Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

ASIA 171-01

Art of the East II: Japan

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *Cross-listed with ART 171-01*

This course examines the art, architecture, and visual culture of Japan, spanning a broad temporal frame from the ancient Neolithic era to our own contemporary moment. We will discuss a diverse array of art and objects from ancient Jomon pottery, Shinto shrines, and print media to Buddhist sculpture, painting practices during World War II, anime (cartoons) and manga (comics). In addition to learning methods of formal visual analysis, students will gain insight into how these artworks, spaces, and objects articulated complex artistic, social, economic, political, and religious trends. Through this course, students will develop skills to reflect critically on the production of narratives of Japanese culture, interrogating concepts such as tradition, hybridity, authenticity, commodity, sexuality, nationalism, and militarism. Cross-listed as Art 171. (4 credits)

ASIA 256-01

India and its Neighbors: The Anthropology of South Asia

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 256-01*

Introduces students to anthropological knowledge of the peoples and cultures of South Asia and to the ways in which Western knowledge of that region has been constructed. The course examines the historical and social processes that have shaped the culture and lifeways of the people who live on the subcontinent and that link the modern states of South Asia to the world beyond their frontiers. (4 credits)


ASIA 275-01

The Rise of Modern China

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 275-01*

A study of leading institutions and movements of nineteenth- and twentieth-century China. Major emphases include the impact of Western imperialism, the transformation of peasant society through revolution, the rise of Mao Tse-Tung, and the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. Special attention will be given to U.S.-China relations. (4 credits)


ASIA 294-01

Embodiment and Subjectivity in Later Chinese Art

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *Cross-listed with ART 294-02*


ASIA 378-01

War Crimes and Memory in East Asia

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 378-01*

This course's main goal is to introduce evidence of the major crimes and atrocities during World War II in East Asia such as the Nanjing Massacre, biochemical warfare (Unit 731), the military sexual slavery ("comfort women") system, the forced labor system, and inhumane treatment of POWs. The course will also help students understand the contemporary geo-political and socio-economic forces that affect how East Asians and Westerners collectively remember and reconstruct World War II. (4 credits) Cross-listed with History 378

ASIA 394-01

Asian Cities

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 394-01; first day attendance required*


Fall 2016

ASIA 111-01

Cultural Anthropology: Introduction to Asian Studies

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 111-02*

This course explores the history of the idea of Asia and how that concept and region have been explicated both in the West and in China, Japan, and India. We examine Buddhism, Confucianism, and Hinduism, religious and philosophical traditions that have been seen as unifying Asia, and consider how those traditions have been used to address contemporary problems like human rights, economic development, and security. The course traces historical relationships among Asian nations and regions involving cultural borrowing, trade, conquest, and colonialism have shaped contemporary Asia, and considers how under globalization, boundaries separating people, cultural artifacts, and capital have become porous, giving new meaning to the notion "Asia." (4 credits)

ASIA 140-01

Introduction to East Asian Civilization

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 140-01*

This course introduces the cultures and societies of China, Japan and Korea from the earliest times to the present day. Primarily an introductory course for beginners in East Asian civilization, this course considers a variety of significant themes in religious, political, economic, social and cultural developments in the region. (4 credits)

ASIA 170-01

Art of the East I: China

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *Cross-listed with ART 170-01*

This course introduces the art and visual culture of China from the Neolithic era to the twenty-first century. Through this survey, students will engage with a broad array of media, from jade carvings, Buddhist cave painting, calligraphy and monumental landscape paintings to ceramics, modern graphic media, and contemporary installations. Lectures and readings will teach methods of formal visual analysis as well as the historical context of each work. While examining the specific cultural, social, economic, and political functions of Chinese art and objects, we will think critically about different ways in which scholars write the artistic history of China. Fall semester. (4 credits) Course cross-listed with Art 170.

ASIA 194-01

Revolution and Romance in Chinese Fiction and Film

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: Xin Yang

Notes: *First Year Course only; cross-listed with CHIN 194-01* From a “sick man of Asia” to a “peaceful rising” nation, from red guards to the online hackers, modern and contemporary China sees tremendous social change and cultural creativity. Revolution and romance are two recurring themes people often visit and revisit, reflecting an intense contemplation on the self and the public, the individual and the collective, the personal and the political. This course seeks to critically understand China by reading modern and contemporary Chinese fiction and film, which not only tell us about China, but also universal human experiences across geographical or cultural boundaries. No prior knowledge of China or Chinese is required.The course fulfills General Education Requirement of Internationalism and Argumentative Writing (WA).

ASIA 271-01

Japan and the (Inter)National Modern

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *Cross-listed with ART 271-01*

This course introduces students to the art and visual culture of Japan from the late 19th century through the post-millennium. In this class, we will ask: What are the Japanese modern and postmodern? How might Japanese art, design, media and spaces be understood not only through the lens of Japanese history over the last 150 years but as part of transnational movements? To answer these questions, this course explores prewar and postwar trends in Japanese visual culture, including painting, prints, sculpture, architecture, fashion, anime (Japanese cartoons), film, photography, advertising design, sculpture, and manga (Japanese comics). Through these various artistic forms and media, we will explore themes such as trauma, nationalism, fascism, protest, hybridity, fantasy, embodiment, and performativity. Students will be asked to critically consider how these works operated as a part of international flows in art, design, and consumerism and contributed to the formation of new modern and postmodern subjects. Cross-listed with ART 271. (4 credits)

ASIA 274-01

The Great Tradition in China before 1840

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 274-01*

A study of the traditional culture and society of China from earliest times to the eighteenth century, when the impact of the West was strongly felt. The course will be based on detailed study of selected significant themes in Chinese history. Lecture/discussion format. (4 credits)


ASIA 277-01

The Rise of Modern Japan

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 277-01*

Japan's rapid industrialization in the latter part of the nineteenth century, and its phenomenal rise as the number two economic power in the world after the devastation wrought by World War II, have led many scholars to declare Japan a model worthy of emulation by all "developing" nations. After an examination of feudal Japan, this course probes the nature and course of Japan's "amazing transformation" and analyzes the consequences of its strengths as a nation-state. Considerable study of Japanese art, literature, and religion will be undertaken and American attitudes toward the Japanese and their history will also be examined. (4 credits)


ASIA 281-01

Dialects, Multilingualism, and the Politics of Speaking Japanese

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Satoko Suzuki

Notes: *Cross-listed with JAPA 281-01 and LING 281-01*

This course will examine linguistic diversity in Japan as well as issues of identity and politics involved in the act of speaking Japanese in Japan and other parts of the world. Students will be engaged with questions such as the following: How do dialects become revitalized? How does the media portray dialect speakers? Does the Japanese government promote multilingualism? How do multilingual/multicultural individuals manage their identities? How do heritage speakers in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru deal with the politics of speaking Japanese? What does it mean to speak Japanese as a non-native speaker? No Japanese language ability is required. Cross-listed with Japanese 281 and Linguistics 281. 4 credits.

ASIA 294-01

Cramming for the Exam: Chinese Education in Literature and History

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 217
  • Instructor: Rivi Handler-Spitz

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with EDUC 294-02 and CHIN 294-01* On tests, Chinese students consistently outperform Americans. This fact has been attributed to Chinese cultural emphasis on education and respect for teachers. But where do these values come from? What constituted an elite education in premodern China? Who had access to it, and what political goals did it serve? This course traces the historical development of the civil service examination system, the benchmark of social and political success in imperial China. We will study the Confucian classics and commentaries, which formed the backbone of the curriculum. Other topics include frustrated scholars’ fictional accounts of the unfairness of the exam system, Europeans’ praise of it as a model for the equitable recruitment of civil servants, and women’s strategies for circumventing a system that explicitly excluded them.

ASIA 294-02

Girls' Manga: Gender/Sexuality in Japan through Popular Culture

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: *Cross-listed with JAPA 294-01* What do big eyes, sparkles and flowers have to do with gender in Japan? What was so revolutionary about boy's love in 1970's manga? What's exciting and difficult about using manga to do cultural analysis? This course offers a survey of girls' comics, or shōjo manga, in Japan. We will discuss major historical trends, read works by important artists, and watch adaptations (e.g. anime and live-action TV series/films). While enjoying amazing stories and artwork, we will focus on serious analysis of gender and sexuality within works and the manga industry. No Japanese-language ability required. Screenings will be determined.

ASIA 294-03

Geography of Asia

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 294-01; first day attendance required* Whether the twenty-first century will be dominated by the “rising Asia” has spurred recurring debates in policy and academic circles. But what is Asia? How can we understand this diverse region where more than half of the world’s population resides? In this course, we will first deconstruct the idea of Asia as a cartographic entity to excavate the layered social-cultural meaning and geographical diversity of the “Asias.” We will also place the “Asias” in a global context to reveal how contemporary Asia anchors the changing world political economy and cultural imaginations outside the West. We will begin with important theoretical debates on (East) Asian development that prevailed in the 1980s and 1990s, including discussions about the colonial past, the path-dependency of development and uneven industrialization, regional disparities and mega-urbanization. We will then use these debates as the foundation to explore the contemporary globalizing Asia. What are the important connections between Asian countries, and with other parts of the world? What are the role of the “Asias” in international governance and geo-politics? Can China replace the United States as the dominant geo-economic power? These are the questions we will explore in this course.

ASIA 394-01

China's Modern Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: *Cross-listed with ECON 394-01* In the past three decades, China is one of the most dynamic and fastest growing countries in the world. Why has China been growing so fast in the last three decades? What are the keys to develop a successful business in China? How does the emergence of China affect the world economy? This course is designed to answer the above questions using a general framework developed for the Chinese economy. China remains a communist country with a significant legacy of a command economy. But it is also a market economy. Understanding this mixture - capitalism with Chinese characters - is a major aim of this course. We will begin with several classes on the historical development of the Chinese economy. This includes the nature of the command economy developed during the Maoist era and the period of economic reform under Deng Xiaoping. Then we will investigate the main players of such an economy (central/local governments and various types of firms). The next is to analyze the three growth engines: globalization, industrialization and urbanization, and to show how they are interacted. We will also study the distorted state financial system and its implication on external imbalances. The last part of the course will be on the future of the Chinese economy.