Class Schedules

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Fall 2014 Class Schedule - updated November 25, 2014 at 01:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
CLAS 294-02  Medieval Political Thought
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Andrew Latham
*Cross-listed with PHIL 294-02 and POLI 266-01* Interested in the roots of contemporary political life (including issues such as state sovereignty, separation of church and state, constitutionalism, just war, property rights, “the people”, nationalism, democracy, rule-of-law, and human rights)? Then this course is for you. Through a careful examination of the political thought of Latin Christendom (Western Europe) during the later Middle Ages (c. 1050-c. 1550) we explore the deep roots of the contemporary world order, demonstrating the ways in which medieval thinkers such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of Salisbury, John of Paris, Giles of Rome, Marsilius of Padua, Dante, Las Casas, ibn Sina, Moshe ben Maimon, and ibn Rushd “invented” many of the ideas that we – presumptuously and erroneously – have come to associate with the modern era. As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields (such as Philosophy or Classics) who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in political theory/philosophy or the medieval roots of contemporary political life. This course fulfills the Political Science Department’s Theory Requirement.

ENGL 294-02  Comparative Feminisms: Whiteness and Postcolonialisms
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with WGSS 240-01*

ENGL 367-01  Postcolonial Theory
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 105 David Moore
*Cross-listed with INTL 367-01*

ENGL 394-03  Dead White Men
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with GERM 337-01, MCST 337-01 and PHIL 294-03; taught in English* The shift away from feudal theocracy (when divinity grounded truth and political authority) to secular capitalist modernity has entailed unforeseen re-conceptualizations of both time and of the distinction between truth and fiction—the latter approaching extinction, as truth is increasingly perceived as a culturally arbitrary (hence fictional) construct. To examine these modern mutations of the central categories of time and truth-fiction, the course will pursue two parallel itineraries. On the one hand, the two competing modes of the secularization of time, as (a) human history progressing toward a certain telos (end or aim), and (b) as a machinic time within which inter-relations within an autonomous structure (one not controlled by humans) determine its participants. And, on the other hand, the replacement of faith with modern philosophy, ideology, and biopolitics. No prerequisites.

FREN 416-01  Of a Beautiful Mind: Literature and Philosophy at Crossroads
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*Cross-listed with PHIL 294-01*

‘What is the beautiful?’ Plato, Hippias Major

‘To love beauty is to see light’ Victor Hugo

A 2012 New York Times article entitled “Is Philosophy Literature?” raised the following question: “Do people read philosophy for pleasure?” The question clearly suggests that the article’s author links “pleasure” to literature. Indeed, in a general manner, literature is understood as a work of aesthetic language and, above all, imagination through its narrative, spatiotemporal, mythical, and symbolic manifestations. There are those who would assert that philosophy is reflection on the whole of reality- the study of ideas about knowledge. In other words, literature is beautiful and philosophy is intelligent (smart); however, these distinctions about pleasure and rationality are neither radical nor absolute. Conversely, we may explore how literature “makes you think” and how philosophy delves into the “pleasure of the text”. While distinct, the two disciplines are mutually dependent, to some extent.

This course scrutinizes the encounter or dialogue between literary and philosophical texts in light of critical theory, as well as through the examination of case-topics (e.g. moral choice, human freedom, commitment, gender issues). Readings will include writings by Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Gérard Genette, Paul Ricoeur, Julia Kristeva, Simone de Beauvoir and Léopold Sédar Senghor. We will follow three axes:

1. The discovery of literature as a vehicle for philosophical ideas

2. A discussion of philosophical content posed by the literature in view

3. A discussion of critical theories that blend literature and philosophy, including Narratology, Structuralism, Phenomenology, Deconstruction and Feminist theories.

This interdisciplinary course is taught in English. In order for it to count toward the French major or minor, students are required to write their papers in French and to meet every three weeks for a ‘Café philo-littéraire’.

GERM 337-01  Dead White Men
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-03, MCST 337-01 and PHIL 294-03; taught in English* The shift away from feudal theocracy (when divinity grounded truth and political authority) to secular capitalist modernity has entailed unforeseen re-conceptualizations of both time and of the distinction between truth and fiction—the latter approaching extinction, as truth is increasingly perceived as a culturally arbitrary (hence fictional) construct. To examine these modern mutations of the central categories of time and truth-fiction, the course will pursue two parallel itineraries. On the one hand, the two competing modes of the secularization of time, as (a) human history progressing toward a certain telos (end or aim), and (b) as a machinic time within which inter-relations within an autonomous structure (one not controlled by humans) determine its participants. And, on the other hand, the replacement of faith with modern philosophy, ideology, and biopolitics. No prerequisites.

GERM 394-01  Concepts of Freedom from Aristotle to Agamben
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 216 David Martyn
*Taught in English* "Free choice" is a concept we can neither explain nor do without. Democracy, the "free" market, the emancipation movements of the 20th century: these and other institutions could not function without the assumption that humans are free agents; but a coherent theory of free agency has yet to be invented. This course will approach the problem of free will by historicizing it. We will read authors from Greek antiquity to the present to understand what freedom meant at different junctures in the history of thought. In the process, we will discover just how peculiar to our own capitalist and secular epoch our notion of freedom is. Discussion topics will include free will in Stoic, religious, and secular thought; the emergence of modern individualism and its effect on the concept of freedom; freedom between Marxism and capitalism; the questionable freedom of "coming out" (Foucault, Judith Butler); art, science, politics, and love as forms of freedom (Badiou); freedom and states of exception (Agamben). Selected readings from Epictetus, Augustine, Luther, Leibniz, Kant, Marx, Hannah Arendt, Milton Friedman, and the other authors mentioned. Course requirements: one reading response per week, two 6-page papers. Core course for the Critical Theory Concentration.

INTL 294-01  Photography: Histories and Practices of an International Medium
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel
*Cross-listed with MCST 294-01; first day attendance required*

INTL 367-01  Postcolonial Theory
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 105 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01*

INTL 394-01  Cultures of Neoliberalism
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Adamson, Gursel
*Cross-listed with MCST 394-01; first day attendance required* Neoliberal theory posits the relative autonomy of the economic sphere from both culture and politics. Rejecting this assumption, the course will give students the ability to understand the interconnection of economic, political and cultural practices as well as the ways that economic theories are shaped by cultural assumptions about what constitutes a person, a life, a society, etc. We will read some of the foundational texts from the neoliberal school of economic thought (Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman) alongside more contemporary reflections on the culture and politics of neoliberalism from the fields of Anthropology, Geography, Philosophy, Cultural Studies, and Critical Race Studies. Additionally, we will look at both the global institutions that craft and enforce economic policies as well as their impacts in multiple international contexts. This course will emphasize interdisciplinarity and original research. Finally, in addition to key texts we will examine recent documentaries that attempt to render economic structures visible.

MCST 294-01  Photography: Histories and Practices of an International Medium
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-01; first day attendance required*

MCST 337-01  Dead White Men
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with GERM 337-01, ENGL 394-03, and PHIL 294-03* Today we often hear people dismiss the Western (mostly European) philosophical tradition as a bunch of “dead white men.” In other words, the argument goes, these thinkers harbored such passe notions as universal truths, a universal subject, and an individual in total control of itself and endowed with a pure reason unadulterated by rhetoric, imagination, fiction, and politics. Why should we bother with “dead white men” now that we understand that truth depends on historical context, that the self is decentered by the unconscious, that identity is constituted by gender, race, class, and other cultural factors, that truth is linked to power, and that ideology is omnipresent? Unfortunately, this all-too-familiar attitude overlooks its own faulty presupposition: it presumes a clear-cut break between philosophical tradition and contemporary thought, as if contemporary thought had no tradition out of which it emerged and could, therefore, merely discard what preceded it. Hence the popularity of phrases like “philosophy is dead.” It is all the more ironic to see this attitude prevail in the West at the very moment that multiculturalism has become our cause celebre : all cultural traditions are supposed to be “respected,” except the West’s own tradition. (Perhaps as a new way for the West to reinstate surreptitiously its superiority as the sole culture with no tradition?) This course pursues a close reading of texts by various “dead white men” as the unconscious (i.e., repressed and, for that matter, all the more powerful) undercurrent of contemporary thought. Assigned texts will include: Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Pascal, Spinoza, Kant, Hegel, Marx, as well as texts by twentieth-century thinkers that stress the dependence of contemporary thought on philosophy. No pre-knowledge required; all readings in English. With different reading lists this course may be taken more than once for credit . Alternate years. (4 credits)

MCST 394-01  Cultures of Neoliberalism
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Adamson, Gursel
*Cross-listed with INTL 394-01; first day attendance required*

MUSI 155-01  Music and Freedom
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mazullo
*First Year Course only* The concept of freedom both lies at the heart of human rights discourse and provides the spark that ignites any number of musical movements. Intended for students with strong interests in the intersection between the performing arts and the humanities, this course serves as an introduction both to the concept of freedom as it has developed in Western societies since the late eighteenth century and to the history of music in the cultures that have fostered such ideals. It intends to introduce students to the study of music (and, by association, the arts in general) from social, cultural, and critical perspectives, using the framework of freedom as a common theme. It also aims to contextualize the discourse of human rights within the history of arts and ideas, providing students with a sense of the term's changing meanings and emphases over time and across space. We will explore traditions in both Western art music (also known as "classical music") and American popular (recorded) music in a search for the ways in which music has served social-political ideologies -- overtly through the aims of its composers and performers, and unintentionally through the conditions of its reception. Historical readings on the concept of freedom from a variety of disciplinary perspectives (history, philosophy, political science, critical theory) will introduce students to several of the most influential thinkers on the subject and the central concerns and questions that animate the discourse on freedom. No prior background in music is required for the course, although it is assumed that students will have a true interest not only in popular music of the twentieth century but also other traditions and genres, such as opera and symphonic music. "Freedom" signifies a number of ideals, which operate in real-political and abstract-aesthetic realms. Music can represent, convey, and "mean" freedom in infinite ways, and it is the intention of this course to introduce students to this diversity.

PHIL 294-01  Of a Beautiful Mind: Literature and Philosophy at Crossroads
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*Cross-listed with FREN 416-01*

PHIL 294-02  Medieval Political Thought
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Andrew Latham
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-02 and POLI 266-01* Interested in the roots of contemporary political life (including issues such as state sovereignty, separation of church and state, constitutionalism, just war, property rights, “the people”, nationalism, democracy, rule-of-law, and human rights)? Then this course is for you. Through a careful examination of the political thought of Latin Christendom (Western Europe) during the later Middle Ages (c. 1050-c. 1550) we explore the deep roots of the contemporary world order, demonstrating the ways in which medieval thinkers such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of Salisbury, John of Paris, Giles of Rome, Marsilius of Padua, Dante, Las Casas, ibn Sina, Moshe ben Maimon, and ibn Rushd “invented” many of the ideas that we – presumptuously and erroneously – have come to associate with the modern era. As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields (such as Philosophy or Classics) who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in political theory/philosophy or the medieval roots of contemporary political life. This course fulfills the Political Science Department’s Theory Requirement.

PHIL 294-03  Dead White Men
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-01, GERM 337-01 and MCST 337-01; taught in English* The shift away from feudal theocracy (when divinity grounded truth and political authority) to secular capitalist modernity has entailed unforeseen re-conceptualizations of both time and of the distinction between truth and fiction—the latter approaching extinction, as truth is increasingly perceived as a culturally arbitrary (hence fictional) construct. To examine these modern mutations of the central categories of time and truth-fiction, the course will pursue two parallel itineraries. On the one hand, the two competing modes of the secularization of time, as (a) human history progressing toward a certain telos (end or aim), and (b) as a machinic time within which inter-relations within an autonomous structure (one not controlled by humans) determine its participants. And, on the other hand, the replacement of faith with modern philosophy, ideology, and biopolitics. No prerequisites.

POLI 160-01  Foundations of Political Theory
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
 
POLI 266-01  Medieval Political Thought
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Andrew Latham
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-02 and PHIL 294-02* Interested in the roots of contemporary political life (including issues such as state sovereignty, separation of church and state, constitutionalism, just war, property rights, “the people”, nationalism, democracy, rule-of-law, and human rights)? Then this course is for you. Through a careful examination of the political thought of Latin Christendom (Western Europe) during the later Middle Ages (c. 1050-c. 1550) we explore the deep roots of the contemporary world order, demonstrating the ways in which medieval thinkers such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of Salisbury, John of Paris, Giles of Rome, Marsilius of Padua, Dante, Las Casas, ibn Sina, Moshe ben Maimon, and ibn Rushd “invented” many of the ideas that we – presumptuously and erroneously – have come to associate with the modern era. As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields (such as Philosophy or Classics) who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in political theory/philosophy or the medieval roots of contemporary political life. This course fulfills the Political Science Department’s Theory Requirement.

RELI 311-01  Ritual
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Erik Davis
*Priority given to declared Major/Minors of Religious Studies and Critical Theory Concentration, permission of the instructor required for all others*

SOCI 194-01  Moral Panics and the Other
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Khaldoun Samman
*First Year Course only* This course will focus primarily on how fears spread and become moral panics of our time. We will deal with a number of issues like pedophilia, gangs, and drug scares, but fear of Muslims and Islam will be the most visible example of the course. Through the works of Foucault (discursive formations and incitement), Laclau and Mouffe (hegemony and articulation), and others, this course will attempt to restore the most significant contribution Moral Panic theory offers: the constitutive nature of moral panics in the production of new racial and political identities. A major sub theme of the course will be to trace the incitement process through certain networks and what sociologists call “claims makers” and “moral entrepreneurs” (think tanks, groups like Jihad Watch, the Military Industrial complex), especially right wing groups but also liberals, mainstream feminists, academics, and other experts. We will also look at the construction of crime waves, but of a particular sort, the kind that reconstitutes the way we understand cultural differences, human rights, immigration, culture and crime, gender inequality, patriarchy, domestic abuse, military occupation, and so on.



WGSS 240-01  Comparative Feminisms: Whiteness and Postcolonialisms
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-02* This course brings together discourses that have remained somewhat parallel and unrelated--Whiteness Studies and Postcolonial Studies. It is based on the premise that 'whiteness' as an academic/social framework stems from and is intertwined with social and political identity-based movements (feminist, critical race, etc.). In other words, studies of the intersection of gender, race, class, and nation initiated in the post-colonizing imagination seeks to shake up paradigms of power, and whiteness studies shares in this effort. This course explores where and how the notion of 'whiteness' converges and diverges from post-colonialism.

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Spring 2015 Class Schedule - updated November 25, 2014 at 01:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
ENGL 394-05  Short Forms: Novella, Essay, Aphorism from Boccaccio to Brecht
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-02; What can a short text do that a long text can’t? This course will look for answers to this question by reading and discussing short prose works from the Renaissance to the 20th century. We will pursue the history of the novella – which is not a short novel but a literary form in its own right – from its emergence in the Italian Renaissance (Boccaccio) to its modern adaptations in German romanticism (Tieck) and French realism (Flaubert). We will explore the complexities of the essay from Michel de Montaigne, who created the genre in the 16th century, through Francis Bacon, whose scientific method relied on it, to its use as a hybrid form between science and literature in the early twentieth century (Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Sigmund Freud). And we will focus on the form that epitomizes the rhetorical virtue of brevitas: the aphorism, from the 17th century moralists (La Rochefoucauld), through the secular pietism of the 18th century (Lichtenberg), romanticism (Goethe), the 19th century’s answers to nihilism (Schopenhauer, Nietzsche), to the crypticism of Kafka, the irony of Brecht, and the uncompromising pessimism of Adorno. Discussion questions will include: what are the literary and rhetorical effects of brevity? How can words gain by being few? What happens when texts get longer? How is literature a form of knowledge and science a form of literature? Requirements: 3 mid-length papers with revisions; one class presentation. Taught in English, but texts will be made available to those who can and would like to read them in the original.

GERM 394-01  Metaphysics in Secular Thought
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-01 and POLI 294-03* A widespread tendency in contemporary Western societies is to associate metaphysics with religion, if not with what is often dismissively called “irrationality.” This course will dismantle this myth by turning to the tradition of European philosophy and political theory, mostly since the seventeenth century, in their relation to theology and their reception by twentieth-century critical theory, in order to examine the ways in which secular thought emerges not as an alternative to metaphysics, something which thought cannot supersede anyway, but simply as an alternative way—and one that by no means is more rationally grounded than religion—of dealing with the very same metaphysical questions and issues that concern religion, from the meaning of life to the imminence of death, and from (real or imagined) guilt to the hope for redemption. Readings will include: Giorgio Agamben, Aristotle, Talal Asad, Augustine of Hippo, George Bataille, Kenneth Burke, Emile Durkheim, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, Karl Marx, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Marcel Mauss, Carl Schmitt, Baruch Spinoza, Alberto Toscano, Max Weber. Readings and class in English. No pre-knowledge required.



GERM 394-02  Short Forms: Novella, Essay, Aphorism from Boccaccio to Brecht
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 David Martyn
*Taught in English; cross-listed with ENGL 394-05* What can a short text do that a long text can’t? This course will look for answers to this question by reading and discussing short prose works from the Renaissance to the 20th century. We will pursue the history of the novella – which is not a short novel but a literary form in its own right – from its emergence in the Italian Renaissance (Boccaccio) to its modern adaptations in German romanticism (Tieck) and French realism (Flaubert). We will explore the complexities of the essay from Michel de Montaigne, who created the genre in the 16th century, through Francis Bacon, whose scientific method relied on it, to its use as a hybrid form between science and literature in the early twentieth century (Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Sigmund Freud). And we will focus on the form that epitomizes the rhetorical virtue of brevitas: the aphorism, from the 17th century moralists (La Rochefoucauld), through the secular pietism of the 18th century (Lichtenberg), romanticism (Goethe), the 19th century’s answers to nihilism (Schopenhauer, Nietzsche), to the crypticism of Kafka, the irony of Brecht, and the uncompromising pessimism of Adorno. Discussion questions will include: what are the literary and rhetorical effects of brevity? How can words gain by being few? What happens when texts get longer? How is literature a form of knowledge and science a form of literature? Requirements: 3 mid-length papers with revisions; one class presentation. Taught in English, but texts will be made available to those who can and would like to read them in the original.

INTL 300-01  Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with WGSS 300-01*

PHIL 394-01  Philosophical Worlds: Martin Heidegger and Ludwig Wittgenstein
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Diane Michelfelder
If the history of philosophy in the West were turned into a Hollywood major motion picture, it is likely the director would cast Martin Heidegger and Ludwig Wittgenstein as heroes of two contrasting philosophical worlds—Heidegger as a key figure and instigator of the European traditions of existentialism and phenomenology, and Wittgenstein as helping to spark the Anglo-American tradition of analytic philosophy. But what if an “indie” filmmaker were to wonder if Heidegger and Wittgenstein had more in common than is usually thought? What if the “and” in the phrase “Heidegger and Wittgenstein” were taken to mean they were philosophical buddies, not only because of the skepticism toward conventional ways of doing philosophy that both of them shared?

In recent years a number of scholars have begun to explore these questions, and we’ll be doing that in this course as well. In the first half, we will toggle back and forth between readings by Heidegger and Wittgenstein; in the course’s second half, we will look at contemporary philosophical reflection on these two thinkers. Selections from works such as Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations, On Certainty, Culture and Value, and The Big Typescript, along with Heidegger’s Being and Time; Poetry, Language, Thought; On the Way to Language and the Zollikon Seminars, will inform our seminar-style class discussions. A particular focus of the class will be on the relationships among philosophical truth, ordinary language, and ordinary experience in the world. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of the professor.



POLI 160-01  Foundations of Political Theory
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Franklin Adler
 
POLI 294-03  Metaphysics in Secular Thought
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01 and RELI 394-01; counts as humanities general distribution credit*

RELI 394-01  Metaphysics in Secular Thought
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01 and POLI 294-03; for description see German Studies listing*

SOCI 272-01  Social Theories
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 Khaldoun Samman
 
SOCI 294-02  Global Capitalism
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 204 Khaldoun Samman
There has been a very significant body of sknowledge that analyzes the historical emergence of the global political economy we have lived under for the past few centuries, how it evolved, expanded, and incorporated the entire spatiality of our planet. In this course we will trace first the mystification of capitalism as a historical system, looking critically at how academics have studied it in fields like economics, political science, and sociology. We will then turn our attention to how we may indeed particularize it as having both a temporal and spatial origin, and that its territorial expansion has had class, racial, and gender implications. We will look at other consequences of global capitalism, with particular focus on how capitalism has much to do with the present ecological disasters, declining food nutrition, and the continued appropriation of indigenous land and subsistence. No prerequisites.

WGSS 300-01  Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with INTL 300-01* This course will focus on feminist and queer postmodern and postcolonial literature and film. We will study how the terms 'feminist' and 'queer' meet and separate in 20th century culture and politics. We will seek to understand and work with definitions of the 'postmodern' and the ‘postcolonial.’ Some themes that bring them into the same conversation are: negotiating prescribed and constructed identities, playing with the notion of 'post,' critiquing existing frameworks and fashioning unprecedented ones, and addressing the material conditions of modernity and postmodernity. Some authors included are Reinaldo Arenas, Theresa Cha, Trinh Minh-Ha, and Gayatri Spivak. Films by Ursula Biemann (Switzerland) and Alka Sadat (Afghanistan) are included

WGSS 330-01  Democracies, Feminisms, Capitalisms
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
Through the organizing notion of Object, we will study the intertwining of democracy and capitalism, with a brief historical overview of both but looking primarily at formations in the 20th and 21st centuries—from liberal nation-state versions through postsocialisms to neoliberal-neocolonial globalization. In this transnational comparative context, we will focus on how various feminisms have negotiated these intertwined political/economic theories, at once emerging from them, claiming a place in them, as well as self-defining against their different formations. We will explore how liberal, second- and third-wave, socialist, women of color, radical transnational, and indigenous feminisms deploy the notion of Object in addressing issues of citizenship, violence, labor, the environment, cultural representation, etc. as ways of tackling this complicated relationship with diverse forms of capitalism and democracy.

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