Class Schedules

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Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated February 13, 2016 at 09:00 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
ANTH 363-01  Anthropology of Development
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Arjun Guneratne
 
ECON 221-01  Introduction to International Economics
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Samiul Haque
 
ECON 426-01  International Economic Development
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Amy Damon
 
EDUC 460-01  Education and Social Change
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 217 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

ENGL 294-05  Feminist Re-Constructions: Indian
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with WGSS 220-01; no prerequisites*

ENVI 343-01  Imperial Nature: The US and the Global Environment
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Chris Wells
*Cross-listed with HIST 343-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

GEOG 263-01  Geography of Development and Underdevelopment
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 Claude Peloquin
*Appropriate for FY Students*

HIST 343-01  Imperial Nature: The US and the Global Environment
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Chris Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 343-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

INTL 320-01  Global Political Economy
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 David Blaney
*Cross-listed with POLI 320-01*

POLI 221-01  Global Governance
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Wendy Weber
 
POLI 242-01  Political Economy of Development
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 202 Lisa Mueller
 
POLI 320-01  Global Political Economy
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 David Blaney
*Cross-listed with INTL 320-01*

WGSS 220-01  Feminist Re-Constructions: Indian
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-05* A historical accident has led to the creation and use of ‘Indian’ in very different geographies—North America and South Asia. We will study what happens when these diverse cultural and political depictions of ‘Indian’ are juxtaposed. Through an intersection of gender with nation, race, class, and sexuality, we will discuss the connections between the concepts of native, ancient, and modern, nation and citizenship, hyphenated and hybrid identities, global cultural consumption, to name some issues. The course will include authors across the 20th century into the present—for example, Zitkala Sa, R.K. Narayan, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Anita Desai, Simon Ortiz, Sherman Alexie, Mulk Raj Anand, Louise Erdrich, nila northSun, Meena Kandasamy, among others. Art, film, and political expressions will be part of the matrix of analysis. No prerequisites.

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Spring 2016 Class Schedule - updated February 13, 2016 at 09:00 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
ECON 294-03  Introduction to International Economic Development
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 102 Brooke Krause
This course is an introduction to economic development and the economics of poverty, using concepts from both microeconomics and macroeconomics to understand globalization, poverty, and development. This class will use economic theory and empirical evidence to understand important questions in the field of development economics. Topics covered in this class include: poverty, inequality, and growth; agricultural markets; microfinance and credit markets; human capital and education; health and nutrition; rural and urban labor markets; population growth and fertility; migration; the environment; international trade; developing-country debt; and foreign aid. This course will apply theory using empirical data to study issues related to development, with a focus on policy relevant solutions. Prerequisite ECON 119, Principles of Economics. This course will count as a 200A elective.

ECON 294-04  Economic Geography of World Food and Resources
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 401 Samiul Haque
To instill knowledge of the world's food and resource systems, an understanding of why things are the way they are today, and a familiarity with the history, policies and institutions that have shaped nations’ development. This should enable you to assess and make judgments about long term resource sustainability and economic conditions around the world. Ultimately, you should be able to integrate facts within the context you have learned and assess the consequences of different policies for dealing with world food, resource, and environmental problems in an economic context. Pre-requisite: ECON 119, Principles of Economics.

ECON 294-05  Introduction to International Economic Development
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Brooke Krause
This course is an introduction to economic development and the economics of poverty, using concepts from both microeconomics and macroeconomics to understand globalization, poverty, and development. This class will use economic theory and empirical evidence to understand important questions in the field of development economics. Topics covered in this class include: poverty, inequality, and growth; agricultural markets; microfinance and credit markets; human capital and education; health and nutrition; rural and urban labor markets; population growth and fertility; migration; the environment; international trade; developing-country debt; and foreign aid. This course will apply theory using empirical data to study issues related to development, with a focus on policy relevant solutions. Prerequisite ECON 119, Principles of Economics. This course will count as a 200A elective.

EDUC 460-01  Education and Social Change
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 102 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

ENVI 232-01  People, Agriculture and the Environment
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with GEOG 232-01; first day attendance required*

ENVI 252-01  Water and Power
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with GEOG 252-01 and POLI 252-01*

GEOG 232-01  People, Agriculture and the Environment
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01; first day attendance required*

GEOG 243-01  Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 William Moseley
*First day attendance required*

INTL 294-01  HIV/AIDS:History, Politics and Evolution of a Pandemic
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Christy Hanson
 
INTL 494-01  Pandemics: When Globalization and Diseases Collide
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Christy Hanson
*Course to meet in Carnegie 411* Historically, infectious diseases have been among the great equalizers of nations. Infectious diseases cross borders with little respect for societal hierarchy or political position in the world order. Pandemics have repeatedly challenged the notion of the nation state, religious and political ideology and social structures. Modern day pandemics have the ability to spread further geographically, reflecting our ever more globalized world. Pandemics can concurrently reflect strong nationalist (almost isolationist) tendencies, alongside growing reliance on a global governance structure. However, they also increasingly reveal society’s marginalized peoples and their limited participation in and attention from government. Through the stories of historical and modern day pandemics, students will explore what pandemics can show us about disparities in development, social order(s), governance models, political and societal priorities and norms, inter-connectedness of nations / peoples, and economic decision-making.

POLI 252-01  Water and Power
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 252-01 and GEOG 252-01*

POLI 294-02  The Politics of Fear and Hope: Africa from Colonial Times to the "Cheetah Generation"
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Lisa Mueller
The popular image of Africa is one of poverty, violence, and dictatorship. However, levels of these outcomes vary considerably over space and time. Why are some parts of Africa more politically and economically successful than others? Why are civil wars ending? Why is inequality rising? What is the significance of an emerging generation of "cheetahs"—young Africans with an entrepreneurial spirit and distaste for the corrupt political establishment? This is a course for students of all levels who wish to answer such questions. It will introduce concepts that are central to the study of African politics: neopatrimonialism, coethnicity, "politics of the belly," and more.

SOCI 194-01  The Origin of Social Problems
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 105 Marci Gerulis-Darcy
How does the organization of production, living arrangements, and relations between people affect our life chances and experiences? How does the structure of key features of our world, such as capitalism and industrialism, affect people? This course analyzes the origins and consequences of social organization and structure as related to a range of social problems. Drawing on evidence from a variety of countries, we will gain insight into various contemporary social problems such as inequitable access to societal amenities, natural disasters, consumer culture, and inequalities in social and community development.

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