Course Descriptions

Classics

CLAS 111 - Elementary Latin I

This two-term sequence introduces the grammar and vocabulary of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Students learn through reading adapted passages, by breaking down grammatical structures into recognizable patterns, and through tutorials and drills. We aim to cover all basic grammar by the end of the year. In the second semester, students begin to read easy Latin such as the Bible, Pliny, Cornelius Nepos and/or Caesar.

Frequency: Every year.

CLAS 113 - Elementary Arabic I

In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs.

Frequency: Every year.

CLAS 115 - Elementary Greek I

This two-semester program introduces students to ancient Greek, the language of Greece, Asia Minor, and the Hellenistic world, including several Jewish and early Christian writers. Students will learn the grammar and vocabulary necessary for reading Greek literature and documents of many periods. During the second term, students begin to read extended prose, such as passages from Plato, Xenophon, the New Testament or documentary sources. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs.

Frequency: Every year.

CLAS 117 - Elementary Hebrew I

An introduction to the language and literature of classical Hebrew. The study of grammar and vocabulary is supplemented with practice in oral recitation and aural comprehension. Basic biblical texts are analyzed and translated, including selections from the books of Genesis and Ruth.

Frequency: Alternate years.

CLAS 121 - The Greek World

This course surveys the political, economic, and cultural development of the peoples of the ancient Greek world from the late Bronze Age through the Hellenistic era. Students will hone their critical thinking skills while working with translations of ancient literature, archaeological remains and works of art. The basic structure of the course is chronological, but we will examine major themes across time and space, which may include the interaction between physical landscape and historical change; rule by the one, the few and the many; the nature and development of literary and artistic genres; the economic, military, and/or cultural dimensions of empire; or the intersections of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, slave/free status and civic identity in the Greek world.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

HIST 121

CLAS 122 - The Roman World

This course introduces students to the Roman world, which at its height stretched from Britain to Iran, from Germany to Africa, and lasted well over a thousand years. Students will develop critical thinking skills while working with Roman literature in translation, art, architecture and other archaeological remains. The structure of the course is chronological, but we will examine major themes across time and space, which may include the development of Roman literature out of and in response to Greek culture; the effects of the civil wars and the resulting political change from a republic to a monarchy; the cultural, religious and/or military aspects of the Roman empire and its immediate aftermath; Roman conceptions of gender, sexuality, slave and free status, citizenship and/or ethnicity, and how these social categories were used to legitimize or exercise power.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

HIST 122

CLAS 123 - Introduction to Archaeology

This course introduces students to archaeology, the study of the material remains of human culture. Students will explore the history of the discipline and profession, its basic methods and theories, and the political and ethical dimensions of modern archaeological practice. Students learn to examine and interpret evidence using specific examples, from artifacts to sites to regions.

Frequency: Every year.

Cross-Listed as

ANTH 123

CLAS 127 - Women, Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome

This course investigates contemporary approaches to studying women, gender and sexuality in history, and the particular challenges of studying these issues in antiquity. By reading ancient writings in translation and analyzing art and other material culture, we will address the following questions: How did ancient Greek and Roman societies understand and use the categories of male and female? Into what sexual categories did different cultures group people? How did these gender and sexual categories intersect with notions of slave and free status, citizenship and ethnicity? How should we interpret the actions and representations of women in surviving literature, myth, art, law, philosophy, politics and medicine in this light? Finally, how and why have gendered classical images been re-deployed in the modern U.S.- from scholarship to art and poetry?

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

WGSS 127

CLAS 129 - Greek Myths

This course studies some of the world's great storytellers-the ancient Greeks. First, we read from translations of Greek poetry to become familiar with the key figures and events in mythology, including the Olympian gods and their origins, the major heroes, and the Trojan War. Then we explore more broadly the adaptable nature of these myths and the variety of forms in which the Greeks told stories, from epic and personal poetry to philosophy, drama, sculpture and vase painting. At the same time, we investigate the ways in which moderns have interpreted these stories. We analyze myths using Freud's psychoanalytical techniques, as folklore and ritual, and through theoretical perspectives including structuralism, new historicism and feminism. Finally, we investigate the later life of Greek myths, focusing on how and why these stories have been retold by the Romans, later European authors and artists, American film makers and playwrights, and science fiction writers.

Frequency: Alternate years.

CLAS 135 - India and Rome

This course is taught jointly between the department of Religious Studies and the department of Classics, by a specialist in the Roman East and a specialist in classical India. We will start on either side of this world, with Alexander the Great and Ashoka, exploring the relationship between empire and religion from Rome to India in the world's crossroads for the thousand years between Alexander and the rise of Islam.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

RELI 135

CLAS 145 - Pagans, Christians and Jews in Classical Antiquity: Cultures in Conflict

This course studies the interaction of Jewish, Christian, and pagan cultures, and the protracted struggle for self-definition and multi-cultural exchange this encounter provoked. The course draws attention to how the other and cultural and religious difference are construed, resisted, and apprehended. Readings include Acts, Philo, Revelation, I Clement, pagan charges against Christianity, Adversus Ioudaios writers, the Goyim in the Mishna, and apologetic literature.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

RELI 145

CLAS 155 - January in Rome: The Art, Archaeology, and Topography of Ancient Rome

A survey and tour of the major spaces, surviving monuments and artifacts of the city of Rome from the earliest occupation of the Palatine around 1000 BCE to the first major Christian buildings in the 4th century CE. Students learn architectural building techniques, systems of dating based on types of stone and brickwork, problems in identifying surviving buildings, the iconography of Roman political sculpture, and issues of Roman copying and reuse of original Greek art. We consider the incorporation of Roman monuments into subsequent architecture, including Fascist political (re)use of archaeology, as well as problems of conservation in the context of the modern city. Finally, visits to the excavated cities of Pompeii and Ostia make visible the lives and activities of those lost in the literary record, including women and slaves.

Frequency: Alternate years.

CLAS 160 - Intro to Ancient/Medieval Art

This course surveys the visual and material culture of Europe and the Middle East from the Paleolithic through the late Medieval period. We consider the material remains of Prehistoric Europe, the Ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, Etruria, and Rome; early Christianity, Judaism and Islam; and Early Medieval, Romanesque and Gothic Europe from a contextual perspective, in order to recover the meanings of works of art within the cultures that produced them. A special focus is placed on the appropriation of these objects and images in later Western culture.

Cross-Listed as

ART 160

CLAS 192 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

CLAS 194 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

CLAS 200 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophies

A study of major philosophers of ancient Greece, Rome and the medieval period, including the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoics, Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas.

Frequency: Every year.

Cross-Listed as

PHIL 200

CLAS 212 - Elementary Latin II

This two-term sequence introduces the grammar and vocabulary of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Students learn through reading adapted passages, by breaking down grammatical structures into recognizable patterns, and through tutorials and drills. We aim to cover all basic grammar by the end of the year. In the second semester, students begin to read easy Latin such as the Bible, Pliny, Cornelius Nepos and/or Caesar.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 111

CLAS 214 - Elementary Arabic II

In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 113

CLAS 218 - Elementary Hebrew II

An introduction to the language and literature of classical Hebrew. The study of grammar and vocabulary is supplemented with practice in oral recitation and aural comprehension. Basic biblical texts are analyzed and translated, including selections from the books of Genesis and Ruth.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 117

CLAS 231 - Intermediate Latin: Prose

A thorough review of Latin grammar followed by a study of a Roman prose author or authors. Students build reading skills while gaining an appreciation for the literary and cultural aspects of Latin prose. Particular texts to be studied may include Petronius' Satyricon , the letters and/or speeches of Cicero, letters of Pliny, or Livy's History of Rome.

Frequency: Every fall.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 212 or its equivalent

CLAS 235 - Elementary Greek II

This two-semester program introduces students to ancient Greek, the language of Greece, Asia Minor, and the Hellenistic world, including several Jewish and early Christian writers. Students will learn the grammar and vocabulary necessary for reading Greek literature and documents of many periods. During the second term, students begin to read extended prose, such as passages from Plato, Xenophon, the New Testament or documentary sources. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 115

CLAS 237 - Intermediate Hebrew I

Hebrew prose selections from the Bible, Dead Sea Scrolls and Rabbinic parables. Translation of texts will be supplemented with grammar review. Students will gain facility with such tools as the lexicon, commentary and critical apparatus and will become familiar with critical trends in contemporary research.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 218 or its equivalent

CLAS 241 - Intermediate Arabic I

This course focuses on expanding vocabulary and grammar through simple texts, dialogs and stories.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 214 or equivalent

CLAS 261 - Intermediate Greek: Prose

This third course in the ancient Greek language sequence involves review of basic grammar and extensive reading in works of ancient prose. Students will build familiarity with forms and vocabulary while gaining confidence as readers and an appreciation for ancient literature. Authors may include Plato, Herodotus, Attic orators, or Lucian.

Frequency: Every fall.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 235 or equivalent

CLAS 294 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

CLAS 301 - Research Forum

An intensive study of a selected period or theme in ancient Mediterranean or Near Eastern history, culture or societies. This course emphasizes the critical evaluation of primary and secondary sources, including texts and material culture, and trains students to conduct research by introducing them to the materials and methods used in the field of Classics. Recent topics include The Dead Sea Scrolls, Literacy in the Ancient World, and Rome: The City. May be repeated for credit.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 121, CLAS 122, CLAS 127, CLAS 129, CLAS 145 or permission of instructor

CLAS 332 - Intermediate Latin: Poetry

A course in the poetic literature of the Republican and/or Augustan Ages with concentrated study on one or two authors. Students work toward grammatical and lexical mastery while learning about the forms, styles and cultural aspects of Latin poetry. Authors to be studied may include Plautus, Catullus, Horace, Vergil, or Ovid.

Frequency: Every spring.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 231or equivalent

CLAS 338 - Intermediate Hebrew II

The final semester in the two-year survey of the Hebrew language from ancient to modern. Students will read selections from the Biblical books of poetry such as Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, and Psalms. The second half of the semester is devoted to modern conversational Hebrew.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 237 or equivalent

CLAS 342 - Intermediate Arabic II

This course introduces students to more authentic texts and samples a variety of authors and genres from around the Arab world.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 241 or equivalent

CLAS 345 - Arabic Reading and Translation

This course aims to improve your Arabic reading and translation skills while introducing you to selected genres of Arabic and Islamic literature. The course will proceed in a workshop format and focus on the comprehension and translation of texts in question. Students will learn to use an Arabic dictionary, expand their vocabulary, deepen their understanding of grammar and syntax, and develop skills in reading manuscripts, navigating Arabic texts, and producing English translations.

Frequency: Every fall.

Prerequisite(s)

3 previous semesters of Arabic language.

Cross-Listed as

RELI 245

CLAS 362 - Intermediate Greek: Poetry

This fourth course in the ancient Greek language sequence involves extensive reading in works of ancient poetry. Students will work toward mastery of grammar and vocabulary while exploring the formal, artistic and cultural dimensions of poetic composition. Most often readings will be from the Homeric epics (Iliad or Odyssey), but other works may be taught, including tragedy, comedy or lyric.

Frequency: Every spring.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 261or equivalent

CLAS 392 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

CLAS 394 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

CLAS 483 - Advanced Reading in Latin

Students who pursue Latin at the advanced level will study closely one or more works and explore relevant problems in literary or textual criticism, linguistic, social or cultural history, and/or reception. Authors may include Tacitus, Seneca, Apuleius, Juvenal, Martial or others.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 332or equivalent

CLAS 485 - Advanced Arabic

A survey course of Renaissance and classic writers from around the Arab world. We explore social issues, with the focus still on language acquisition.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 342

CLAS 487 - Advanced Reading in Greek

Students who pursue ancient Greek at the advanced level will study closely one or more works and explore relevant problems in literary or textual criticism, linguistic, social or cultural history, and/or reception. Offered upon consultation with department.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS 362 or equivalent

CLAS 490 - Senior Seminar

The Senior Seminar caps the experience of being a Classics major. Students in all three tracks (Archaeology, Civilization, and Languages) join together to explore the history of the discipline and its relationship to their own histories and future plans. Students learn about, draft and critique documents useful for their next steps, including resumes, personal statements and cover letters, along with discussing selected readings in a seminar setting. Each student also works with an advisor from the department to develop and execute a major piece of work in their chosen field, Majors who have completed the Senior Seminar have thus executed a substantive independent project and can articulate the place of their Classics major within their personal and professional development.

Frequency: Every fall.

Prerequisite(s)

CLAS major and a course at the 300-leve or higher, or permission of instructor.

CLAS 494 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

CLAS 601 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

CLAS 602 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

CLAS 603 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

CLAS 604 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

CLAS 611 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

CLAS 612 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

CLAS 613 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

CLAS 614 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.