Class Schedules

History
Old Main, Room 311
651-696-6493
FAX: 651-696-6498

Office Hours
September 1-May 31
Weekdays 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
June 1-August 31
Tuesdays 8 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Spring 2017 »      Fall 2016 »     

Spring 2017 Class Schedule - updated May 1, 2016 at 04:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
HIST 115-01  Africa Since 1800
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm STAFF
 
HIST 137-01  From Confederation to Confederacy: US History from Independence to Civil War
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am Linda Sturtz
 
HIST 180-01  Going Global: The Experiment of World History
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am Karin Velez
 
HIST 181-01  Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with LATI 181-01*

HIST 194-01  Europe in the Era of World War
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm Jessica Pearson-Patel
 
HIST 222-01  Imagining the American West
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am Katrina Phillips
*Cross-listed with AMST 222-01*

HIST 234-01  U.S. Environmental History
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am Margot Higgins
*Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of the instructor*

HIST 237-01  Environmental Justice
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm Erik Kojola
*Cross-listed with AMST 237-01 and ENVI 237-01*

HIST 251-01  Pirates, Translators, Missionaries: Between Atlantic Empires
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am Karin Velez
 
HIST 275-01  The Rise of Modern China
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 275-01*

HIST 282-01  Latin America: Art and Nation
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with LATI 282-01*

HIST 294-03  Debating the Civil Rights Movement through Film
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm Crystal Moten
This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. By viewing and analyzing key documentaries and motion pictures that focus on this important time in history, we will analyze the ways in which screenwriters and directors depict the movement and the larger implications of this. In addition to viewing key documentaries and films, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary sources that highlight the key people, issues, events, and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power.

HIST 294-04  Modern African American History: Reconstruction to Obama
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm Crystal Moten
 
HIST 294-06  Governing the Body: Health, Eugenics, and Population Control in Global Perspective
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm Jessica Pearson-Patel
 
HIST 294-07  Topics African History
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm STAFF
 
HIST 294-08  Topics African History
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am STAFF
 
HIST 294-09  The Hundred Years' War
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm Cameron Bradley
 
HIST 353-01  Oceans in World History
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm Karin Velez
 
HIST 378-01  War Crimes and Memory in East Asia
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 378-01*

HIST 379-01  The Study of History
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm Linda Sturtz
 
HIST 394-01  Science, Empire, and Visual Culture
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with LATI 394-01*

HIST 394-02  Gender and Sexuality in Medieval Europe
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm Cameron Bradley
 

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Fall 2016 Class Schedule - updated May 1, 2016 at 04:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
HIST 114-01  History of Africa to 1800
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 STAFF
 
HIST 121-01  The Greek World
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Brian Lush
*Cross-listed with CLAS 121-01; first day attendance required*

HIST 135-01  Captives, Cannibals, and Capitalists in Early Modern Atlantic World
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Linda Sturtz
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02 and LATI 294-01 (to be renumbered AMST 235-01 and LATI 235-01)*

HIST 140-01  Introduction to East Asian Civilization
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 140-01*

HIST 154-01  African Life Histories
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 STAFF
 
HIST 194-01  Getting Medieval: The Middle Ages in the Modern Imaginary
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Cameron Bradley
Who says the Middle Ages are over? Judging from the popularity of medieval-themed television series, films, books, and video games, the Middle Ages live on—at least in our imaginations. In this class, we will look at various modern reimaginings of the medieval past, with a view toward understanding why the idea of the Middle Ages continues to excite our curiosity and what purposes these reimaginings serve. Fiction and film sources will include material from Game of Thrones, Harry Potter, the Tolkien corpus, Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, and How to Tame Your Dragon (among others), and we will look also at gaming, art, and Live-Action Role Playing.

HIST 194-02  Revolutionary Europe in the Long Nineteenth Century
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 214 Jessica Pearson-Patel
This course will provide an introduction to European politics, culture, and society in the long nineteenth century from the French Revolution in 1789 to the eve of the First World War in 1914. We will explore a multitude of different kinds of revolutions—including political revolutions, dramatic changes in class and social structure, evolving gender roles for men and women, and the establishment of new empires and nation states. This class will situate these vast changes in Europe in a broad global context and will consider the experiences of people with very different identities, ranging from women fighting for equal rights under the banner of the French Revolution to Russian peasants to African workers in the Belgian Congo. We will challenge traditional notions of what constitutes Europe and we will explore the various transnational connections that linked Europe to the rest of the world. Readings will include Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Emile Zola’s The Belly of Paris, and the memoirs of Savva Dmitrievich Purlevskii about his life as a Russian serf.

HIST 225-01  Native American History
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 228 Katrina Phillips
*Cross-listed with AMST 225-01*

HIST 234-01  U.S. Environmental History
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Margot Higgins
*Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; first day of attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

HIST 236-01  Consumer Nation: American Consumer Culture in the 20th Century
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 400 Chris Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 236-01; first day of attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

HIST 252-01  Conversion and Inquisition: Religious Change
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 110 Karin Velez
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-04*

HIST 256-01  Transatlantic Slave Trade
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Linda Sturtz
*First Year Course only*

HIST 274-01  The Great Tradition in China before 1840
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 274-01*

HIST 277-01  The Rise of Modern Japan
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 277-01*

HIST 294-01  Narrating African American Women's 20th Century Resistance
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Crystal Moten
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-04* Using critical biographies of both well-known and lesser known African American women, this course will examine traditions of 20th century African American women’s activism, the ways in which they have changed over time, and also the interior lives of African Amercican women. Too often, the narrative of the “strong black woman” infuses stories of African American women’s resistance, which coupled with a culture of dissemblance, makes the inner workings of their lives difficult to imagine. This course, at its heart, seeks to uncover the motivations, both personal and political, behind African American women’s activism. It also seeks to address the ways in which African American women have responded to the pressing social, economic, and political needs of their diverse communities. We will read biographies of African American women such as Ida B. Wells, Amy Jacques Garvey, Henrietta Lacks, Ella Baker, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, Florynce Kennedy, and Barbara Jordan, to name a few. Biographical reading will be coupled with primary sources, documentaries, and additional secondary sources to provide context.

HIST 294-02  Debating the Civil Rights Movement through Film
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Crystal Moten
This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. By viewing and analyzing key documentaries and motion pictures that focus on this important time in history, we will analyze the ways in which screenwriters and directors depict the movement and the larger implications of this. In addition to viewing key documentaries and films, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary sources that highlight the key people, issues, events, and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power.

HIST 294-04  Women, Gender, and the Family in Contemporary Europe
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Jessica Pearson-Patel
This course will explore the ways in which the major events and processes in contemporary European history shaped the lives of women and families as well and the way that both individual women and women’s movements have shaped the history of contemporary Europe. Our exploration will begin with the French Revolution in 1789 and end with the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe in the late twentieth century. We will focus on issues such as family policy, reproductive rights, labor, immigration, women’s political representation, and LGBTQ equality in Europe. We will also explore the importance of children and childhood in the context of contemporary European society and the role that the state has played in shaping the lives of young people. Whenever possible, we will approach the topics at hand by exploring the voices of European women themselves and we will consider the experiences of people from a wide range of identities. Readings will include Virginia Woolf’s Three Guineas, Edith Hahn Beer’s memoir, The Nazi Officer’s Wife, and Shattering the Silence: French Women’s Voices from the Ghetto by French women’s rights activist Fadela Amara.

HIST 294-07  Towns and City Life from Late Antiquity to the Later Middle Ages
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Cameron Bradley
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01* The city is a key component of modern life, but much of what we associate with urban life took shape during the Middle Ages. This course explores European cities and city life from the Roman period to the end of the Middle Ages. We will investigate how and why cities developed, how they were governed, their relationships with the hinterland and the environment, what urban living was like, and people’s perceptions of cities and urban life. Along the way, we will cover such topics as the transformations of late Roman cities during the Middle Ages, commerce and work, urban rebellions, family life, forms of entertainment, and more.

HIST 294-08  The Vikings: Raiders, Traders, and Settlers
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Cameron Bradley
In the popular imagination, the Vikings are little more than blood-thirsty raiders wearing horned helmets who pillaged their way across Europe, wiping out culture and “civilization” wherever they could find it. This class seeks to correct that view, contending that the Vikings did much more than plunder and destroy (although they did some of that, too). The Vikings were accomplished traders and settlers as well, and they fundamentally altered the political, economic, military, and religious history of northern Europe and beyond. We will use textual, archaeological, and linguistic evidence alongside scholarly works to explore the rich history of the Vikings and their impact.

HIST 294-10  Uses and Abuses: A History of Drugs, Addiction, and Recovery in the U.S.
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Amy Sullivan
Beginning with an essential global history of legal and illegal mind-altering substances, this course will ultimately focus on 19th and 20th century social and medical histories of substance use/abuse: Temperance and Prohibition, the “War on Drugs,” the shifting concept of addiction as a moral failing to addiction as a treatable disease, and the history of the recovery movement. From the Narcotic Farm in Kentucky, Alcoholics Anonymous, and the Minnesota Model to the current opiate epidemic, ravaged meth-laden small towns, and marijuana legalization, topics abound for class discussion and research papers. This course requires a considerable amount of reading but will be interspersed with expert guest speakers and documentary film viewing.

HIST 340-01  US Urban Environmental History
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Chris Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 340-01; first day of attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

HIST 490-01  Senior Seminar in History
TR 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 009 Karin Velez
 

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