Monday, April 30
5:00 PM
From the Twin Cities to Paris from Dakar to the Twin Cities: Immigration in France and the US from Various Perspectives
Coordinated by Joëlle Vitiello

Clare Ryan, ‘08

Principles and Reality of Child Immigration in France: Working with the League of Human Rights

Clare’s internship in Paris with the League des Droits de l'Homme opened her eyes to the reality of French immigration law, particularly through her contact with unaccompanied minors who had been arrested at the border and were not allowed to enter France. She was able to counsel these young people over the telephone on issues of asylum, human trafficing, uncooperative police, and dangerous living conditions. She says: “ I hope that sharing my experiences will help reveal the hidden cost of immigration policy on these children.”

Sokhna Nata Samb
Academic Dean at Lincoln International High School
From Dakar to the Twin Cities

From advising U.S. students in Dakar, including some students from Macalester, for a study abroad program, Sokhna Nata Samb came to work for the program at the University of Minnesota, and is now the Academic Dean of Lincoln International High School in Minneapolis, an alternative school created in 1997 “in response to an urgent need in the community to serve a burgeoning immigrant population.” Ten years after its opening, Sokhna Nata Samb will speak about her own trajectory and the role she plays in the community as Secretary of the Twin Cities Senegalese Association.

Sponsored by the Department of French and Francophone Studies and the Bush Foundation

Thursday, April 26
4:30 PM
Humanities 401
Yawo Attivor
Yawo: From Lomé to Minneapolis
Coordinated by Joëlle Vitiello

Yawo: A native of Togo, West Africa, Yawo started his musical career at the “Ecole Experimentale de musique” of Lomé where he studied flute, classical guitar, and electric bass. As the leader of the high school band he formed with his brother and sister, Yawo Attivor developed a talent for composing and arranging music that embraces both the traditions of the Ewe tribe and the influences of the western civilization. This multicultural approach to songwriting led to the creation of the MIMI-Togo (International Movement for Innovative music-Togo branch) which Yawo directed until he left Togo in 1992 as a result of political turmoil in his motherland. In 1993, Yawo joined the international organization Up With People, traveling the U.S. and Europe, promoting peace and understanding among the citizens of the world. After Up with People, Yawo, his cousin Ro Attivor (aka Ro Bezz), Sarah Agbeto and guitarist Matt Hupton created Doliho, an afropop project that rocked the Midwest with a unique album in the late 1990’s. In 2002, after he moved to Minneapolis a year earlier, Yawo launched a solo career with the album “Celebrate” (Mia du agbe) followed in October 2004 by “Take Out the Fences”, a “refreshingly upbeat” (Minneapolis Star-Tribune) album that breaks musical barriers with an explosion of afrobeat, afrofunk and reggae.

Yawo will speak about his trajectory from Lomé to the Twin Cities, his political engagement and his music. He will play some of his tunes.

Monday, April 16
4:30 PM
Humanities 401
Rachid Boudjedra
Faulkner et la littérature maghrébine
Coordinated by Joëlle Vitiello

Rachid Boudjedra (born in 1941) is a prolific and revolutionary Algerian writer who has published numerous poems, essays and novels. Boudjedra’s fiction is written in a difficult, complex style, reminiscent of Faulkner or García Márquez in its intricacy. La Répudiation (1969) brought him sudden attention, both for the strength with which he challenged traditional Muslim culture in Algeria and for the strong reaction against him. Other novels include Topographie idéale pour une agression caractérisée (1975), L'escargot entêté (1977), Les 1001 années de la nostalgie (1979). Boudjedra announced in June 1982 that he would no longer write in French. His Arabic novel al-tafakkuk (1982, The falling apart) appeared in French translation as Le démantèlement (The dismantling). He gradually returned to writing in French, in the novels Timimoun (1994), La vie à l'endroit (1997), and Fascination (2000). Boudjedra has opposed political Islamism, as illustrated by his FIS de la haine (1992, The Fis [Islamic Salvation Front] of Hatred). Fascination).

Co-Sponsored by French & Francophone Studies, Wells Fargo Foundation and French Cultural Studies

Friday, April 13
3:30 PM
Olin Rice 250
Trica Keaton
Race and Belonging in the Other France: The Subjectivity of Exclusion in the French Outer Cities
Coordinated by Joëlle Vitiello

Trica Keaton is an Assistant Professor in the Americans Studies Departmentand Institute for Global Studies at the University of MN, Twin Cities. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley and has pursued graduate study at the Université de Paris V and the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris where she was also a visiting scholar. Professor Keaton is also a long-term Non-Resident Fellow of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University. Her first book, Muslim Girls and the Other France: Race, Identity Politics, and Social Exclusion was published in 2006 by Indiana University Press, and she is currently co-editing an anthology tentatively titled Black Europe and the African Diaspora. Her current research focuses on politics of race and migration in relation to the African diaspora in the U.S. and France

Thursday, April 12
12:00 PM
Olin Rice 350
Christophe Wall-Romana
What is a Poetic Image? Six Answers from French Poetry
Coordinated by Diane Brown

The poetic image informs both what sort of poem is written and how it is read. Yet, what exactly is a poetic image? In this talk we will examine six answers ranging from Victor Hugo and poetician Gaston Bachelard to Arthur Rimbaud, Surrealism and contemporary poetry.

Christophe Wall-Romana received his Ph.D. from the University of California Berkeley. He teaches 19th and 20th Century French Poetry and Cinema Studies.

Thursday, November 16
4:30 PM
Humanities 401
Ahmed Zitouni
Immigration and the Novelist in France
Coordinated by Joëlle Vitiello

Born in Saïda, Algeria, in 1949, Ahmed Zitouni has lived in France since 1973. He has dedicated more than 30 years of his life to analyzing and writing about the struggle of immigrants in Western societies and the politics of human dignity in a multicultural world. Zitouni has published 8 novels and 1 essay with some of the most prestigious publishing companies in France

Ahmed Zitouni's fictional writing delves into the unique experience of being a foreigner, dramatizing the personal, political and intellectual turmoil specific to the Maghrebi Arab experience in France. Concerned with both obvious and subtle prejudices that foreigners experience and that mark their psyches, Ahmed Zitouni's writing offers a stark social criticism of contemporary France, but also a profound artistic and philosophical meditation on an astonishing range of social and political practices that transcend national borders.

Tuesday, October 31
12:00 PM
Olin Rice 250
Dr. David Wrisley
The City That Lives Within Us: Spaced of Beirut in Two Contemporary Novels by Jaber and Eddé
Coordinated by Joëlle Vitiello

Dr. David Wrisley is a graduate of Princeton University, with a Ph.D. in Romance Languages and Literatures. He has taught at Princeton, Rutgers, and the City University of New York. Since 2002, he has been Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies at the American University of Beirut. Dr. Wrisley has published on medieval literature. His current research interests include images of the Orient in the medieval library of the Dukes of Burgundy, ideology and prose writing in the 15th century, as well as the contact between Islam and Christianity in the late medieval Mediterranean. He has recently begun work on more contemporary topics such as 17th century travel narratives to the Hafsid and Ottoman Maghrib and contemporary francophone and arabophone Lebanese writers.

Monday, October 30
7:00 PM
John B. Davis Lecture Hall
Dr. David Wrisley will talk on Lebanese Cinema
Coordinated by Joëlle Vitiello

Tuesday, October 24
12:00 PM
H401
Cybelle Wilkens
Entering into the Video: The Female Body, the Film Body, and the Self-Portrait
Coordinated by Joëlle Vitiello

Professor Cybelle McFadden Wilkens received her PhD from Duke University and taught at Georgia Institute of Technology before coming to Macalester. She has published articles on Monique Wittig and Sophie Calle and is currently working on an edited collection on female bodily visibility in French and Francophone literature.

Prof. Wilkens’ research focuses on self-representation and reflexivity in the works of contemporary French women artists. Her talk will focus on the inclusion of the videographer’s own body in Agnès Varda’s Les glaneurs et la glaneuse and Dominique Cabrera’s Demain et encore demain. By videotaping their own hands, their own images in a mirror, or themselves directly in front of the camera, Varda and Cabrera in different ways alter meaning associated with the female body. They provide excellent examples of forms of expression that help us think about representation of the female body in new ways.

Monday, October 9
7:00 PM
John B. Davis Lecture Hall
Tracy Kidder
Mountain Beyond Mountains

Pulitzer Prize winner and acclaimed author Tracy Kidder will speak about his book, Mountain Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer’s work in Haiti.

Kidder’s most recent book, My Detachment (2005) is a moving memoir about his experiences as a soldier in Vietnam. Kidder is a regular contributor to the New YorkerAtlantic Monthly, and the New York Times Review. His awards include: The National Book Award, The Robert F. Kennedy Award and the Sarah Josepha Hale Award.

After his talk, Kidder will sign copies of his books.

Thursday, October 5
7:00 PM
John B. Davis Lecture Hall
Movie L'Homme Sur les Quais
Coordinated by Joëlle Vitiello

Wednesday, September 20
7:00 PM
Olin Rice 250
Christelle Taraud
Prostitution and Colonization: Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco 1830-1962
Coordinated by Joëlle Vitiello

Christelle Taraud teaches History in Paris for Columbia University, Vassar, Wesleyan College, the Institute of European Studies, Sarah Lawrence College and New York University. She is Associate Researcher at the GTMS lab center (Genèse et Transformation des Mondes Sociaux), a joint research center of the EHESS (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales) and the CNRS (National Center for Scientific Research). She leads a research seminar on Inheritance and Identity in the Mediterranean.

She studies the role and intervention of colonial French administration in the control of prostitution and the role played by prostitutes in North Africa with various groups.