Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

ANTH 230-01

Ethnographic Interviewing

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes:

An introduction to ethnographic field interviewing learned in the context of individually run student field projects. Focuses on the anthropologist-informant field relationship and the discovery of cultural knowledge through participant observation and ethnosemantic interviewing techniques. (4 credits)


ANTH 239-01

Medical Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course examines issues of health, illness, and healing from a variety of anthropological perspectives. From a cross-cultural perspective, we will examine the diversity of beliefs about human health and sickness, and a variety of healing practices by which people treat them. From the perspective of critical epidemiology, we will wrestle with recurrent problems of socioeconomic inequalities, ecological disruptions, and their impact upon the differential distribution, prevention, and treatment of human diseases. (4 credits)

BIOL 117-01

Women, Health and Reproduction

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Elizabeth Jansen

Notes: *Cross-listed with WGSS 117-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on December 2nd with permission of the instructor*

This course will deal with those aspects of human anatomy and physiology which are of special interest to women, especially those relating to sexuality and reproduction. Biological topics covered will include menstruation and menopause, female sexuality, conception, contraception, infertility, abortion, pregnancy, cancer, and AIDS. Advances in assisted reproductive technologies, hormone therapies, and genetic engineering technologies will be discussed. Not open to biology majors. This course fulfills 4 credits in the science distribution requirement and counts toward the biology minor, but not toward the major. No prerequisite. Three lecture hours per week. (4 credits)


BIOL 355-01

Virology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Steven Sundby

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on December 2nd with permission of the instructor*

This seminar course will focus on the molecular biology of viruses, including prions and retroviral vectors. Topics will include bacterial, plant and animal viral infection and replication cycles, morphology, oncogenesis, and virus-host interactions. Viruses of epidemiologic and biotechnological importance, including new and emergent viruses, will be emphasized. Students will read current literature, lead class discussions and prepare a research proposal. (4 credits)

ECON 381-01

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: *Students that register for ECON 381-01 must register for ECON 381-L1*

This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-02

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 109
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: *Students that register for ECON 381-02 must register for ECON 381-L2*

This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L1

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L2

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

GEOG 225-01

Intro to Geog Info Systems

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Holly Barcus

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-02

Intro to Geog Info Systems

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Kelsey McDonald

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L1

Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L2

Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-12:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L3

Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 256-01

Medical Geography: The Geography of Health and Health Care

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course examines the geographical dimensions of health and disease, including global and domestic public health issues. Key approaches and themes include the human ecology approach to health; epidemiological mapping and spatial analysis; environmental health, including the environmental causes of cancer; the relationship among demographic change, economic development, and population health; the political economy of non-communicable health problems, such as lead poisoning and the "obesity epidemic"; the spatial diffusion of infectious diseases; the disease ecology approach to infectious and vector-borne diseases, e.g. malaria, West Nile virus, and Lyme disease; and the challenges of "global health" in the 21st century, with special emphasis on "emerging infectious diseases," such as HIV/AIDS, SARS, and Avian influenza. (4 credits)

MATH 125-01

Epidemiology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 101
  • Instructor: Kelsey McDonald

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 2nd with permission of the instructor*

Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease and health in human populations and the application of this understanding to the solution of public health problems. Topics include measurement of disease and health, the outbreak and spread of disease, reasoning about cause and effect, analysis of risk, detection and classification, and the evaluation of trade-offs. The course is designed to fulfill and extend the professional community's consensus definition of undergraduate epidemiology. In addition to the techniques of modern epidemiology, the course emphasizes the historical evolution of ideas of causation, treatment, and prevention of disease. The course is a required component of the concentration in Community and Global Health. (4 credits)

MATH 155-01

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Christina Knudson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 2nd with permission of the instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-02

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Vittorio Addona

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 2nd with permission of the instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-03

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Vittorio Addona

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 2nd with permission of the instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-04

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Christina Knudson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 2nd with permission of the instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-05

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Vittorio Addona

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 2nd with permission of the instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 253-01

Statistical Computing and Machine Learning

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 245
  • Instructor: Daniel Kaplan

Notes: *ACTC students may register on December 2nd with permission of the instructor*

An introduction to multivariate statistical analysis. Emphasizes rationales, applications, and interpretations using advanced statistical software. Examples drawn primarily from economics, education, psychology, sociology, political science, biology and medicine. Topics may include: simple/multiple regression, one-way/two-way ANOVA, logistic regression, discriminant analysis, multivariable correlation. Additional topics may include analysis of covariance, factor analysis, cluster analysis. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-01

Research in Psychology I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Brooke Lea

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-L1

Research in Psychology I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 349
  • Instructor: Brooke Lea

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-L2

Research in Psychology I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 349
  • Instructor: Brooke Lea

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 252-01

Distress, Dysfunction, and Disorder: Perspectives on the DSM

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Jaine Strauss

Notes: *ACTC students may register with permission of the instructor*

This course will examine the experiences, causes, and treatments of the major forms of distress and disorder codified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), including schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, stress disorders, and personality disorders. We will critically evaluate theories and research derived from biological, genetic, psychological, interpersonal, and social-cultural perspectives. Group B course. (4 credits)

SOCI 269-01

Social Science Inquiry

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: Social science presents claims about the social world in a particular manner that is centered on theoretical claims (explanations) supported by evidence. This course covers the methods through which social scientists develop emprically-supported explanations. The course covers three main sets of topics: the broad methodological questions posed by philosophy of social science, how social scientists develop research design to generate relevant evidence, and methods with which social scientists analyze data. For both the research design and analysis sections, we will concentrate on quantitative research, learning how to use statistical software. (4 credits)

WGSS 117-01

Women, Health, Reproduction

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Elizabeth Jansen

Notes: Cross-listed with BIOL 117-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on December 2nd with permission of the instructor*

Fall 2016

ANTH 239-01

Medical Anthropology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: This course examines issues of health, illness, and healing from a variety of anthropological perspectives. From a cross-cultural perspective, we will examine the diversity of beliefs about human health and sickness, and a variety of healing practices by which people treat them. From the perspective of critical epidemiology, we will wrestle with recurrent problems of socioeconomic inequalities, ecological disruptions, and their impact upon the differential distribution, prevention, and treatment of human diseases. (4 credits)

BIOL 357-01

Immunology

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 205
  • Instructor: Devavani Chatterjea

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on April 29th with permission of the instructor*

This course is an introduction to vertebrate immunity. Its evolution, cellular and molecular mechanisms, health and disease functions and therapeutic manipulations are explored through approaches including lectures, clinical case studies, extensive reading of the primary literature, problem-solving and an intensive focus on scientific writing. The course typically includes a civic engagement component where students work with health organizations and schools in the Twin Cities area. The course laboratory uses guided exercises and independent projects to focus on current immunological techniques including flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting and antibody assays. Three hours of lectures and four to six hours of laboratory per week. Junior or senior standing required. (4 credits).

BIOL 357-L1

Immunology Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 277
  • Instructor: Devavani Chatterjea

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on April 29th with permission of the instructor*

This course is an introduction to vertebrate immunity. Its evolution, cellular and molecular mechanisms, health and disease functions and therapeutic manipulations are explored through approaches including lectures, clinical case studies, extensive reading of the primary literature, problem-solving and an intensive focus on scientific writing. The course typically includes a civic engagement component where students work with health organizations and schools in the Twin Cities area. The course laboratory uses guided exercises and independent projects to focus on current immunological techniques including flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting and antibody assays. Three hours of lectures and four to six hours of laboratory per week. Junior or senior standing required. (4 credits).

BIOL 358-01

Microbiology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Steven Sundby

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on April 29th with permission of the instructor*

This course is an introduction to the subdisciplines of microbiology: virology, bacteriology, immunology, parasitology and mycology. Emphasis is given to our efforts to understand and control microbial growth processes. Additional focus will be on the effect of microbes on humans, especially as relates to disease processes. The laboratory emphasizes determinative microbiology. Three hours of lecture/discussion and four to five hours of laboratory per week. (4 credits)

BIOL 358-L1

Microbiology Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 289
  • Instructor: Steven Sundby

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on April 29th with permission of the instructor*

This course is an introduction to the subdisciplines of microbiology: virology, bacteriology, immunology, parasitology and mycology. Emphasis is given to our efforts to understand and control microbial growth processes. Additional focus will be on the effect of microbes on humans, especially as relates to disease processes. The laboratory emphasizes determinative microbiology. Three hours of lecture/discussion and four to five hours of laboratory per week. (4 credits)

ECON 381-01

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-02

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L1

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L2

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

GEOG 225-01

Intro to Geog Info Systems

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Holly Barcus

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-02

Intro to Geog Info Systems

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Kelsey McDonald

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L1

Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L2

Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-12:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L3

Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 368-01

Health GIS

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Kelsey McDonald

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course builds on skills learned in the introductory Geographic Information Systems (GIS) course, focusing explicitly on geospatial techniques used for analyzing problems in public health. Through lectures, discussions, hands-on labs, and collaborative group work, students will learn to use advanced GIS tools to visualize and analyze public health issues, including: health disparities; neighborhood effects on health; spatial clustering of disease events, such as cancers; environmental health and environmental justice; infectious and vector-borne disease; and accessibility of populations to health care services. The course builds skills in spatial thinking, statistical and epidemiological reasoning, logical inference, critical use of data, geovisualization, and research project design. Students will be required to complete a final independent project on a topic of their choice. Lab section registration is required. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week required. (4 credits)

GEOG 368-L1

Health GIS Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: This course builds on skills learned in the introductory Geographic Information Systems (GIS) course, focusing explicitly on geospatial techniques used for analyzing problems in public health. Through lectures, discussions, hands-on labs, and collaborative group work, students will learn to use advanced GIS tools to visualize and analyze public health issues, including: health disparities; neighborhood effects on health; spatial clustering of disease events, such as cancers; environmental health and environmental justice; infectious and vector-borne disease; and accessibility of populations to health care services. The course builds skills in spatial thinking, statistical and epidemiological reasoning, logical inference, critical use of data, geovisualization, and research project design. Students will be required to complete a final independent project on a topic of their choice. Lab section registration is required. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week required. (4 credits)

INTL 282-01

Introduction to International Public Health

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: This course introduces and explores the major health problems facing developing countries, and the main approaches to remediation. The course considers the social determinants of health, and the need for public health programs to address the root causes of health inequities as well as illness itself. Focus is at the country, international-organization, and donor levels. Attention will be given to major indicators, recent trends, policies, and metrics for monitoring progress. A case study, such as international tuberculosis control, will be used as an applied analysis.

INTL 282-02

Introduction to International Public Health

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: This course introduces and explores the major health problems facing developing countries, and the main approaches to remediation. The course considers the social determinants of health, and the need for public health programs to address the root causes of health inequities as well as illness itself. Focus is at the country, international-organization, and donor levels. Attention will be given to major indicators, recent trends, policies, and metrics for monitoring progress. A case study, such as international tuberculosis control, will be used as an applied analysis.

MATH 125-01

Epidemiology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Vittorio Addona

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 29th with permission of the instructor*

Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease and health in human populations and the application of this understanding to the solution of public health problems. Topics include measurement of disease and health, the outbreak and spread of disease, reasoning about cause and effect, analysis of risk, detection and classification, and the evaluation of trade-offs. The course is designed to fulfill and extend the professional community's consensus definition of undergraduate epidemiology. In addition to the techniques of modern epidemiology, the course emphasizes the historical evolution of ideas of causation, treatment, and prevention of disease. The course is a required component of the concentration in Community and Global Health. (4 credits)

MATH 155-01

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Alicia Johnson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 29th with permission of the instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-02

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Alicia Johnson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 29th with permission of the instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-03

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 241
  • Instructor: Alicia Johnson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 29th with permission of the instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-04

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 243
  • Instructor: Christina Knudson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 29th with permission of the instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 155-05

Intro to Statistical Modeling

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 243
  • Instructor: Christina Knudson

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 29th with permission of the instructor*

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. (4 credits)


MATH 253-01

Statistical Computing and Machine Learning

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 258
  • Instructor: Daniel Kaplan

Notes: *ACTC students may register on April 29th with permission of the instructor*

An introduction to multivariate statistical analysis. Emphasizes rationales, applications, and interpretations using advanced statistical software. Examples drawn primarily from economics, education, psychology, sociology, political science, biology and medicine. Topics may include: simple/multiple regression, one-way/two-way ANOVA, logistic regression, discriminant analysis, multivariable correlation. Additional topics may include analysis of covariance, factor analysis, cluster analysis. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-01

Research in Psychology I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-L1

Research in Psychology I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 349
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 201-L2

Research in Psychology I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 349
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs to test psychological hypotheses. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. (4 credits)


PSYC 272-01

Health Psychology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 352
  • Instructor: Jaine Strauss

Notes: *ACTC students may register with permission of the instructor*

This course will examine multiple, interactive factors that contribute to human health; we will take a biopsychsocial perspective to understanding how best to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and adapt and thrive in the context of chronic illness. We will discuss the roles of stress, coping, immune response, social relationships, personality, and structural inequalities in the progression and prevention of disease. We will also address some ways in which behaviors (e.g. physical activity, nutrition, substance use, sleep) can contribute to wellbeing or sickness, and we will examine behavior change strategies that can help improve our own health habits. Group B course. (4 credits)

PSYC 380-01

Community Psychology and Public Health

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 170
  • Instructor: Jaine Strauss

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required*

This course will examine the inter-related fields of community psychology and public health psychology. These disciplines share a commitment to the promotion of well-being within a social and cultural context. We will explore theory, research, and praxis related to ecological analysis, empowerment models, prevention and health promotion, risk and resilience, and community organizing and activism. These conceptual tools will help us understand the complex processes underlying clinical psychopathology (e.g., serious and persistent mental illness), behavioral health (e.g., smoking; obesity; substance abuse), and symptoms of structural violence (e.g., domestic violence; homelessness). Throughout the course, we will focus on the unique contributions of psychological scholarship to understanding and improving population health. All students will participate in a civic engagement experience of at least two hours a week to foster fuller understanding of the course concepts. Student led component. UP3 course. (4 credits)