Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

INTL 114-01

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

INTL 114-02

Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: James von Geldern

Notes: *Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

Open to first- and second-year students. Can we all live by one set of rules? This course investigates the broad field of global studies by addressing fresh and age-old issues in international law from the personal to the global, including borders, sources and enforcement of international law, law of the sea, immigration and asylum, post-national federation, colonization, world order, and global citizenship. Readings include case studies, memoirs, fiction, and other texts focusing on individuals, cultures, and states. Open to first- and second-year students. (4 credits)

PHIL 121-01

Ethics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: William Wilcox

Notes: An introductory philosophy course that concentrates on concepts and issues, such as the nature of value, duty, right and wrong, the good life, human rights, social justice, and applications to selected problems of personal and social behavior. Topics may include liberty and its limitations, civil disobedience, abortion, affirmative action, capital punishment, terrorism and the morality of war, animal rights and environmental ethics. 4 credits

PHIL 321-01

Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: William Wilcox

Notes: This course will focus on some central topics in contemporary Anglo-American (or "analytic") social and political philosophy. Likely topics would include an examination of John Rawls's theory of justice and the work of critics of that theory, the value of equality, and issues about global justice. Every other year. (4 credits)

POLI 212-01

Rights and Wrongs: Litigation and Public Policy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: This course explores the significance, possibilities and limits of litigation as a way of shaping public policy and society. Focusing mainly in the American context, the course connects two braod areas of interest: the rise of rights movements in the 20th century (from the NAACP to contemporary movements such as gay rights) and the use of class action lawsuits and tort law to compensate people for injuries or risk, especially in matters affecting public health (e.g. asbestos, tobacco). Related subjects discussed include the historical roots of litigation as an approach to social problems and government regulation as an alternative to litigation. (4 credits)

SOCI 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

Fall 2016

AMST 225-01

American Indian History to 1871

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 228
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 225-01*

The history of American Indians is wonderfully complex, but this history is simultaneously fraught with misconceptions and misinterpretations. European (and, later, Euro-Americans) alternated among fascination, fear, and frustration toward American Indians, while American Indians sought to maintain tribal sovereignty and control over their lands, cultures, religions, politics, and lifestyles amidst continuing encroachment and settlement. This course examines American Indian history to 1871 - the year that Congress stopped making treaties with Native nations - by considering the complicated and multifaceted history of the nation's indigenous people. By looking at American Indian interactions with Spanish, French, British, and American explorers, settlers, missionaries, militaries, and government officials, this courses argues that the history of American Indians is essential to understanding past as well as present issues. Furthermore, this course looks to move beyond the notion that American Indian history is one of inevitable decline by creating a more nuanced understanding of the American Indian experience from pre-contact toward the twentieth century. Offered occasionally. Cross-listed with History 225. (4 credits)

AMST 235-01

Captives, Cannibals, and Capitalists in Early Modern Atlantic World

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 235-01 and LATI 235-01*

This course will interrogate the way scholars study large-scale violence in its many forms between human communities. Throughout class discussions we will consider the ways in which warfare has been recorded and analyzed in early America. While warfare and major political conflicts will be discussed, the class will also engage the meanings of violence by investigating intra- and inter- cultural violence within and between colonial America's many ethnic, political, and religious groups. The chronological focus of the course, circ. 1500-1800, also permits our examination of the idea of American exceptionalism. Is there a specific form or pattern of violence or warfare that can be called "American?" If so, does this type of violence remain present in our contemporary society? Cross-listed with History 225 and Latin American Studies 225. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)

HIST 225-01

American Indian History to 1871

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 228
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 225-01*

The history of American Indians is wonderfully complex, but this history is simultaneously fraught with misconceptions and misinterpretations. European (and, later, Euro-Americans) alternated among fascination, fear, and frustration toward American Indians, while American Indians sought to maintain tribal sovereignty and control over their lands, cultures, religions, politics, and lifestyles amidst continuing encroachment and settlement. This course examines American Indian history to 1871 - the year that Congress stopped making treaties with Native nations - by considering the complicated and multifaceted history of the nation's indigenous people. By looking at American Indian interactions with Spanish, French, British, and American explorers, settlers, missionaries, militaries, and government officials, this courses argues that the history of American Indians is essential to understanding past as well as present issues. Furthermore, this course looks to move beyond the notion that American Indian history is one of inevitable decline by creating a more nuanced understanding of the American Indian experience from pre-contact toward the twentieth century. Offered occasionally. Cross-listed with American Studies 225. (4 credits)

HIST 235-01

Captives, Cannibals, and Capitalists in Early Modern Atlantic World

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 235-01 and LATI 235-01*

This course will interrogate the way scholars study large-scale violence in its many forms between human communities. Throughout class discussions we will consider the ways in which warfare has been recorded and analyzed in early America. While warfare and major political conflicts will be discussed, the class will also engage the meanings of violence by investigating intra- and inter- cultural violence within and between colonial America's many ethnic, political, and religious groups. The chronological focus of the course, circ. 1500-1800, also permits our examination of the idea of American exceptionalism. Is there a specific form or pattern of violence or warfare that can be called "American?" If so, does this type of violence remain present in our contemporary society? Cross-listed with American Studies 235 and Latin American Studies 235. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)

HIST 294-10

Uses and Abuses: A History of Drugs, Addiction, and Recovery in the U.S.

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Amy Sullivan

Notes: Beginning with an essential global history of legal and illegal mind-altering substances, this course will ultimately focus on 19th and 20th century social and medical histories of substance use/abuse: Temperance and Prohibition, the “War on Drugs,” the shifting concept of addiction as a moral failing to addiction as a treatable disease, and the history of the recovery movement. From the Narcotic Farm in Kentucky, Alcoholics Anonymous, and the Minnesota Model to the current opiate epidemic, ravaged meth-laden small towns, and marijuana legalization, topics abound for class discussion and research papers. This course requires a considerable amount of reading but will be interspersed with expert guest speakers and documentary film viewing.

LATI 235-01

Captives, Cannibals, and Capitalists in Early Modern Atlantic World

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 235-01 and HIST 235-01*

This course will interrogate the way scholars study large-scale violence in its many forms between human communities. Throughout class discussions we will consider the ways in which warfare has been recorded and analyzed in early America. While warfare and major political conflicts will be discussed, the class will also engage the meanings of violence by investigating intra- and inter- cultural violence within and between colonial America's many ethnic, political, and religious groups. The chronological focus of the course, circ. 1500-1800, also permits our examination of the idea of American exceptionalism. Is there a specific form or pattern of violence or warfare that can be called "American?" If so, does this type of violence remain present in our contemporary society? Cross-listed with American Studies 225 and History 225. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)

PHIL 121-01

Ethics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 409
  • Instructor: Samuel Asarnow

Notes: *First Year Course only* What matters in life? Is pleasure the only thing that matters? If so, whose pleasure should I seek—just my own, my family’s, or everyone’s? Does suffering matter, too? What about the suffering of non-human animals? Is it okay for me to make animals suffer in order for me to enjoy the pleasure of eating their flesh? Or how about the suffering of people who are really far away from me—say, on another continent? Is it okay for me to spend money on cool stuff for myself when instead I could donate it to help people who are suffering very badly far away? If things in life other than pleasure matter too, what are they? People who oppose torture think that it’s wrong to hurt one person really badly even in order to prevent a large number of people from being hurt. Are they right? Is it always wrong to treat someone as merely a means to an end? Is it in general wrong to do things to people without their consent? Why? When do people deserve to be praised or blamed for their actions? What kind of person should I be? Should I try to be happy? Or should I try to be virtuous? Is virtue its own reward? Or are we all inevitably faced with a choice between being virtuous and being happy? If we are faced with that choice, which one should we pick? In Ethics, we will talk about these questions, and more.

PHIL 121-02

Ethics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Samuel Asarnow

Notes: An introductory philosophy course that concentrates on concepts and issues, such as the nature of value, duty, right and wrong, the good life, human rights, social justice, and applications to selected problems of personal and social behavior. Topics may include liberty and its limitations, civil disobedience, abortion, affirmative action, capital punishment, terrorism and the morality of war, animal rights and environmental ethics. 4 credits

POLI 301-01

Law, Economy, and Identity

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Patrick Schmidt

Notes: This seminar-style course explores American political development, examining how law, when influenced by economic ideologies or the focus of contests among economic interests, has had a significant impact on persons of identity. Topics include the property rights of women in early America, the law of slavery, and the legal development of Native American law, before reaching contemporary questions of inclusion and exclusion in law. Prior course work in American history, political science, or legal studies strongly recommended. (4 credits)

PSYC 377-01

Moral Psychology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: Steve Guglielmo

Notes: This course will explore how and why we make moral judgments about people and their behavior. How are our moral judgments shaped by intuition, emotion, and reasoning? Which kinds of behaviors do we view as immoral? Do we ever put the interests of our broader group or community above our own self-interest? What are the evolutionary and developmental origins of moral judgements? How do we balance punishment motives of retribution and deterrence, and how do these relate to policy decisions about capital punishment? Could a robot have moral rights and responsibilities? In this course we will examine these questions by considering theories and findings from social, developmental, evolutionary, and political psychology, as well as from related fields like philosophy and artificial intelligence. Offered every year. (4 credits)

SOCI 310-01

Law and Society

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: Law is omnipresent in contemporary social life. How should we understand this development and its consequences? How does law operate to the advantage or disadvantage of various members of society? Can law be the source of significant social change? This course examines the development of a formal, legal system and the ways in which such a system connects to other parts of society. We begin by focusing on individual experiences and understandings of law and what these tell us about how law fits into the larger social order. We then evaluate explanations about the connections between social and legal development. We also consider how the "law in action" operates by examining empirical studies of legal institutions and the limits and potential of law as a source for social change. (4 credits)