology

An analysis of various political structures and activities in diverse world societies. Emphasis is placed on pre-literate cultures, but the societies examined vary from hunting and gathering bands through agricultural tribes to the industrial state.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

POLI 243

ANTH 365 - Environmental Anthropology

This course examines how the concept of culture can contribute to our understanding of environmental issues, in terms of how human beings adapt to their environment and the way in which they understand and give meaning to the world they live in. It aims to develop an anthropological understanding of the environment and to understand the way the "environmental crisis"-of resource scarcity and ecological degradation-is the outcome of particular structures of power, economic relations and consumption.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

ENVI 365

ANTH 368 - Life Histories/Cultures/Selves

This seminar focuses on the relationship between individuals and their culture. Students will record, edit, and analyze personal documents such as diaries, letters, interview transcriptions, and autobiographies. Analysis of life events such as childhood play activities, family meals, kinship relations, and modes of communication, will lead to the identification of cultural themes.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

ANTH 380 - Advanced Topics in Medical Anthropology

This course provides an in-depth focus on a major topic in medical anthropology as it pertains to human health, illness, and/or healing. Specific topics vary from year to year, ranging from traditional healing systems, to health related stigma and social inequalities. Students will learn to apply social theories to important health issues, and will critically read, analyze, and discuss the clinical, epidemiological, and social science literature pertaining to the most recent discussions and debates about the topic.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

ANTH 381 - Emerging Infectious Diseases

This course examines the human determinants of infectious diseases from the Paleolithic to the present day using the combined frameworks of evolution, human ecology, critical history, and social epidemiology. We will consider the co-evolution of culture and disease: the ways that human subsistence, ecological disruptions, social inequalities, and demographic changes have created selective conditions for new infections, re-emerging infections, and antibiotic resistance. We will also address the social dynamics of current epidemics, and major controversies over biosecurity and bioterrorism.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

ANTH 387 - Darwin and Evolutionary Thought

This course examines the influence of Charles Darwin on both the discipline of Anthropology and general scientific thought in the 20th century. It begins with an exploration of the emergence of modern evolutionary theory, its role in society, and how it is essential to the field of Anthropology. We consider some of the work of Darwin's predecessors, who laid the intellectual and scientific foundations that Darwin built upon, as well as those who adapted Darwin's concepts to theories of social change. Students also read and discuss some of the bigest debates surrounding the theory of Evolution by Natural Selection, both past and present. Finally, we look at the future of evolutionary theory in light of recent developments in molecular biology and the fossil record.

Prerequisite(s)

One of the following: ANTH 101, ANTH 111, ANTH 112, ANTH 115, BIOL 112, BIOL 270, or BIOL 285

ANTH 394 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

ANTH 405 - Ethnomusicology

This course introduces students to the field of ethnomusicology through its philosophical foundation, theoretical models, and disciplinary practices. Topics include comparative approach, structuralist/functionalist models, cultural relativism, organology, bi-musicality, reflexivity, post/modernism, among other recent research directions. Assignments are designed to develop skills in musical fieldwork, transcription and analysis, as well as preparing and presenting scholarly findings in ethnographic disciplines. This course is aimed primarily for students of music and/or anthropology. There is no prerequisite, hower basic knowledge or experience in world music and performance is desirable.

Cross-Listed as

MUSI 405

ANTH 487 - Theory in Anthropology

This course introduces students to the broad range of explanations for social and cultural phenomena used by anthropologists since the emergence of the discipline in the 19th century. The course focuses on the development of three broad theoretical approaches: The American school of cultural anthropology, British social anthropology, and the French school that emerged from the work of Durkheim and his followers. The course also examines theoretical approaches such as cultural materialism, and symbolic and interpretive approaches to the study of culture.

Frequency: Fall semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Junior or senior standing.  Students should have at least two courses in anthropology including ANTH 101 or ANTH 111, or the permission of the instructor.

ANTH 490 - Senior Seminar

The senior seminar is for anthropology majors who are working on their senior capstone project and is designed to help students develop that project for presentation. The seminar will also include reading of anthropological works, guest speakers and discussion of current controversies in the discipline.

Frequency: Every year; Spring semester.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 111 or ANTH 101, and ANTH 487. Junior or Senior standing.

ANTH 494 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

ANTH 601 - Tutorial

Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of knowledge not available through the regular catalog offerings.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

ANTH 602 - Tutorial

Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of knowledge not available through the regular catalog offerings.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

ANTH 603 - Tutorial

Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of knowledge not available through the regular catalog offerings.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

ANTH 604 - Tutorial

Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of knowledge not available through the regular catalog offerings.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

ANTH 611 - Independent Project

Independent project in anthropology. Projects might include intensive ethnographic research, the analysis of ethnographic data, or a variety of other projects.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

ANTH 612 - Independent Project

Independent project in anthropology. Projects might include intensive ethnographic research, the analysis of ethnographic data, or a variety of other projects.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

ANTH 613 - Independent Project

Independent project in anthropology. Projects might include intensive ethnographic research, the analysis of ethnographic data, or a variety of other projects.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

ANTH 614 - Independent Project

Independent project in anthropology. Projects might include intensive ethnographic research, the analysis of ethnographic data, or a variety of other projects.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

ANTH 621 - Internship

Work that involves the student in practical (usually off campus) experience. Students may intern in any of the variety of internships listed by the college or arrange their own internships. Students will be expected to produce an ethnographic paper for the instructor in addition to approximately 10 hours per week at the internship site. Only one internship may count towards an anthropology major. The department views internships as a valuable experience in which the student has an opportunity to "study" a job. Offered as S/D/NC grading only, but may be included on Anthropology major plans.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

ANTH 622 - Internship

Work that involves the student in practical (usually off campus) experience. Students may intern in any of the variety of internships listed by the college or arrange their own internships. Students will be expected to produce an ethnographic paper for the instructor in addition to approximately 10 hours per week at the internship site. Only one internship may count towards an anthropology major. The department views internships as a valuable experience in which the student has an opportunity to "study" a job. Offered as S/D/NC grading only, but may be included on Anthropology major plans.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

ANTH 623 - Internship

Work that involves the student in practical (usually off campus) experience. Students may intern in any of the variety of internships listed by the college or arrange their own internships. Students will be expected to produce an ethnographic paper for the instructor in addition to approximately 10 hours per week at the internship site. Only one internship may count towards an anthropology major. The department views internships as a valuable experience in which the student has an opportunity to "study" a job. Offered as S/D/NC grading only, but may be included on Anthropology major plans.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

ANTH 624 - Internship

Work that involves the student in practical (usually off campus) experience. Students may intern in any of the variety of internships listed by the college or arrange their own internships. Students will be expected to produce an anthropological paper for the instructor in addition to approximately 10 hours per week at the internship site. Only one internship may count towards an anthropology major. The department views internships as a valuable experience in which the student has an opportunity to "study" a job. Offered as S/D/NC grading only, but may be included on Anthropology major plans.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

ANTH 631 - Preceptorship

Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course, precepting or tutoring.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

ANTH 632 - Preceptorship

Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course, precepting or tutoring.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

ANTH 633 - Preceptorship

Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course, precepting or tutoring.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

ANTH 634 - Preceptorship

Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course, precepting or tutoring.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

ANTH 641 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

ANTH 642 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

ANTH 643 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

ANTH 644 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.