Class Schedules

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Fall 2014 Class Schedule - updated November 1, 2014 at 06:56 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
AMST 256-01  Transatlantic Slave Trade
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with HIST 256-01*

ANTH 362-01  Culture and Globalization
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
*Cross-listed with INTL 362-01*

HIST 256-01  Transatlantic Slave Trade
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with AMST 256-01*

INTL 245-01  Intro to Intl Human Rights
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 James von Geldern
 
INTL 362-01  Culture and Globalization
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
*Cross-listed with ANTH 362-01*

LATI 245-01  Latin American Politics
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 212 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with POLI 245-01; S/D/NC with Written evaluation only*

MUSI 155-01  Music and Freedom
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mazullo
*First Year Course only* The concept of freedom both lies at the heart of human rights discourse and provides the spark that ignites any number of musical movements. Intended for students with strong interests in the intersection between the performing arts and the humanities, this course serves as an introduction both to the concept of freedom as it has developed in Western societies since the late eighteenth century and to the history of music in the cultures that have fostered such ideals. It intends to introduce students to the study of music (and, by association, the arts in general) from social, cultural, and critical perspectives, using the framework of freedom as a common theme. It also aims to contextualize the discourse of human rights within the history of arts and ideas, providing students with a sense of the term's changing meanings and emphases over time and across space. We will explore traditions in both Western art music (also known as "classical music") and American popular (recorded) music in a search for the ways in which music has served social-political ideologies -- overtly through the aims of its composers and performers, and unintentionally through the conditions of its reception. Historical readings on the concept of freedom from a variety of disciplinary perspectives (history, philosophy, political science, critical theory) will introduce students to several of the most influential thinkers on the subject and the central concerns and questions that animate the discourse on freedom. No prior background in music is required for the course, although it is assumed that students will have a true interest not only in popular music of the twentieth century but also other traditions and genres, such as opera and symphonic music. "Freedom" signifies a number of ideals, which operate in real-political and abstract-aesthetic realms. Music can represent, convey, and "mean" freedom in infinite ways, and it is the intention of this course to introduce students to this diversity.

MUSI 155-02  Music and Freedom
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mazullo
 
PHIL 222-01  Philosophy of Human Rights
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 113 Martin Gunderson
 
POLI 221-01  Global Governance
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 214 Wendy Weber
 
POLI 245-01  Latin American Politics
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 212 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with LATI 245-01; S/D/NC with Written evaluation only*

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Spring 2015 Class Schedule - updated November 1, 2014 at 06:56 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
ANTH 394-01  Gender, Power, and Sexualities in Africa
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-01* This course uses gender, one of the most dynamic areas of Africanist research today, as a lens to examine struggles over power and human rights in Africa. It engages some of the most recent discussions on sexualities by examining the body as a site of political, legal, and social contestation. In particular, we will interrogate the local and global dimensions of the recent and highly controversial anti-homosexuality legislation in Uganda and the implications for discussions of human rights and sexualities throughout the continent. Through reading ethnographic and life history texts and researching their own projects, students will grapple with themes such as “the status” of women in hierarchical vs. complementary conceptualizations of social power, the making of men, the meaning of “tradition” in historical perspective, the relationship between kinship, politics, and civil order in Africa, the challenges of forming coalitions around gender-based human rights issues, the intersection of gender and patterns of production and reproduction, and the ways in which conflict and post-conflict settings bring intersections of gender, power, sexualities, and human rights to the fore.

FREN 416-01  French Interdisciplinary Studies: Haiti: Culture, Human Rights and Humanitarianism
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 404 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required* The January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, that killed more than 250.000 people, brought a lot of attention to the country traditionally described as "the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere." In October 2014, the former dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier (Baby Doc 1971-1986) passed away before being brought to justice for his human rights crimes against the citizens of Haiti.

This course aims to provide students interested in humanitarianism, human rights, the Caribbean, cultural studies, and French and Francophone Studies an introduction to Haiti and Haitian culture throughout its history, including pre- and post-earthquake culture. It also aims at providing a thoughtful critical frame to the extraordinary humanitarian situation after the earthquake and the responses it generated at the Haitian and international levels.

Throughout the course, students will become more familiar with Haitian history, its rich cultural production, and the relevance of culture to human rights representations, abuses, and responses to abuses as well as its relevance to various humanitarian crises in Haiti, especially the post-earthquake daily situation. Students will also gain knowledge about Haitian society, local organizations working in human rights and humanitarianism, the geography of Human Rights, local IDP environment, and humanitarian distribution of resources, and they will acquire the critical tools necessary to understand, assess, and participate in the current debates about human rights and humanitarianism practices in Haiti (including issues related to health, gender, economic rights, education, and access to resources of any kind).

Materials for the course include interdisciplinary readings and reports (including various human rights reports, humanitarian assistance reports and updates, C.L.R. James, Paul Farmer, Michael Dash, Peter Hallward, Elizabeth McAlister, Edwidge Danticat, Myriam Chancy, Beverly Bell, Jacqueline Regis, and Anne-Christine d'Adesky among others) and films (by Raoul Peck, Anne Lescot and Laurence Magloire, Rachel Magloire, Jonathan Demme). Speakers will include human rights activists, writers, and humanitarian aid specialists about and from Haiti. Technology permitting, students will meet members of the Haitian community involved in relief work via Skype.

This course will be taught in English. Students taking it for credit counting toward the French major or Minor will be able to read some of the material and conduct their research in French. Students interested in doing an internship with one of the many organizations in the Twin Cities linked with Haiti should speak to the instructor.

INTL 245-01  Intro to Intl Human Rights
MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 05 Wendy Weber
 
INTL 352-01  Transitional Justice
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky
*Cross-listed with POLI 352-01*

POLI 323-01  Humanitarianism in World Politics
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber
 
POLI 352-01  Transitional Justice
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky
*Cross-listed with INTL 352-01*

WGSS 394-01  Gender, Power, and Sexualities in Africa
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-01*

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