Archaeology is an interdisciplinary field connected to many other fields, including anthropology, history, art history, religion, and geology.  Because of these connections, and because material culture varies so widely by period and region, there are many different types of archaeology.  Classical archaeology concentrates on the ancient Greek and Roman cultures and the peoples with whom they interacted.  Biblical or Near Eastern archaeology focuses on the material remains of the ancient Middle East as a region of great cultural diversity.  Anthropological archaeology explores the material remains of past peoples within the conceptual and methodological framework of anthropology, often focusing on prehistoric societies or societies outside the ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern spheres, such as the pre-modern peoples of the Americas and Asia.  A background in archaeology can also pave the way for a career in museums or cultural resource management.

There are many different curricular paths to graduate study in archaeology, and these are not exclusive.  But there are paths you can follow that will specifically prepare you for advanced study in certain fields of archaeology.  All students who plan to attend graduate school in some field of archaeology should gain field experience (preferably two seasons), and it is useful to gain curatorial, archival, educational, or cultural resource management experience at a local museum or agency.  In terms of coursework, students wishing to pursue graduate study in Biblical or Near Eastern archaeology should consult the guidelines for majors in Middle Eastern Studies, Ancient Religions, Ancient History with a Near Eastern focus, or Near Eastern languages.  Students wishing to pursue graduate study in anthropological archaeology should considering majoring in Anthropology but taking relevant offerings in geology (e.g., GEOL 155 History and Evolution of Earth, GEOL 260 Geomorphology, GEOL 265 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, GEOL 300 Paleobiology) and certain archaeology courses in Classics:

CLAS 123 Introduction to Archaeology
CLAS 160 Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art
CLAS 301 Research Forum (e.g., Greco-Roman Egypt).

Students wishing to pursue graduate study in classical archaeology should expose themselves to anthropology and geology, but graduate programs will prefer more study of classical art and languages.  Students should also gain a basic knowledge of one of the major modern languages of scholarship, German or French.

CLASSICAL OR NEAR EASTERN ARCHAEOLOGY

a) Two courses which provide a comprehensive introduction to the ancient Mediterranean world. Good choices include:

  • CLAS 121 Greek World
  • CLAS 122 Roman World
  • CLAS 127 Women, Gender & Sexuality
  • CLAS 145 Pagans, Christians & Jews

b) For Classical Archaeology, study in Greek or Latin through at least the intermediate level.  Those interested in Biblical or Near Eastern Archaeology may prefer Hebrew or Arabic.

c) CLAS 123 Introduction to Archaeology

d) CLAS 160 Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art

e) CLAS 301 Research Forum

f) CLAS 490 Senior Seminar

g) Electives from the following are particularly recommended:

  • GEOL 155 History and Evolution of Earth
  • ANTH 112 Archaeology and Human Evolution
  • ANTH 101 General Anthropology

For a field experience, we recommend participating in an excavation, preferably at least two seasons. Students should study abroad in the region of interest (North Africa, Middle East, Southern Europe, or Great Britain).

ART HISTORY

a) Two courses which provide a comprehensive introduction to the ancient Mediterranean world.  Good choices include:

  • CLAS 121 Greek World
  • CLAS 122 Roman World
  • CLAS 127 Women, Gender & Sexuality
  • CLAS 129 Greek Myths

b) Study in a classical language to include at least one course at the intermediate level (Arabic, Greek, Latin or Hebrew):  Greek or Latin strongly preferred.

c) CLAS 123 Introduction to Archaeology

d) CLAS 160 Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art

e) CLAS 301 Research Forum

f) CLAS 490 Senior Seminar

g) Electives from the following are particularly recommended:

  • CLAS 155 January in Rome
  • ART 238 Ceramic Art

OR a course otherwise approved in advance by the department, such as:

  • ART 487 Art History Methodology Seminar (strongly recommended)
  • ART 232 Fibers I
  • ART 235 Sculpture I
  • ART 252 Gender, Sexualities, and Feminist Visual Culture
  • ART 270 Art and Religion Along the Silk Road

We also recommend at least one course in studio art:

  • ART 232 Fibers I
  • ART 235 Sculpture I
  • ART 238 Ceramic Art

Recommended forms of field experience would include excavation OR interning in a museum, such as the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Science Museum of Minnesota, or Minnesota History Museum.  Study away should include archaeological learning in an archival, laboratory or field context.

MUSEUM STUDIES

a) Two courses which provide a comprehensive introduction to the ancient Mediterranean world. Good choices include:

  • CLAS 121 Greek World
  • CLAS 122 Roman World
  • CLAS 127 Women, Gender & Sexuality
  • CLAS 129 Greek Myths
  • CLAS 145 Pagans, Christians & Jews

b) Study in a classical language to include at least one course at the intermediate level (Arabic, Greek, Latin or Hebrew).

c) CLAS 123 Introduction to Archaeology

d) CLAS 160 Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art

e) CLAS 301 Research Forum

f) CLAS 490 Senior Seminar

g) Electives from the following are particularly recommended:

  • CLAS 155 January in Rome
  • ART 238 Ceramic Art
  • ANTH 112 Archaeology and Human Evolution
  • ANTH 101 General Anthropology

OR courses otherwise approved in advance by the department. Consider:

  • ART 149 Introduction to Visual Culture
  • ANTH 360 The Anthropology of Tourism
  • HMCS 110 Texts and Power
  • ECON 252 Economics of Not-for-Profit
  • SOCI 250 Nonprofit Organizations
  • EDUC 260 Philosophy of Education
  • ART 232 Fibers I
  • ART 235 Sculpture I
  • Courses in Art History and Anthropology that would be good introductions to particular cultures or regions, e.g. ART 270 Art and Religion Along the Silk Road.

For a field experience, we strongly recommend a museum internship (e.g. Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Science Museum of Minnesota, Minnesota History Museum).  For study away, look for programs that provide courses or training in an archival, museum, laboratory or field context.

ANTIQUITIES LAW OR CULTURAL HERITAGE

a) Two courses which provide a comprehensive introduction to the ancient Mediterranean world:

  • CLAS 121 Greek World
  • CLAS 122 Roman World
  • CLAS 127 Women, Gender & Sexuality
  • CLAS 129 Greek Myths
  • CLAS 145 Pagans, Christians & Jews

b) Study in a classical language to include at least one course at the intermediate level (Arabic, Greek, Latin or Hebrew).

c) CLAS 123 Introduction to Archaeology

d) CLAS 160 Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art

e) CLAS 301 Research Forum

f) CLAS 490 Senior Seminar

g) Electives from the following are particularly recommended:

  • CLAS 155 January in Rome
  • ART 238 Ceramic Art

OR courses otherwise approved in advance by the department. Consider:

  • ART 487 Art History Methodology Seminar (strongly recommended)
  • ART 252 Gender, Sexualities, and Feminist Visual Culture
  • ART 270 Art and Religion Along the Silk Road
  • ART 232 Fibers I
  • ART 235 Sculpture I
  • ART 149 Introduction to Visual Culture

Recommended forms of field experience would include excavation OR interning in a museum, such as the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Science Museum of Minnesota, or Minnesota History Museum.  Study away should include archaeological learning in an archival, laboratory or field context.

You might also consider a minor in Legal Studies.

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