Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

ANTH 358-01

Anthropology of Violence

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: Faced with the escalation of political and ethnic violence in the modern world, anthropologists have become increasingly aware of the need to address these realities which have forced a rethinking of the meaning of violence as a social and cultural phenomenon. This course interrogates the slippery concept of violence in the light of theoretical approaches from different disciplines. The course will begin with a discussion of how anthropologists have reexamined the concept of violence within the context of complex and large-scale societies. It will then address the preponderate weight that the concept of the state has played within the social sciences in interpretation of violence, followed by a consideration of how notions of community and cultural difference figure prominently in the ideology of conflict.

(4 credits)

INTL 245-01

Intro to Intl Human Rights

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the study and promotion of human rights. Using broad materials, it focuses on the evolution and definition of key concepts, the debate over "universal" rights, regional and international institutions, core documents, the role of states, and current topics of interest to the human rights movement. (4 credits)

INTL 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with SOCI 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

LATI 245-01

Latin American Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Paul Dosh

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 245-01*

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Cross-listed with Political Science 245. (4 credits)

PHIL 223-01

Health and Human Rights

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Martin Gunderson

Notes: Human rights and healthcare are intimately connected. Human rights are used both to protect human subjects in biomedical research and to support claims for adequate healthcare. The use of human rights to protect human research subjects raises issues of informed consent, privacy, and individual autonomy. The use of human rights to secure healthcare resources raises issues about what level of healthcare ought to be supported and what constitutes a just distribution of healthcare resources. The course also explores recent work on the way in which human rights and public health combine in the quest to secure overall wellbeing. In general the course views public health through the framework of human rights. Alternate years. (4 Credits)


POLI 245-01

Latin American Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Paul Dosh

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 245-01*

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 245. (4 credits)


SOCI 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

Fall 2016

ANTH 246-01

Refugees/Humanitarian Response

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: This course provides an overview of issues related to refugees and humanitarian response in U.S. and international settings. Students explore the meaning of "humanitarian" and inherent issues of power, ethics, and human rights in responses to conflict by examining the roles of those who engage in humanitarian work. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)


FREN 394-01

Representations of Immigration and Border-Crossings in Contemporary Europe

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 402
  • Instructor: Joelle Vitiello

Notes: *First day attendance required* Global media have long been fascinated with images of migrants from the South enduring perilous journeys in their attempts to enter Europe through land or sea. These images have produced series of standard narratives, especially since the 2010s, rather than a deep understanding. With the help of theorists such as Giorgio Agamben, Etienne Balibar, Isotina Ballesterros, Nina Glick-Schiller, Alec Hargreaves, or Sarah Mekdjian, this course will critically analyze mass media images of immigration, juxtaposing them with more nuanced representations from European cinema and literature. Works from France, Germany, Greece, Italy, and Spain will be examined to study specific issues (from detention camps in and out of the Schengen space to integration and citizenship of several generations, from cultural exclusions to hospitality, love, and success stories). Each of the major European countries has a different historical, geographical, and economic relationship with the migrants' countries of origin, and the course will proceed comparatively, seeking not just commonalities but also significant differences among the European countries receiving migrants. Questions of race, ethnicity, gender, race, religion and differences will be important concerns.

The materials for the class are diverse. They include written memoirs and fiction, films, graphic novels, critical essays, and interactive and creative maps such as euborderscapes projects. Starting with classics that deal directly with immigration such as Werner Fassbinder's Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1974), the course will carry its analysis forward to current fiction films such as Terraferma (2011) and Samba (2014). In addition, some documentary films (or excerpts from them) such as Kal Touré's Victims of our Riches (2006) will be screened for background information. Narratives include short works by Igiaba Scego, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Laila Lallami, Alexander Maksik, Donato Ndongo-Bidyogo, Amara Lakhous, Tahar Ben Jelloun among others.

HISP 394-01

Translating Human Rights

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 213
  • Instructor: Teresa Mesa Adamuz

Notes: *First day attendance required* This course is an introduction to community interpreting and translation that focus on the linguistic, ethical, and cultural elements of the practice. It aims to give students an opportunity to improve their language skills and to gain a deeper understanding of the intercultural aspects of the translation activity in connection with immigration and human rights issues. Taught in partnership with The Advocates for Human Rights. This course counts towards the HRH concentration. Prerequisites: At least two 300 level courses in Spanish or permission of the instructor.

HIST 256-01

Transatlantic Slave Trade

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: *First Year Course only*

Cross-listed with American Studies 256. This class examines the Atlantic commerce in African slaves that took place roughly between 1500 and 1800. We will explore, among other topics, transatlantic commerce, the process of turning captives into commodities, the gendered dimensions of the slave trade, resistance to the trade, the world the slaves made, and the abolitionist movement on both sides of the Atlantic. Students will read a range of primary and secondary sources in order to gain a more complex understanding of the slave trade and how it changed over time. (4 credits)

INTL 245-01

Intro to Intl Human Rights

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the study and promotion of human rights. Using broad materials, it focuses on the evolution and definition of key concepts, the debate over "universal" rights, regional and international institutions, core documents, the role of states, and current topics of interest to the human rights movement. (4 credits)

POLI 221-01

Global Governance

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Wendy Weber

Notes: This course is designed to introduce students to global governance. It begins with a discussion of the concept of global governance. It then turns to some of the central features of contemporary global governance, including the changing status of the state and of international/world organizations and the role of global civil society. The emphasis here is on how patterns of global governance have changed and are changing and on the implications of these changes for democracy, social justice, etc. The remainder of the course focuses on the areas of international peace and security, human rights and international humanitarian law, and economic governance. By addressing such topics as the International Criminal Court and the role of the IMF and the World Bank in economic development, these parts of the course highlight the contested nature of global governance in each of the three issue areas. Political Science 120 recommended.(4 credits)

POLI 323-01

Humanitarianism in World Politics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 111
  • Instructor: Wendy Weber

Notes: The past two decades appear to have been very successful ones for humanitarianism. Funding for humanitarianism has skyrocketed; humanitarian organizations have expanded their public support, as well as their activities; and, increasingly, humanitarian issues have found a place at the center of policy decisions. It is also generally agreed that humanitarianism is in crisis owing to the growing awareness of the sometimes harmful effects of aid; the expansion of the concept of humanitarianism to include human rights, development, and peace-building; and the increasing involvement of states in humanitarian operations. This advanced-level course explores the nature and dilemmas of contemporary humanitarianism. (4 credits)