Class Schedules

Legal Studies

Erik Larson, Co-Director
651-696-6309


Patrick Schmidt, Co-Director
651-696-6147

Fall 2015 »      Spring 2016 »     

Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated February 6, 2016 at 07:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
AMST 300-01  Jr Civic Engagement Seminar
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 213 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required*

ANTH 394-01  Anthropology of Morality
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Anna Jacobsen
The world as we know it has become increasingly one in which defining and identifying the "moral" is both of vital importance socially and simultaneously highly personal and subjective. Yet, we often presume that morality is something quintessentially universal. This course will draw on new studies of morality within anthropology to examine issues of violence (such as in post-conflict settings in East Africa and Southeast Asia), on issues of religion and piety as they pertain to personhood and group identity (such as in Papua New Guinea), and in politics and political rhetoric, both in North America and in non-western locations. In this course, by drawing on a combination of ethnography, news and journal articles, film, anthropological theory and class discussion, students will unpack the dense and often personal topic of morality, worldwide, and from an anthropological perspective. What can we learn about ourselves and others if we understand the world as one with multiple moralities rather than one with a singular moral code? What are the implications of this? Please note: Students wishing to count this course toward Legal Studies will choose a final paper topic that intersects with law.

ENGL 310-01  Shakespeare Studies
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Penelope Geng
In Shakespeare’s England, whipping, branding, mutilation (of the hand, nose, ears, or face), pillorying, hanging, burning, and beheading were common forms of legal punishment. The rigors of early modern law may seem strange or “barbaric” to us, yet we can recognize the intentions behind the laws: to restore order, to keep the peace, and to stabilize social relations. To grasp what justice meant to the early moderns and, in turn, what it means to us today, we will examine some of Shakespeare’s most challenging plays through the lens of legal and political philosophy. Plays such as Titus Andronicus, The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, Macbeth, Hamlet, and Othello stage a spectrum of responses to insult, injury, and violence. At the same time, the texts trouble the division between good and evil, justice and revenge. Our agenda is two-fold: to deepen our reading of Shakespearean drama and to use our knowledge to investigate difficult and still unresolved questions about the problem of evil, the dialectic between law and justice, and the meaning of the “good life.” This course fulfills the Medieval/Renaissance requirement for the English major. Prerequisite: a foundation course in English.



INTL 487-01  Senior Seminar: Rule of Law and the Chaos of Globalization
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 411 James von Geldern
 
PHIL 121-01  Ethics
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 William Wilcox
 
PHIL 121-02  Ethics
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 William Wilcox
 
POLI 206-01  US Constitutional Law and Thought
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 215 Patrick Schmidt
 
PSYC 377-01  Moral Psychology
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Steve Guglielmo
 
SOCI 190-01  Criminal Behavior / Social Control
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Erik Larson
*First Year Course only* The use of imprisonment as a form of criminal punishment is only about as old at the United States. Currently, 1 in 100 adults in the United States are in prison or jail. How should we understand the growth of this form of criminal punishment? How is it similar to other methods to react to and to attempt to control unwanted behavior? What are the social consequences of these formal institutions of social control? In this course, we examine these developments in the processes and organization of social control, paying particular attention to criminal behavior and formal, legal responses to crime. We study and evaluate sociological theories of criminal behavior to understand how social forces influence levels of crimes. We examine recent criminal justice policies in the United States and their connections to inequality, examining the processes that account for expanding criminalization. Finally, we compare the development of formal, bureaucratic systems of social control and informal methods of social control, paying attention to the social and political implications of these developments.

SOCI 230-01  Affirmative Action Policy
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Terry Boychuk
 

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Spring 2016 Class Schedule - updated February 6, 2016 at 07:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
GERM 394-02  Power of Words
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with LING 394-01; taught in English; core course for the Critical Theory concentration* Hate speech (cross burnings, cyberbullying of LGBTQs), but also revolutionary messages that can cause political or religious conversions (political speeches, the gospel) are uses, perhaps abuses of language with real effects - ways of "doing things with words." In this course, we will explore how words have the power to effect real-world change, both for good and for ill. What uses of speech constitute forms of injury or of undue influence? What uses are transformative or emancipatory? How do we draw the line between these two valences of "forceful speech"? Readings and discussion topics will include theories of rhetoric, persuasion, and performativity (Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, John Austin, Derrida); instances and studies of transformative speech in religion and psychoanalysis (Hebrew Bible, New Testament, Luther, Freud); political speech from the language of emancipation (Declaration of Independence, Martin Luther King) to National Socialist propaganda (Goebbels, Hitler); racist and sexist hate speech (Judith Butler, Critical Race Theory); the constitutionality of laws against hate speech in view of the First Amendment's protection of free speech (U.S. Supreme Court rulings); the salutary effects of insults and invective (Flannery O'Connor, the TV-series "Louie," the Hollywood movie "Lincoln"); depictions and uses of rhetoric in literature (Homer, Thucydides, Shakespeare, Friedrich Schiller, Heinrich von Kleist). Requirements: weekly reading responses; three papers.

HIST 137-01  From Confederation to Confederacy: US History from Independence to Civil War
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Linda Sturtz
In the Plan of Union prepared during the 1754 "Albany Convention," Anglo-American colonists met to consider uniting as a loose confederation for their common defense and to ally with the Iroquois confederacy. That plan failed, but a later experiment in unity succeeded when the united colonies declared independence. Nevertheless, social, cultural, and ideological differences persisted, and the union formed in 1776 was tried and tested before finally fracturing with the secession of South Carolina, precipitating the Civil War. In the intervening years, Americans grappled with how they should govern themselves, who should be included in the polity, and how society should be organized. Reformers considered the controversial issues of women's rights, the role of Native Americans within the US, and the place of slavery in a nation founded on the precept that "All men are created equal." This course covers the periods of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the early national and antebellum periods, before concluding with the Civil War. It also considers the global causes and consequences of the war and the rise of the new United States.

INTL 114-01  Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 James von Geldern
*Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

INTL 114-02  Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 James von Geldern
*Open to First Year and Sophomore or, permission from the instructor*

LING 394-01  Power of Words
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-02; taught in English; core course for the Critical Theory concentration* Hate speech (cross burnings, cyberbullying of LGBTQs), but also revolutionary messages that can cause political or religious conversions (political speeches, the gospel) are uses, perhaps abuses of language with real effects - ways of "doing things with words." In this course, we will explore how words have the power to effect real-world change, both for good and for ill. What uses of speech constitute forms of injury or of undue influence? What uses are transformative or emancipatory? How do we draw the line between these two valences of "forceful speech"? Readings and discussion topics will include theories of rhetoric, persuasion, and performativity (Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, John Austin, Derrida); instances and studies of transformative speech in religion and psychoanalysis (Hebrew Bible, New Testament, Luther, Freud); political speech from the language of emancipation (Declaration of Independence, Martin Luther King) to National Socialist propaganda (Goebbels, Hitler); racist and sexist hate speech (Judith Butler, Critical Race Theory); the constitutionality of laws against hate speech in view of the First Amendment's protection of free speech (U.S. Supreme Court rulings); the salutary effects of insults and invective (Flannery O'Connor, the TV-series "Louie," the Hollywood movie "Lincoln"); depictions and uses of rhetoric in literature (Homer, Thucydides, Shakespeare, Friedrich Schiller, Heinrich von Kleist). Requirements: weekly reading responses; three papers.

PHIL 121-01  Ethics
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Samuel Asarnow
 
PHIL 121-02  Ethics
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Samuel Asarnow
 
PHIL 224-01  Philosophy of Law
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 William Wilcox
 
POLI 207-01  US Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Patrick Schmidt
 

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