Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

ANTH 111-01

Cultural Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Introductory Course

Open to first year students. The cultural perspective on human behavior including case studies, often illustrated by ethnographic films and slides, of non-Western and American cultures. May include some field interviewing. Includes the cross cultural treatment of economic, legal, political, social and religious institutions and a survey of major approaches to the explanation of cultural variety and human social organization. (4 credits)


ANTH 112-01

Archaeology and Human Origins

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: Introductory Course

Open to first year students. The origin and development of prehistoric peoples and cultures. The concepts, methods, and theories of prehistoric archaeology, human paleontology, and human biology as a framework for examining the fossils and artifacts left by humans. Course includes films and the use of casts and slides to illustrate concepts. (4 credits)


ANTH 223-01

Introduction to Archaeology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Andrew Overman

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 223-01*

This course introduces students to archaeology, the study of the material remains of human culture. Students will explore the history of the discipline and profession, its basic methods and theories, and the political and ethical dimensions of modern archaeological practice. Students learn to examine and interpret evidence using specific examples, from artifacts to sites to regions. Cross-listed with Classics 223. (4 credits)

ANTH 230-01

Ethnographic Interviewing

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes:

An introduction to ethnographic field interviewing learned in the context of individually run student field projects. Focuses on the anthropologist-informant field relationship and the discovery of cultural knowledge through participant observation and ethnosemantic interviewing techniques. (4 credits)


ANTH 239-01

Medical Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course examines issues of health, illness, and healing from a variety of anthropological perspectives. From a cross-cultural perspective, we will examine the diversity of beliefs about human health and sickness, and a variety of healing practices by which people treat them. From the perspective of critical epidemiology, we will wrestle with recurrent problems of socioeconomic inequalities, ecological disruptions, and their impact upon the differential distribution, prevention, and treatment of human diseases. (4 credits)

ANTH 241-01

Anthropology of Death and Dying

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course examines the dying process and the ways that humans beings come to terms with their mortality in different societies. We will learn how people die in major illnesses and critically analyze controversial issues regarding brain death, suicide, and euthanasia. We will survey funerary traditions from a variety of cultures and compare the social, spiritual, and psychological roles that these rituals play for both the living and the dying. We will examine cultural attitudes towards death; and how the denial and awareness of human mortality can shape social practices and institutions. Finally, we will consider issues regarding the quality of life, the opportunities and challenges of caregiving, and hospice traditions around the world. (4 credits)

ANTH 253-01

Comparative Muslim Cultures

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 253-01*

This course is an introduction to the diverse lifeways of Muslims around the world, looking at how understandings and practice of Islam are shaped by social, economic, and political factors. It examines the Qur’an and hadith, and other authoritative texts that ground Islamic jurisprudence, and explores the diverse ways in which Muslims have understood and interpreted these teachings in locations across the world—such as Indonesia, the Middle East, South Asia, Europe and the United States – and at various points in history. The specific focus may vary with each offering, responding to instructor expertise and focus, emerging and volatile situations worldwide, or new advances in the field.

Cross-listed with International Studies 253. (4 credits)

ANTH 255-01

Peoples and Cultures of Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 255-01*

Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 255. This course is an introduction to the cultural diversity and complexity of Latin American societies. We will examine regional differences from an anthropological perspective and discus how social institutions and cultural practices and traditions have been shaped, and how they have dealt with continuity and change. Ethnographic case studies will allow us to explore relevant topics related to ethnicity, social stratification, gift-giving/reciprocity, kinship, rural/urban relationships, cosmology and religion, and gender. These issues will be examined within the context of particular histories, considering the legacy of colonialism, the formation of the nation-state, the emergence of social movements, post-colonial nationalism, the impart of migration and urbanization, and the effects of neo-liberalism and globalization. We will conclude with a critical examination of forms of representation of Latin America, which involve notions such as -indigenismo-. (4 credits)

ANTH 256-01

India and its Neighbors: The Anthropology of South Asia

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 256-01*

The following course is open only to students who have taken Anthropology 111 unless otherwise indicated.

Intermediate Courses. Introduces students to anthropological knowledge of the peoples and cultures of South Asia and to the ways in which Western knowledge of that region has been constructed. The course examines the historical and social processes that have shaped the culture and lifeways of the people who live on the subcontinent and that link the modern states of South Asia to the world beyond their frontiers. (4 credits)


ANTH 294-01

Sustainability and the Modern World

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes:

ANTH 333-01

The Language of Diplomacy

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Rogers, Shandy

Notes: *Cross-listed with FREN 333-01; application and permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; not open to ACTC students*

This interdisciplinary course, co-taught by faculty in Anthropology and French and Francophone Studies, will introduce students to the broad range of international institutions where French is one of the primary working languages. Language, as the basis for human cooperation, provides a vehicle for students to explore the connections between language, power, and human rights. To engage students from the outset with the lived experiences of those working in the larger diplomatic world, students will do a life-history interview with a professional to learn more about their career trajectory and the work that they do. We will further bring real-life scenarios into the classroom by watching and analyzing simulcast sessions in French from the International Criminal Court and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Throughout the course we will deepen our understanding of the historical and cultural dynamics within Europe over the past 150 years that gave rise to, maintain, and subvert the role of language in diplomacy. See the website of the Anthropology or French department for information on the both course application process, as well as the optional international Fieldtrip component for this course in Summer 2017. Cross-listed with French 333. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)

ANTH 358-01

Anthropology of Violence

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: Faced with the escalation of political and ethnic violence in the modern world, anthropologists have become increasingly aware of the need to address these realities which have forced a rethinking of the meaning of violence as a social and cultural phenomenon. This course interrogates the slippery concept of violence in the light of theoretical approaches from different disciplines. The course will begin with a discussion of how anthropologists have reexamined the concept of violence within the context of complex and large-scale societies. It will then address the preponderate weight that the concept of the state has played within the social sciences in interpretation of violence, followed by a consideration of how notions of community and cultural difference figure prominently in the ideology of conflict.

(4 credits)

ANTH 387-01

Darwin and Evolutionary Thought

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: This course examines the influence of Charles Darwin on both the discipline of Anthropology and general scientific thought in the 20th century. It begins with an exploration of the emergence of modern evolutionary theory, its role in society, and how it is essential to the field of Anthropology. We consider some of the work of Darwin's predecessors, who laid the intellectual and scientific foundations that Darwin built upon, as well as those who adapted Darwin's concepts to theories of social change. Students also read and discuss some of the bigest debates surrounding the theory of Evolution by Natural Selection, both past and present. Finally, we look at the future of evolutionary theory in light of recent developments in molecular biology and the fossil record. (4 credits)

ANTH 394-02

Archaeology, Museums and Nationalism

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Sudharshan Seneviratne

Notes:

ANTH 490-01

Senior Seminar

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: The senior seminar is for anthropology majors who are working on their senior capstone project and is designed to help students develop that project for presentation. The seminar will also include reading of anthropological works, guest speakers and discussion of current controversies in the discipline. (4 credits)


Fall 2016

ANTH 111-01

Cultural Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: Introductory Course

Open to first year students. The cultural perspective on human behavior including case studies, often illustrated by ethnographic films and slides, of non-Western and American cultures. May include some field interviewing. Includes the cross cultural treatment of economic, legal, political, social and religious institutions and a survey of major approaches to the explanation of cultural variety and human social organization. (4 credits)


ANTH 111-02

Cultural Anthropology: Intro To Asian Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 111-01*

Introductory Course

Open to first year students. The cultural perspective on human behavior including case studies, often illustrated by ethnographic films and slides, of non-Western and American cultures. May include some field interviewing. Includes the cross cultural treatment of economic, legal, political, social and religious institutions and a survey of major approaches to the explanation of cultural variety and human social organization. (4 credits)


ANTH 115-01

Biological Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: This class is a broad survey covering topics such as genetics, evolutionary mechanisms, adaptation, primate studies, the human fossil record, and human variation. All of these areas will be placed within the framework of the interaction of humans within their environment. The course is divided into three sections: human genetics, human ecology and primatology, human evolution and adaptation. (4 credits)

ANTH 194-02

Politics of Truth and Memory in Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: *First Year Course; first day attendance required; cross-listed with LATI 194-02* This course examines and critically analyzes various approaches to the study of how different individuals and communities in particular historical and cultural scenarios in contemporary Latin America create meanings about their past experience with political violence. The course addresses questions related to the tension between remembering and forgetting, the presence of conflicting memories and truths and how these are negotiated or not through distinct forms of representation. The cultural analysis of different means of representation: human rights and truth commissions’ reports, testimonials, film, art and memorials will be the basis for class discussions on different notions of truth and different forms of truth-telling. A close examination of these forms of representation will reveal the extent to which they can conflict with each other while at the same time feed on each other, creating “effects of truth” and leaving room for secrecy as a mode of truth-telling. Finally, the course will also compel students to think about what consequences the politics of memory have for the future. This course will combine lectures and class discussions. It will have a strong writing component with a series of short papers and one longer final research paper. There will be one final exam. Grades will be based on written assignments in addition to oral presentations and participation in class discussions.

ANTH 194-03

Global Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 101
  • Instructor: Hilary Chart

Notes: *Appropriate for first year students* Whether in university halls or technology hubs, government offices or remote villages, entrepreneurship has come to be celebrated around the world in hopes of driving innovation and solving diverse problems. What exactly do we mean by entrepreneurship, though? Moreover, what challenges do entrepreneurs face and how do they in turn challenge the world(s) we live in? Moving beyond the buzzword, this course takes an anthropological approach to these questions by investigating contemporary experiences with entrepreneurship across the globe—from Silicon Valley to South Africa. Combining ethnographic accounts with critical theories of capitalism, work, political economy, and social change, students will examine the broader social and economic worlds that shape and are in turn shaped by the rise of entrepreneurship. Counts for the African Studies concentration (Tier II).

ANTH 206-01

Endangered/Minority Languages

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Marianne Milligan

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with LING 206-01; total class limit is set for 20 instructor is looking for a mix of 9 rising Sr/Jr and 11 Soph/FY*

Language loss is accelerating at alarming rates. In fact, Linguists predict that only five percent of the six thousand languages currently spoken in the world are expected to survive into the 22nd century. In this course, we will examine the historical, political, and socio-economic factors behind the endangerment and/or marginalization of languages in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and North and South America. We will also concentrate on the globalization of English (and other major languages), which plays a primary role in language endangerment and marginalization. Additional topics include: linguistic diversity, language policy, multilingualism (in both nations and individuals), global language conflict, and language revitalization. Students will have the opportunity to learn first-hand about these issues by interviewing speakers of an endangered and/or minority language. Cross-listed with Linguistics 206. (4 credits)

ANTH 232-01

Field Methods and Research Design

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course combines civic engagement with the fundamentals of ethnographic research needed for successful completion of a one to two-month field-based project. Learning modules will include: a) the ethics of social science research and human subjects review; b) research design and proposal; c) observation methods and field notes; d) interview methods and transcription; and e) qualitative data analysis. All students will conduct a joint research project in partnership with local community members to address a relevant social problem.

(4 credits)

ANTH 239-01

Medical Anthropology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: This course examines issues of health, illness, and healing from a variety of anthropological perspectives. From a cross-cultural perspective, we will examine the diversity of beliefs about human health and sickness, and a variety of healing practices by which people treat them. From the perspective of critical epidemiology, we will wrestle with recurrent problems of socioeconomic inequalities, ecological disruptions, and their impact upon the differential distribution, prevention, and treatment of human diseases. (4 credits)

ANTH 246-01

Refugees/Humanitarian Response

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: This course provides an overview of issues related to refugees and humanitarian response in U.S. and international settings. Students explore the meaning of "humanitarian" and inherent issues of power, ethics, and human rights in responses to conflict by examining the roles of those who engage in humanitarian work. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)


ANTH 258-01

Dynamic Africa

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Hilary Chart

Notes: Africa has long been a continent on the move. This course introduces students to concepts associated with systems, process, and change in Africa by juxtaposing classic and contemporary ethnography that aims to get at how lives, subjectivities, and intimacies on the continent mediate and are shaped by global historical processes and how anthropologists have inhabited and tried to grasp such contexts. Toward this end, we draw on diverse representations of Africa that include fiction, film, and more traditional forms of scholarship. (4 credits)


ANTH 259-01

Indigenous Peoples of the Arctic

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 259-01*

The Arctic represents one of the most extreme environments to which humans have adapted. These adaptations include both biological and cultural changes required to settle and flourish in this formidable setting. This course looks at some of the cultural practices that appear to be ubiquitous throughout the Arctic, as well as those specializations that have developed as a result of some of the more localized environmental pressures. It also explores the consequences of rapid global climate change as well as modernization on these unique cultures to get a sense of what the future might hold for the indigenous peoples of the Arctic. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 259. (4 credits)

ANTH 294-01

City, State and Early Historic Buddhist Ideology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Sudharshan Seneviratne

Notes: This course charters the history of Buddhism and its social base and material culture represented by urbanization and state formation from c. 6th Century BC to c. 4th Century AC in India. Buddhism is viewed as a social response to evolving institutional structures, both as a philosophy and religion across time and space. Central to the discussion is the role of Buddhist ideology and its institutional (monastic) structure as a mechanism of social legitimacy, acculturation, upward social mobility, imaging the female, economic enterprise, state-monastery power dynamics, and expressive traditions of literature, art, and architecture and material culture. Sources will be drawn from excavated material evidence, inscriptions and Buddhist texts (in translation). Approved by the Classics Department to count toward majors and minors in Classical Archaeology; will count towards the major in Anthropology and in Asian Studies.

ANTH 294-02

Oral Histories in Performance

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: THEATR 204
  • Instructor: Beth Cleary

Notes: *Cross-listed with THDA 294-01; counts as fine arts general distribution* Interview. Testimony. Auto-ethnography. These bases for performance challenge conventional play-wrighting and, as Della Pollock declares, "expand upon traditional ways of transmitting historical knowledge." Oral history/-based performance often breaks new performance ground, especially for issues and underrepresented bodies/voices lacking access to traditional performance economics and audiences. We will study the ethics advocated, and practices developed, by major figures in the field of oral history and oral history-based performance, including Studs Terkel, Augusto Boal, Anna Deavere Smith, Roger Guenveur Smith, and the choreographer Ralph Lemon. Students will develop projects in designing and creating new oral history performance and, if they are so inclined, moving their texts into performance. (This course is superb preparation for a major oral history-based performance in THDA in Spring 2017, on themes of nursing, emotional labor, and public health; students interested in ethnographic methods are encouraged to enroll in this course even if they cannot participate in the Spring production.)

ANTH 294-03

Global Media Industries

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 202-01 and MCST 202-01; counts for humanities general distribution* Global media collectively have tremendous influence in how many see and comprehend the world and therefore on the information and beliefs upon which they feel or act. While media are central to the continued production of a sense of "the world" at large or the "global" scale, media industries are situated geographically, culturally and institutionally. Even if they promise worldwide coverage or are multinational companies, there is much to be gained from studying how media are produced and distributed differently according to specific social, political, economic and historical conditions. This course considers media industries around the world with a focus on the relationships between the labor and infrastructures behind representations in a broad range of media (television, radio, cinema, news, telecommunications, internet).

ANTH 394-02

Food and Culture

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to human food ways focusing on how food creates community and shapes identity, class and gender. We will also discuss the transition from foraging to agriculture, the role of particular foods in the making of the modern world, and the nature of the modern industrial food system. The course includes field trips and an ethnographic research project leading to a 15-page final paper. Students must successfully cook one culturally unfamiliar and fairly complex dish of their choosing to pass the course (that is, it’s got to be edible). The course will count towards the requirement in argumentative writing. Prerequisites: either Anth 111 or Anth 101 or permission of the instructor.

ANTH 394-03

untitled (Museums)

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 202
  • Instructor: Legge, Rousseau

Notes: *Cross-listed with ART 394-01 and CLAS 394-01; no prerequisites; first day attendance required; counts as humanities general distribution* Museum studies stands at the confluence of a range of critical topics that span artistic, cultural, ethical, and legal questions. We will explore these issues and more in addition to learning about the practicalities of a range of museum departments and jobs (including collections management and care, curation, development, and education). The museum field is broad and inherently interdisciplinary, reflecting the liberal arts at work. Thus, this course will include a major Digital Liberal Arts project: reconstructing Macalester’s now-defunct museum. We will work in Macalester’s archives to determine what it consisted of and what happened to the items from the museum when they were removed. We will visit the local museums to which some of the original museum material was transferred. We will then transition into reimagining a “Macalester Museum” with Omeka’s digital content management system. This hands-on exploration of Digital Liberal Arts and Digital Storytelling will draw upon a wide range of texts and experts to consider how our concepts have changed regarding what makes a museum.

ANTH 394-04

Poetics, Performance, and Political Speech

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 394-01* In the context of the 2016 United States presidential debates, this course will provide students with a series of theoretical frameworks for analyzing political speech. The semester will begin with an intensive introduction to theories and methods in linguistic anthropology, sociolinguistics, and philosophy of language. Students will explore how these theories have been used to make sense of political speech around the world – from Soviet political slogans to Tamil democratic oratory in South India. Students will also have the opportunity to observe language in actual social settings, and analyze presidential debates and televised political satire. Themes will include performance, gender, gesture, poetics, and metaphor.

ANTH 405-01

Ethnomusicology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MUSIC 228
  • Instructor: Kathryn Alexander

Notes: *Cross-listed with MUSI 405-01*

This course introduces students to the field of ethnomusicology through its philosophical foundation, theoretical models, and disciplinary practices. Topics include comparative approach, structuralist/functionalist models, cultural relativism, organology, bi-musicality, reflexivity, post/modernism, among other recent research directions. Assignments are designed to develop skills in musical fieldwork, transcription and analysis, as well as preparing and presenting scholarly findings in ethnographic disciplines. This course is aimed primarily for students of music and/or anthropology. There is no prerequisite, hower basic knowledge or experience in world music and performance is desirable. Cross-listed as Music 405. (4 credits)

ANTH 487-01

Theory in Anthropology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: This course introduces students to the broad range of explanations for social and cultural phenomena used by anthropologists since the emergence of the discipline in the 19th century. The course focuses on the development of three broad theoretical approaches: The American school of cultural anthropology, British social anthropology, and the French school that emerged from the work of Durkheim and his followers. The course also examines theoretical approaches such as cultural materialism, and symbolic and interpretive approaches to the study of culture. (4 credits)