Class Schedules

German Studies
Martha Davis
Department Coordinator
Neill Hall, Room 209
651-696-6374
651-696-6428 fax

Fall 2015 »      Spring 2016 »     

Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated February 10, 2016 at 03:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
GERM 101-01  Elementary German I
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 402 Brigetta Abel
 
GERM 101-L1  Elementary German I Lab
R 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 101-L2  Elementary German I Lab
R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm NEILL 212 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 101-L3  Elementary German I Lab
W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 112 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 110-01  Accelerated Elementary German
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 213 Brigetta Abel
 
GERM 110-L1  Accelerated Elementary German Lab
MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 113 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 110-L2  Accelerated Elementary German Lab
TR 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 110-L3  Accelerated Elementary German Lab
TBA TBA STAFF
 
GERM 194-01  Vampires from Monsters to Superheroes
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 214 Brigetta Abel
*First Year Course only* Vampires are cyclical. Just a few years ago you ran into them anytime you walked into a bookstore or turned on the TV—just like in Victorian times when Bram Stoker’s famous work emerged from a vampire craze. Vampires have always been popular fodder and will continue to be so, even if and as the image of the vampire shifts dramatically over time. The popularity of vampires has waxed and waned for over a hundred years, partially because vampirism can be used as a metaphor for almost anything—from the plague to sexuality to addiction. We will spend the first portion of the semester looking at “classic” tales of vampires as monsters (Bram Stoker, John Polidori, Sheridan Le Fanu, Nosferatu, Bella Lugosi) and then look at the more recent generation of vampires (Buffy & Angel, Anne Rice, Twilight, True Blood, Let the Right One In). What happened to change our imagination of vampires from monsters into hip, outsider superheroes? And what can the examination of vampires tell us about the context in which they were created?

Course Requirements: Students are required to come to class prepared and to participate actively in the classroom discussion. As preparation for class, students will read novels and articles and/or view films and TV shows; please note that many of the screenings will be outside of class time. In addition, students will complete weekly writing assignments, including class blogs, responses to blogs, and several shorter essays that will prepare for a final paper. This is a residential first-year course that satisfies the WA General Education Requirement. It is designed for non-majors and requires no prior knowledge of vampirism or German.



GERM 203-01  Intermediate German I
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 228 Linda Schulte-Sasse
 
GERM 203-L1  Intermediate German I Lab
M 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 404 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 203-L2  Intermediate German I Lab
W 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 216 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 203-L3  Intermediate German I Lab
T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm NEILL 215 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 203-L4  Intermediate German I Lab
TBA TBA Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 204-01  Intermediate German II
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 215 Rachael Huener
 
GERM 204-L1  Intermediate German II Lab
R TBA Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 204-L2  Intermediate German II Lab
R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 101 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 255-01  German Cinema Studies
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 401 Linda Schulte-Sasse
*First Year Course only* The movies love to hate the Nazi, but what exactly is a “Nazi”? Whether glamorized by Third Reich propaganda, vilified by allied propaganda, dramatized by historical thrillers, or caricatured by Hollywood fantasies, the cinematic Nazi is always a construct. This is not to say there may not be some historical, psychological, or sociological truth in the depiction of Nazis, but their filmic portrayal, like that of any historical group, necessarily involves construction or representation. And representations tend to tell us more about the era in which they were concocted than about the “real” thing. Consciously or unconsciously, they serve a purpose: to educate, to entertain, to complicate or (over)simplify our understanding of history, to thrill, disturb, or affirm us as viewers. The course will examine the questions of representation using the example of the cinematic Nazi—one case among hundreds, but an important one, as the Nazi has become the symbol of evil over the past half-century. The first part of the course will focus on films from the historical period of the Third Reich. We will examine how the Nazis represent themselves in documentaries like Leni Riefenstahl’s Triumph of the Will or Fritz Hippler’s The Eternal Jew, as well as feature films like Hitler Youth Quex. We will then turn to U.S. counter-propaganda in dramas like Tomorrow the World, in comedies like Chaplin’s Great Dictator or Lubitsch’s To Be Or Not To Be and in Disney cartoons. Later we will explore postwar representations; likely examples will include Billy Wilder’s A Foreign Affair, Lina Wertmueller’s Seven Beauties, Mel Brooks’s The Producers, Oliver Hirschbiegel’s Downfall, Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds. Student obligations: a series of short papers and one longer research paper; at least one oral presentation. Two exams and in-class free-writing. Hopefully the Twin Cities will offer some cultural events relevant to our theme that we can visit as a class. N.B.: The course is taught in English and films are subtitled; no German language skills required. However, the course has much to offer students with an interest and background in German



GERM 305-01  German Through the Media
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 217 Gisela Peters
 
GERM 305-L1  German Through the Media Lab
R 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 227 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 305-L2  German Through the Media Lab
R 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 227 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 308-01  German Cultural History I
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 215 Rachael Huener
*Taught in German*

GERM 314-01  Marx, Nietzsche, Freud
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 401 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with PHIL 214-01; taught in English; core course for Critical Theory*

What happens when God dies? And what if he’s always already been dead? Few authors have pursued the consequences of secular modernity as persistently as the three thinkers -- as similarly radical as they are different from one another -- whose works we will study in this course. Focusing on the related domains of ethics, subjectivity, aesthetics, and cultural value, we will explore how modern thought tries, and just as frequently fails, to overcome its religious past. Discussion topics include: the loss of "truth" as a meaningful term; ethics beyond good and evil; alienation, ideology, and false consciousness; art as ersatz God; mourning, trauma, and transience. Readings include all or parts of: Marx, "The Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844" and "The German Ideology"; Nietzsche, "The Gay Science" and "The Genealogy of Morals"; Freud, "Civilization and its Discontents" and "Beyond the Pleasure Principle." Requirements: reading, reading, and reading again. Plus two papers, several reading responses, and an exam.

GERM 364-01  Class Cultures
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 217 David Martyn
*Taught in German*

GERM 394-01  French-German Dialogues in Philosophy and Theory
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 401 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in English; cross-listed with FREN 416-01 and POLI 394-03* This course focuses on the dialogue and mutual influence between the French-and German-speaking traditions of political economy and philosophical and theoretical thought, as it becomes evident in the relations among German Idealism, Phenomenology, Existentialism, Psychoanalysis, structuralism, and twentieth-century Critical Theory. In reading the work of influential thinkers in the above fields we shall also examine the structural and conceptual homologies or differences among political economy, abstract thought, and human subjectivity. Beyond Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Jacques Lacan, our readings will include Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jean Laplanche and J. B. Pontalis, Gilles Deleuze, and Robert Pfaller. All readings and class taught in English.*Paper will be written in French for those wishing this course to count for a French major or minor.* If the capacity of 20 has been reached by the time you register, please contact Prof. Kordela and you will be allowed to register at the start of the semester.

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Spring 2016 Class Schedule - updated February 10, 2016 at 03:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
GERM 102-01  Elementary German II
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 214 Brigetta Abel
 
GERM 102-L1  Elementary German II Lab
T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 102-L2  Elementary German II Lab
M 03:00 pm-04:00 pm NEILL 102 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 102-L3  Elementary German II Lab
W 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 247 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 110-01  Accelerated Elementary German
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 215 Linda Schulte-Sasse
 
GERM 110-L1  Accel Elementary German Lab
MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 113 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 110-L2  Accel Elementary German Lab
T 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 113 Vera Struckmann
*Plus additional hour to be arranged.*

GERM 110-L3  Accel Elementary German Lab
TBA TBA Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 203-01  Intermediate German I
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 409 Linda Schulte-Sasse
 
GERM 203-L1  Intermediate German I Lab
M 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 113 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 203-L2  Intermediate German I Lab
T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 110 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 203-L3  Intermediate German I Lab
TBA TBA Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 204-01  Intermediate German II
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 212 David Martyn
 
GERM 204-L1  Intermediate German II Lab
W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 102 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 204-L2  Intermediate German II Lab
F 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 113 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 204-L3  Intermediate German II Lab
TBA TBA Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 305-01  German Through the Media
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 213 David Martyn
This semester the overarching theme will be "History and Culture of the GDR" (East Germany). Students will see films, read stories and novels, and discuss the wide range of contemporary attitudes toward the "other Germany." Taught in German.

GERM 305-L1  German Through the Media Lab
W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 217 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 305-L2  German Through the Media Lab
R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm NEILL 113 Vera Struckmann
 
GERM 305-L3  German Through the Media Lab
TBA TBA STAFF
 
GERM 309-01  German Cultural History II
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 409 Gisela Peters
*Taught in German*

GERM 365-01  Kafka: Gods, Animals, and Other Species of Modernity
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in German*

GERM 394-01  Words, Music and other Transcendences
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 228 Kordela, Mazullo
*Cross-listed with MUSI 294-02; taught in English; counts for humanities general distribution credit*

GERM 394-02  Power of Words
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with LING 394-01; taught in English; core course for the Critical Theory concentration* Hate speech (cross burnings, cyberbullying of LGBTQs), but also revolutionary messages that can cause political or religious conversions (political speeches, the gospel) are uses, perhaps abuses of language with real effects - ways of "doing things with words." In this course, we will explore how words have the power to effect real-world change, both for good and for ill. What uses of speech constitute forms of injury or of undue influence? What uses are transformative or emancipatory? How do we draw the line between these two valences of "forceful speech"? Readings and discussion topics will include theories of rhetoric, persuasion, and performativity (Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, John Austin, Derrida); instances and studies of transformative speech in religion and psychoanalysis (Hebrew Bible, New Testament, Luther, Freud); political speech from the language of emancipation (Declaration of Independence, Martin Luther King) to National Socialist propaganda (Goebbels, Hitler); racist and sexist hate speech (Judith Butler, Critical Race Theory); the constitutionality of laws against hate speech in view of the First Amendment's protection of free speech (U.S. Supreme Court rulings); the salutary effects of insults and invective (Flannery O'Connor, the TV-series "Louie," the Hollywood movie "Lincoln"); depictions and uses of rhetoric in literature (Homer, Thucydides, Shakespeare, Friedrich Schiller, Heinrich von Kleist). Requirements: weekly reading responses; three papers.

GERM 394-03  The Total Work of Art: A 360-Degree Look at Richard Wagners's Ring of the Nibelung
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 228 Mark Mandarano
*Cross-listed with MUSI 394-01; permission of the instructor required; taught in English*

GERM 488-01  Senior Seminar
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am ARTCOM 202 Brigetta Abel
 

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