Class Schedules

classroom.jpg

Fall 2015 »      Spring 2016 »     

Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated July 3, 2015 at 06:56 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
ART 264-01  Contemporary Art and Critical Theory
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot
This course examines the developments in contemporary art focusing on the last three decades. The course will start with the discussion of the break of the modernist artistic canon in the 1960s, and through a set of themes, move on to analyze the most significant developments in art today. The course covers movements from Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptualism, Performance to the most recent engagement of artists with postmodernism and globalization. Linking discussions of art with pertinent aspects of Critical Theory will facilitate an understanding of current theoretical and issue-based debates that have provide the engine for the art of this period.

FREN 416-01  French Interdisciplinary Studies:French-German Dialogues in Philosophy and Theory
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 213 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in English; cross-listed with GERM 394-01 and POLI 394-03* This course focuses on the dialogue and mutual influence between the French-and German-speaking traditions of political economy and philosophical and theoretical thought, as it becomes evident in the relations among German Idealism, Phenomenology, Existentialism, Psychoanalysis, structuralism, and twentieth-century Critical Theory. In reading the work of influential thinkers in the above fields we shall also examine the structural and conceptual homologies or differences among political economy, abstract thought, and human subjectivity. Beyond Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Jacques Lacan, our readings will include Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jean Laplanche and J. B. Pontalis, Gilles Deleuze, and Robert Pfaller. All readings and class taught in English.*Paper will be written in French for those wishing this course to count for a French major or minor.* If the course has reached its capacity of 20 by the time you register, please contact Prof. Kordela and you'll be allowed to register at the start of the semester.

GERM 314-01  Marx, Nietzsche, Freud
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 214 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with PHIL 214-01; taught in English; core course for Critical Theory* What happens when God dies? And what if he’s always already been dead? Few authors have pursued the consequences of secular modernity as persistently as the three thinkers -- as similarly radical as they are different from one another -- whose works we will study in this course. Focusing on the related domains of ethics, subjectivity, aesthetics, and cultural value, we will explore how modern thought tries, and just as frequently fails, to overcome its religious past. Discussion topics include: the loss of "truth" as a meaningful term; ethics beyond good and evil; alienation, ideology, and false consciousness; art as ersatz God; mourning, trauma, and transience. Readings include all or parts of: Marx, "The Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844" and "The German Ideology"; Nietzsche, "The Gay Science" and "The Genealogy of Morals"; Freud, "Civilization and its Discontents" and "Beyond the Pleasure Principle." Requirements: reading, reading, and reading again. Plus two papers, several reading responses, and an exam.

GERM 394-01  French-German Dialogues in Philosophy and Theory
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 213 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in English; cross-listed with FREN 416-01 and POLI 394-03* This course focuses on the dialogue and mutual influence between the French-and German-speaking traditions of political economy and philosophical and theoretical thought, as it becomes evident in the relations among German Idealism, Phenomenology, Existentialism, Psychoanalysis, structuralism, and twentieth-century Critical Theory. In reading the work of influential thinkers in the above fields we shall also examine the structural and conceptual homologies or differences among political economy, abstract thought, and human subjectivity. Beyond Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Jacques Lacan, our readings will include Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jean Laplanche and J. B. Pontalis, Gilles Deleuze, and Robert Pfaller. All readings and class taught in English.*Paper will be written in French for those wishing this course to count for a French major or minor.* If the capacity of 20 has been reached by the time you register, please contact Prof. Kordela and you will be allowed to register at the start of the semester.

HISP 394-01  Hispanic Studies and Critical Theory
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 215 Justin Butler
*Cross-listed with PHIL 294-03; first day attendance required* Hispanic Studies and Critical Theory will engage a corpus of philosophical texts in order to equip students for advanced literary, cultural, and historical critique. To this end, students will learn key concepts in critical thought as presented by a variety of thinkers such as Marx, Benjamin, Hegel, Althusser, Gramsci, Baudrillard, Adorno, Agamben, Haraway, and Morton. Students will direct their critical understanding to an analysis of select cultural, literary, or filmic texts and events in the field of Hispanism. Such items may range from Gracián’s texts on the accrual of power in the Golden Age court to present day immigration and practices of coyotaje. The course has been designated a core course in the Critical Theory Concentration and is suitable for diverse interests in the humanities. The course will be taugh in English. Hispanic Studies majors and minors will submit written work in Spanish; non-majors and minors, in English.

MUSI 155-01  Music and Freedom
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mazullo
*First Year Course only* The concept of freedom both lies at the heart of human rights discourse and provides the spark that ignites any number of musical movements. Intended for students with strong interests in the intersection between the performing arts and the humanities, this seminar serves as an introduction both to the concept of freedom as it has developed in Western thought since the late 18th century, and to the history of music in the cultures that have fostered such ideals. It intends to introduce students to the study of music (and, by association, the arts in general) from social, cultural, and critical perspectives, using the framework of human rights as a common theme. It also aims to contextualize the discourse of human rights within the history of arts and ideas, providing students with a sense of the term’s changing meanings and emphases over time and across space.

We will explore traditions in both Western art music (opera and symphonic music from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century) and twentieth-century popular music (from the mid-1940s to the present) in a search for the ways in which music has served socio-political ideologies – overtly through the aims of its composers, and unintentionally through the conditions of its reception. Readings on the concept of freedom from a variety of disciplinary perspectives (history, philosophy, political science, critical theory) will introduce students to several of the most influential thinkers on the subject and to the central concerns of the discourse on freedom. In a semester-long course project in several stages, students will devise their own topics on the intersection of music and freedom and/or human rights in contemporary or historical musical contexts of their choosing.

No prior background in music is required for this course, although it is assumed that any student taking it will have a true interest in a variety of musical traditions, including not only familiar popular styles, but opera and symphonic music as well. I take “freedom” to signify a number of ideals, which span real-political and abstract-aesthetic realms. Music can represent, convey, and “mean” freedom in infinite ways, in other words, and it is the intention of this course to expose students to this diversity, opening more questions about music’s relationship to this idea than providing answers. This course is designated as a WA (argumentative writing) course and thus partially fulfills the College’s General Education Requirement in writing. It also counts towards the Concentrations in Critical Theory and Human Rights and Humanitarianism.



PHIL 214-01  Marx, Nietzsche, Freud
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 214 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with GERM 314-01; taught in English; core course for Critical Theory* What happens when God dies? And what if he’s always already been dead? Few authors have pursued the consequences of secular modernity as persistently as the three thinkers -- as similarly radical as they are different from one another -- whose works we will study in this course. Focusing on the related domains of ethics, subjectivity, aesthetics, and cultural value, we will explore how modern thought tries, and just as frequently fails, to overcome its religious past. Discussion topics include: the loss of "truth" as a meaningful term; ethics beyond good and evil; alienation, ideology, and false consciousness; art as ersatz God; mourning, trauma, and transience. Readings include all or parts of: Marx, "The Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844" and "The German Ideology"; Nietzsche, "The Gay Science" and "The Genealogy of Morals"; Freud, "Civilization and its Discontents" and "Beyond the Pleasure Principle." Requirements: reading, reading, and reading again. Plus two papers, several reading responses, and an exam.

POLI 160-01  Foundations of Political Theory
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 David Blaney
 
POLI 394-03  French-German Dialogues in Philosophy and Theory
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 213 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in English; cross-listed with FREN 416-01 and GERM 394-01* This course focuses on the dialogue and mutual influence between the French-and German-speaking traditions of political economy and philosophical and theoretical thought, as it becomes evident in the relations among German Idealism, Phenomenology, Existentialism, Psychoanalysis, structuralism, and twentieth-century Critical Theory. In reading the work of influential thinkers in the above fields we shall also examine the structural and conceptual homologies or differences among political economy, abstract thought, and human subjectivity. Beyond Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Jacques Lacan, our readings will include Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jean Laplanche and J. B. Pontalis, Gilles Deleuze, and Robert Pfaller. All readings and class taught in English.*Paper will be written in French for those wishing this course to count for a French major or minor.* If the course reaches its enrollment limit of 20 by the time you register, please contact Prof. Kordela and you'll be allowed to register at the start of the semester.

RUSS 151-01  "Things Don't Like Me": The Material World and Why It Matters
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 212 Julia Chadaga
 

top of page »

Spring 2016 Class Schedule - updated July 3, 2015 at 06:56 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
ENGL 367-01  Postcolonial Theory
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with INTL 367-01*

GERM 365-01  Kafka: Gods, Animals, and Other Species of Modernity
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in German*

INTL 367-01  Postcolonial Theory
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 David Moore
Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01*

POLI 160-01  Foundations of Political Theory
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 216 David Blaney
 
SOCI 272-01  Social Theories
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 STAFF
 
SOCI 290-01  Colonialism, Modernity, and Identities in the Middle East
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Khaldoun Samman
 
WGSS 300-01  Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 STAFF
*Cross-listed with INTL 300-01*

top of page »