Course Descriptions

International Studies

INTL 110 - Introduction to International Studies: Globalization - Homogeneity and Heterogeneity

Globalization is upon us, resulting in unprecedented cultural interpenetration and civilizational encounter. Most of what animates this condition is old. However, the contemporary velocity, reach, and mutations of these forces suggest a new "world time," full of contradictions, perils, and promises. This course introduces students to globalization by asking What is globalization, and how does one study it? What are the principal forces (social groups, ideas, institutions, and ecological circumstances) that shaped and now propel it? What are its concrete consequences, and how are we to respond? Open to first- and second-year students.

INTL 111 - Introduction to International Studies: Literature and Global Culture

One of the most significant trends of the current era has been globalization: the shrinking of distances, the greater interpenetration of the world's peoples, and the rise, perhaps, of a so-called global culture. Yet it is too simple to say, "it's all a big mix," for the questions of how the mixing is done, and who mixes, are complex. The study of literature illuminates these questions. By reading important recent texts, this course tackles "world" questions: what does it mean to be from a certain place? what is a culture? and who are we in it? We'll work to link our own personal readings with the texts in dialogue with the world. Texts will be drawn from U.S. multicultural, "world," and travel literature, and rich theoretical readings.

Prerequisite(s)

Open only to First Year students and rising sophomores.

INTL 112 - Introduction to International Studies: Globalization, Media, and Cultural Identities

 

What roles do media play in constituting identities for people and places both near and far? How do various media facilitate or hinder globalization? How are cultures and cultural identities shaped by contemporary media practices and globalization? The course introduces some key concepts in social theory that have been central to how media is researched (i.e.: public sphere, nation, media, identity, diaspora, multiculturalism and so on). We will investigate the role of media in constituting national identities, contesting and proposing political visions, creating subcultures, and representing and shaping social categories such as race, gender and class. How do media create categories of people? How do people inhabit, resist, subvert, reproduce those categories in and through media? This course focuses on thinking through, about and with media.

 


INTL 113 - Introduction to International Studies: Identities, Interests, and Community

Open to first- and second-year students. This course develops a base of knowledge, concepts, and analytical skills for engaging with International Studies' multi-dimensional concerns. Ranging across disciplines but with an emphasis on social science, we study global theories of interaction and conflict between human groups and explore sites and implications of increasing encounter. Focusing on culture, people flows, nationalism and ethnicity, democratization, contending interests, security, religious fundamentalism, gender, and modes of community integration, we examine how particular cases reflect broader processes.

INTL 114 - Introduction to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students.

INTL 115 - Introduction to International Studies: World Travel

Travel, whether by diplomats, migrants, soldiers, scientists, traders, or tourists, is at the core of countless past and present societies, and connects closely to how we live, work and conceive ourselves in today's interconnected world. Thus this course introduces students to international studies in two ways: by exploring a set of ideas and authors influential in the study of world travel and mobility in its many forms; and by investigating, through examples drawn from many actors, centuries, and locales, the countless motives for and consequences of world travel. Open to first- and second- year students.

INTL 190 - Mediterranean, Baltic, Black: Seas, Identities and History

People typically organize the world by its landmasses: but the regions around seas are just as integral and important. This course explores the civilizations around the Mediterranean, Baltic, and Black seas, which bridge Europe, Africa, and Asia. We will probe the history, culture, economy and politics of maritime and coastal zones, and extend to linked inland societies. Critical focus will be devoted to identity, nation, territory, border, culture, and coexistence. Readings, films and more will draw from diverse sources.

INTL 194 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

INTL 202 - Global Media Industries

Global media collectively have tremendous influence in how many see and comprehend the world and therefore on the information and beliefs upon which they feel or act. While media are central to the continued production of a sense of "the world" at large or the "global" scale, media industries are situated geographically, culturally and institutionally. Even if they promise worldwide coverage or are multinational companies, there is much to be gained from studying how media are produced and distributed differently according to specific social, political, economic and historical conditions. This course considers media industries around the world with a focus on the relationships between the labor and infrastructures behind representations in a broad range of media (television, radio, cinema, news, telecommunications, internet).

Cross-Listed as

MCST 202.

INTL 225 - Comparative Economic Systems

This course examines the workings of economic systems from the perspective of the incentives facing the firm and consumer. The course provides an introduction to the economics of information and organization which is used to evaluate resource allocation under the specific institutional environment of different economic systems. Our understanding of the incentive system is then used to evaluate the overall economic system. The focus of the course is primarily on the U.S., Japan and the former Soviet Union/Russia. As time permits the course may examine China, Germany and Central Europe.

Prerequisite(s)

ECON 119.

Cross-Listed as

ECON 225

INTL 245 - Introduction to International Human Rights

This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the study and promotion of human rights. Using broad materials, it focuses on the evolution and definition of key concepts, the debate over "universal" rights, regional and international institutions, core documents, the role of states, and current topics of interest to the human rights movement.

INTL 253 - Comparative Muslim Cultures

This course examines the cultures of three globally influential Islamic civilizations: Arab, Persian, and Indian. We will explore pre-Islamic frameworks, and engage diverse primary Islamic political, intellectual, and spiritual sources and recent scholarship. We'll ask, what (if anything) is essential to all Islamic societies? What varies? What of interactions with neighboring religions and traditions? And how have these core traditions extended into today's North American, French, German-Turkish, East or West African, British, and other forms of Islam?

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

ANTH 253

INTL 265 - Translation as Cross-Cultural Communication

When communication takes place across language barriers, it raises fundamental questions about meaning, style, power relationships, and traditions. This course treats literary translation as a particularly complex form of cross-cultural interaction. Students will work on their own translations of prose or poetry while considering broader questions of translation, through critiques of existing translations, close comparisons of variant translations, and readings on cultural and theoretical aspects of literary translation.

Prerequisite(s)

Advanced proficiency in a second language.

Cross-Listed as

RUSS 265

INTL 269 - Economics of International Migration

This course will examine the global movement of people through an economic lens. The course will study the impact that emigration has on the economy of the home country, such as brain drain and population change, the historic role that migration has played in economic development, and finally the effect that immigration has on immigrant-receiving countries. The various economic issues in the current immigration debate in the United States will be analyzed including the economic assimilation of immigrants, and the impact of immigration on native born workers.

Frequency: Every other spring.

Cross-Listed as

ECON 269 and LATI 269

INTL 272 - Post-Nationalism: The Post-Soviet Sphere

The USSR's 1991 dissolution ended one of history's great experiments. Socialism sought to dissolve ethnicity and overcome ethnic conflict with a focus on equality. Instead it exacerbated nationalism and created-separated identities. But how? Topics include ethno-creation, control, and resistance; ethnic animosities and the USSR's destruction; new states after 1991; "diaspora" populations beyond ethnic homelands; local rebellions; new "native" dictatorships; and recent international organizations.

Cross-Listed as

RUSS 272

INTL 280 - Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes.

Frequency: Every other year.

Cross-Listed as

SOCI 280

INTL 282 - Introduction to International Public Health

This course introduces and explores the major health problems facing developing countries, and the main approaches to remediation. The course considers the social determinants of health, and the need for public health programs to address the root causes of health inequities as well as illness itself. Focus is at the country, international-organization, and donor levels. Attention will be given to major indicators, recent trends, policies, and metrics for monitoring progress. A case study, such as international tuberculosis control, will be used as an applied analysis.

Frequency: Every year.

INTL 285 - Ethnicity and Nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe

This course explores ethnic nationalism's causes and consequences in Eastern Europe. Drawing on several disciplines, we begin by examining the core concepts and theories in the contemporary study of nationalism. We then explore both the historical roots of Eastern European nationalisms, and their implications for democracy, minority inclusion, regional stability, and European integration.

INTL 288 - Race and Ethnicity in Japan

One of the founding myths of the modern Japanese nation-state has been the illusion of racial and ethnic homogeneity. This course aims not only to challenge this myth but also to historicize and contextualize it by investigating various racial and ethnic minorities in Japan: Ainu, Burakumin (outcasts), Okinawans, Koreans, African Americans, Nikkeijin (South Americans of Japanese descent), and Caucasians. These groups pose fundamental questions about the boundaries of "Japan" and about the meanings of "race" and "ethnicity" as categories of identification and difference. The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) to familiarize students with the history of minority discourse in Japan, and 2) to encourage students to think critically and comparatively about race and ethnicity in general. All readings are in English or English translation.

Frequency: Every year.

Cross-Listed as

AMST 288 and JAPA 288.

INTL 294 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

INTL 300 - Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies

This course is an in-depth study of some specific theories and methodologies on which contemporary feminist and queer thinkers have based their analysis, critique, and reconstruction of men's and women's roles. Some guiding questions are: What is a nation? Who are its citizens? How do language and gender roles shape the ways we imagine our roles as men and women? Do sexuality or economy affect how we subscribe to or resist political ideologies? In previous offerings, the course has explored the intersection of Postcolonialism (specifically gendered critiques of colonizing sociopolitical structures) with Postmodernism (specifically gendered critiques of language and sexuality). The course will include film, photography, music, and the writings of Butler, Foucault, Chodorow, Kristeva, hooks, Spivak, and Trinh, among others. It offers ways to create links with local community and social-work organizations.

Prerequisite(s)

junior standing or permission of instructor and at least one intermediate WGSS core course.

Cross-Listed as

WGSS 300

INTL 301 - Power and Development in Africa

In a notable turn around, a significant number of African societies, in recent years, have experienced both economic growth and renewal of the spirit of women and men acting as citizens. These are commendable achievements. Yet, old quotidian urgencies such as precarious personal safety, hunger, poor health, and political disorder are still prevalent. This is the dialectic of development. This course explores these contradictions. Most of the attention will be given to the concepts of power, politics, and development in contemporary Africa. The course concludes with each student submitting a research paper on a specific problem (e.g. environment, economic, social, cultural, political) confronting one country of the student's choice.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

Sophomore standing.

Cross-Listed as

POLI 333

INTL 317 - Writers and Power: The European East in the 20th Century

Eastern European writers and filmmakers have long been prominent figures, reflecting their confrontation with the 20th century's three most powerful ideologies: fascism, communism, and democracy. This course explores the interactions between writers and these systems of power in the works of major figures such as Ionesco, Kundera, Havel, Milosz, Forman, and Kusturica. We follow written and cinematic engagements with power at both social and individual levels, and extend to broad questions of history and community.

INTL 320 - Global Political Economy

Traces the evolution of (global) political economy as a peculiarly modern way of understanding and organizing (global) social life. Particular attention will be paid to how the distinction between the political and the economic is drawn and implemented in interconnected ways within nation-states and in international society. Course includes a detailed study of one of the key components of the international political economy: international trade, international finance, technological processes, etc.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 120 recommended.

Cross-Listed as

POLI 320

INTL 323 - Economic Restructuring in Latin America

This course uses economic principles to examine the transition from Import Substitution Industrialization to trade liberalization in Latin America. The goal of the course is to understand the economic antecedents to free trade as well as the resulting impact on workers and resource allocation. The course also addresses peripheral aspects of economic restructuring, such as the drug trade, migration, and the maquiladora industry. Requires an Economics 200 level course from the Group A electives, Economics 221 preferred.

Frequency: Offered every year.

Prerequisite(s)

Grade of C– or higher in any 200-level Economics course, ECON 221 preferred

Cross-Listed as

ECON 323 and LATI 323

INTL 325 - China, Russia and Central Europe in Transition

This course surveys the theoretic and empirical literature on Soviet-style central planning and the transition to a market economy. The economic history of central planning is examined with emphasis on the experience of the Soviet Union and its variants in Eastern Europe and China. The tool of analysis is the branch of economics known as the economics of organization and information, which will be used to analyze the operation, strengths, and limitations of central planning. The legacy of central planning forms the backdrop for an examination of the transition to a market economy.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ECON 119 and one 200s level ECON course from Group A electives; ECON 221 or ECON 225 are recommended.

Cross-Listed as

ECON 325

INTL 333 - Economics of Global Food Problems

This course will examine food distribution, production, policy, and hunger issues from an economics perspective. It explores and compares food and agriculture issues in both industrialized and developing countries. Basic economic tools will be applied to provide an analytical understanding of these issues. Topics such as hunger and nutrition, US farm policy, food distribution, food security, food aid, biotechnology and the Green Revolution, the connection between food production and health outcomes, as well as other related themes will be explored in depth throughout the semester.

Frequency: Offered every other spring semester.

Prerequisite(s)

ECON 119 and a C- or higher in one 200-level Economics course from Group A electives; ECON 221 or ECON 225 recommended.

Cross-Listed as

ECON 333 and ENVI 333.

INTL 345 - Advanced Themes in Human Rights

This course closely investigates human rights violations and the dilemmas facing the actors and institutions that seek to address them. The specific focus may vary with each offering, responding to instructor expertise and focus, emerging and volatile situations worldwide, or new advances in the field. Prior coursework on human rights, or instructor's permission required.

Prerequisite(s)

Prior coursework in human rights or permission of instructor.

INTL 352 - Transitional Justice

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and examines a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies.

INTL 362 - Culture and Globalization

The world is far more interconnected today than ever before, but what does this mean in terms of culture? This course looks at the impact of globalization on cultures and at examples of global cultures such immigrants, media and popular cultures, world cities, and transnational intellectuals, ethnicities and ideologies. It also looks at the way cultures interact at geographic borders and in the margins of society.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

ANTH 362

INTL 364 - Culture and Revolution

This course examines the relationship between cultural and political change during three very different revolutions: France 1789, Russia 1917, Iran 1979. How do people change when governments are overturned? How do revolutions shape popular consciousness? Do people understand events as revolutionaries intend? To answer these questions, we will examine symbols and political ideologies, mass media, education, social identities, the culture of violence, popular participation and resistance, and other issues. Readings will include revolution-inspiring works of Voltaire and Rousseau, Marx and Lenin, Khomeini and the Koran. We will read sympathetic and antagonistic contemporary accounts, and look at popular culture to see how events were understood. Fashion and etiquette, comics and caricatures, movies and plays will be used.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

RUSS 364

INTL 367 - Postcolonial Theory

Traces the development of theoretical accounts of culture, politics and identity in Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean and related lands since the 1947-1991 decolonizations. Readings include Fanon, Said, Walcott, Ngugi and many others, and extend to gender, literature, the U.S., the post-Soviet sphere, and Europe. The course bridges cultural, representational, and political theory.

Prerequisite(s)

Prior internationalist and/or theoretical coursework strongly recommended.

Cross-Listed as

ENGL 367

INTL 368 - Sustainable Development and Global Future

This course examines the history and modern use of "sustainable development" as a framework for international development. Close attention is given to the role of philanthropies, NGOs and social movements in shaping projects and policies. The course examines a range of topics including appropriate technology, microfinance, ecotourism and ecovillages. Prior coursework in international development and/or environmental studies is strongly recommended

Frequency: Spring semester.

Cross-Listed as

ENVI 368.

INTL 372 - Post-Nationalism: The European Union

The European Union aims to overcome nationality for the common good. Its successes have challenged traditional customs and identities, and it has stumbled over cultural questions, foreign policy, and constitutional foundations. Topics will include genesis of the EU; erosion of national sovereignty and consequent anxieties; European institutions vs. local control; cultural norms confronted with EU economic, political, and human rights; incorporating new member-states, and the very notion of "Europe." Throughout we will ask whether one can get "beyond nationalism."

INTL 380 - Global Leadership

Leadership is among the deepest features of associational life, pervading every profession and institution, especially in the age of complex global change. Thus this seminar explores leadership. We begin with the relationship between structure and agency, and then focus on vision and invention, integrity and legitimacy, flexibility and decisiveness. Readings draw from Western, Islamic, and Indian sources. The main paper will focus on a major individual from any century or locale, chosen by the student.

Prerequisite(s)

Open to all but first year students

INTL 381 - Transnational Latin Americas

Examines critical and primary literatures concerning the transnational, hemispheric, Atlantic, and Pacific cultures that have intersected in Latin America since the early colonial era, with a particular focus on the 19th and 20th centuries.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

HIST 381 and LATI 381

INTL 382 - Poverty, Health, and Development

This course explores the links among poverty, health and socio-economic development in low-income countries. Key principles, methodologies and approaches to designing and evaluating programs to improve the health of poor populations will be discussed. We will explore several contemporary approaches to linked poverty reduction, public health improvement, and development. Enrollment limited to International Studies majors, Community and Global Health Concentrators, or International Development concentrators, or by permission of the instructor.

INTL 384 - Langston Hughes: Global Writer

The great African American writer Langston Hughes (1902-1967) is best known as the poet laureate of the Harlem Renaissance. But his career was vaster still. He was a Soviet screenwriter, Spanish Civil War journalist, African literary anthologist, humorist, playwright, translator, social critic, writer of over 10,000 letters, and much more. This course engages Hughes-s full career, bridging race and global issues, politics and art, and makes use of little-known archival materials.

Cross-Listed as

ENGL 384 and AMST 384

INTL 394 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

INTL 415 - Cultural Resistance and Survival: Indigenous and African Peoples in Early Spanish America

In the Old World, Spain defined its national identity by locating its "others" in Jews, conversos, Muslims, moriscos, Turks, gypsies, pirates and Protestants. In the New World, Spaniards employed many of the same discursive and legal tactics—along with brute force—to subject Amerindian and African peoples to their will and their cultural norms. But indigenous and African populations in the Americas actively countered colonization. They rejected slavery and cultural imposition through physical rebellion, the use of strategies of cultural preservation and the appropriation of phonetic writing, which they in turn wielded against European hegemony. We will examine a fascinating corpus of indigenous pictographic codexes, architecture, myths, and histories and letters of resistance, along with a rich spectrum of texts in which peoples of African descent affirm their own subjectivity in opposition to slavery and cultural violence. What will emerge for students is a complex, heterogeneous vision of the conquest and early colonization in which non-European voices speak loudly on their own behalf. This course satisfies the Area 1 requirement for the Hispanic & Latin American Studies major. 

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

HISP 307 or consent of instructor.

Cross-Listed as

LATI 415 and HISP 415

INTL 416 - Mapping the New World: Exploration, Encounters, and Disasters

Europeans were by no means the first peoples to explore new territories and human populations. Renaissance scientific methodology, however, led European travelers to meticulously document each New World encounter in writing and develop new tools with which to navigate and represent space, devices that subsequently became weapons of colonial domination. But as Nature and indigenous populations refused to be subjected to European epistemology, failure and disaster were frequent events: shipwrecks left Old World survivors stranded among unknown lands and peoples in the Americas; Amerindians rejected the imposition of a foreign culture and religion, murdering colonists and missionaries; Africans rebelled against slavery and escaped to mountains and jungles to form autonomous communities. An examination of maps, exploration logs, missionary histories, travel literature, historiography and colonial documents will provide the foundation for this course on the ambivalent reality of the Old World's encounter with the Americas, in which Europeans were often the losers. This course satisfies the Area 1 requirement for the Hispanic & Latin American Studies major.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

HISP 307 or permission of instructor.

Cross-Listed as

HISP 416 and LATI 416.

INTL 477 - Comparative Environment and Development Studies

A concern for the relationship between nature and society has been one of the pillars of geographic inquiry and has also been an important bridge between other disciplines. By the 1960s, this area of inquiry was referred to variously as "human ecology." Over the last decade, certain forms of inquiry within this tradition have increasingly referred to themselves as "political ecology." The purpose of this seminar is to review major works within the traditions of cultural and political ecology; examine several areas of interest within these fields (e.g., agricultural modernization, environmental narratives, conservation, ecotourism); and explore nature-society dynamics across a range of geographical contexts. Towards the end of the course we will explore how one might begin to think in practical terms about facilitating development in marginal environments.

Frequency: Offered occasionally.

Prerequisite(s)

GEOG 232 or permission of instructor.

Cross-Listed as

ENVI 477

INTL 485 - Senior Seminar: Confronting Global Hatred

Drawing on several disciplines, this course confronts global hatred from three angles. The first is the hater's internal world and looks at how human nature, genetic structure/instincts, and individual psychology may foster hatred. The second is external, exploring the role history, culture, ideology, social structure, religion, and mass psychology play. The third seeks to apply the insights gained from the first two, asking: how might we break the devastating cycles of hatred so present in our world?

Prerequisite(s)

Senior standing or permission of instructor.

INTL 487 - Senior Seminar: Rule of Law and the Chaos of Globalization

Globalization has helped the international community to come together with an unprecedented immediacy. It has also enabled individuals and on-state actors to assume powers and duties formerly exclusive to state. The dispersion of state prerogatives can be liberating, as when oppressed people use new communication technologies to overthrow their masters. It can also provide opportunities for criminal enterprises and other agents of disorder to act with impunity. Our senior seminar will explore the tensions between the centripedal forces that bring us together, and the centrifugal forces that tear the global community apart. The state will most often be the law. The Westphalian sovereign state has often been declared vanquished by globalization, yet it is still very much alive, and has proven creative in deriving new means to control its subjects. It must do so because those subjects have proven equally creative in resisting state control; and globalization, in both its modern and older forms, has provided those subjects with many tools of resistance.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

Senior standing or permission of instructor.

INTL 488 - Senior Seminar: Thinking on a World Scale

For more than a century, many fine minds - St. Lucian poets, Russian linguists, Mexican mystics, German forest historians, American sociologists, Bengali novelists, and Macalester International Studies students among them - have been drawn to thinking on a world scale. This senior seminar begins by reading some of them at essay length, then tackles current world-scale books the instructor himself has not yet read. Finally we generate some world-scale writing of our own. Open to all geographies and disciplinary specialties. 

INTL 489 - Senior Seminar: Paradigms of World Order

The end of the Cold War eliminated a large divide in international society. However, the initial astonishments of this event now give way to arguments about the nature and direction of transnational life. For some, the situation is seen as the disappearance of an aberration, and the return of the "natural" processes of Western modernization and progress, guaranteed by free markets and liberal democracy. Others read the changes as the unveiling of a deeper, more complicated divide, requiring fundamental rethinking as well as reconstitution of world order. Through various readings, this senior seminar interrogates these and other interpretations of the interregnum and their correlative visions.

Prerequisite(s)

Senior standing or permission of instructor.

INTL 494 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

INTL 601 - Tutorial

Closely supervised individual or small group study for advanced students on a subject not available through regular offerings.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

INTL 602 - Tutorial

Closely supervised individual or small group study for advanced students on a subject not available through regular offerings.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

INTL 603 - Tutorial

Closely supervised individual or small group study for advanced students on a subject not available through regular offerings.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

INTL 604 - Tutorial

Closely supervised individual or small group study for advanced students on a subject not available through regular offerings.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

INTL 611 - Independent Project

An opportunity for advanced students to pursue independent research under the supervision of a sponsoring faculty member.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Introduction to International Studies, junior standing, and a written proposal to the faculty supervisor and department chair.

INTL 612 - Independent Project

An opportunity for advanced students to pursue independent research under the supervision of a sponsoring faculty member.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Introduction to International Studies, junior standing, and a written proposal to the faculty supervisor and department chair.

INTL 613 - Independent Project

An opportunity for advanced students to pursue independent research under the supervision of a sponsoring faculty member.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Introduction to International Studies, junior standing, and a written proposal to the faculty supervisor and department chair.

INTL 614 - Independent Project

An opportunity for advanced students to pursue independent research under the supervision of a sponsoring faculty member.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Introduction to International Studies, junior standing, and a written proposal to the faculty supervisor and department chair.

INTL 621 - Internship

Internships join the intellect with practical internationalist experience. Students first identify a specific placement, and agree on objectives and means to gauge progress, including a 1500-word objective midterm report and 3000-word final reflective essay. Course is pass/fail (S/D/NC) only, but may be included on I.S. major plans.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Introduction to International Studies, sophomore standing, and International Studies faculty sponsorship. Work with Internship Office.

INTL 622 - Internship

Internships join the intellect with practical internationalist experience. Students first identify a specific placement, and agree on objectives and means to gauge progress, including a 1500-word objective midterm report and 3000-word final reflective essay. Course is pass/fail (S/D/NC) only, but may be included on I.S. major plans.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Introduction to International Studies, sophomore standing, and International Studies faculty sponsorship. Work with Internship Office.

INTL 623 - Internship

Internships join the intellect with practical internationalist experience. Students first identify a specific placement, and agree on objectives and means to gauge progress, including a 1500-word objective midterm report and 3000-word final reflective essay. Course is pass/fail (S/D/NC) only, but may be included on I.S. major plans.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Introduction to International Studies, sophomore standing, and International Studies faculty sponsorship. Work with Internship Office.

INTL 624 - Internship

Internships join the intellect with practical internationalist experience. Students first identify a specific placement, and agree on objectives and means to gauge progress, including a 1500-word objective midterm report and 3000-word final reflective essay. Course is pass/fail (S/D/NC) only, but may be included on I.S. major plans.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Introduction to International Studies, sophomore standing, and International Studies faculty sponsorship. Work with Internship Office.

INTL 631 - Preceptorship

Work assisting a faculty member in planning and teaching a course.

Frequency: Every semester, depending on instructor need.

Prerequisite(s)

Advanced proficiency in the area of study and invitation by a faculty member. Work with Academic Programs.

INTL 632 - Preceptorship

Work assisting a faculty member in planning and teaching a course.

Frequency: Every semester, depending on instructor need.

Prerequisite(s)

Advanced proficiency in the area of study and invitation by a faculty member. Work with Academic Programs.

INTL 633 - Preceptorship

Work assisting a faculty member in planning and teaching a course.

Frequency: Every semester, depending on instructor need.

Prerequisite(s)

Advanced proficiency in the area of study and invitation by a faculty member. Work with Academic Programs.

INTL 634 - Preceptorship

Work assisting a faculty member in planning and teaching a course.

Frequency: Every semester, depending on instructor need.

Prerequisite(s)

Advanced proficiency in the area of study and invitation by a faculty member. Work with Academic Programs.

INTL 641 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of a senior honors thesis.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

INTL 642 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of a senior honors thesis.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

INTL 643 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of a senior honors thesis.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

INTL 644 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of a senior honors thesis.

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.