Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

INTL 114-01

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 114-02

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 194-01

Introduction to International Studies: Pandemics and the World

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 112
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: *Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*


INTL 225-01

Comparative Economic Systems

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: *Cross-listed with ECON 225-01*

Intermediate Courses. This course examines the workings of economic systems from the perspective of the incentives facing the firm and consumer. The course provides an introduction to the economics of information and organization which is used to evaluate resource allocation under the specific institutional environment of different economic systems. Our understanding of the incentive system is then used to evaluate the overall economic system. The focus of the course is primarily on the U.S., Japan and the former Soviet Union/Russia. As time permits the course may examine China, Germany and Central Europe. This course counts as a Group A elective for Economics major and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. Cross-listed with Economics 225. (4 credits)

INTL 245-01

Intro to Intl Human Rights

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the study and promotion of human rights. Using broad materials, it focuses on the evolution and definition of key concepts, the debate over "universal" rights, regional and international institutions, core documents, the role of states, and current topics of interest to the human rights movement. (4 credits)

INTL 253-01

Comparative Muslim Cultures

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 253-01*

This course is an introduction to the diverse lifeways of Muslims around the world, looking at how understandings and practice of Islam are shaped by social, economic, and political factors. It examines the Qur’an and hadith, and other authoritative texts that ground Islamic jurisprudence, and explores the diverse ways in which Muslims have understood and interpreted these teachings in locations across the world—such as Indonesia, the Middle East, South Asia, Europe and the United States – and at various points in history. The specific focus may vary with each offering, responding to instructor expertise and focus, emerging and volatile situations worldwide, or new advances in the field. Cross-listed with Anthropology 253. (4 credits)

INTL 265-01

Translation as Cross-Cultural Communication

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 112
  • Instructor: Julia Chadaga

Notes: *Cross-listed with RUSS 265-01*

When communication takes place across language barriers, it raises fundamental questions about meaning, style, power relationships, and traditions. This course treats literary translation as a particularly complex form of cross-cultural interaction. Students will work on their own translations of prose or poetry while considering broader questions of translation, through critiques of existing translations, close comparisons of variant translations, and readings on cultural and theoretical aspects of literary translation. Advanced proficiency in a second language required. (4 credits)

INTL 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with SOCI 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

INTL 288-01

Identity, Race, and Ethnicity in Japan

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 288-01 and JAPA 288-01*

From notions of the "pure self" to teenage ganguro ("face-blackening"), Japanese culture is rife with instances of ideology and performance that reflect a deep complexity in its engagement with issues of identity and foreignness. This course traces the roots of this complexity back to Japan's beginnings as a modern nation and examines its cultural development into the present day. Works of fiction will be paired with readings in history and criticism to explore the meanings of identity, race, and ethnicity as they are expressed and contested in Japanese culture. The course will cover the literature of Korea and Taiwan, the experience of domestic minorities, and the contemporary cultures of cos-play ("costume-play") and hip-hop. No prior knowledge of Japanese required. (4 credits). Course is cross-listed with American Studies 288 and Japanese 288.

INTL 294-01

INTL Topics Course

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes:

INTL 294-02

Photography:Histories and Practices of an International Medium

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes:

INTL 294-03

Representing the World As It Is:Histories and Theories of Ethnographic Film

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes:

INTL 294-04

HIV/AIDS: History, Politics, and Evolution of a Pandemic

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: *First day attendance required*


INTL 300-01

Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 003
  • Instructor: Sonita Sarker

Notes: Cross-listed with WGSS 300-01*

INTL 352-01

Transitional Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 352-01*

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and examines a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies. Cross-listed with Political Science 352. (4 credits)

INTL 380-01

Global Leadership

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 411
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: ZLeadership is among the deepest features of associational life, pervading every profession and institution, especially in the age of complex global change. Thus this seminar explores leadership. We begin with the relationship between structure and agency, and then focus on vision and invention, integrity and legitimacy, flexibility and decisiveness. Readings draw from Western, Islamic, and Indian sources. The main paper will focus on a major individual from any century or locale, chosen by the student. Open to all but first years. Every fall. (4 credits)

INTL 382-01

Poverty, Health, and Development

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course explores the links among poverty, health and socio-economic development in low-income countries. Key principles, methodologies and approaches to designing and evaluating programs to improve the health of poor populations will be discussed. We will explore several contemporary approaches to linked poverty reduction, public health improvement, and development. Enrollment limited to International Studies majors, Community and Global Health Concentrators, or International Development concentrators, or by permission of the instructor. 4 credits.

INTL 489-01

Senior Seminar: Capitalism and World (Dis)Order

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 411
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: Capitalism, for many, is synonymous with the "natural" exchange of goods and services through "the free market." But fuller examination shows capitalism to be neither natural, free, nor limited to economic transactions. Capitalism more precisely is a historical social system and a way of being which now penetrates all forms of life: cultural, ecological, civic and more. This senior seminar aims to identify capitalism's origins and development, and interrogate its contemporary status. Thinkers such as Smith, Marx, and Braudel will loom, but readings will focus on works by Beaud, Weber, Tawney, Kotz, Wallerstein, and others. The course concludes with a significant research paper on a topic, relevant to the theme, of a student's choice. Senior standing or permission of instructor. (4 credits)

Fall 2016

INTL 110-01

Introduction to Intl Studies: Globalization - Homogeneity and Heterogeneity

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: *First Year Course only* Globalization is upon us, resulting in unprecedented cultural interpenetrations and civilizational encounters. Most of what animates this condition is old. However, the contemporary velocity, reach, and mutations of these forces suggest a new “world time,” full of contradictions, perils, and promises. This course introduces students to globalization by posing the following questions: What is globalization, and how does one study it? What are the paramount ecological, cultural, economic, and political factors that shaped and propel it? What are the consequences, and how do we respond?

INTL 112-01

Intro to International Studies: Globalization, Media, and Cultural Identities

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *Open to those who will be first years and sophomores in the fall, or by permission of instructor.*

What roles do media play in constituting identities for people and places both near and far? How do various media facilitate or hinder globalization? How are cultures and cultural identities shaped by contemporary media practices and globalization? The course introduces some key concepts in social theory that have been central to how media is researched (i.e.: public sphere, nation, media, identity, diaspora, multiculturalism and so on). We will investigate the role of media in constituting national identities, contesting and proposing political visions, creating subcultures, and representing and shaping social categories such as race, gender and class. How do media create categories of people? How do people inhabit, resist, subvert, reproduce those categories in and through media? This course focuses on thinking through, about and with media. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 112-02

Intro to International Studies: Globalization, Media, and Cultural Identities

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *Open to those who will be first years and sophomores in the fall, or by permission of instructor.*

What roles do media play in constituting identities for people and places both near and far? How do various media facilitate or hinder globalization? How are cultures and cultural identities shaped by contemporary media practices and globalization? The course introduces some key concepts in social theory that have been central to how media is researched (i.e.: public sphere, nation, media, identity, diaspora, multiculturalism and so on). We will investigate the role of media in constituting national identities, contesting and proposing political visions, creating subcultures, and representing and shaping social categories such as race, gender and class. How do media create categories of people? How do people inhabit, resist, subvert, reproduce those categories in and through media? This course focuses on thinking through, about and with media. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 113-01

Intro to International Studies: Identities, Interests, and Community

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: *Open to those who will be first years and sophomores in the fall, or by permission of instructor.*

Open to first- and second-year students. This course develops a base of knowledge, concepts, and analytical skills for engaging with International Studies' multi-dimensional concerns. Ranging across disciplines but with an emphasis on social science, we study global theories of interaction and conflict between human groups and explore sites and implications of increasing encounter. Focusing on culture, people flows, nationalism and ethnicity, democratization, contending interests, security, religious fundamentalism, gender, and modes of community integration, we examine how particular cases reflect broader processes. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 202-01

Global Media Industries

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 294-03 and MCST 202-01*

Global media collectively have tremendous influence in how many see and comprehend the world and therefore on the information and beliefs upon which they feel or act. While media are central to the continued production of a sense of "the world" at large or the "global" scale, media industries are situated geographically, culturally and institutionally. Even if they promise worldwide coverage or are multinational companies, there is much to be gained from studying how media are produced and distributed differently according to specific social, political, economic and historical conditions. This course considers media industries around the world with a focus on the relationships between the labor and infrastructures behind representations in a broad range of media (television, radio, cinema, news, telecommunications, internet). (4 credits) Cross-listed with Media and Cultural Studies 202.

INTL 245-01

Intro to Intl Human Rights

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the study and promotion of human rights. Using broad materials, it focuses on the evolution and definition of key concepts, the debate over "universal" rights, regional and international institutions, core documents, the role of states, and current topics of interest to the human rights movement. (4 credits)

INTL 250-01

Terrorism and Art: The Spectacle of Destruction

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Julia Chadaga

Notes: *Cross-listed with RUSS 250-01*

Russia presents an excellent case study for the topic of political violence. Terrorism as a means of political persuasion originated in the land of the tsars; Russian history features an incendiary cycle of repressions, revolts, and reprisals. Studying the origins and depictions of these events in works of art reveals how culture mediates between the world of ideas and the sphere of action. We will consider the tactics and motives of revolutionary conspirators as well as the role that gender and religion played in specific acts of terror. We will explore the ways in which Russian revolutionary thought and action served as a model for radicals around the world. The Russian case will provide a framework for in-depth study of examples of terrorism from Algeria, Ireland, Germany, the U.S., and the Middle East. Texts will include novels, poems, manifestos, letters, journalistic accounts, and films, as well as readings in cultural history and political theory. Taught in English. Cross-listed with Russian Studies 250. (4 credits)

INTL 272-01

The Post-Soviet Sphere

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Cross-listed with RUSS 272-01*

The USSR's 1991 dissolution ended one of history's great experiments. Socialism sought to dissolve ethnicity and overcome ethnic conflict with a focus on equality. Instead it exacerbated nationalism and created-separated identities. But how? Topics include ethno-creation, control, and resistance; ethnic animosities and the USSR's destruction; new states after 1991; "diaspora" populations beyond ethnic homelands; local rebellions; new "native" dictatorships; and recent international organizations. (4 credits)

INTL 282-01

Introduction to International Public Health

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: This course introduces and explores the major health problems facing developing countries, and the main approaches to remediation. The course considers the social determinants of health, and the need for public health programs to address the root causes of health inequities as well as illness itself. Focus is at the country, international-organization, and donor levels. Attention will be given to major indicators, recent trends, policies, and metrics for monitoring progress. A case study, such as international tuberculosis control, will be used as an applied analysis.

INTL 282-02

Introduction to International Public Health

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Christy Hanson

Notes: This course introduces and explores the major health problems facing developing countries, and the main approaches to remediation. The course considers the social determinants of health, and the need for public health programs to address the root causes of health inequities as well as illness itself. Focus is at the country, international-organization, and donor levels. Attention will be given to major indicators, recent trends, policies, and metrics for monitoring progress. A case study, such as international tuberculosis control, will be used as an applied analysis.

INTL 294-01

Social Entrepreneurship

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MARKIM LOWER
  • Instructor: Kate Reiling

Notes: *Cross-listed with SOCI 294-03; first day attendance required; Not open to students who are enrolled in ECON 294-01: Introduction to Enterpreneurship (Spring 2016)* This course focuses on theories and applications of Social Entrepreneurship, which mobilizes and adapts an array of new techniques from the business and nonprofit worlds to address diverse social problems around the world. Students will explore debates over Social Entrepreneurship and seek to understand its current global and U.S. contexts, as well as methodologies like Lean Startup, Human Centered Design, Participatory Poverty Assessment, Design Thinking, and Business Model Canvass. In addition, students will spend the semester working in teams to apply the methodologies to identify a problem and develop a solution. For their final project, students will prepare a plan for their project and present it to an external audience.

INTL 294-02

Muslim Women Writers

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENGL 294-04 and WGSS 294-05* Against the swirling backdrop of political discourses about women in the Islamic world, this course will engage with feminist and postcolonial debates through literary works by Muslim women writers. The course will begin with an exploration of key debates about women’s agency and freedom, the Islamic headscarf, and Qur’anic hermeneutics. With this in mind, we will turn to the fine details of literature and poetry by Muslim women. How do these authors constitute their worlds? How are gendered subjectivities constructed? And how do the gender politics of literary texts relate to the broader political and historical contexts from which they emerge? Themes will include an introduction to Muslim poetesses and Arabic poetic genres, the rise of the novel in the Arabic speaking world, and Muslim women’s literary production outside of the Middle East: from Senegal to South Asia, and beyond.

INTL 301-01

Power and Development in Africa

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 411
  • Instructor: Ahmed Samatar

Notes: *Cross-listed with POLI 333-01*

In a notable turn around, a significant number of African societies, in recent years, have experienced both economic growth and renewal of the spirit of women and men acting as citizens. These are commendable achievements. Yet, old quotidian urgencies such as precarious personal safety, hunger, poor health, and political disorder are still prevalent. This is the dialectic of development. This course explores these contradictions. Most of the attention will be given to the concepts of power, politics, and development in contemporary Africa. The course concludes with each student submitting a research paper on a specific problem

(e.g. environment, economic, social, cultural, political) confronting one country of the student's choice. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Cross-listed with Political Science 333. (4 credits)

INTL 394-01

Poetics, Performance, and Political Speech

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 394-04* In the context of the 2016 United States presidential debates, this course will provide students with a series of theoretical frameworks for analyzing political speech. The semester will begin with an intensive introduction to theories and methods in linguistic anthropology, sociolinguistics, and philosophy of language. Students will explore how these theories have been used to make sense of political speech around the world – from Soviet political slogans to Tamil democratic oratory in South India. Students will also have the opportunity to observe language in actual social settings, and analyze presidential debates and televised political satire. Themes will include performance, gender, gesture, poetics, and metaphor.

INTL 477-01

Comparative Environment and Development Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and GEOG 477-01*

A concern for the relationship between nature and society has been one of the pillars of geographic inquiry and has also been an important bridge between other disciplines. By the 1960s, this area of inquiry was referred to variously as "human ecology." Over the last decade, certain forms of inquiry within this tradition have increasingly referred to themselves as "political ecology." The purpose of this seminar is to review major works within the traditions of cultural and political ecology; examine several areas of interest within these fields (e.g., agricultural modernization, environmental narratives, conservation, ecotourism); and explore nature-society dynamics across a range of geographical contexts. Towards the end of the course we will explore how one might begin to think in practical terms about facilitating development in marginal environments. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 477 and Geography 477. (4 credits)

INTL 485-01

Senior Seminar: Confronting Global Hatred

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 411
  • Instructor: Nadya Nedelsky

Notes: Students should have at least two courses in international studies including an Introduction to International Studies, or the permission of the instructor. Drawing on several disciplines, this course confronts global hatred from three angles. The first is the hater's internal world and looks at how human nature, genetic structure/instincts, and individual psychology may foster hatred. The second is external, exploring the role history, culture, ideology, social structure, religion, and mass psychology play. The third seeks to apply the insights gained from the first two, asking: how might we break the devastating cycles of hatred so present in our world? Senior standing or permission of instructor. (4 credits.)

INTL 488-01

Senior Seminar: Thinking on a World Scale

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 411
  • Instructor: David Moore

Notes: For more than a century, many fine minds - St. Lucian poets, Russian linguists, Mexican mystics, German forest historians, American sociologists, Bengali novelists, and Macalester International Studies students among them - have been drawn to thinking on a world scale. This senior seminar begins by reading some of them at essay length, then tackles current world-scale books the instructor himself has not yet read. Finally we generate some world-scale writing of our own. Open to all geographies and disciplinary specialties. Senior standing or permission of instructor. (4 credits)