Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

CLAS 129-01

Greek Myths

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: This course studies some of the world's great storytellers¿the ancient Greeks. First, we read from translations of Greek poetry to become familiar with the key figures and events in mythology, including the Olympian gods and their origins, the major heroes, and the Trojan War. Then we explore more broadly the adaptable nature of these myths and the variety of forms in which the Greeks told stories, from epic and personal poetry to philosophy, drama, sculpture and vase painting. At the same time, we investigate the ways in which moderns have interpreted these stories. We analyze myths using Freud's psychoanalytical techniques, as folklore and ritual, and through theoretical perspectives including structuralism, new historicism and feminism. Finally, we investigate the later life of Greek myths, focusing on how and why these stories have been retold by the Romans, later European authors and artists, American film makers and playwrights, and science fiction writers. (4 credits)


CLAS 212-01

Elementary Latin II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: This two-term sequence introduces the grammar and vocabulary of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Students learn through reading adapted passages, by breaking down grammatical structures into recognizable patterns, and through tutorials and drills. We aim to cover all basic grammar by the end of the year. In the second semester, students begin to read easy Latin such as the Bible, Pliny, Cornelius Nepos and/or Caesar. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 214-01

Elementary Arabic II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 214-L1

Elementary Arabic II Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 214-L2

Elementary Arabic II Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 218-01

Elementary Hebrew II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: An introduction to the language and literature of classical Hebrew. The study of grammar and vocabulary is supplemented with practice in oral recitation and aural comprehension. Basic biblical texts are analyzed and translated, including selections from the books of Genesis and Ruth. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 218-L1

Elementary Hebrew II Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: An introduction to the language and literature of classical Hebrew. The study of grammar and vocabulary is supplemented with practice in oral recitation and aural comprehension. Basic biblical texts are analyzed and translated, including selections from the books of Genesis and Ruth. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 218-L2

Elementary Hebrew II Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: An introduction to the language and literature of classical Hebrew. The study of grammar and vocabulary is supplemented with practice in oral recitation and aural comprehension. Basic biblical texts are analyzed and translated, including selections from the books of Genesis and Ruth. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 223-01

Introduction to Archaeology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Andrew Overman

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 223-01*

This course introduces students to archaeology, the study of the material remains of human culture. Students will explore the history of the discipline and profession, its basic methods and theories, and the political and ethical dimensions of modern archaeological practice. Students learn to examine and interpret evidence using specific examples, from artifacts to sites to regions. Cross-listed with Anthropology 223. (4 credits)

CLAS 294-01

Ancient Healing and Medicine

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Andrew Overman

Notes:

CLAS 294-02

Rhyming Worlds: Hebrew and Arabic Poetry to the Middle Ages

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: El Meligi, Goldman

Notes:

CLAS 294-03

Topics in Classics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes:

CLAS 332-01

Intermediate Latin: Poetry

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: A course in the poetic literature of the Republican and/or Augustan Ages with concentrated study on one or two authors. Students work toward grammatical and lexical mastery while learning about the forms, styles and cultural aspects of Latin poetry. Authors to be studied may include Plautus, Catullus, Horace, Vergil, or Ovid. (4 credits)

CLAS 342-01

Intermediate Arabic II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course introduces students to more authentic texts and samples a variety of authors and genres from around the Arab world. (4 credits)

CLAS 342-L1

Intermediate Arabic II Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course introduces students to more authentic texts and samples a variety of authors and genres from around the Arab world. (4 credits)

CLAS 342-L2

Intermediate Arabic II Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course introduces students to more authentic texts and samples a variety of authors and genres from around the Arab world. (4 credits)

CLAS 362-01

Intermediate Greek: Poetry

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 003
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: This fourth course in the ancient Greek language sequence involves extensive reading in works of ancient poetry. Students will work toward mastery of grammar and vocabulary while exploring the formal, artistic and cultural dimensions of poetic composition. Most often readings will be from the Homeric epics (Iliad or Odyssey), but other works may be taught, including tragedy, comedy or lyric. (4 credits)

Fall 2016

CLAS 111-01

Elementary Latin I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: This two-term sequence introduces the grammar and vocabulary of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Students learn through reading adapted passages, by breaking down grammatical structures into recognizable patterns, and through tutorials and drills. We aim to cover all basic grammar by the end of the year. In the second semester, students begin to read easy Latin such as the Bible, Pliny, Cornelius Nepos and/or Caesar. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 111-L1

Elementary Latin I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: This two-term sequence introduces the grammar and vocabulary of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Students learn through reading adapted passages, by breaking down grammatical structures into recognizable patterns, and through tutorials and drills. We aim to cover all basic grammar by the end of the year. In the second semester, students begin to read easy Latin such as the Bible, Pliny, Cornelius Nepos and/or Caesar. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 113-01

Elementary Arabic I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 113-L1

Elementary Arabic I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 10:00 am-11:00 am
  • Room: MAIN 410
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 113-L2

Elementary Arabic I Lab

  • Days: F
  • Meeting Time: 03:20 pm-04:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 003
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 117-01

Elementary Hebrew I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: An introduction to the language and literature of classical Hebrew. The study of grammar and vocabulary is supplemented with practice in oral recitation and aural comprehension. Basic biblical texts are analyzed and translated, including selections from the books of Genesis and Ruth. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 117-L1

Elementary Hebrew I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 410
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: An introduction to the language and literature of classical Hebrew. The study of grammar and vocabulary is supplemented with practice in oral recitation and aural comprehension. Basic biblical texts are analyzed and translated, including selections from the books of Genesis and Ruth. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 117-L2

Elementary Hebrew I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: An introduction to the language and literature of classical Hebrew. The study of grammar and vocabulary is supplemented with practice in oral recitation and aural comprehension. Basic biblical texts are analyzed and translated, including selections from the books of Genesis and Ruth. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 121-01

The Greek World

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Brian Lush

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 121-01; first day attendance required*

This course surveys the political, economic, and cultural development of the peoples of the ancient Greek world from the late Bronze Age through the Hellenistic era. Students will hone their critical thinking skills while working with translations of ancient literature, archaeological remains and works of art. The basic structure of the course is chronological, but we will examine major themes across time and space, which may include the interaction between physical landscape and historical change; rule by the one, the few and the many; the nature and development of literary and artistic genres; the economic, military, and/or cultural dimensions of empire; or the intersections of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, slave/free status and civic identity in the Greek world. (4 credits) Cross-listed with History 121.


CLAS 135-01

India and Rome

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Laine, Overman

Notes: *Cross-listed with RELI 135-01*

This course is taught jointly between the department of Religious Studies and the department of Classics, by a specialist in the Roman East and a specialist in classical India. We will start on either side of this world, with Alexander the Great and Ashoka, exploring the relationship between empire and religion from Rome to India in the world's crossroads for the thousand years between Alexander and the rise of Islam. Cross-listed with Religious Studies 135. (4 credits)

CLAS 200-01

Ancient and Medieval Philosophies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Geoffrey Gorham

Notes: *Cross-listed with PHIL 200-01*

A study of major philosophers of ancient Greece, Rome and the medieval period, including the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoics, Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas. Every year. Cross-listed with Philosophy 200. (4 credits)

CLAS 231-01

Intermediate Latin: Prose

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Brian Lush

Notes: A thorough review of Latin grammar followed by a study of a Roman prose author or authors. Students build reading skills while gaining an appreciation for the literary and cultural aspects of Latin prose. Particular texts to be studied may include Petronius' Satyricon, the letters and/or speeches of Cicero, letters of Pliny, or Livy's History of Rome. (4 credits)

CLAS 231-L1

Intermediate Latin: Prose Lab

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 217
  • Instructor: Brian Lush

Notes: A thorough review of Latin grammar followed by a study of a Roman prose author or authors. Students build reading skills while gaining an appreciation for the literary and cultural aspects of Latin prose. Particular texts to be studied may include Petronius' Satyricon, the letters and/or speeches of Cicero, letters of Pliny, or Livy's History of Rome. (4 credits)

CLAS 241-01

Intermediate Arabic I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course focuses on expanding vocabulary and grammar through simple texts, dialogs and stories.

CLAS 241-L1

Intermediate Arabic I Lab

  • Days: F
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 410
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course focuses on expanding vocabulary and grammar through simple texts, dialogs and stories.

CLAS 241-L2

Intermediate Arabic I Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course focuses on expanding vocabulary and grammar through simple texts, dialogs and stories.

CLAS 260-01

Introduction to Ancient/Medieval Art

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Vanessa Rousseau

Notes: *Cross-listed with ART 160-01*

This course surveys the visual and material culture of Europe and the Middle East from the Paleolithic through the late Medieval period. We consider the material remains of Prehistoric Europe, the Ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, Etruria, and Rome; early Christianity, Judaism and Islam; and Early Medieval, Romanesque and Gothic Europe from a contextual perspective, in order to recover the meanings of works of art within the cultures that produced them. A special focus is placed on the appropriation of these objects and images in later Western culture. Cross-listed with Art 160. (4 credits)

CLAS 261-01

Intermediate Greek: Prose

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: THEATR 205
  • Instructor: Andrew Overman

Notes: This third course in the ancient Greek language sequence involves review of basic grammar and extensive reading in works of ancient prose. Students will build familiarity with forms and vocabulary while gaining confidence as readers and an appreciation for ancient literature. Authors may include Plato, Herodotus, Attic orators, or Lucian. (4 credits)

CLAS 294-01

Towns and City Life from Late Antiquity to the Later Middle Ages

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Cameron Bradley

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 294-07* The city is a key component of modern life, but much of what we associate with urban life took shape during the Middle Ages. This course explores European cities and city life from the Roman period to the end of the Middle Ages. We will investigate how and why cities developed, how they were governed, their relationships with the hinterland and the environment, what urban living was like, and people’s perceptions of cities and urban life. Along the way, we will cover such topics as the transformations of late Roman cities during the Middle Ages, commerce and work, urban rebellions, family life, forms of entertainment, and more.

CLAS 345-01

Arabic Reading and Translation

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: Gregory Lipton

Notes: *Cross-listed with RELI 245-01*

This course aims to improve your Arabic reading and translation skills while introducing you to selected genres of Arabic and Islamic literature. The course will proceed in a workshop format and focus on the comprehension and translation of texts in question. Students will learn to use an Arabic dictionary, expand their vocabulary, deepen their understanding of grammar and syntax, and develop skills in reading manuscripts, navigating Arabic texts, and producing English translations. Prerequisite: 3 previous semesters of Arabic language. Cross-listed with Religious Studies 245. (4 credits)

CLAS 394-01

untitled (Museums)

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 202
  • Instructor: Legge, Rousseau

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 394-03 and ART 394-01; no prerequisites; first day attendance required; counts as humanities general distribution* Museum studies stands at the confluence of a range of critical topics that span artistic, cultural, ethical, and legal questions. We will explore these issues and more in addition to learning about the practicalities of a range of museum departments and jobs (including collections management and care, curation, development, and education). The museum field is broad and inherently interdisciplinary, reflecting the liberal arts at work. Thus, this course will include a major Digital Liberal Arts project: reconstructing Macalester’s now-defunct museum. We will work in Macalester’s archives to determine what it consisted of and what happened to the items from the museum when they were removed. We will visit the local museums to which some of the original museum material was transferred. We will then transition into reimagining a “Macalester Museum” with Omeka’s digital content management system. This hands-on exploration of Digital Liberal Arts and Digital Storytelling will draw upon a wide range of texts and experts to consider how our concepts have changed regarding what makes a museum.

CLAS 483-01

Advanced Reading in Latin

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 102
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: Students who pursue Latin at the advanced level will study closely one or more works and explore relevant problems in literary or textual criticism, linguistic, social or cultural history, and/or reception. Authors may include Tacitus, Seneca, Apuleius, Juvenal, Martial or others. (4 credits)

CLAS 490-01

Senior Seminar

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 003
  • Instructor: Andrew Overman

Notes: The Senior Seminar caps the experience of being a Classics major. Students in all three tracks (Archaeology, Civilization, and Languages) join together to explore the history of the discipline and its relationship to their own histories and future plans. Students learn about, draft and critique documents useful for their next steps, including resumes, personal statements and cover letters, along with discussing selected readings in a seminar setting. Each student also works with an advisor from the department to develop and execute a major piece of work in their chosen field, Majors who have completed the Senior Seminar have thus executed a substantive independent project and can articulate the place of their Classics major within their personal and professional development. (4 credits)

CLAS 494-01

Advanced Readings in Hebrew

  • Days: MW
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 410
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: