Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

ECON 113-01

Financial Accounting

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: Accounting is the language of business. One of the objectives of this course is to learn that "language." The emphasis will be on understanding financial statements both for profit and non-profit organizations. International accounting, ethics and investment decisions are also covered. This course is designed for students who desire an understanding of the elements of accounting as a component of a liberal arts education as well as for those who would like to study further in accounting or business. Counts for Group B elective. (4 credits)

ECON 116-01

Organizational Leadership

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: This course will combine a theoretical background with hands-on experience that will permit a student to begin their career-long development of their leadership talent. The traditional model of a great leader was one that was tough, visionary and determined. Today scholars of leadership have argued that a great leader is self-aware, motivated, empathetic and skilled socially. Which model is right? Are there factors common to all great leaders? We will learn from Aristotle, Winston Churchill, Steve Jobs, Ernest Shackelton's ill-fated trip to the South Pole, and the latest scholarly research. Extensive use will be made of case studies from the Harvard MBA program and guest speakers. (4 credits)

ECON 119-01

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-02

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-03

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-04

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-05

Principles of Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes: *First day attendance required*

A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 194-01

Business Negotiations

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Joyce Minor

Notes:

ECON 221-01

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes: This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 221-02

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes: This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 225-01

Comparative Economic Systems

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 225-01*

This course examines the workings of economic systems from the perspective of the incentives facing the firm and consumer. The course provides an introduction to the economics of information and organization which is used to evaluate resource allocation under the specific institutional environment of different economic systems. Our understanding of the incentive system is then used to evaluate the overall economic system. The focus of the course is primarily on the U.S. economy, Japan and the former Soviet Union/Russia. As time permits the course may examine China, Germany and Central Europe. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. Cross-listed with International Studies 225. (4 credits)

ECON 294-01

Introduction to Entrepreneurship

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Kate Reiling

Notes:

ECON 294-02

Health Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes:

ECON 356-01

Capital Markets

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 150
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: The structure, operation, regulation and economic role of financial markets and institutions; fundamental security analysis and present-value techniques; forecasts of earnings and analysis of yields on stocks and bonds; the portfolio theory and characteristic lines, betas and mutual-fund ratings; futures and options markets. This course counts as a Group A elective. (4 credits)


ECON 358-01

Introduction to Securities Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Joyce Minor

Notes: This course will primarily focus on equity securities analysis (stocks) from the perspective of institutional (Wall Stree) investors. Topics will include industry analysis and forecasting, financial statement analysis, fundamental company analysis and valuation methods. Students will form industry groups and will each research a company in that industry. Students will build complete historical and projected financial statement models in Excel. The end product of the course will be a company report written by each student. This course counts as a Group B elective. (4 credits)

ECON 361-01

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 361-02

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 371-01

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: This course develops in detail theories of the determination of national income, employment and the price level. The foundations and mechanics of neo-classical and Keynesian models of the aggregate economy are studied and modern syntheses of these approaches are explored. Considerable attention will be paid to current behavior of the national economy. (4 credits)

ECON 371-02

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes: This course develops in detail theories of the determination of national income, employment and the price level. The foundations and mechanics of neo-classical and Keynesian models of the aggregate economy are studied and modern syntheses of these approaches are explored. Considerable attention will be paid to current behavior of the national economy. (4 credits)

ECON 381-01

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: *Students that register for ECON 381-01 must register for ECON 381-L1*

This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-02

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 109
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: *Students that register for ECON 381-02 must register for ECON 381-L2*

This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L1

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L2

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 394-01

Game Theory

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes:

ECON 457-01

Finance

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: This course concentrates on developing and applying economic principles to the decision making process of the firm. Typically the course is taught from the viewpoint of the financial manager of a firm (profit or non-profit). Traditional corporate finance topics will be covered, including: cash flow management, sources of capital, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and financial structure. Recent theoretical developments in the capital asset pricing model and portfolio theory also will be examined. Actual case studies of financial decision making often are included in the course. (4 credits)

ECON 490-01

Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: *Cross-listed with PSYC 490-01*

This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas. Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. Cross-listed with Psychology 490. (4 credit)

ECON 494-01

Economics of Public Policy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes:

Fall 2016

ECON 113-01

Financial Accounting

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: Accounting is the language of business. One of the objectives of this course is to learn that "language." The emphasis will be on understanding financial statements both for profit and non-profit organizations. International accounting, ethics and investment decisions are also covered. This course is designed for students who desire an understanding of the elements of accounting as a component of a liberal arts education as well as for those who would like to study further in accounting or business. Counts for Group B elective. (4 credits)

ECON 113-02

Financial Accounting

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 100
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: Accounting is the language of business. One of the objectives of this course is to learn that "language." The emphasis will be on understanding financial statements both for profit and non-profit organizations. International accounting, ethics and investment decisions are also covered. This course is designed for students who desire an understanding of the elements of accounting as a component of a liberal arts education as well as for those who would like to study further in accounting or business. Counts for Group B elective. (4 credits)

ECON 119-01

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: *First Year Course only* This class provides a foundation in economic theory and addresses many major topics in economics. We will discuss and apply economic theory to behavioral and policy questions and develop tools needed to critically evaluate international events and policies. The first part of the course covers microeconomics. Here we focus on the economic decisions of individual households, workers and firms and how these decisions interact in markets. The second part of the course covers macroeconomics. Here, we focus on the study of economic aggregates (e.g., GDP, inflation, and unemployment) and the forces that cause them to change over time. The first objective of this class is to introduce students to a wide range of economic theory and to help students understand how markets work to allocate goods, resources and income in society. The second objective is to provide students proper scientific methods and tools to discuss economic issues, solve economic problems and make good policy decisions. This course also aims to provide economic majors the appropriate background and foundation for future coursework in the economics major.


ECON 119-02

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes: *First Year Course only* Principles of Economics is an introduction to the concepts, tools, and ideas that shape modern economic theory. We'll divide the course into two broad sections, each focusing on a main area of economics: micro and macroeconomics.

In microeconomics, we'll get to understand the process that helps individual consumers and firms make their (economic) decisions and define some notions of efficiency. Some relevant questions that can be answered here are the following: how do consumers choose to allocate their resources between two different goods? What role do prices and income play in these decisions? How do firms choose their production scale and their inputs to production? Why should we worry about monopolies? Are their choices "efficient"? If they are not, can the government do something? In macroeconomics, the focus shifts towards the behavior of consumers and firms as an aggregate. Some relevant questions that can be answered here are the following: what causes unemployment? Why are standards of living a lot better today than 50 years ago? (Or, for that matter, 200 years ago?) Why do some countries grow over time, but others don't? Why are there (economic) recessions and booms? What role does money play into this? What can the government do to "improve" the economy?


ECON 119-03

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-04

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-05

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-06

Principles of Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 221-01

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes: This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 227-01

Adam Smith and Karl Marx

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Vasant Sukhatme

Notes: The objective of this course is to study the lives and the original writings of two of the most important scholars in the history of economic thought. Adam Smith, the patron saint of laissez-faire capitalism, was the founding father of modern economics, as well as the intellectual predecessor of Marx. Marx's historical and political vision embraced an equally large panorama. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 229-01

World Economic History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: This course presents a broad overview of world economic history. It uses concepts and models developed in Principles of Economics to explore how the interplay between geography, institutions, and technology has influenced material living standards from the Stone Age to the present. In particular, we will study the causes and consequences of long-term structural forces such as the agriculture, industrial and informational revolutions, the Malthusian trap and demographic transition, slavery, globalization, and the rise of government. We will also explore more cyclical phenomena such as wars, financial crises, economic depressions and hyper-inflations. Students will learn how economic historians use evidence to make sense of the past and the role economic history plays in guiding current policy debates. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. Offered once per year. (4 credits)

ECON 256-01

Intro to Investment Banking

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 150
  • Instructor: Joyce Minor

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course will provide a one semester overview of investment banks. The role of equity capital markets, debt capital markets, research, sales and trading, and investment banking will be covered. Basic corporate finance techniques will be introduced. Current financial issues in the business world will be reviewed. Classroom work, case studies, and outside speakers will be utilized. The key objectives of this course are for students to obtain a solid understanding of the various disciplines within the investment banking field and to prepare themselves for interviews and internships. The course is well suited for students who are contemplating a career in investment banking, banking, or corporate finance. This course counts as a Group B elective and does not serve as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 294-01

Climate Change: Science, Economics and Policy

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Bradtmiller, West

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 294-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor* The causes and effects of climate change are inextricably linked with the global economy. The combustion of fossil fuels produces carbon dioxide, which traps energy near Earth’s surface and leads to warmer average global temperatures. The combustion of fossil fuels also forms the backbone of the modern economy, fueling cars, power plants, and everything in between. This team-taught course will provide a framework in which to consider the costs and benefits of fossil fuel consumption in the present, but also over the coming decades and centuries. We will use concepts from climate science and environmental economics to help evaluate existing and proposed policy interventions designed to reduce fossil fuel consumption, and we will similarly consider possible technological solutions to slow or even reverse climate change. We will spend a significant amount of time exploring how the preceding topics factor into Integrated Assessment Models. Governments and NGOs use these models to combine scientific and socioeconomic information in order to predict the outcomes of various climate and policy scenarios. These are the state of the art in climate science, economics and policy; students will be exposed to several of the most commonly used models and to research from their critics. We hope to attract a diverse group of students with varying academic interests; the only prerequisite for this course is ECON 119: Principles of Economics. Students registering for the course as ECON 294 will receive credit toward the general distribution requirement in social sciences; those registering for ENVI 294 will receive credit towards the natural science requirement. The course counts as a 200A course in the economics major.

ECON 294-02

Money and Banking

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Samuel Schulhofer-Wohl

Notes: Banks and other financial institutions play a central role in allocating resources in modern economies. How exactly do financial institutions do this? Why can their failures be so devastating to the economy as a whole, as the 2007-2008 financial crisis demonstrated? And how does public policy influence banks, financial markets and, through them, the rest of the economy? This course examines the structure of banks and other financial institutions, their

relationship to the rest of the economy, and public policies affecting these institutions, especially monetary policy. We will begin by studying how financial institutions allocate scarce investment resources, with a particular focus on the role of interest rates and the question of whether modern financial markets allocate resources efficiently. Next, we will study how financial institutions are regulated and supervised. Finally, we will examine the role of money

and monetary policy, including both standard approaches to monetary policy in "normal" times and the extraordinary policy approaches that central banks have employed in the aftermath of the recent financial crisis. The only prerequisite for this course is Economics 119: Principles of Economics. This course counts as a Group E elective.

ECON 353-01

Managerial Accounting

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: Planning is the key to business success. How do firms plan for the future? Setting objectives and budgets. Evaluating and rewarding employee performance. Controlling inventory, cash budgeting, and capital budgeting. Extensive use of case studies and group work. This course counts as a Group B elective. (4 credits)


ECON 361-01

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Vasant Sukhatme

Notes: Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 361-02

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Vasant Sukhatme

Notes: Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 371-01

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes: This course develops in detail theories of the determination of national income, employment and the price level. The foundations and mechanics of neo-classical and Keynesian models of the aggregate economy are studied and modern syntheses of these approaches are explored. Considerable attention will be paid to current behavior of the national economy. (4 credits)

ECON 371-02

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes: This course develops in detail theories of the determination of national income, employment and the price level. The foundations and mechanics of neo-classical and Keynesian models of the aggregate economy are studied and modern syntheses of these approaches are explored. Considerable attention will be paid to current behavior of the national economy. (4 credits)

ECON 381-01

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-02

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L1

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L2

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 394-01

China's Modern Economy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 394-01* In the past three decades, China is one of the most dynamic and fastest growing countries in the world. Why has China been growing so fast in the last three decades? What are the keys to develop a successful business in China? How does the emergence of China affect the world economy? This course is designed to answer the above questions using a general framework developed for the Chinese economy. China remains a communist country with a significant legacy of a command economy. But it is also a market

economy. Understanding this mixture - capitalism with Chinese characters - is a major aim of this course. We will begin with several classes on the historical development of the Chinese economy. This includes the nature of the command economy developed during the Maoist era and the period of economic reform under Deng Xiaoping. Then we will investigate the main players of such an economy (central/local governments and various types of firms). The next is to analyze the three growth engines: globalization, industrialization and urbanization, and to show how they are interacted. We will also study the distorted state financial system and its implication on external imbalances. The last part of the course will be on the future of the Chinese economy.


ECON 405-01

Industrial Organization

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: This course will extend beyond the conventional structure-conduct-performance framework of industrial organization to focus on the theoretical models that inform the discipline and their empirical applications. In particular, students will use microeconomics and game theory to study models of imperfect competition and understand the implications for consumer welfare. We will analyze firm behavior and strategic interactions such as price discrimination, predatory pricing, limit pricing and investment under different market structures. We will also discuss various public policies that affect the structure of markets and the behavior of firms, specifically regulation, deregulation and antitrust laws. Every year. (4 credits)

ECON 426-01

International Economic Development

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: This course will apply the tools of economic analysis to gain an understanding of economic development problems and their solutions. Patterns of economic development in an historical and dynamic context will be examined. The central role of agriculture and the problem of technological change in agriculture will also be examined. Other topics will include neo-classical growth models, domestic and international economic policies, international trade, foreign aid, external debt, technology transfer, rural-urban migration and income distribution. (4 credits)

ECON 444-01

Honors Seminar

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *Permission of instructor required*

An honors seminar to enhance the senior capstone requirement.


ECON 481-01

Advanced Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course will introduce advanced topics in applied econometrics. Among other topics, it will examine limited dependent variable models, vector autoregression and advanced time series techniques, simultaneous equations models and the econometrics of panel data estimation. Although the emphasis will be on applied work, the course will also examine the underlying mathematical structure of these estimation methods. (4 credits)