Class Schedules

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Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated February 11, 2016 at 09:00 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
INTL 110-01  Introduction to Intl Studies: Globalization - Homogeneity and Heterogeneity
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Ahmed Samatar
*First Year Course only* Globalization is upon us, resulting in unprecedented cultural interpenetrations and civilizational encounters. Most of what animates this condition is old. However, the contemporary velocity, reach, and mutations of these forces suggest a new “world time,” full of contradictions, perils, and promises. This course introduces students to globalization by posing the following questions: What is globalization, and how does one study it? What are the paramount ecological, cultural, economic, and political factors that shaped and propel it? What are the consequences, and how do we respond?

INTL 111-01  Intro to International Studies: Literature and Global Culture
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Open only to First Year students and rising Sophomores*

INTL 111-02  Intro to International Studies: Literature and Global Culture
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Open only to First Year students and rising Sophomores*

INTL 202-01  Global Media Industries
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 226 Michael Griffin
*Cross-listed with MCST 202-01*

INTL 245-01  Intro to Intl Human Rights
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 Wendy Weber
 
INTL 253-01  Comparative Muslim Cultures
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Jenna Rice
*Cross-listed with ANTH 253-01; no prerequisites*

INTL 282-01  Introduction to International Public Health
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Christy Hanson
 
INTL 294-01  Religion, Violence, Politics
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Murat Altun
Updated course description: Why are certain religions believed to be inherently violent while others are believed to be peaceful? How do we examine violent acts such as 9/11, the rise of ISIS and the Charlie Hebdo attacks? The aim of this course is to understand how and why political violence crosscuts religious discourses and practices. How do we classify what is violent and what is not? While examining historical and contemporary cases (Palestine/Israeli, Indonesia, Myanmar), where religion, violence, and politics intersect, students will engage with the political implications of religious difference and secularism in a comparative perspective.

INTL 294-02  Social Entrepreneurship
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am Kate Reiling
*Course to meet in the basement of Markim Hall; cross-listed with SOCI 294-03*

INTL 301-01  Power and Development in Africa
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 411 Ahmed Samatar
*Cross-listed with POLI 333-01*

INTL 320-01  Global Political Economy
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 David Blaney
*Cross-listed with POLI 320-01*

INTL 352-01  Transitional Justice
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 Bridget Marchesi
*Cross-listed with POLI 352-01*

INTL 487-01  Senior Seminar: Rule of Law and the Chaos of Globalization
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 411 James von Geldern
 
INTL 488-01  Senior Seminar: Thinking on a World Scale
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 411 David Moore
 

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Spring 2016 Class Schedule - updated February 11, 2016 at 09:00 am

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
INTL 114-01  Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 James von Geldern
*Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

INTL 114-02  Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 James von Geldern
*Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

INTL 225-01  Comparative Economic Systems
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with ECON 225-01*

INTL 245-01  Intro to Intl Human Rights
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 Wendy Weber
 
INTL 284-01  Imaging the Modern City
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with HIST 284-01* From c.1850-1950 the world's cities transformed as never before. Across the globe, these burgeoning metropolises were reconstituted as massive stages for the economic and cultural transformations of the day - the sites of industrialization, centralized planning, mass transport, and the locus of global migration. This course will trace the broader history of global urbanization during this period with an emphasis on how these processes were represented and imaged by nineteenth and twentieth-century urbanites. How was the modern city conceived as it transformed beyond all recognition? How did the global scope of the modern city impact these images? How were new technologies incorporated into this radical re-imagining of the modern city? And how did these images travel across the globe, themselves spurring further urbanization as they went? Geographically, the class introduces the radical transformation of urban morphology that began in mid-19th century European cities such as Manchester, London, Paris, Vienna and engages the transfer and reinterpretation of such processes on global cities from Kolkata to Moscow to Mexico City to Rio de Janeiro to Chicago and back, often to Paris. The class also engages classic and contemporary urban theory, artistic representations, and other narratives of the modern city.

INTL 288-01  Identity, Race, and Ethnicity in Japan
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 110 Arthur Mitchell
*Cross-listed with AMST 288-01 and JAPA 288-01*

INTL 294-01  HIV/AIDS:History, Politics and Evolution of a Pandemic
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Christy Hanson
 
INTL 294-02  Critical Asylum Studies: Escape, Control, Exclusion
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Asli Ikizoglu Erensu
One of the goals of this course is to map out the evolution of the international asylum regime, from its historical origins when it emerged amidst debates on whether the stateless and non-citizens could have human rights to its current place in the politics of humanitarianism. On the national scale, we will look into how state policies regarding asylum-seekers and refugees not only impact those on the receiving end but also shape the contours and identities of states, in other words, how refugees have state-producing effects. On the local scale, we will examine life in camps, under conditions of permanent exception, as well as urban refugees whose presence blurs the lines between city and camp. Overall, the course aims to introduce students to the multiple dimensions of asylum and invite them to think these in relation to bigger questions of global justice, workings of international organizations, transnational networks and tools of mobility control, and citizenship regimes.

INTL 294-05  New Global Thinking: Conspiracy Theories
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Murat Altun
What lies beneath power that creates wealth, political success, and such? Whereas the intellectual questions the impossibility of a prompt answer to this question, a mode of thinking that is so eager to explain “everything” has been haunting the globe: conspiracy theories. This course aims to see the world from the perspective of conspiracy theorists by focusing on their quests for secrecies in the age of global transparency. For this goal it adopts one method: the examination of conspiracy theory cases across the globe. This method will not only comb the grain against the framework that reduces conspiracy theories to paranoia, but also aims to map their cross-cultural prevalence. How has dissatisfaction with empirical explanations for local (religious, ethnic, and national) incidents become a globally ubiquitous form of knowing about what misses the eye?

INTL 300-01  Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Benjamin Singer
*Cross-listed with WGSS 300-01*

INTL 367-01  Postcolonial Theory
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01*

INTL 380-01  Global Leadership
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Ahmed Samatar
*Course to meet in Carnegie 411*

INTL 384-01  Langston Hughes: Global Writer
TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with AMST 384-01 and ENGL 384-01*

INTL 394-01  Cultures of Neoliberalism
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 202 Morgan Adamson
*Cross-listed with MCST 394-01* Neoliberal theory posits the relative autonomy of the economic sphere from both culture and politics. Rejecting this assumption, the course will give students the ability to understand the interconnection of economic, political and cultural practices as well as the ways that economic theories are shaped by cultural understanding about what constitutes a person, a life, a society, etc. We will complicate commonplace ideas about neoliberalism by reading foundational texts from the neoliberal school of economic thought (Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman) alongside more contemporary reflections on the culture and politics of neoliberalism from the fields of Anthropology, Geography, Philosophy, Cultural Studies, and Critical Race Studies. In addition to key texts, we will examine neoliberal cultures through film, literature, and popular culture. This course will emphasize interdisciplinarity and original research.

INTL 489-01  Senior Seminar: Capitalism and World (Dis)Order
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Ahmed Samatar
*Course to meet in Carnegie 411*

INTL 494-01  Pandemics: When Globalization and Diseases Collide
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Christy Hanson
*Course to meet in Carnegie 411* Historically, infectious diseases have been among the great equalizers of nations. Infectious diseases cross borders with little respect for societal hierarchy or political position in the world order. Pandemics have repeatedly challenged the notion of the nation state, religious and political ideology and social structures. Modern day pandemics have the ability to spread further geographically, reflecting our ever more globalized world. Pandemics can concurrently reflect strong nationalist (almost isolationist) tendencies, alongside growing reliance on a global governance structure. However, they also increasingly reveal society’s marginalized peoples and their limited participation in and attention from government. Through the stories of historical and modern day pandemics, students will explore what pandemics can show us about disparities in development, social order(s), governance models, political and societal priorities and norms, inter-connectedness of nations / peoples, and economic decision-making.

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