Class Schedules

History
Old Main, Room 311
651-696-6493
FAX: 651-696-6498

Office Hours
September 1-May 31
Weekdays 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
June 1-August 31
Tuesdays 8 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Fall 2015 »      Spring 2016 »     

Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated February 12, 2016 at 06:00 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
HIST 115-01  Africa Since 1800
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Christopher Tounsel
 
HIST 121-01  The Greek World
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Brian Lush
*Cross-listed with CLAS 121-01*

HIST 140-01  Introduction to East Asian Civilization
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 003 Yue-him Tam
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ASIA 140-01* This course introduces the cultures and societies of East Asia from the earliest times to the present day from an historical perspective. Primarily an introductory course for beginners, this course considers a variety of significant themes in religious, political, economic, social and cultural changes in the region with emphasis on China and Japan. To a lesser degree, significant changes in Korea and Vietnam will also be examined.

ASSIGNMENTS & ASSESSMENT:

• Map Exercise: 5%

• Attendance & Discussion Participation: 20%

• 1 oral report (20 minutes) on assigned topic: 20%

• Mid-Term reflection on readings & lectures (8-10 pages): 25%

• 1 research paper (10-12 pages) on topic of your own choice: 30%

• [No final exam]

REQUIRED READINGS:

• Required readings are mostly assigned from the following books: John K. Fairbank, Edwin 0. Reischauer, Albert M. Craig.

• East Asia: Tradition and Transformation.(Houghton Mifflin). Conrad Schirokauer, A Brief History of Chinese and Japanese Civilizations. (Harcourt, Brace & Jovanovich).

• Also, the following books are recommended: Frederick W. Mote. Intellectual Foundations of China. (Alfred A. Knopf). John Naisbitt. Megatrends Asia: Eight Asian Megatrends That Are Reshaping our World. (Touchstone).

Other readings will be assigned from other publications and journals from time to time.



HIST 154-01  African Life Histories
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 Christopher Tounsel
 
HIST 181-01  Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 204 Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with LATI 181-01*

HIST 190-01  Topics in US History: Childhood and Youth
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Amy Sullivan
This course examines the history of childhood and youth, primarily in the United States, but will integrate global childhoods as well. The historical voices and perspectives of childhood that we study will pay close attention to the significance of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, time periods, and social settings. Some questions we will consider relevant to the study of history: Do children have agency? What is the role of children a subjects in history? How has childhood been socially and historically constructed? Why are children such galvanizing social and political symbols?

HIST 194-01  Introduction to Middle Ages
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Cameron Bradley
This course will introduce students to the European Middle Ages, in all its vigor, vibrancy, and violence, from the decline of the Western Roman Empire in the 4th century until Martin Luther and the beginning of the Reformation in the 16th. Our purpose will be to question received notions about the Middle Ages: Was the period before 1000 really the Dark Ages? Does the central period of 1000-1300 deserve to be called the High Middle Ages? Was the later period primarily a time of decadence and calamity? We will trace the themes of politics and governance, religion, work and trade, and the experiences of everyday life (including social status and gender) as we learn about the events that shaped the period. This class will make use of the full range of sources available to medievalists, including art, architecture, imaginative literature, archaeology, philosophy, law, histories, and more.

HIST 225-01  Native American History
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Katrina Phillips
*Cross-listed with AMST 225-01*

HIST 225-02  Native American History
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Katrina Phillips
*Cross-listed with AMST 225-02*

HIST 234-01  American Environmental History
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 205 Chris Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

HIST 244-01  US Since 1945
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 Amy Sullivan
This course will have security as its unifying theme for the era. We will study Post WWII Cold War politics, culture and society; FBI & CIA in the US and abroad during the Civil Rights era, in post-colonial governments and revolutions; border security & immigration, U.S. Prison industrial complex; security as a free-market business; race, religion & class in surveillance and policing; and our Post-9/11 security paradigm shift.

HIST 250-01  Science, Magic and Belief
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Karin Velez
 
HIST 256-01  Transatlantic Slave Trade
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Linda Sturtz
*Cross-listed with AMST 256-01*

HIST 258-01  Europe Since 1945
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 011 Julia Fein
 
HIST 274-01  The Great Tradition in China before 1840
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 274-01*

HIST 277-01  The Rise of Modern Japan
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 112 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 277-01*

HIST 282-01  Latin America: Art and Nation
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm THEATR 204 Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with LATI 282-01*

HIST 294-03  Mass Culture Under Communism
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 304 James von Geldern
*Cross-listed with RUSS 256-01*

HIST 294-04  History of Russia to 1855
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Julia Fein
This course introduces students to topics in the history of Russian civilization from the Christianization of the Kievan Rus’ polity (10th century) to the death of Tsar Nicholas I at the end of the Crimean War (1855). In addition to learning about exciting, famous reigns like those of the Mongols, Ivan the Terrible, and Peter the Great, we will also pay attention to Russia’s many Muslim subjects; the East European borderlands between the Russian, Ottoman, and Habsburg empires; and the place of Siberia in the history of transnational European scientific exploration. Other topics and approaches include: Russia’s military, trade, and cultural relations with Eurasian nomads and with Europeans; strategies for managing a multiethnic and religiously diverse empire; dynamics of elite cultural consumption, particularly vis-à-vis “the West"; serfdom and the experience of the Russian peasantry; Russian Orthodoxy; elite and non-elite women’s lives; and the environmental history of Russia’s expansions. Class will be evenly split between lecture and discussion, and over seventy-five percent of reading materials will be primary sources. We will also circle frequently around to the question, “What is Russia?” Note that this class - as does the second part of the sequence to be offered in the spring - actually begins and ends in Ukraine!

HIST 294-05  Knights in Shining Armor: Chivalry, Violence, and Courtly Culture
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 002 Cameron Bradley
The figure of the medieval knight in shining armor remains one of the enduring images of the Middle Ages. Aboard his noble steed, he dashes fearlessly into battle, clutching shield and sword, his coat of arms brilliant in the sunlight, a turreted castle in the background. Or perhaps he is rescuing a fair maiden from danger, or riding through the forest in search of adventure, or reciting poetry for his beloved. This romantic picture only tells part of the story, of course. Knights were violent men who engaged in violent pursuits. Indeed, they celebrated that violence, enshrining it in their code of chivalry under the name “prowess,” even as they also cultivated the genteel manners of courtliness and professed their Christian faith. In this course, we will explore chivalry and courtliness, the lives and attitudes of knights, reforming efforts from within and outside knighthood, the role of religion, and the effects of gender as we seek to understand the interrelationship of chivalry, violence, and courtly culture.

HIST 343-01  Imperial Nature: The US and the Global Environment
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Chris Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 343-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

HIST 353-01  Oceans in World History
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 003 Karin Velez
 
HIST 490-01  Senior Seminar: Narrative/Myth
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Karin Velez
 

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Spring 2016 Class Schedule - updated February 12, 2016 at 06:00 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
HIST 114-01  History of Africa to 1800
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Christopher Tounsel
This course is designed to provide a survey of African history from antiquity to the end of the eighteenth century. Important themes that will be covered include (but are not limited to) Ancient Egypt, Africa’s place in the Greco-Roman world, Early African Christianity, the Islamic conquest, Increased European contact, and the Atlantic Slave Trade. By the end of the course students will be able to trace Africa’s general progression from ancient times to the onset of modernity, its historical engagements with non-African civilizations and cultures, and fully equipped to take the successor course 'Africa since 1800.'

HIST 137-01  From Confederation to Confederacy: US History from Independence to Civil War
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Linda Sturtz
In the Plan of Union prepared during the 1754 "Albany Convention," Anglo-American colonists met to consider uniting as a loose confederation for their common defense and to ally with the Iroquois confederacy. That plan failed, but a later experiment in unity succeeded when the united colonies declared independence. Nevertheless, social, cultural, and ideological differences persisted, and the union formed in 1776 was tried and tested before finally fracturing with the secession of South Carolina, precipitating the Civil War. In the intervening years, Americans grappled with how they should govern themselves, who should be included in the polity, and how society should be organized. Reformers considered the controversial issues of women's rights, the role of Native Americans within the US, and the place of slavery in a nation founded on the precept that "All men are created equal." This course covers the periods of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the early national and antebellum periods, before concluding with the Civil War. It also considers the global causes and consequences of the war and the rise of the new United States.

HIST 180-01  Going Global: The Experiment of World History
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Rebecca Church
 
HIST 194-01  Of Sex and Society: Women's History and Feminist Thought
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Amy Sullivan
*Cross-listed with WGSS 194-01* This course will provide students with a thorough knowledge of women’s and gender history in the United States from the late 18th century to the early 21st century. What ideas did early feminist thinkers have about liberty, justice, and equality? How has feminist and LGBT activism shaped laws, culture, and society? How has feminism been constructed over time? Is it possible to be a feminist without knowing women’s history and without asking historical questions? We will study the outcome of women's political action as well as the history of thinking undertaken by many important, and perhaps previously unknown, historically important leaders.

HIST 234-01  American Environmental History
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 Margot Higgins
*Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

HIST 237-01  Environmental Justice
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Erik Kojola
*Cross-listed with AMST 237-01 and ENVI 237-01*

HIST 262-01  Revolutionary Russia and the Soviet Union, 1856-2000
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Julia Fein
*Cross-listed with RUSS 294-05* From the nineteenth century through Perestroika, the long revolutionary experiment in the Russian Empire and Soviet Union was about creating an alternative to existing modes of production, exploitative social relations, and autocratic political structures. It was also about transforming the natural and built environments, and bringing “culture” (comprising everything from poetry and ballet to soap and changes of underwear), along with political consciousness, to a huge, largely agrarian country with an ethnically and religiously diverse population. Throughout this survey of modern Russian/Soviet history, we will continually pose the question of what – and when – was the Russian Revolution? Key concepts/approaches include: resistance; social mobility; individual subjectivity and the collective; ethnic diversity and imperial strategies; gendering revolutionary transformation; environmental transformations and consequences, and the Russian/Soviet experience in the context of European/Eurasian/global modernity. The course begins with the Great Reforms of the 1860s and 1870s following Russia’s loss in the Crimean War, and ends with reflections on Russia’s recent reclaiming of Crimea from Ukraine.

HIST 275-01  The Rise of Modern China
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 275-01*

HIST 284-01  Imaging the Modern City
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with INTL 284-01* From c.1850-1950 the world's cities transformed as never before. Across the globe, these burgeoning metropolises were reconstituted as massive stages for the economic and cultural transformations of the day - the sites of industrialization, centralized planning, mass transport, and the locus of global migration. This course will trace the broader history of global urbanization during this period with an emphasis on how these processes were represented and imaged by nineteenth and twentieth-century urbanites. How was the modern city conceived as it transformed beyond all recognition? How did the global scope of the modern city impact these images? How were new technologies incorporated into this radical re-imagining of the modern city? And how did these images travel across the globe, themselves spurring further urbanization as they went? Geographically, the class introduces the radical transformation of urban morphology that began in mid-19th century European cities such as Manchester, London, Paris, Vienna and engages the transfer and reinterpretation of such processes on global cities from Kolkata to Moscow to Mexico City to Rio de Janeiro to Chicago and back, often to Paris. The class also engages classic and contemporary urban theory, artistic representations, and other narratives of the modern city.

HIST 294-01  Cold War Latin America
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with LATI 294-02; During the Cold War, Latin America was a decidedly “hot zone.” This class examines the reasons for this phenomenon, reviewing both internal and external pressures such as the region’s sociopolitical instability and its conflictive relationship with the United States. The class will examine some of the more dramatic moments of the Latin American Cold War, including the overthrow of Jacobo Arbenz in Guatemala, the Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions, and the Dirty Wars in Chile and Argentina. In addition, we will engage less-discussed elements of the Latin American Cold War such as its important role in fostering transhemispheric solidarities, the creative possibilities of Cold War cultural production, the emergence of a youth counterculture, and the many attempts by Latin Americans across the political spectrum to reject the premise of the Cold War altogether.*

HIST 294-03  Environmental History of Europe/Empires
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Julia Fein
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-05; not open to students who took HIST 294, Environmental History of Modern Europe, during the fall 2014 semester.* From Chernobyl radiation to London smog, modern Europe’s environmental history can be read as a series of manmade disasters in capitalist, imperialist, and communist countries. It is also possible to tell a more optimistic counter-history: one of environmental protection legislation by states and environmentalist movements by citizens, within and across national and continental borders. This course puts both of these perspectives into the broader context of historical human interactions with the earthly infrastructures of modern Europe and its empires. We will be reading about water, microbes, food, and trash; animals from the tsetse fly to the reindeer; ways in which rivers, forests, sands, soils, and carbon fuels shape human geographies in war and peace; gender roles and ethnic divisions in the management and exploitation of natural resources; changing scientific and spiritual attitudes towards humans’ relationship with the physical world in the last three centuries; and the role of the environment in European governance from British India, to Nazi Germany, to the European Union.

HIST 294-04  The Crusades
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Cameron Bradley
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-02* Crusading and the crusaders left an indelible imprint on the cultures, societies, and politics of Byzantium, the Near East, and certainly Europe as well. This course will examine the crusading phenomenon as a whole, including the traditionally numbered crusades of western Europeans to the Near East, the crusades to southern France and eastern Europe, and the Reconquista in Iberia. We will analyze the origins of the idea of crusade, the evolution of this concept over time, crusader motivations, the many effects of crusading on the European homefront, and the principalities that conquering Europeans established in the East. We also will examine the interactions of Christians, Jews, and Muslims both in Europe and abroad, as well as the perspectives of the Byzantines, Jews, and Muslims who experienced firsthand the effects of the European Christians’ enterprise.

HIST 294-06  Adventures in the Early Modern World: Traders, Travelers, Explorers and Scoundrels
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Cameron Bradley
The travels of early modern European traders and explorers fundamentally changed the places and peoples they encountered, as well as Europe and Europeans. Although medieval European voyagers already had begun to venture into the wider world, it was arguably the endeavors of the early modern era that fixed the world on the path to globalism. In this class, we will follow the travelers to the Ottoman Empire, Africa, the Americas, and Asia, on a mission to understand both Europeans’ effects on world societies and those societies’ effects on Europe.

HIST 294-09  Native American History since 1900
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Katrina Phillips
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-01* This course examines Native American history since 1900. We begin with an introduction to indigenous history before 1900, characterized by centuries of Euro-American attempts to colonize and Christianize, to assimilate Native bodies and allot Native lands. We will then analyze the ways in which Native Americans have continually fought to sustain their cultures, languages, and religions, as well as their political and socio-economic structures, throughout the 20th century and into the 21st. Focusing on themes such as Native resistance to the development of U.S. federal policies and the proliferation of Native culture, we will also consider the shifting nature of Native American sovereignty and the importance of indigenous identity in regards to the experiences of Native Americans.

HIST 294-11  Between Hitler and Stalin: European Culture and Society Between the Wars
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Julia Fein
With wars, economic crises, and political regime changes as the backdrop, this course examines European high culture, mass culture, and cultures of everyday life from World War I through the beginning of World War II. The course will include primary and secondary source readings about wartime and interwar Britain, France, Germany, the U.S.S.R., Poland, Italy, and Spain, and we will discuss topics relating to: literature, music, art and architecture; everyday life, coping strategies, and resistance; European empires and travel between the wars; and political thought in an age of extremes. Through individual and collaborative research, students will also have the opportunity to explore areas of personal interest such as: women’s, Jewish, or LGBTQ history; history of material culture and consumption; Marxism-as-internationalism; and others.

HIST 294-12  Straight Outta Africa: The History of the African Diaspora
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Christopher Tounsel
Since Biblical times Africans have had a long history of migrating-willfully and otherwise-throughout every corner of the world. Other members of the Diaspora have undertaken reverse migration by moving ‘back’ to Africa and bringing with them certain elements of Western culture. Peoples of African descent have had an immeasurable impact on the religions, politics, economies, music, and societies of non-African worlds in which they have lived. This course will examine the diverse histories and cultures of the African Diaspora from the ancient world to the present day. Particular subjects of study will include African slaves in Islamic Asia and Europe, enslaved communities in North and South America, repatriated communities in Liberia and Sierra Leone, Garveyism, Pan-Africanism, and the Sudanese Diaspora.

HIST 294-15  British History to 1603: From the Celts to the Tudors
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 112 Cameron Bradley
Premodern Britain has long held the imagination of scholars, filmmakers, authors, and the general public. Figures like Alfred the Great, Richard the Lionheart, Henry VIII, and Elizabeth I are especially conspicuous, but Britain also is remembered for its folklore, government, literature, law, ideas about social status, chivalry, forms of religious expression, sea power, and world exploration. Through primary sources and recent scholarship, this course will examine developments in society, culture, religion, and government, as well as Britain’s ties with the outside world, from the time of the Celts to the end of the Tudor line in 1603. We will proceed both chronologically and thematically, paying particular attention to the ways in which events, institutions, and ideas affected the lives of the people who lived through them.

HIST 294-16  Sport and the Modern World
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Christopher Tounsel
Sport, leisure, and organized competition have been elements of human societies since at least the Greco-Roman period. In many ways, however, sport has served as an 'arena' for the articulation, definition, and rejection of some of the modern world’s most foundational elements. In this class we will investigate the ways in which societies throughout the world have used sports to make particular arguments about race, gender, class, empire, and nationality since the end of the eighteenth century. Particular themes that we will explore include the roles of cricket and soccer in the British Empire, 'Muscular Christianity' and the ideological roots of the YMCA, the development of college football on Ivy League campuses, shifting conceptions of manhood in the late 19th century, the 'Nazi' Olympics of 1936, the desegregation of baseball, the monetization of professional sports in the 20th century, and debates concerning the history of slavery and the modern Black athlete.

HIST 294-17  Early Arab and Persian Empires 200BCE-950CE
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Andrew Overman
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01*

HIST 350-01  Race, Gender, and Medicine
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 Amy Sullivan
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-02* This seminar-style class examines the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality in the history of medicine and health in the U.S. Our diverse topics for study include eugenics, sexuality, midwifery, cultural/spiritual healing methods, pandemics, race- and gender-based ailments and medical experiments (such as the science and politics of the birth control pill and the infamous Tuskegee syphilis experiment), gender reassignment surgery, and sex-testing in the Olympics. This wide range of topics will prepare students to explore a research topic of their own choosing for a final paper.

HIST 378-01  War Crimes and Memory in East Asia
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 378-01*

HIST 379-01  The Study of History
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Linda Sturtz
 
HIST 394-01  Public History in Action-Remembering Rondo: An Oral History Practicum
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 215 Amy Sullivan
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01* Archives, institutions, and museums have vast, invaluable collections of local, state, and national histories built from the collections they acquire through purchase or donation. But what about the stories and artifacts still in the hands of the people? This hands-on, collaborative course focuses on the Rondo community, an historically African American St. Paul neighborhood bisected and ruined by the construction of I-94 in the 1960s. Over the years, Rondo citizens continued to fight for recognition of what happened to their community. In July 2015, St. Paul issued a formal apology. Students will actively engage in a community-driven project to collect and record the history of Rondo in a variety of mediums--written, oral and digital. Throughout the semester, the Digital History class and the Oral History class will work and meet together to create a meaningful piece of Public History.

Oral History Focus: This team will collect the oral histories of Rondo neighbors, families, and citizens. After immersion in oral history theory and methods, memory and narrative-based histories, students will work with the community to conduct and transcribe video interviews and help create an online repository.The course will include standard lecture and classroom activity, a lab to learn digital methodologies, tools pertinent to the project, and hands-on work in the Rondo community.

HIST 394-02  Public History in Action-Remembering Rondo: A Digital History Practicum
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 216 Rebecca Wingo
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-02* Archives, institutions, and museums have vast, invaluable collections of local, state, and national histories built from the collections they acquire through purchase or donation. But what about the stories and artifacts still in the hands of the people? This hands-on, collaborative course focuses on the Rondo community, an historically African American St. Paul neighborhood bisected and ruined by the construction of I-94 in the 1960s. Over the years, Rondo citizens continued to fight for recognition of what happened to their community. In July 2015, St. Paul issued a formal apology. Students will actively engage in a community-driven project to collect and record the history of Rondo in a variety of mediums--written, oral and digital. Throughout the semester, the Digital History class and the Oral History class will work and meet together to create a meaningful piece of Public History.

Digital History Focus: This team will produce a digital history archive for the Rondo community through a model known as the History Harvest (historyharvest.net). Students will work with the community to digitize their artifacts, conduct interviews, and create an online repository.The course will include standard lecture and classroom activity, a lab to learn digital methodologies and tools pertinent to the archive, and hands-on work in the Rondo community.

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