CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

Greek and Latin are considered the traditional classical languages, although Hebrew has sometimes been included in that category. We accept Arabic in our classical languages track as well. Your choices should depend upon your long-term goals. Graduate programs like to see Latin and Greek taken to the advanced level, with multiple semesters of study in each. Typical is aminimum requirement of the equivalent of three years of college level Latin and two years of Greek. Some knowledge of history is recommended, as well as some experience of French or German, but these are secondary to the acquisition of the traditional Classical languages of Latin and Greek. More flexibility is available to those less interested in continuing into graduate school in Classics. For example, Hebrew or Arabic might be substituted for either language, or more courses may be taken in translation instead of in the original, etc.

a) Two courses which provide a comprehensive introduction to the ancient Mediterranean world. Good choices include:

  • 121 Greek World
  • 122 Roman World
  • 127 Women, Gender & Sexuality
  • 129 Greek Myths
  • 145 Pagans, Christians & Jews

 b) Seven courses involving classical languages and literatures in the original language (Greek, Latin, Hebrew or Arabic). Courses must be taken in at least two different languages and involve at least one class at the advanced level.

c) 490 Senior Seminar.

Students must also take a course that includes a major research project prior to the Senior Seminar. If none of the intermediate or advanced language courses provide this, a student must take 301: Research Forum as an eleventh course.

Study Away Recommendations: Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome; University of Edinburgh.

EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN LANGUAGES

a) Two courses which provide a comprehensive introduction to the ancient near east. Good choices include

  • 121 Greek World
  • 145 Pagans, Christians and Jews

OR consult with your adviser about taking one of the following as a survey course:

  • CLAS 135 India and Rome
  • RELI 100 Muslim Societies and Identities
  • RELI 120 Hebrew Bible
  • RELI 121 New Testament
  • RELI 122 Early Christianity

b) Seven courses involving language and literature in Arabic, Hebrew and/or Greek. Courses must be taken in at least two languages and involve one class at the advanced level (in Hebrew this will need to be an independent study).

We also recommend taking supporting courses that study of an aspect of the ancient near east, such as:

  • CLAS 301 Research Forum (e.g. Dead Sea Scrolls)
  • CLAS 194 Background to the Modern Middle East
  • CLAS 192 Comparative Ancient and Modern Cities: Rome and Alexandria
  • CLAS 192 January in Turkey
  • RELI 200 Revelation and Tradition in Islam
  • RELI 201 Islam and Philosophy
  • RELI 300 Introduction to Islamic Law
  • HIST 250 History of Pre-Modern Medicine
  • HIST 266 History of Islam from Mohammed to 1517

c) 490 Senior Seminar.

Students must also take a course that includes a major research project prior to the Senior Seminar. If none of the intermediate or advanced language courses provide this, a student must take 301: Research Forum as an eleventh course.

For study away, we strongly recommend a semester in the modern Middle East or Greece. Classics majors have studied in Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, Greece, Israel and other countries.

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