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Environmental Studies

Endocrine Disrupters and the Pill

Introduction
How EDs Work
Our Stolen Future
Drugs in the Environment
Examples of EDs
Government Testing
Laws
The Pill as an ED
History of the Pill
Case Study: Coastal Waters
Case Study: Fish
Case Study: Men in Italy
Solutions
What you can do!
Further Information

Comments & questions to:
khornbach@macalester.edu



Involved Organizations


    Several organizations are involved in the issue of Endocrine Disrupters, which you can become involved with further to help facilitate change. The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) has a large section of their website dedicated to the problem of toxics. While they do not focus on types of toxics, they focus on topics such as Pesticides and Toxics in the Home. They do not specifically dedicate any part of their work to the end of Endocrine Disrupters, but instead concentrate on helping people to see what chemicals are hazardous, and possible alternatives to these chemicals. Like NRDC, many larger organizations such as Greenpeace and Sierra Club see the mounting problem of toxics, but often do not have large campaigns that are currently occurring. Other organizations, such as Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides (NCAP) and the Pesticide Action Network (PAN), focus solely on the issue of pesticides, looking at their overall negative health problems, noting their place in disrupting the endocrine system.
    While many environmental organizations focus on pesticides, there are a growing number of women's environmental groups that are beginning to think and speak about the issues of synthetic chemicals as they relate to women, in particular to birth control pills and hormone replacement therapies. Organizations such as the Network for Women's Health and the Environment in Ontario, the Women's Environmental Network in Britain and the Women's Healthy Environments Network (WHEN) have all looked at the problems posed by synthetic chemicals in our world.  Citizen involvement and environmental interest in the issue of endocrine disrupters seems to be dwindling with more and more ED websites becoming inactive. For organizations to pay attention to issues, they must often be flashy or the new thing. EDs are neither, but are still an important issue, where citizens can affect change through spreading the word about the problems of EDs and letting politicians know this is an important issue to you. EDs can be dealt with; the right steps simply must be taken.




Last updated:  5/2/2006

 


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Comments and questions to khornbach@macalester.edu