Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

ANTH 253-01

Comparative Muslim Cultures

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 253-01*

This course is an introduction to the diverse lifeways of Muslims around the world, looking at how understandings and practice of Islam are shaped by social, economic, and political factors. It examines the Qur’an and hadith, and other authoritative texts that ground Islamic jurisprudence, and explores the diverse ways in which Muslims have understood and interpreted these teachings in locations across the world—such as Indonesia, the Middle East, South Asia, Europe and the United States – and at various points in history. The specific focus may vary with each offering, responding to instructor expertise and focus, emerging and volatile situations worldwide, or new advances in the field.

Cross-listed with International Studies 253. (4 credits)

INTL 253-01

Comparative Muslim Cultures

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 253-01*

This course is an introduction to the diverse lifeways of Muslims around the world, looking at how understandings and practice of Islam are shaped by social, economic, and political factors. It examines the Qur’an and hadith, and other authoritative texts that ground Islamic jurisprudence, and explores the diverse ways in which Muslims have understood and interpreted these teachings in locations across the world—such as Indonesia, the Middle East, South Asia, Europe and the United States – and at various points in history. The specific focus may vary with each offering, responding to instructor expertise and focus, emerging and volatile situations worldwide, or new advances in the field. Cross-listed with Anthropology 253. (4 credits)

RELI 233-01

Hindus and Muslims

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: James Laine

Notes: This class will be a reflection on the long history of co-existence of people in South Asia thought to belong to two very different religions Hinduism and Islam. We will begin by looking at the formation of classical Islam in the Middle East, and looking at the classical Hindu epic, the Ramayana. From there we will move to a survey of the history of encounter and exchange, from the early period (al Biruni), to the establishment of the great Muslim sultanates. We will critically examine the evidence of religious conflict, alongside the evidence of rich cultural exchange, and interrogate the competing historigrahic narratives, according to which South Asia either become a single Indo-Islamic civilization or a place of two cultures destined to become different modern nation states (India, Pakistan and Bangladesh). Finally, we will consider colonial and post colonial South Asia and conclude with a reflection on the Babri Masjid crisis and India's debates about secularism. (4 credits)

SOCI 290-01

Colonialism, Modernity, and Identities in the Middle East

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Khaldoun Samman

Notes: How can we best understand the complexities of the present U.S. "War on Terrorism"? Should it be understood as a clash between two different cultural systems, one modern and democratic and the other feudal and fanatic? Or, is the violence systemic, taking a variety of forms in different parts of the globe? What role does power and inequality on a global scale have to do with it? These and many other questions will be dealt with in this course. We will trace the conflict historically to assess moments of violence and tensions and other periods of calm and symbioses. Finally, we will analyze how modernity transformed the relationship between Islam and the West, Jew and Arab, male and female, and nation/race and identity. (4 credits)


Fall 2016

CLAS 135-01

India and Rome

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Laine, Overman

Notes: *Cross-listed with RELI 135-01*

This course is taught jointly between the department of Religious Studies and the department of Classics, by a specialist in the Roman East and a specialist in classical India. We will start on either side of this world, with Alexander the Great and Ashoka, exploring the relationship between empire and religion from Rome to India in the world's crossroads for the thousand years between Alexander and the rise of Islam. Cross-listed with Religious Studies 135. (4 credits)

RELI 135-01

India and Rome

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Laine, Overman

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 135-01*

This course is taught jointly between the department of Religious Studies and the department of Classics, by a specialist in the Roman East and a specialist in classical India. We will start on either side of this world, with Alexander the Great and Ashoka, exploring the relationship between empire and religion from Rome to India in the world's crossroads for the thousand years between Alexander and the rise of Islam. Cross-listed with Classics 135. (4 credits)