Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

ART 130-01

Drawing I

  • Days: MW
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-11:40 am
  • Room: ART 302
  • Instructor: Megan Vossler

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This studio course is an introduction to a variety of drawing media and techniques. Students explore a variety of themes and subjects, including still life, architecture, figure drawing, portraiture, and imagination. Formal elements explored include: line, value, volume, space, proportion, perspective, markmaking, and surface. Theoretical components include group critiques and slide lectures. In critiques and discussions, we consider composition, representational accuracy, emotional expression, content, and intention. Two three-hour periods per week. (4 credits)


ART 131-01

Ceramics I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:40 am
  • Room: ART 113
  • Instructor: Summer Hills-Bonczyk

Notes: *First day attendance required; $100 material fee required* This introductory course will provide a supportive studio environment for the exploration of diverse approaches to the ceramic field, ranging from investigation of utilitarian object making to sculptural practice. Techniques and applications for both handbuilding and wheel throwing will be presented. Emphasis is placed on development and understanding of strong three-dimensional forms as well as the relationship with surface decoration. Content-based assignments allow for individual expression through creative problem solving. The course goal is to present students with a historical perspective and the understanding of contemporary ceramics, building an appreciation for the spirit of the hand-made object as well as preparing students for upper level self-directed work. Lectures, demonstrations, critiques and gallery/museum visits will supplement studio work. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review, along with class participation.

ART 149-01

Introduction to Visual Culture

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: This course considers the production and reception of multiple visual culture forms, from standards of fine art practice such as painting and sculpture to mass media including TV, film, advertising, and the Internet. Students will learn different theoretical paradigms and techniques for visual analysis in order to understand how visual media inscribes power, difference, and desire as it mediates numerous social, economic, cultural and political relationships. We will investigate diverse types of visual culture through lectures, exhibitions, guest lectures, film, historical art and media, and, of course, those proliferating images that define our daily experiences. (4 credits)

ART 161-01

Art of the West II

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Joanna Inglot

Notes: This course surveys the artists and art movements that are generally perceived to be crucial in the development of Western art from the 14th through the 20th century. Stylistic periods covered include Renaissance, Mannerism, Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism and a wide spectrum of modernist art movements such as Fauvism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism and an introduction to Post-Modernism. The course focuses on the analysis of art within political, socio-historical and philosophical context in which it was produced. (4 credits)

ART 171-01

Art of the East II: Japan

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 171-01*

This course examines the art, architecture, and visual culture of Japan, spanning a broad temporal frame from the ancient Neolithic era to our own contemporary moment. We will discuss a diverse array of art and objects from ancient Jomon pottery, Shinto shrines, and print media to Buddhist sculpture, painting practices during World War II, anime (cartoons) and manga (comics). In addition to learning methods of formal visual analysis, students will gain insight into how these artworks, spaces, and objects articulated complex artistic, social, economic, political, and religious trends. Through this course, students will develop skills to reflect critically on the production of narratives of Japanese culture, interrogating concepts such as tradition, hybridity, authenticity, commodity, sexuality, nationalism, and militarism. Cross-listed as Asian Studies 171. (4 credits)

ART 230-01

Color

  • Days: MW
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-11:40 am
  • Room: ART 202
  • Instructor: Christine Willcox

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course introduces, through studio projects, the basic principles regarding the use of color in the visual arts. Students explore a range of topics, including the historical uses of color, the interactions between colors, and the psychology of color. The class will be comprised of a series of small color studies with more involved studies to follow. Some projects will be completed using paint while others will use media chosen by the student. The class will include painting/color demonstrations, color assignments, image presentations, readings, museum visits, individual and group critiques.

ART 233-01

Photography I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: ART 301
  • Instructor: Eric Carroll

Notes: *First day attendance required; $75 material fee required*

This course introduces conceptual, technical, and historical aspects of digital photography within a fine-arts context. The emphasis throughout is on photography as creative medium and narrative medium and will introduce strategies and methods related to this goal through assignments and class activities. Students will learn the foundational aspects of digital photography from manual camera operation to the editing of images through Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop. Along the way, students will be introduced to digital workflow, color management, and how to take their images from screen to print. Historical presentations and assigned readings will help students develop the critical skills needed to understand how photographs function in society and culture. Every semester. * A digital SLR camera is required for this course. * (4 credits)

ART 234-01

Painting I

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ART 308
  • Instructor: Christine Willcox

Notes: *First day attendance required*

An introduction to the studio practice of painting, using oil paint on a variety of supports ranging from paper, board and canvas to non-traditional painting surfaces. Exploration of the practical techniques and mechanics of painting as well as a consideration of content and meaning. Readings and class discussions of historical and contemporary painting practices and issues will develop a visual vocabulary as well as critical/theoretical knowledge to complement technical skills. Slide lectures, critiques and a gallery/museum visit will supplement studio work. Three two-hour periods per week. (4 credits)

ART 235-01

Sculpture I: Basic Sculpture with a Dose of Hot Metal

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: ART 118
  • Instructor: Stanton Sears

Notes: *First day attendance required; $150 material fee required*

We begin with an exploration of the nature of vision, creating life-size clay portrait heads of a partner. We move on to the exploration of the tools and processes available in the new sculpture studio, including woodworking tools for both carving and fabrication. Sculpture I introduces students to case metal work in our new foundry, where we will learn a lost wax ceramic shell casting system. The range of form which can be explored is infinite and starts with a wax form which is eventually replaced with 2100-degree bronze. Like my other course offerings, Sculpture I will include off-site projects that includes a class trip to my farm/studio in Western Wisconsin. (4 credits)

ART 236-01

Printmaking I

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ART 214
  • Instructor: Ruthann Godollei

Notes: *First day attendance required*

A hands-on introduction to original printmaking in the media of relief, etching, lithography and handset type. Included are discussions of aesthetics, the impact of printed imagery on our society, printmaking practices from around the world and field trips to local exhibits and museum collections. Emphasis is on individual expression and appropriate techniques for the content.Drawing (Art 130) is recommended as an introduction to the studio courses in the department.Two three-hour periods per week. (4 credits)

ART 333-01

Photography II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ART 301
  • Instructor: Eric Carroll

Notes: Building on the tools and techniques learned in the Photography I course, Photography II highlights the material aspect of photography in contemporary art and is designed for self-driven students wanting to pursue a photography-based art project. Alternative processes, advanced lighting, and digital distribution will be explored at length. Students will work toward the product of printed and digital portfolios and create work for a group exhibition. Class time will consist of critiques, readings, lectures, material demonstrations, field trips, and lab time. 4 credits.

ART 370-01

Drawing II: Narrative and Sequential Images

  • Days: MW
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-04:20 pm
  • Room: ART 206
  • Instructor: Megan Vossler

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Building on Art 130, this studio course seeks to enlarge the student's visual vocabulary and inventive capacities. Projects are more complex and require a sustained effort. Students have an opportunity to explore content and styles according to their individual needs. Group discussions and critiques, slide lectures, and field trips are included. Two three-hour periods per week. May be taken up to three times for credit. (4 credits)

ART 371-01

Painting II

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-11:10 am
  • Room: ART 202
  • Instructor: Christine Willcox

Notes: *First day attendance required*

A continuation of Art 234, expanding both technical and critical/theoretical knowledge through projects which demand the development of each student's individual interests. Required projects will encourage increasing self-direction and development of the students' own artistic vision. Readings will supplement students' art historical critical, theoretical understanding of contemporary or postmodern art practices. Weekly group discussions and critiques. Three two-hour periods per week. (4 credits)

ART 372-01

Sculpture II: Metal Fabrication and Welding

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room: ART 118
  • Instructor: Stanton Sears

Notes: *$150 materials fee required*

In this course, students build upon and expand the basic technical skills acquired in Sculpture I, and work to develop more sophisticated, individually-designed projects in a variety of media. Basic welding is taught, allowing students to develop strength and scale in their projects. the new foundry provides the means for an individual or a small group to cast bronze components which can become part of larger sculptural pieces. The foundry process includes working with dangerous materials, requires wearing of funny outfits, and offers the potential for dramatic moments. Students in Sculpture II will create a piece for transport and installation at the farm/studio. A typical project which could be shown at the farm might be a wind-powered kinetic sculpture. (4 credits)

ART 373-01

Printmaking II

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room: ART 214
  • Instructor: Ruthann Godollei

Notes: *First day attendance required; permission of the instructor required*

This course is a continuation of Art 236, focusing on individually generated projects. There is an introduction of new techniques appropriate for content such as monoprint, collograph, screenprint, photo-printmaking and computer-based processes. Field trips, and arranged meetings. (4 credits)

ART 374-01

Ceramic Art II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-03:10 pm
  • Room: ART 113
  • Instructor: Summer Hills-Bonczyk

Notes: *Permission of Instructor required; first day attendance required; $100 materials fee required* This course is for students with a passion for clay! Designed to engage and build on students’ previous ceramic experiences, advancing their knowledge, techniques and concepts of contemporary ceramic art. Course content will be both assignment based and self-directed whether created on the wheel or through handbuilding. Through thoughtful discussion, critical examination and evaluation of concepts and ideas the class encourages students to develop a better understanding of their relationship to the rich tradition of ceramics and ceramic sculpture. Students will develop an understanding of glaze and clay materials while also taking on responsibilities for electric, and gas firings. Lectures, demonstrations, critiques and gallery/museum visits will supplement studio work. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review, along with class participation. Can be taken for credit multiple times.

ART 394-02

Globalization and Contemporary Art

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Joanna Inglot

Notes: Globalization processes are forcing artists, curators and museum directors to rethink the way we study and understand contemporary art. The increasingly international art market and auction houses, art fairs, festivals, and biennales in places such as Dubai, Istanbul, or Cairo, have done much to spark the excitement about the contemporary art around the globe and move us beyond the traditional centers of gravity in Europe and the United States.This course will introduce students to global artistic production from the 1990s to the present. Using a series of geographical case studies, we will examine how social and political contexts have shaped artistic developments in various regions in the world, beyond the Western canon. Students will study the shift of the dominant western avant-garde in Europe and the United States to more global art world and learn about contemporary art practices in Asia, Africa, India, Latin America, Russia, Eastern Europe, Russia, and the Middle East. While analyzing a diverse range of artistic practices, we will also look critically at discourses of multiculturalism, postcolonialism, and globalization. Classes will be primarily structured around lectures and group discussions of class readings.

ART 394-04

Art Around the Edges

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ART 118
  • Instructor: Stanton Sears

Notes: Why do people love to travel to Barcelona? The food! Yes, of course, but also for the art that is embedded in the infrastructure of the city; tiled surfaces, doors and doorframes, light fixtures, railings gates and fences, columns and stained glass. Inspired by the landscape of Barcelona and other great places, the goal of the class is to note the rich tapestry of form and material that can be part of the built environment, and to experiment in our well-equipped shops with contemporary expressions of this type of architecturally-integrated artwork. Our first project will be to learn how to weld and to use this skill to build a dimensional stained glass window, followed by other sculptural explorations.We will visit some of the many fine examples of this sort of art right here in the twin cities, and wrap up with paella at my farm at the end of the semester.


ART 487-01

Art History Methodology Seminar

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Joanna Inglot

Notes: In this course, graduating seniors analyze methods and theories of art history, with a particular focus on the transformation of the discipline that began in the 1970s, when the conventional methods of art historical analysis (style, form, iconography, artistic intention) were challenged and replace by the so called "revisionist" perspectives of visual studies. The course surveys a wide range of approaches used traditionally by art historians within the discipline, beginning with writers such as Vasari, Riegl, Panofsky, Gombrich, and ending with the more recent art historical studies informed by Marxism, feminism, and numerous manifestations of postmodern and postcolonial thought. Students are required to write a capstone art history project during the seminar. (4 credits)

ART 488-01

Senior Studio Seminar

  • Days: MW
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: ART 105
  • Instructor: Ruthann Godollei

Notes: This course provides a setting in which art studio majors complete their capstone projects, including mounting a professional exhibition of recent work. It provides a look ahead to post-Macalester opportunities and the challenges of graduate school, jobs, and career opportunities in art. Arts professionals make presentations to the class and readings provide theoretical grounding for putting contemporary art in context. Students prepare artist statements, professional resumes and learn grant and application writing techniques. Two three-hour sessions per week. (4 credits)

Fall 2016

ART 130-01

Drawing I

  • Days: MW
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-11:40 am
  • Room: ART 302
  • Instructor: Megan Vossler

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This studio course is an introduction to a variety of drawing media and techniques. Students explore a variety of themes and subjects, including still life, architecture, figure drawing, portraiture, and imagination. Formal elements explored include: line, value, volume, space, proportion, perspective, markmaking, and surface. Theoretical components include group critiques and slide lectures. In critiques and discussions, we consider composition, representational accuracy, emotional expression, content, and intention. Two three-hour periods per week. (4 credits)


ART 130-02

Drawing I

  • Days: MW
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-04:20 pm
  • Room: ART 302
  • Instructor: Megan Vossler

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This studio course is an introduction to a variety of drawing media and techniques. Students explore a variety of themes and subjects, including still life, architecture, figure drawing, portraiture, and imagination. Formal elements explored include: line, value, volume, space, proportion, perspective, markmaking, and surface. Theoretical components include group critiques and slide lectures. In critiques and discussions, we consider composition, representational accuracy, emotional expression, content, and intention. Two three-hour periods per week. (4 credits)


ART 131-01

Ceramics I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:40 am
  • Room: ART 113
  • Instructor: Summer Hills-Bonczyk

Notes: *First day attendance required; $100 material fee required*

This introductory course will provide a supportive studio environment for the exploration of diverse approaches to the ceramic field, ranging from investigation of utilitarian object making to sculptural practice. Techniques and applications for both handbuilding and wheel throwing will be presented. Emphasis is placed on development and understanding of strong three-dimensional forms as well as the relationship with surface decoration. Content-based assignments allow for individual expression through creative problem solving. The course goal is to present students with a historical perspective and the understanding of contemporary ceramics, building an appreciation for the spirit of the hand-made object as well as preparing students for upper level self-directed work. Lectures, demonstrations, critiques and gallery/museum visits will supplement studio work. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review, along with class participation. Three two-hour periods per week. $100 materials fee is required.

ART 149-01

Introduction to Visual Culture

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *First Year Course only; first day attendance required* This course considers the production and reception of multiple visual culture forms, from standards of fine art practice such as painting and sculpture to mass media including TV, film, advertising, and the Internet. Students will learn different theoretical paradigms and techniques for visual analysis in order to understand how visual media inscribes power, difference, and desire as it mediates numerous social, economic, cultural and political relationships. We will investigate diverse types of visual culture through lectures, exhibitions, guest speakers, film, historical art and media and, of course, those proliferating images that define our daily experiences. Course meets the Fine Arts general distribution requirement.

ART 160-01

Art of the West I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Vanessa Rousseau

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 260-01*

This course surveys the visual and material culture of Europe and the Middle East from the Paleolithic through the late Medieval period. We consider the material remains of Prehistoric Europe, the Ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, Etruria, and Rome; early Christianity, Judaism and Islam; and Early Medieval, Romanesque and Gothic Europe from a contextual perspective, in order to recover the meanings of works of art within the cultures that produced them. A special focus is placed on the appropriation of these objects and images in later Western culture. Cross-listed with Classics 260. 4 credits

ART 170-01

Art of the East I: China

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 170-01*

This course introduces the art and visual culture of China from the Neolithic era to the twenty-first century. Through this survey, students will engage with a broad array of media, from jade carvings, Buddhist cave painting, calligraphy and monumental landscape paintings to ceramics, modern graphic media, and contemporary installations. Lectures and readings will teach methods of formal visual analysis as well as the historical context of each work. While examining the specific cultural, social, economic, and political functions of Chinese art and objects, we will think critically about different ways in which scholars write the artistic history of China. Fall semester. (4 credits) Course cross-listed as Asian Studies 170.

ART 233-01

Photography I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: ART 301
  • Instructor: Eric Carroll

Notes: *First day attendance required; $75 materials fee required*

This course introduces conceptual, technical, and historical aspects of digital photography within a fine-arts context. The emphasis throughout is on photography as creative medium and narrative medium and will introduce strategies and methods related to this goal through assignments and class activities. Students will learn the foundational aspects of digital photography from manual camera operation to the editing of images through Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop. Along the way, students will be introduced to digital workflow, color management, and how to take their images from screen to print. Historical presentations and assigned readings will help students develop the critical skills needed to understand how photographs function in society and culture. Every semester. * A digital SLR camera is required for this course. * (4 credits)

ART 234-01

Painting I

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ART 308
  • Instructor: Christine Willcox

Notes: *First day attendance required*

An introduction to the studio practice of painting, using oil paint on a variety of supports ranging from paper, board and canvas to non-traditional painting surfaces. Exploration of the practical techniques and mechanics of painting as well as a consideration of content and meaning. Readings and class discussions of historical and contemporary painting practices and issues will develop a visual vocabulary as well as critical/theoretical knowledge to complement technical skills. Slide lectures, critiques and a gallery/museum visit will supplement studio work. Three two-hour periods per week. (4 credits)

ART 235-01

Sculpture I: Basic Sculpture with a Dose of Hot Metal

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ART 118
  • Instructor: Stanton Sears

Notes: *Appropriate for freshman and incoming first year students; $150 material fee required*

We begin with an exploration of the nature of vision, creating life-size clay portrait heads of a partner. We move on to the exploration of the tools and processes available in the new sculpture studio, including woodworking tools for both carving and fabrication. Sculpture I introduces students to case metal work in our new foundry, where we will learn a lost wax ceramic shell casting system. The range of form which can be explored is infinite and starts with a wax form which is eventually replaced with 2100-degree bronze. Like my other course offerings, Sculpture I will include off-site projects that includes a class trip to my farm/studio in Western Wisconsin. (4 credits)

ART 236-01

Printmaking I

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ART 214
  • Instructor: Ruthann Godollei

Notes: *First day attendance required*

A hands-on introduction to original printmaking in the media of relief, etching, lithography and handset type. Included are discussions of aesthetics, the impact of printed imagery on our society, printmaking practices from around the world and field trips to local exhibits and museum collections. Emphasis is on individual expression and appropriate techniques for the content.Drawing (Art 130) is recommended as an introduction to the studio courses in the department.Two three-hour periods per week. (4 credits)

ART 239-01

2-D Design

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ART 301
  • Instructor: Eric Carroll

Notes: A series of two-dimensional projects through which the components of design are examined and applied. Discussion includes philosophical, cultural and design topics and theories. Both manual and computer generated projects are expected. Three two-hour periods per week.

ART 271-01

Japan and the (Inter)National Modern

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 271-01*

This course introduces students to the art and visual culture of Japan from the late 19th century through the post-millennium. In this class, we will ask: What are the Japanese modern and postmodern? How might Japanese art, design, media and spaces be understood not only through the lens of Japanese history over the last 150 years but as part of transnational movements? To answer these questions, this course explores prewar and postwar trends in Japanese visual culture, including painting, prints, sculpture, architecture, fashion, anime (Japanese cartoons), film, photography, advertising design, sculpture, and manga (Japanese comics). Through these various artistic forms and media, we will explore themes such as trauma, nationalism, fascism, protest, hybridity, fantasy, embodiment, and performativity. Students will be asked to critically consider how these works operated as a part of international flows in art, design, and consumerism and contributed to the formation of new modern and postmodern subjects. Cross-listed with Asian Studies 271. (4 credits)

ART 294-01

Surrealisms: Art, Photography, and Film

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Joanna Inglot

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with MCST 294-01* Surrealism was one of the most multi-faceted and influential literary and artistic movements of the modern era. This course will offer a broad examination of the ideology and artistic production of Surrealism from inter-disciplinary perspective, examining art, film, poetry, manifestos, and theoretical perspectives that framed surrealist goals and practices. Although most histories of Surrealism focus on developments in France in the 1920s, this course introduces a more inclusive narrative of international developments including those in Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the United States from the 1950s to the present. Projects for this course will include short writing assignments such as Dadaists poems, exquisite corpse writings, the dérive (or “drifting), a dream journal, and a collaborative final group project.

ART 294-02

History of Body and Performance Art

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Joanna Inglot

Notes: *First day attendance required* This course will examine the history of body and performance art from early 20th century avant-gardepractices through contemporary period in which performance has become a vehicle to explore identities of gender, sexuality, race and issues of power. The course will address the work of the major artists and theorists of performance, including Antonin Artaud, Guy Debord, Peggy Phelan, Amelia Jones, Claire Bishop, José Esteban Muñoz, Nicolas Bourriaud as well as artists such as Allan Kaprow, Marina Abramovic, Joseph Beuys, Coco Fusco, Guillermo Gómez-Peña,Laurie Anderson, Forced Entertainment, Wooster Group, Yvonne Rainer, Francis Alÿs, Pussy Riot, and Nick Cave. The class will explore subjects such as duration & endurance; dematerialization and the archive; delegated performance; performance of gender & sexuality; and participation. The course will draw on the performance art programs at the Walker Art Center.

ART 330-01

Figure Drawing

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: ART 206
  • Instructor: Megan Vossler

Notes: *First day attendance required*

In this course we will explore both the structural and expressive aspects of figure drawing. Students will be introduced to the elements of surface anatomy and structure of the human body through working with nude and clothed models, the skeleton, anatomical texts, and other source material. Confidence, the ability to improvise, and an expressive connection with the figure will be encouraged through exercises that encourage experimentation with gesture and materials. In an in-depth, independent final project, students will develop their own personal content related to the figure/body, using the materials and methods of their choice. Discussion of the various issues brought up by representation of the body will be part of our study of both contemporary and historical works of art. Every other fall. (4 credits)

ART 367-01

3-D Design

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: ART 118
  • Instructor: Stanton Sears

Notes: *Appropriate for freshman and incoming first year students*

We are surrounded by three dimensional design; from the architecture of our built environment to the tools and objects that surround us, to the human-altered landforms and plantings of our larger environment. All of these elements can be considered and affected by design choices which we make. In the class we build structures which can be considered from structural, aesthetic, and functional points of view. Some of these projects are built to very specific parameters so that trade-offs can be observed and measured. We smash a lot of things, but learn a lot about problem-solving along the way. The course includes a field trip to my farm/studio in Western Wisconsin where we install a large site-specific project. Past projects have included a collaboratively-built ninety-three foot long illuminated lantern across the pastures, as well as a series of kinetic structures. The food is great too! (4 credits)

ART 371-01

Painting II

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: ART 202
  • Instructor: Christine Willcox

Notes: *First day attendance required*

A continuation of Art 234, expanding both technical and critical/theoretical knowledge through projects which demand the development of each student's individual interests. Required projects will encourage increasing self-direction and development of the students' own artistic vision. Readings will supplement students' art historical critical, theoretical understanding of contemporary or postmodern art practices. Weekly group discussions and critiques. Three two-hour periods per week. (4 credits)

ART 373-01

Printmaking II

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room: ART 214
  • Instructor: Ruthann Godollei

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course is a continuation of Art 236, focusing on individually generated projects. There is an introduction of new techniques appropriate for content such as monoprint, collograph, screenprint, photo-printmaking and computer-based processes. Field trips, and arranged meetings. (4 credits)

ART 374-01

Ceramic Art II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-03:10 pm
  • Room: ART 113
  • Instructor: Summer Hills-Bonczyk

Notes: *First day attendance required; $100 material fee required*

This course is for students with a passion for clay! Designed to engage and build on student’s previous ceramic experiences, advancing their knowledge, techniques and concepts of contemporary ceramic art. Course content will be both assignment based and self-directed whether created on the wheel or through handbuilding. Through thoughtful discussion, critical examination and evaluation of concepts and ideas the class encourages students to develop a better understanding of their relationship to the rich tradition of ceramics and ceramic sculpture. Students will develop an understanding of glaze and clay materials while also taking on responsibilities for electric, gas and raku kiln firings. Lectures, demonstrations, critiques and gallery/museum visits will supplement studio work. Learning will be assessed primarily through portfolio production and review, along with class participation. May be taken without an introductory class with instructor’s review and approval. Can be taken for credit up to three times. Three two-hour periods per week. $100 materials fee is required.

ART 394-01

untitled (Museums)

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 202
  • Instructor: Legge, Rousseau

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 394-03 and CLAS 394-01; first day attendance required; no prerequisites; counts as humanities general distribution* Museum studies stands at the confluence of a range of critical topics that span artistic, cultural, ethical, and legal questions. We will explore these issues and more in addition to learning about the practicalities of a range of museum departments and jobs (including collections management and care, curation, development, and education). The museum field is broad and inherently interdisciplinary, reflecting the liberal arts at work. Thus, this course will include a major Digital Liberal Arts project: reconstructing Macalester’s now-defunct museum. We will work in Macalester’s archives to determine what it consisted of and what happened to the items from the museum when they were removed. We will visit the local museums to which some of the original museum material was transferred. We will then transition into reimagining a “Macalester Museum” with Omeka’s digital content management system. This hands-on exploration of Digital Liberal Arts and Digital Storytelling will draw upon a wide range of texts and experts to consider how our concepts have changed regarding what makes a museum.