Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

HIST 115-01

Africa Since 1800

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: This course is designed to introduce students to the history of Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It examines major themes relating to change in the colonial period such as European conquest and imperialism, the development of the colonial economy, African responses to colonialism and the rise of nationalist movements that stimulated the movement towards independence. Students will examine these themes by applying them to case studies of specific geographic regions of the continent. (4 credits)

HIST 137-01

From Confederation to Confederacy: US History from Independence to Civil War

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: In the Plan of Union prepared during the 1754 "Albany Convention," Anglo-American colonists met to consider uniting as a loose confederation for their common defense and to ally with the Iroquois confederacy. That plan failed, but a later experiment in unity succeeded when the united colonies declared independence. Nevertheless, social, cultural, and ideological differences persisted, and the union formed in 1776 was tried and tested before finally fracturing with the secession of South Carolina, precipitating the Civil War. In the intervening years, Americans grappled with how they should govern themselves, who should be included in the polity, and how society should be organized. Reformers considered the controversial issues of women's rights, the role of Native Americans within the US, and the place of slavery in a nation founded on the precept that "All men are created equal." This course covers the periods of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the early national and antebellum periods, before concluding with the Civil War. It also considers the global causes and consequences of the war and the rise of the new United States. We will also analyze the construction of the myth and historical memory of Alexander Hamilton, the founding father who has captured the imagination of people in the modern U.S. Through a study of the recent biography of Hamilton along with the music and stage production of Hamilton, we will consider both the biographical and mythical Alexander Hamilton in order to understand his era and our own.

HIST 180-01

Going Global: The Experiment of World History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 215
  • Instructor: Karin Velez

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 194-02*

What broad patterns do we see repeated across human cultures and eras? How do current international concerns shape the way we perceive these pattersn, and retell the past? This course is an introduction to the youngest and boldest experiementers in the discipline of history: global historians. We follow these trail-blazers to every corner of the planet and across the grandest expanses of time, all the way from the emergence of Homo sapiens to present day. Such a sweeping survey of human history invites us to look beyond chronological, national, cultural and geographic boundaries. It also forces us to sharply rethink the methodology of traditional historians. Throughout our critical survey of world history we will assess the usefulness (and potential outdatedness) of the concepts of civilization, empire, revolution, and global networks. This course fulfills the global/comparative requirement for the major. Offered every year. (4 credits)

HIST 181-01

Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 181-01*

This course offers a general survey of the complex and heterogeneous region we somewhat reductively term Latin America. It follows a roughly chronological approach, beginning with the eve of encounter and continuing through the contemporary era. Discussions will consider themes such as the institution and legacy of colonialism, the search for new national identities, and the onset of modern racial and political strife. The course will emphasize the import of global economic, political, and cultural trends on the formation of the region. (4 credits). Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 181.

HIST 222-01

Imagining the American West

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 222-01*

The American West is central to the construction of America’s identity and popular culture. The mythology of the American West, built on a narrow foundation of Euro-American settlement and conquest, is critical to understanding the role of the West in the national narrative of American history. Using a variety of materials, including films, art and photography, literature, and historical sources, this course will examine how writers, artists, actors, settlers, and government officials, among others, shaped the creation of the mythic West. This course will investigate what – and who – is and is not considered part of this mythology, as well as the ways in which these constructs attempted to make sense of the diverse populations converging in the West. Cross-listed with American Studies 222. (4 credits)

HIST 226-01

American Indian History since 1871

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 226-01*

This course examines Native American history since 1871. We begin with an introduction to indigenous history before 1871, characterized by centuries of Euro-American attempts to colonize and Christianize, to assimilate Native bodies and allot Native lands. We will then analyze the ways in which Native Americans have continualy fought to sustain their cultures, languages, and religions, as well as their political and socio-economic structures, throughout the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Focusing on themes such as Native resistance to the development of U.S. federal policies and the proliferation of Native culture, we will also consider the shifting nature of Native American sovereignty and the importance of indigenous identity in regards to the experiences of Native Americans. Cross-listed with American Studies 226. Spring semester. (4 credits)

HIST 237-01

Environmental Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Erik Kojola

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 237-01 and ENVI 237-01*

Poor and minority populations have historically borne the brunt of environmental inequalities in the United States, suffering disproportionately from the effects of pollution, resource depletion, dangerous jobs, limited access to common resources, and exposure to environmental hazards. Paying particular attention to the ways that race, ethnicity, class, and gender have shaped the political and economic dimensions of environmental injustices, this course draws on the work of scholars and activists to examine the long history of environmental inequities in the United States, along with more recent political movements-national and local-that seek to rectify environmental injustices. Cross-listed with American Studies 237 and Environmental Studies 237. (4 credits)

HIST 251-01

Pirates, Translators, Missionaries: Between Atlantic Empires

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 215
  • Instructor: Karin Velez

Notes: Why are cultural intermediaries often remembered as villains or traitors? This course calls the popular stereotype into question by focusing on four dramatic case studies of notorious but pivotal mediators who moved between the Spanish, Aztec, English, French, Kongolese and Portuguese empires of the early modern period. Among others, we will consider conflicting primary source accounts and current scholarship about the Dona Marina, the Mexica translator for the Army of Cortes; Nathaniel Courthope, and English profiteer who made a fortune peddling nutmeg between India and New York; two competing French pirates who sacked the South American port city of Cartagena de Indias twice in a single month; and Dona Beatriz, an Kongolese convert to Christianity who was burned at the stake for professing that she was possessed by the spirit of Saint Anthony. This diverse group of pirates, missionaries and translators walked a similar tightrope between worlds, both liberated and constrained by their border crossings. We will evaluate how gender, race, religion, and imperial loyalties affected the survival of this small group of interlopers, and how, in spite of this, they came to disproportionately influence events in the Atlantic world. This course fulfills both the global/comparative and pre-1800 requirements for the major. Every other year. (4 credits)

HIST 275-01

The Rise of Modern China

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 275-01*

A study of leading institutions and movements of nineteenth- and twentieth-century China. Major emphases include the impact of Western imperialism, intellectual and cultural changes, the transformation of peasant society through revolution, the rise of Mao Tse-Tung, and the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, and the rise of China as a world power. Special attention will be given to China's international relations. (4 credits)

HIST 281-01

The Andes: Race, Region, Nation

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 281-01*

This course provides a survey of Andean history with an emphasis upon the formation of collective identities. Class discussion will treat continuities and divergences between the Andean colonial and post-colonial experiences, especially the intersection between racial and regional tensions and their impact upon the emergence and construction of nation-states. Recent topics explored have included the role of landscape in Andean culture, Incan and neo-Incan cultural mythologies, the conflation of racial and class identities in the twentieth century, violence and guerrilla movements, urbanization, and the various shades of indigenismo. (4 credits). Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 281.

HIST 294-04

In Motion: African Americans in the United States

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: In Motion is an introduction to modern African American History from slavery to contemporary times. In Motion emphasizes the idea that both African Americans and the stories of their lives in the United States are fluid, varied and continually being reinterpreted. Rather than a strict chronological survey, this course is organized thematically. Some of the important themes include movement/mobility; work/labor; resistance to systems of oppression; gender/sexuality; culture/performance; politics/citizenship; and sites of (re)memory. In this course, students will read important historical texts, both primary and secondary, engage in discussion, and write essays that ask them to critically engage the history of African Americans in the US. Potential readings include texts such as W.E.B. Du Bois’ classic work The Souls of Black Folk, Audre Lorde’s Zami, Jeanne Theoharis’ The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks and excerpts from more contemporary African American texts such as Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me and Claudia Rankine’s Citizen.

HIST 294-06

Governing the Body: Health, Eugenics, and Population Control in Global Perspective

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Jessica Pearson-Patel

Notes: Concerns about health and population transcend both temporal and geographic boundaries. These are problems that have preoccupied governments, colonial armies, international organizations, and individual families throughout history. While disease has affected populations from the earliest days of human civilization, doctors and politicians in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries developed new and different ways of governing bodies. This course traces the dramatic shift from a concern about the transmission of infectious diseases to an overriding fear about the “quality and quantity” of families, workers, and soldiers. Using a global/comparative approach, we will explore themes such as the history of epidemic disease control, population policy and eugenics, and the creation international health organizations.

HIST 294-07

Merchants and Messengers: Islam/Christianity in 19th and 20th Century Africa

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: This course will investigate the recent histories of two of the most numerous Abrahamic religions in African history. While both Christianity and Islam were prevalent in Africa by the nineteenth century, both were limited to certain regions. Catholicism existed in West-Central Africa from the fifteenth century, and Orthodox Christianity in Ethiopia for over a thousand years, yet the role and interpretation of what Christianity meant to Africans began to take on new meanings after the ending of the slave trade and with more European contact in the interior. Christianity became both a way to help colonization and also a way for Africans to see themselves as distinctly African apart from Europeans. Islam was a religion of rulers and traders but with increased commerce began to grow. As the nineteenth century emerged a series of jihads in West Africa allowed Islam to reach the masses and Indian Ocean connections in East and Southern Africa created new opportunities as well as conflict between Africans and Europeans occupying forces. This course will look at the history of these two religions during the nineteenth and twentieth century and how Africans changed the course of their own histories via both acceptance and adaptation of monotheisms. Some of the books that will be read in full or partially include: A History of Christianity in Africa: From Antiquity to the Present E Isichei 1995; History if Islam in Africa Eds. Randall Pouwels, and Nehemia Levtzion, 2000; Into Africa: A Transnational History of Catholic Medical Missions and Social Change B Mann Wall, 2015; A History of Race in Muslim West Africa Bruce Hall 2011; Sufis and Scholars of the Sea: Family Networks in East Africa, 1860-1925 (Routledge Indian Ocean Series) Anne K. Bang 2004; Regarding Muslims: From Slavery to Postapartheid, Gabeba Baderoon 2014;Christianity in Africa: The Renewal of a Non-Western Religion Kwame Bediako, 1997 Beads and Strands: Reflections of an African Woman on Christianity in Africa Mercy Amba Oduyoye, 2013; African Christianity: An African Story Ogbu Kalu, 2007.

HIST 294-08

African Resources and Conflict from 1808 to the Present

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: This course analyzes the historical context for current resource conflict in Africa. Students will consider present resource exploitation in the context of the more recent historical eras of: the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, “legitimate commerce,” colonialism and neo-colonialism. They will also learn about the role of Africa’s resources as essential to western prosperity. This course will address the ethical, social and environmental implications of the system of extraction and the resulting violence that is inevitably one of the most common and most severe consequences of it. While all resources will be briefly considered and minerals such as, coltan (columbite-tantalite) and cobalt and platinum in areas such as west-central Africa (the Congos, Zambia) and southern Africa will be addressed, special attention will go to diamonds and oil and the particular mining and drilling industries in those areas. This course will intertwine historical sources, films and literature about the history of resource extraction in Africa with current journal and newspaper articles that document these continuing realities. We will also use the NISA archives (available online) to do a research project with primary sources. Readings will come from journal articles, primary sources and the all/part of the following texts: Warfare in Independent Africa Will Reno, 2011; The New Kings of Crude: China, India and the Global Struggle for Oil Luke Patey, 2014; Stones of Contention Todd Cleveland, 2014; Being Nuclear: Africans and the Global Uranium Trade Gabrielle Hecht 2012; and Colonial Extractions: Race and Canadian Mining in Contemporary Africa Paula Butler, 2015.

HIST 294-09

The Hundred Years War, 1337-1453: Age of Upheaval

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Cameron Bradley

Notes: The Hundred Years War began as a conflict between England and France, but it ultimately involved all of western Europe, and catalyzed far-reaching changes throughout medieval society. This course follows the war from causes to conclusion, with particular emphasis on the war’s social, cultural, and political effects. We will examine the experiences of those who took part, the impact of the war on non-elites, ideas about chivalry and rulership, and the development of national identities, while situating the war in the context of the tumultuous later Middle Ages.

HIST 294-10

Europe in the Era of World War

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Jessica Pearson-Patel

Notes: Between 1914 and 1945 two world wars left an indelible mark on European culture, society, politics, and economy. This course explores various facets of wartime and interwar Europe, focusing on themes and topics such as collaboration, resistance, occupation, genocide, daily life, gender, war and empire, and the changing relationship between Europe and the US.

HIST 353-01

Oceans in World History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Karin Velez

Notes: Between 1450 and 1850, people started to venture farther outward into oceans that had previously been understood as dangerous and hostile environments. This course takes the Age of Sail as a starting point to track changes in human approaches to boundless waters. We will consider two questions in particular: How have oceans functioned as a means of global integration rather than division? How are historians using oceans to further the study of world (versus regional) history? Readings will cover and compare the Atlantic, pacific, and Indian Oceans, and address themes of diaspora, port cities, banditry, trade, and imperial encounters. Every other year. This course fulfills the global/comparative requirement for the history major. Every other year. (4 credits)

HIST 378-01

War Crimes and Memory in East Asia

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 378-01*

This course's main goal is to introduce evidence of the major crimes and atrocities during World War II in East Asia such as the Nanjing Massacre, biochemical warfare (Unit 731), the military sexual slavery ("comfort women") system, the forced labor system, and inhumane treatment of POWs. The course will also help students understand the contemporary geo-political and socio-economic forces that affect how East Asians and Westerners collectively remember and reconstruct World War II. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement. (4 credits)

Cross-listed with Asian Studies 378

HIST 379-01

The Study of History

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: This advanced course is required for majors. It examines the various forms of analysis used by historians through a study of different kinds of historical texts and sources. It provides an opportunity for students to develop the skills and habits of thinking essential to practicing the discipline of history. This course invites students to address some of the myriad questions and controversies that surround such historical concepts as "objectivity," "subjectivity," "truth," "epistemology," and thereby to develop a "philosophy" of history. At the same time, it stresses the acquisition of such historical tools as the use of written, oral, computer and media sources and the development of analytical writing skills. The subject matter for study changes each year. Recent themes of the course have been memory, empires, and class formation. (4 credits)

HIST 394-01

Science, Empire, and Visual Culture

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 394-01; prerequisite of one History course or permission of instructor* This advanced seminar investigates the ongoing feedback loop between scientific measurement, techniques of visualization, and global empires in the early modern and modern world. Beginning with the expansion of optical science in the late medieval era and the development of “linear” perspective in the Renaissance, the ability to measure, describe and visualize distant geographical realms became a crucial ally to the knowledge and administration of empire. The course will focus particularly on the interaction of these forces during imperial and scientific exploration, especially during the 18th and 19th centuries. Case studies will include astronomical, botanical, and geographic studies in the early modern French and Spanish Atlantic empires, the Napoleonic survey of Egypt, the American journeys of Alexander von Humboldt, the Great Surveys of the US West and 19th-century polar expeditions. In each case, we will consider the relationship between measurement, visualization, collection, display, aesthetics, technology and coloniality.

HIST 394-02

Gender in the Middle Ages: Paradigms, Practices, Possibilities

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Cameron Bradley

Notes: *Cross-listed with WGSS 394-01* Ideas about gender were foundational to medieval society, serving as the basis for the ways women and men were to think, pray, work, play, and love. Today, it remains popular to think of medieval gender norms with a combination of disdain for the benighted view of femininity and women, and nostalgia for the days of real men. In this class, we will interrogate this view of the Middle Ages by examining ideas about gender that prevailed at the time, the ways in which people performed femininities and masculinities, and the ways people shaped, challenged, and disrupted the dominant paradigms of gender.

HIST 394-03

Public History in Action: Rondo Digital History Harvest

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 394-02* This digital history practicum is a hands-on workshop where students will work collaboratively to put on a signature national program called a History Harvest. Created by historians at the University of Nebraska Lincoln, History Harvest is a collaborative, community-based approach to history. The shared experience of giving is at the heart of the History Harvest concept. The project makes invisible histories and materials more visible by working with and within local communities to collect, preserve and share previously unknown or under-appreciated artifacts and stories. Initial "harvests" have taken place in a series of communities across the Great Plains region. At each “harvest,” community-members are invited to bring and share their letters, photographs, objects and stories, and participate in a conversation about the significance and meaning of their materials. Each artifact is digitally captured and then shared in this free web-based archive for general educational use and study. This class will begin by examining the history of Saint Paul’s Historic African American community, Rondo, which was devastated by the development of highway I-94. We will also consider the local and national dimensions and consequences of this tragic event. Since the devastation of their physical community, African Americans who once lived in this vibrant neighborhood have been working collectively to make sure Saint Paul remembers this history and that something like this never happens again. The class will collaborate with community partner, Rondo Avenue, Inc. to implement a History Harvest during spring 2017. After the History Harvest event students will digitally process all of the artifacts in order to make them available to the wider Saint Paul community. No digital skills required but students should know that collaboration, flexibility, and enthusiasm are encouraged for this fun community-based course!

HIST 394-04

Public History in Action - Remembering Rondo: Archives

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Rebecca Wingo

Notes: *Course appropriate for First Years; cross-listed with AMST 394-03* This course has two main foci: archives and digital history. First, we broadly examine the “archive” as records of the past. We will interrogate the role of the archive in preserving and interpreting our knowledge, and explore how institutionalized archives preserve some pasts and repress others. We will cover a wide range of fields to study archives, including public history, museum studies, Indigenous studies, gender studies, and African American history. Concentrating specifically on the latter, our second focus will center around a hands-on archival project in partnership with Rondo Avenue, Inc. (RAI). The Rondo neighborhood in St. Paul is a historically Black neighborhood that was intentionally bifurcated by the construction of I-94 in the 1960s to create a diaspora of the community there. We will read old newspapers produce by and for the neighborhood (preserved on microfilm) and mine them for old business advertisements. We will then plot the businesses on a map and generate timelines of businesses for each address. In addition to producing this map for RAI, students are required to produce a final research paper examining the economic trends of the Rondo neighborhood.

Fall 2016

HIST 114-01

History of Africa to 1800

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: A study of the history of Africa before 1800, this course covers the major themes relating to the development of African societies and cultures from the earliest times. Students will engage with themes of state-building, trade and religion as catalysts for change and learn how historians have reconstructed the history of early Africa. This course will provide students with knowledge of specific case studies from North, South, East, West, and Central Africa. (4 credits)

HIST 121-01

The Greek World

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Brian Lush

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 121-01; first day attendance required*

This course surveys the political, economic, and cultural development of the peoples of the ancient Greek world from the late Bronze Age through the Hellenistic era. Students will hone their critical thinking skills while working with translations of ancient literature, archaeological remains and works of art. The basic structure of the course is chronological, but we will examine major themes across time and space, which may include the interaction between physical landscape and historical change; rule by the one, the few and the many; the nature and development of literary and artistic genres; the economic, military, and/or cultural dimensions of empire; or the intersections of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, slave/free status and civic identity in the Greek world. (4 credits) Cross-listed with Classics 121.

HIST 140-01

Introduction to East Asian Civilization

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 140-01*

This course introduces the cultures and societies of China, Japan and Korea from the earliest times to the present day. Primarily an introductory course for beginners in East Asian civilization, this course considers a variety of significant themes in religious, political, economic, social and cultural developments in the region. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement. (4 Credits)

HIST 154-01

African Life Histories

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: In this course we will learn about African history through the stories that Africans themselves have told about their own lives. We will use oral history, songs of West Africa's griots; slave narratives; political autobiographies; theatre and film to explore the personal narration of lived experience. To guide our class discussions we will also consult scholarly essays about life history as a genre, to help us understand the methodology behind the production of these important texts. Class activities will include seminar discussions, writing workshops, a field trip and intermittent background lectures. Each student will carry out an individual research project on their topic of choice. (4 credits)

HIST 194-01

Getting Medieval: The Middle Ages in the Modern Imaginary

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Cameron Bradley

Notes: Who says the Middle Ages are over? Judging from the popularity of medieval-themed television series, films, books, and video games, the Middle Ages live on—at least in our imaginations. In this class, we will look at various modern reimaginings of the medieval past, with a view toward understanding why the idea of the Middle Ages continues to excite our curiosity and what purposes these reimaginings serve. Fiction and film sources will include material from Game of Thrones, Harry Potter, the Tolkien corpus, Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, and How to Tame Your Dragon (among others), and we will look also at gaming, art, and Live-Action Role Playing.

HIST 194-02

Revolutionary Europe in the Long Nineteenth Century

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Jessica Pearson-Patel

Notes: This course will provide an introduction to European politics, culture, and society in the long nineteenth century from the French Revolution in 1789 to the eve of the First World War in 1914. We will explore a multitude of different kinds of revolutions—including political revolutions, dramatic changes in class and social structure, evolving gender roles for men and women, and the establishment of new empires and nation states. This class will situate these vast changes in Europe in a broad global context and will consider the experiences of people with very different identities, ranging from women fighting for equal rights under the banner of the French Revolution to Russian peasants to African workers in the Belgian Congo. We will challenge traditional notions of what constitutes Europe and we will explore the various transnational connections that linked Europe to the rest of the world. Readings will include Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Emile Zola’s The Belly of Paris, and the memoirs of Savva Dmitrievich Purlevskii about his life as a Russian serf.

HIST 225-01

American Indian History to 1871

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 225-01*

The history of American Indians is wonderfully complex, but this history is simultaneously fraught with misconceptions and misinterpretations. European (and, later, Euro-Americans) alternated among fascination, fear, and frustration toward American Indians, while American Indians sought to maintain tribal sovereignty and control over their lands, cultures, religions, politics, and lifestyles amidst continuing encroachment and settlement. This course examines American Indian history to 1871 - the year that Congress stopped making treaties with Native nations - by considering the complicated and multifaceted history of the nation's indigenous people. By looking at American Indian interactions with Spanish, French, British, and American explorers, settlers, missionaries, militaries, and government officials, this courses argues that the history of American Indians is essential to understanding past as well as present issues. Furthermore, this course looks to move beyond the notion that American Indian history is one of inevitable decline by creating a more nuanced understanding of the American Indian experience from pre-contact toward the twentieth century. Offered occasionally. Cross-listed with American Studies 225. (4 credits)

HIST 234-01

U.S. Environmental History

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Margot Higgins

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; first day of attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

People have always had to contend with the natural world, but only recently have historians begun to explore the changing relationships between people and their environment over time. In this course, we will examine the variety of ways that people in North America have shaped the environment, as well as how they have used, labored in, abused, conserved, protected, rearranged, polluted, cleaned, and thought about it. In addition, we will explore how various characteristics of the natural world have affected the broad patterns of human society, sometimes harming or hindering life and other times enabling rapid development and expansion. By bringing nature into the study of human history and the human past into the study of nature, we will begin to see the connections and interdependencies between the two that are often overlooked. Fall semester. (4 credits)

HIST 235-01

Captives, Cannibals, and Capitalists in Early Modern Atlantic World

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 235-01 and LATI 235-01*

This course will interrogate the way scholars study large-scale violence in its many forms between human communities. Throughout class discussions we will consider the ways in which warfare has been recorded and analyzed in early America. While warfare and major political conflicts will be discussed, the class will also engage the meanings of violence by investigating intra- and inter- cultural violence within and between colonial America's many ethnic, political, and religious groups. The chronological focus of the course, circ. 1500-1800, also permits our examination of the idea of American exceptionalism. Is there a specific form or pattern of violence or warfare that can be called "American?" If so, does this type of violence remain present in our contemporary society? Cross-listed with American Studies 235 and Latin American Studies 235. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)

HIST 236-01

Consumer Nation: American Consumer Culture in the 20th Century

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 236-01; first day of attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

"Of all the strange beasts that have come slouching into the 20th century," writes James Twitchell, "none has been more misunderstood, more criticized, and more important than materialism." In this course we will trace the various twists and turns of America's vigorous consumer culture across the twentieth century, examining its growing influence on American life, its implications for the environmental health of the world, and the many debates it has inspired. Cross-listed with History 236. (4 credits)

HIST 252-01

Conversion and Inquisition: Religious Change

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: Karin Velez

Notes: *Cross-listed with RELI 294-04*

What causes people to change their religious beliefs? How have societies handled those who do alter their spiritual attitudes? This course focuses on several dramatic case studies of men and women who self-consciously changed their religion during the turbulent period of imperial encounters between the mid-1500s and the 1700s. Among others, we will examine and interrogate reports of converts to Christianity including Jewish and Muslim prisoners of the Inquisition, captives of Mediterranean pirates, and the nearly canonized Mohawk convert Catherine Tekakwitha. We will consider how violence, national loyalties, gender, charisma, local power dynamics, environmental upheaval, and serendipity affected the choices and fates of these converts. Meets both the global/comparative and pre-1800 requirements for the major. Every other year. (4 credits)

HIST 256-01

Transatlantic Slave Trade

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: *First Year Course only* In order to convey the history of the transatlantic slave trade, Bob Marley sang about the process of enslavement: “Old pirates, yes, they rob I; Sold I to the merchant ships.” By 1820, almost 80% of the people who had crossed the Atlantic were Africans, far outnumbering the number of Europeans who migrated to the Americas during this period. This forced migration shaped the cultures that emerged in North and South America and have an ongoing impact on modern political, social, and economic life.

In this class we will analyze the trans-Atlantic slave trade in historical context. What were the conditions in the Atlantic world that led to the rise of this long-distance trade in humans? How does the transatlantic slave trade compare to other forms of enslavement in history and the present? How did children experience enslavement? What role did gender play in the lives of enslaved people? What agency did the enslaved seize and how did people create community in the midst of oppression? Why and how did the transatlantic trade in slaves end?

We will consider the problems of locating and analyzing relevant primary sources as well as interrogating various methods and theories scholars have employed in seeking to understand the trade and its effects. Students will learn how to use digital mapping tools to assist them in their analyses. We will conclude by investigating the ways that enslavement is remembered in modern historical memory and by examining ongoing debates over Reparations. Meets the global and/or comparative history requirement.


HIST 274-01

The Great Tradition in China before 1840

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 274-01*

A study of the culture and society of China from earliest times to the eighteenth century, when the impact of the West was strongly felt. The course will feature themes in Chinese history, including the birth of the Great Philosophers, the story of the Great Wall, the making and sustaining of the imperial system, the Silk Road and international trade and cultural exchange, the emergence of Chinese Buddhism and Neo-Confucianism, Genghis Kahn and his Eurasian Empire, the splendid literary and artistic achievements, the Opium War and its impact on modern China. Lecture/discussion format. (4 credits)

HIST 277-01

The Rise of Modern Japan

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 277-01*

Japan's rapid industrialization in the latter part of the nineteenth century, and its phenomenal rise as the number two economic power in the world after the devastation wrought by World War II, have led many scholars to declare Japan a model worthy of emulation by all "developing" nations. After an examination of feudal Japan, this course probes the nature and course of Japan's "amazing transformation" and analyzes the consequences of its strengths as a nation-state. Considerable study of Japanese art, literature, and religion will be undertaken and American attitudes toward the Japanese and their history will also be examined. (4 credits)

HIST 294-01

Narrating African American Women's 20th Century Resistance

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 294-05 and WGSS 294-04* Using critical biographies of both well-known and lesser known African American women, this course will examine traditions of 20th century African American women’s activism, the ways in which they have changed over time, and also the interior lives of African Amercican women. Too often, the narrative of the “strong black woman” infuses stories of African American women’s resistance, which coupled with a culture of dissemblance, makes the inner workings of their lives difficult to imagine. This course, at its heart, seeks to uncover the motivations, both personal and political, behind African American women’s activism. It also seeks to address the ways in which African American women have responded to the pressing social, economic, and political needs of their diverse communities. We will read biographies of African American women such as Ida B. Wells, Amy Jacques Garvey, Henrietta Lacks, Ella Baker, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, Florynce Kennedy, and Barbara Jordan, to name a few. Biographical reading will be coupled with primary sources, documentaries, and additional secondary sources to provide context.

HIST 294-02

Debating the Civil Rights Movement through Film

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with AMST 294-05* This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. By viewing and analyzing key documentaries and motion pictures that focus on this important time in history, we will analyze the ways in which screenwriters and directors depict the movement and the larger implications of this. In addition to viewing key documentaries and films, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary sources that highlight the key people, issues, events, and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power.

HIST 294-04

Women, Gender, and the Family in Contemporary Europe

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Jessica Pearson-Patel

Notes: This course will explore the ways in which the major events and processes in contemporary European history shaped the lives of women and families as well and the way that both individual women and women’s movements have shaped the history of contemporary Europe. Our exploration will begin with the French Revolution in 1789 and end with the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe in the late twentieth century. We will focus on issues such as family policy, reproductive rights, labor, immigration, women’s political representation, and LGBTQ equality in Europe. We will also explore the importance of children and childhood in the context of contemporary European society and the role that the state has played in shaping the lives of young people. Whenever possible, we will approach the topics at hand by exploring the voices of European women themselves and we will consider the experiences of people from a wide range of identities. Readings will include Virginia Woolf’s Three Guineas, Edith Hahn Beer’s memoir, The Nazi Officer’s Wife, and Shattering the Silence: French Women’s Voices from the Ghetto by French women’s rights activist Fadela Amara.

HIST 294-07

We Built This City: Towns and City Life from Late Antiquity to the Later Middle Ages

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Cameron Bradley

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01* The city is a key component of modern life, but much of what we associate with urban life took shape during the Middle Ages. This course explores European cities and city life from the Roman period to the end of the Middle Ages. We will investigate how and why cities developed, how they were governed, their relationships with the hinterland and the environment, what urban living was like, and people’s perceptions of cities and urban life. Along the way, we will cover such topics as the transformations of late Roman cities during the Middle Ages, commerce and work, urban rebellions, family life, forms of entertainment, and more.

HIST 294-08

The Vikings: Raiders, Traders, and Settlers

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Cameron Bradley

Notes: In the popular imagination, the Vikings are little more than blood-thirsty raiders wearing horned helmets who pillaged their way across Europe, wiping out culture and “civilization” wherever they could find it. This class seeks to correct that view, contending that the Vikings did much more than plunder and destroy (although they did some of that, too). The Vikings were accomplished traders and settlers as well, and they fundamentally altered the political, economic, military, and religious history of northern Europe and beyond. We will use textual, archaeological, and linguistic evidence alongside scholarly works to explore the rich history of the Vikings and their impact.

HIST 294-10

Uses and Abuses: A History of Drugs, Addiction, and Recovery in the U.S.

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Amy Sullivan

Notes: Beginning with an essential global history of legal and illegal mind-altering substances, this course will ultimately focus on 19th and 20th century social and medical histories of substance use/abuse: Temperance and Prohibition, the “War on Drugs,” the shifting concept of addiction as a moral failing to addiction as a treatable disease, and the history of the recovery movement. From the Narcotic Farm in Kentucky, Alcoholics Anonymous, and the Minnesota Model to the current opiate epidemic, ravaged meth-laden small towns, and marijuana legalization, topics abound for class discussion and research papers. This course requires a considerable amount of reading but will be interspersed with expert guest speakers and documentary film viewing.

HIST 340-01

US Urban Environmental History

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 340-01; first day of attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

In the minds of many Americans, cities are places where nature is absent¿places where nature exists only in the crevices and on the margins of spaces dominated by technology, concrete, and human artifice. This course confronts this assumption directly, drawing on the scholarship from the relatively young field of urban environmental history to uncover the deep interconnections between urban America and the natural world. Among the other things, we will examine how society has drawn upon nature to build and sustain urban growth, the implications that urban growth has for transforming ecosystems both local and distant, and how social values have guided urbanites as they have built and rearranged the world around them. Using the Twin Cities has a backdrop and constant reference point, we will attempt to understand the constantly changing ways that people, cities, and nature have shaped and reshaped one another throughout American history. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 340. (4 credits)

HIST 490-01

Senior Seminar in History

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Karin Velez

Notes: The senior seminar is taught every fall on themes that cross chronological and geographic lines. Past themes have included Memory, Migration, Gender and Micro-History. (4 credits)