Class Schedules

German Studies
Martha Davis
Department Coordinator
Humanities Room 209
651-696-6374
651-696-6428 fax

Fall 2014 »      Spring 2015 »     

Fall 2014 Class Schedule - updated September 2, 2014 at 10:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
GERM 101-01  Elementary German I
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL Kiarina Kordela
 
GERM 101-L1  Elementary German I Lab
M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm NEILL 102 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 101-L2  Elementary German I Lab
T 10:10 am-11:10 am Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 101-L3  Elementary German I Lab
T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 402 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 101-L4  Elementary German I Lab
TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 110-01  Accelerated Elementary German
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
 
GERM 110-L1  Accel Elementary German Lab
MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 228 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 110-L2  Accel Elementary German Lab
TR 09:00 am-10:00 am Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 110-L3  Accel Elementary German Lab
TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm NEILL 217 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 110-L4  Accel Elementary German Lab
TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 203-01  Intermediate German I
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 214 Brigetta Abel
 
GERM 203-L1  Intermediate German I Lab
W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 203-L2  Intermediate German I Lab
W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm NEILL 217 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 203-L3  Intermediate German I Lab
W 08:10 pm-09:10 pm NEILL 217 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 203-L4  Intermediate German I Lab
R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm NEILL 404 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 203-L5  Intermediate German I Lab
TBA TBA STAFF
 
GERM 204-01  Intermediate German II
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 215 Linda Schulte-Sasse
 
GERM 204-L1  Intermediate German II Lab
R 09:00 am-10:00 am Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 204-L2  Intermediate German II Lab
R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 404 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 204-L3  Intermediate German II Lab
TBA TBA STAFF
 
GERM 255-01  German Cinema Studies
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 401 Linda Schulte-Sasse
*First Year Course only* One often hears horror movies referred to as trash. Does horror necessarily deserve this condemnation (or plug)? Why does an occasional horror film like The Silence of the Lambs win respectability or even a best-picture Oscar? What are the criteria by which we determine whether any film or work of art is good, bad, or perhaps not art at all? The course will examine horror films from various periods and places, some of which were repudiated at their release only to be recuperated later as art house classics. But all challenge cultural assumptions about art and horror as mutually exclusive categories, and all employ shock, horror, and gore as compelling means of representing social anxieties and historical traumas. Our objective will be to reflect on questions of aesthetic valuation, and to explore the themes, narrative strategies, and audience effects of horror; we will draw on a variety of theoretical approaches like Freud’s notion of the uncanny or Todorov’s of the fantastic. Likely examples will include pre-World War II Germany (Wiene, Murnau, Lang), depression-era USA (Tod Browning), the invention of body horror (Franju, Powell, Hitchcock), and contemporary “post-modern” horror (Argento, Romero, Cronenberg, Haneke).

Course prerequisite: guts. First, films like Tod Browning’s Freaks (1932) or Franju’s Les Yeux sans Visage (1960) will disabuse you of any notion that Quentin Tarantino invented grossness. Second, you may find that by seriously engaging film studies, introducing theoretical concepts, and doing what some call “over”-reading, the course will “ruin the fun.” My hope is that the opposite will be the case (and that fun and work are no more mutually exclusive than art and horror). The course counts for credit toward a German Studies major, although it is international in focus. German cinema was especially important in the early days of horror, and I will work with students who wish to have a particular German focus.

Student obligations: a series of short papers, oral presentations, and one longer research paper. Two exams and an informal log responding to class readings. Hopefully the Twin Cities will offer some cultural events relevant to our theme that we can visit as a class.



GERM 305-01  German Through the Media
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 215 David Martyn
 
GERM 305-L1  German Through Media Lab
R 09:00 am-10:00 am Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 305-L2  German Through Media Lab
R 10:10 am-11:10 am Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 308-01  German Cultural History
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 214 Brigetta Abel
*Taught in German* German Cultural History I is one of two introductory courses for advanced-level German courses. This cultural-historical investigation of Germany begins at the end of the Napoleonic Wars (ca. 1815) and covers through the end of the Weimar Republic.

This course will provide a historical and contextual grounding for future advanced work in German Studies, and, primarily through the critical examination of a wide variety of texts and media, will introduce students to the methodologies that make up our interdisciplinary discipline. Students will develop college-level German reading, writing and discussion skills, and will develop the analytical vocabulary necessary for advanced work. Our texts and media will include historical, autobiographical and literary texts, numerous artifacts and images and several films.

GERM 337-01  Dead White Men
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-03, MCST 337-01 and PHIL 294-03; taught in English* The shift away from feudal theocracy (when divinity grounded truth and political authority) to secular capitalist modernity has entailed unforeseen re-conceptualizations of both time and of the distinction between truth and fiction—the latter approaching extinction, as truth is increasingly perceived as a culturally arbitrary (hence fictional) construct. To examine these modern mutations of the central categories of time and truth-fiction, the course will pursue two parallel itineraries. On the one hand, the two competing modes of the secularization of time, as (a) human history progressing toward a certain telos (end or aim), and (b) as a machinic time within which inter-relations within an autonomous structure (one not controlled by humans) determine its participants. And, on the other hand, the replacement of faith with modern philosophy, ideology, and biopolitics. No prerequisites.

GERM 363-01  Crime and the Fantastic
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 217 David Martyn
*Taught in German*

GERM 394-01  Concepts of Freedom from Aristotle to Agamben
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 216 David Martyn
*Taught in English* "Free choice" is a concept we can neither explain nor do without. Democracy, the "free" market, the emancipation movements of the 20th century: these and other institutions could not function without the assumption that humans are free agents; but a coherent theory of free agency has yet to be invented. This course will approach the problem of free will by historicizing it. We will read authors from Greek antiquity to the present to understand what freedom meant at different junctures in the history of thought. In the process, we will discover just how peculiar to our own capitalist and secular epoch our notion of freedom is. Discussion topics will include free will in Stoic, religious, and secular thought; the emergence of modern individualism and its effect on the concept of freedom; freedom between Marxism and capitalism; the questionable freedom of "coming out" (Foucault, Judith Butler); art, science, politics, and love as forms of freedom (Badiou); freedom and states of exception (Agamben). Selected readings from Epictetus, Augustine, Luther, Leibniz, Kant, Marx, Hannah Arendt, Milton Friedman, and the other authors mentioned. Course requirements: one reading response per week, two 6-page papers. Core course for the Critical Theory Concentration.

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Spring 2015 Class Schedule - updated September 2, 2014 at 10:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
GERM 102-01  Elementary German II
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 214 Rachael Huener
 
GERM 102-L1  Elementary German II Lab
M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm STAFF
 
GERM 102-L2  Elementary German II Lab
T 10:10 am-11:10 am STAFF
 
GERM 102-L3  Elementary German II Lab
T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm STAFF
 
GERM 102-L4  Elementary German II Lab
TBA TBA STAFF
 
GERM 110-01  Accelerated Elementary German
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 214 Rachael Huener
 
GERM 110-L1  Accel Elementary German Lab
MW 07:00 pm-08:00 pm STAFF
 
GERM 110-L2  Accel Elementary German Lab
TR 09:00 am-10:00 am STAFF
 
GERM 110-L3  Accel Elementary German Lab
TR 02:45 pm-03:45 pm STAFF
 
GERM 110-L4  Accel Elementary German Lab
TBA TBA STAFF
 
GERM 203-01  Intermediate German I
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 215 Linda Schulte-Sasse
 
GERM 203-L1  Intermediate German I Lab
M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm STAFF
 
GERM 203-L2  Intermediate German I Lab
T 09:00 am-10:00 am STAFF
 
GERM 203-L3  Intermediate German I Lab
T 02:45 pm-03:45 pm STAFF
 
GERM 203-L4  Intermediate German I Lab
TBA TBA STAFF
 
GERM 204-01  Intermediate German II
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 215 Linda Schulte-Sasse
 
GERM 204-L1  Intermediate German II Lab
R 09:00 am-10:00 am STAFF
 
GERM 204-L2  Intermediate German II Lab
R 10:10 am-11:10 am STAFF
 
GERM 204-L3  Intermediate German II Lab
R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm STAFF
 
GERM 204-L4  Intermediate German II Lab
TBA TBA STAFF
 
GERM 305-01  German Through the Media
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 216 Brigetta Abel
 
GERM 305-L1  German Through the Media Lab
W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm STAFF
 
GERM 305-L2  German Through the Media Lab
W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm STAFF
 
GERM 309-01  German Cultural History II
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 214 Rachael Huener
*Taught in German*

GERM 366-01  Postwar Germany
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in German; specific topic will be posted in advance of registration*

GERM 394-02  GERM Topics Course
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in English*

GERM 394-03  GERM Topics Course
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 227 David Martyn
*Taught in English*

GERM 488-01  Senior Seminar
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 113 David Martyn
 

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