Class Schedules

German Studies
Martha Davis
Department Coordinator
Humanities Room 209
651-696-6374
651-696-6428 fax

Fall 2015 »      Spring 2015 »     

Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated April 19, 2015 at 11:56 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
GERM 101-01  Elementary German I
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 Kiarina Kordela
 
GERM 101-L1  Elementary German I Lab
R 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 STAFF
 
GERM 101-L2  Elementary German I Lab
R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm NEILL 212 STAFF
 
GERM 101-L3  Elementary German I Lab
TBA TBA STAFF
 
GERM 110-01  Accelerated Elementary German
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 213 Kiarina Kordela
 
GERM 110-L1  Accelerated Elementary German Lab
MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 113 STAFF
 
GERM 110-L2  Accelerated Elementary German Lab
TR 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 STAFF
 
GERM 110-L3  Accelerated Elementary German Lab
TBA TBA STAFF
 
GERM 194-01  First Year Course
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 214 Brigetta Abel
*First Year Course only*

GERM 203-01  Intermediate German I
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 214 Linda Schulte-Sasse
 
GERM 203-L1  Intermediate German I Lab
M 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 404 STAFF
 
GERM 203-L2  Intermediate German I Lab
T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 101 STAFF
 
GERM 203-L3  Intermediate German I Lab
T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 101 STAFF
 
GERM 203-L4  Intermediate German I Lab
TBA TBA STAFF
 
GERM 204-01  Intermediate German II
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 215 Rachael Huener
 
GERM 204-L1  Intermediate German II Lab
R TBA STAFF
 
GERM 204-L2  Intermediate German II Lab
R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 101 STAFF
 
GERM 255-01  German Cinema Studies
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 401 Linda Schulte-Sasse
*First Year Course only*

GERM 305-01  German Through the Media
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 217 Gisela Peters
 
GERM 305-L1  German Through the Media Lab
R 09:00 am-10:00 am NEILL 227 STAFF
 
GERM 305-M2  German Through the Media Lab
R 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 227 STAFF
 
GERM 308-01  German Cultural History
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 215 Rachael Huener
*Taught in German*

GERM 314-01  Marx, Nietzsche, Freud
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 214 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with PHIL 214-01; taught in English; core course for Critical Theory* What happens when God dies? And what if he’s always already been dead? Few authors have pursued the consequences of secular modernity as persistently as the three thinkers -- as similarly radical as they are different from one another -- whose works we will study in this course. Focusing on the related domains of ethics, subjectivity, aesthetics, and cultural value, we will explore how modern thought tries, and just as frequently fails, to overcome its religious past. Discussion topics include: the loss of "truth" as a meaningful term; ethics beyond good and evil; alienation, ideology, and false consciousness; art as ersatz God; mourning, trauma, and transience. Readings include all or parts of: Marx, "The Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844" and "The German Ideology"; Nietzsche, "The Gay Science" and "The Genealogy of Morals"; Freud, "Civilization and its Discontents" and "Beyond the Pleasure Principle." Requirements: reading, reading, and reading again. Plus two papers, several reading responses, and an exam.

GERM 364-01  Class Cultures
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 217 David Martyn
*Taught in German*

GERM 394-01  French-German Dialogues in Philosophy and Theory
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 213 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in English; cross-listed with FREN 416-01 and POLI 394-03* This course focuses on the dialogue and mutual influence between the French-and German-speaking traditions of political economy and philosophical and theoretical thought, as it becomes evident in the relations among German Idealism, Phenomenology, Existentialism, Psychoanalysis, structuralism, and twentieth-century Critical Theory. In reading the work of influential thinkers in the above fields we shall also examine the structural and conceptual homologies or differences among political economy, abstract thought, and human subjectivity. Beyond Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Jacques Lacan, our readings will include Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jean Laplanche and J. B. Pontalis, Gilles Deleuze, and Robert Pfaller. All readings and class taught in English.*Paper will be written in French for those wishing this course to count for a French major or minor.*

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Spring 2015 Class Schedule - updated April 19, 2015 at 11:56 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
GERM 102-01  Elementary German II
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 214 Rachael Huener
 
GERM 102-L1  Elementary German II Lab
M 01:15 pm-02:15 pm NEILL 227 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 102-L2  Elementary German II Lab
M 02:30 pm-03:30 pm NEILL 227 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 102-L3  Elementary German II Lab
TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 110-01  Accelerated Elementary German
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 214 Rachael Huener
*5 credits*

GERM 110-L1  Accel Elementary German Lab
TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 110-L2  Accel Elementary German Lab
TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 110-L3  Accel Elementary German Lab
TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 110-L4  Accel Elementary German Lab
TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 203-01  Intermediate German I
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 227 Linda Schulte-Sasse
 
GERM 203-L2  Intermediate German I Lab
M 02:30 pm-03:30 pm NEILL 113 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 203-L3  Intermediate German I Lab
T 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 113 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 203-L4  Intermediate German I Lab
TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 204-01  Intermediate German II
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 215 Linda Schulte-Sasse
 
GERM 204-L1  Intermediate German II Lab
W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 113 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 204-L2  Intermediate German II Lab
R TBA Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 204-L3  Intermediate German II Lab
R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 227 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 204-L4  Intermediate German II Lab
TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 305-01  German Through the Media
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 216 Brigetta Abel
 
GERM 305-L1  German Through the Media Lab
W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 113 Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 305-L2  German Through the Media Lab
TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
 
GERM 309-01  German Cultural History II
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 214 Rachael Huener
*Taught in German*

GERM 366-01  Literature and Film
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
In this course we read closely a selection of German literary texts and compare them to their film adaptations. The literature may range from German "classics" to popular "best sellers," and the films from critically acclaimed cases to box office successes, as a way of gauging social diversity in interests and taste. Beyond focusing on literary analysis, the course will address questions such as: how the written word is translated to the screen; what happens when the film adaptation occurs in another language and culture; what difference it makes if the work was written in the 1920s and filmed in the 2000s. Taught in German. Prerequisites: German 308, 309, or equivalent.

GERM 394-01  Metaphysics in Secular Thought
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-01 and POLI 294-03* A widespread tendency in contemporary Western societies is to associate metaphysics with religion, if not with what is often dismissively called “irrationality.” This course will dismantle this myth by turning to the tradition of European philosophy and political theory, mostly since the seventeenth century, in their relation to theology and their reception by twentieth-century critical theory, in order to examine the ways in which secular thought emerges not as an alternative to metaphysics, something which thought cannot supersede anyway, but simply as an alternative way—and one that by no means is more rationally grounded than religion—of dealing with the very same metaphysical questions and issues that concern religion, from the meaning of life to the imminence of death, and from (real or imagined) guilt to the hope for redemption. Readings will include: Giorgio Agamben, Aristotle, Talal Asad, Augustine of Hippo, George Bataille, Kenneth Burke, Emile Durkheim, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, Karl Marx, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Marcel Mauss, Carl Schmitt, Baruch Spinoza, Alberto Toscano, Max Weber. Readings and class in English. No pre-knowledge required.



GERM 394-02  Short Forms: Novella, Essay, Aphorism from Boccaccio to Brecht
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 David Martyn
*Taught in English; cross-listed with ENGL 394-05* What can a short text do that a long text can’t? This course will look for answers to this question by reading and discussing short prose works from the Renaissance to the 20th century. We will pursue the history of the novella – which is not a short novel but a literary form in its own right – from its emergence in the Italian Renaissance (Boccaccio) to its modern adaptations in German romanticism (Tieck) and French realism (Flaubert). We will explore the complexities of the essay from Michel de Montaigne, who created the genre in the 16th century, through Francis Bacon, whose scientific method relied on it, to its use as a hybrid form between science and literature in the early twentieth century (Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Sigmund Freud). And we will focus on the form that epitomizes the rhetorical virtue of brevitas: the aphorism, from the 17th century moralists (La Rochefoucauld), through the secular pietism of the 18th century (Lichtenberg), romanticism (Goethe), the 19th century’s answers to nihilism (Schopenhauer, Nietzsche), to the crypticism of Kafka, the irony of Brecht, and the uncompromising pessimism of Adorno. Discussion questions will include: what are the literary and rhetorical effects of brevity? How can words gain by being few? What happens when texts get longer? How is literature a form of knowledge and science a form of literature? Requirements: 3 mid-length papers with revisions; one class presentation. Taught in English, but texts will be made available to those who can and would like to read them in the original.

GERM 488-01  Senior Seminar: The Politics of Translation
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 David Martyn
The common notion of translation is based on a number of seemingly self-evident axioms: that texts are written in a specific language; that languages exist; that the content of a text can be transported from one language into another. This course will upset all of these assumptions. In the process, translation will emerge not as something that occurs *between* languages or cultures, but as a practice that constitutes them – with effects as political as they are poetic. After exploring the history of translation theory, current debates in the field of translation studies, and specific examples of translation (works by Franz Kafka), students will work on a research project related to the politics and/or poetics of translation. Possible topics include: an analysis of existing translations of a specific text with an original translation of one’s own; texts written in “weird” German by non-native speakers; translation as a political practice for establishing cultural dominance; film adaptations as “translations” of literary works. Open to Sophomores and Juniors who have completed German 363, 364, 365, or 366; will not preclude the possibility of taking future iterations of the Senior Seminar. Also open to other interested students with the prerequisite knowledge of German and permission of the instructor.

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