Course Descriptions

Political Science

POLI 100 - US Politics

An analysis of the major ideas, actors, institutions, and processes that shape the formulation and execution of public policy in the United States. Every semester. Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.

POLI 101 - Argument and Advocacy

Course introduces students to classic principles of argument and advocacy-intellectual practices essential to academic success and effective democratic institutions. Students learn to analyze political arguments and engage in rational decision-making by rigorously evaluating types and use of evidence. Course emphasizes argument advocacy in written and oral assignments. Available only as a first year seminar.

POLI 120 - International Politics

This course has three broad goals. The first is to develop the foundational knowledge and conceptual literacy necessary to engage with International Relations' multidimensional concerns. These include issues such as world order, power, hierarchy, political violence, international law, development, religion, human rights, gender, humanitarianism and international organizations (such as the United Nations). The second is to introduce students to the different perspectives or intellectual frameworks for making sense of international relations (also known as global or world politics), including realist, liberal, constructivist, historical materialist, postcolonial and feminist approaches. The third is to encourage students to reflect on some of the ethical issues inherent in both the study and practice of international politics. Emphasis will also be placed on developing a range of critical, analytical, research and writing skills required for the further study of international politics. The course is thus intended to prepare students for advanced work in the field, although it is also appropriate for those merely seeking to satisfy an interest in the study of global politics. Every semester. Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.

POLI 140 - Comparative Politics

A survey of theories and methods employed in comparative political analysis. Every year. Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.

POLI 141 - Latin America Through Women's Eyes

Latin American women have overcome patriarchal "machismo" to serve as presidents, mayors, guerilla leaders, union organizers, artists, intellectuals, and human rights activists. Through a mix of theoretical, empirical, and testimonial work, we will explore issues such as feminist challenges to military rule in Chile, anti-feminist politics in Nicaragua, the intersection of gender and democratization in Cuba, and women's organizing and civil war in Colombia. Teaching methods include discussion, debates, simulations, analytic papers, partisan narratives, lecture, film, poetry, and a biographical essay. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-pressure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies.

Cross-Listed as

LATI 141 and WGSS 141

POLI 160 - Foundations of Political Theory

An examination of the evolution of fundamental western political ideas from the Greeks to the present. Every year. Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.

POLI 170 - Theories of Rhetoric

A study of classical and modern rhetorical theories throughout Western history. The course analyzes how each theory defines rhetoric and characterizes the relationship between rhetoric and power, art, truth, emotion, and ethics. Discusses the symbiotic relationship between rhetoric and democracy. Every year. Foundations Courses: Courses numbered in the 100s are Foundations courses. These courses are designed principally for beginning political science majors, as well as non-majors seeking an introduction to the discipline's various sub-fields. The purpose of these courses is threefold: To provide foundational knowledge of the key actors, structures, institutions and/or historical dynamics relevant to the respective sub-fields; to introduce the major theoretical trends, perspectives and debates that have shaped the evolution of the respective sub-fields; and to begin to develop a range of practical competencies (esp. research/writing skills) essential to further scholarly inquiry within the discipline of political science.

POLI 194 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

POLI 200 - Women and American Politics

This course examines the evolutionary role of women in politics as voters, citizens, candidates, and leaders from the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 to the present. Drawing from a variety of theoretical perspectives, we examine women's historical and contemporary roles in U.S. politics, investigate and debate a variety of public policy issues of particular concern to women, and explore the intersection of race and gender in U.S. politics.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 202 - Political Participation

Analysis of institutions and procedures such as parties and elections, and also informal activities such as social movements, interest groups, and community action.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 203 - Politics and Inequality

  Americans, at least since the Founding era, have cherished the ideal of political equality.  Unlike European nations, the United States did not inherit economic class distinctions from a feudal past. But time and again, American social reformers and mass movements have highlighted inconsistencies between the value of equality and the actual practice of democracy. Through the extension of rights to citizens who were previously excluded or treated as second-class citizens, such as women and African Americans, the polity has become more inclusive. But over the last three decades American citizens have grown increasingly unequal in terms of income and wealth.   The central question posed by this course is the implications of such vast economic inequality for American democracy. Do these disparities between citizens curtail, limit, and perhaps threaten the functioning of genuinely representative governance?   In this course will 1) Explore what other social scientists, mostly economists and sociologists, know about contemporary inequality, particularly in terms of its causes, manifestation, and socio-economic effects; 2) Consider the concept of inequality in political theory and in American political thought, and; 3) Examine the current relationship between economic inequality and each of three major aspects of the American political  system: political voice, representation, and public policy.

Cross-Listed as

AMST 203

POLI 204 - Urban Politics

American urban politics, emphasizing urban policy problems, planning and decision-making.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 100 recommended

POLI 205 - Politics and Policymaking

several case studies designed to engage these theories and debate their practical application, and 3) Become "experts" in a particular policy area as each student prepares a presentation on that topic and presents politically viable solutions.   This course will focus on writing for a variety of audiences and leave students well-prepared to apply for policy-oriented scholarships, fellowships and jobs.

Frequency: Offered only in the fall.

POLI 206 - US Constitutional Law and Thought

An exploration of the structure of the American political system as seen through the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. Topics include the separation of powers in the federal government, the scope of executive power, and the development of federal-state relations over the course of American history. The material also includes the nature of judicial review, economic rights and contemporary questions about the limits of government power.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 100 recommended

POLI 207 - US Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

An examination of civil liberties and rights in the U.S., focusing on the cases decided by the Supreme Court. Central topics include the 1st Amendment freedom of religion, speech, and the press; the right to privacy and abortion; and the constitutional requirement of Equal Protection as affecting discrimination, affirmative action, and voting rights.

Frequency: Every year.

POLI 208 - Immigration and Citizenship in American Political Development

The United States are often described as a nation of immigrants, yet various anxieties over the status of immigrants have been expressed throughout the history of the country. This clas offers a survey of key historical debates over immigration and the character of citizenship in the United States. Though close analysis of primary documents the class explores the definition, terms, and goals of such debats, the variety of interests vested in the issues, and the political and social consequences of these controversies not only for the dominant political order but especially for teh lives and identites of the immigrants, their families, and communities. In particular we explore:
- key historical events and trends that have defined the flow and status of immigrants in the United States;
- how various anxieties about immigration have served to disenfranchise some groups while solidifying the power of others;
- the rehetorical, economic, political, and ideological challenges faced by those interested in promoting immigrants' rights;
- how the status of immgrants has consequences for the political rights of citizens and vice versa, thus challenging the notion that immigrants' problems are theirs alone.

POLI 211 - Re-envisioning Education and Democracy

This course explores the design, implementation, and evaluation of public education policy as a primary means for engaging more active, inclusive and effective approaches to social inquiry and civic participation. Drawing from classic and contemporary theories of education and democracy, complemented by recent developments and controversies in public policy studies, students work to design innovative, principled, educationally sound and politically feasible responses to significant civic concerns.

Frequency: Fall semester.

Cross-Listed as

AMST 280 and EDUC 280

POLI 212 - Rights and Wrongs: Litigation and Public Policy

This course explores the significance, possibilities and limits of litigation as a way of shaping public policy and society. Focusing mainly in the American context, the course connects two braod areas of interest: the rise of rights movements in the 20th century (from the NAACP to contemporary movements such as gay rights) and the use of class action lawsuits and tort law to compensate people for injuries or risk, especially in matters affecting public health (e.g. asbestos, tobacco). Related subjects discussed include the historical roots of litigation as an approach to social problems and government regulation as an alternative to litigation.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 214 - Cyber Politics

An analysis of innovations on the internet to assist candidates running for political office, enhance citizen participation, develop e-Democracy, and organize political protest. Course focuses on theories of cyberpolitics, and examines the effectiveness and ethical character of these persuasive approaches. Topics include an examination of candidate and political party web sites, on-line grassroots organizing, the ascendancy of political web logs (blogs), candidate "meet-ups," campaign advertisements designed for the web, on-line fundraising, "fake news" sites, sites that parody or satirize candidates running for office, and "attack animations." Students will utilize Macalester's course-management software and learn HTML in order to design web-based assignments.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 215 - Environmental Politics/Policy

This course provides an introduction to the field of Environmental Politics and Policy. Using a comparative approach, the course engages the meaning and development of environmental governance. We will explore the tandem rise of the modern environmental movement and profound new environmental legislation in the U.S. and internationally. Topics investigated will include: deforestation, hazardous wastes, climate change, population growth, and loss of biodiversity.

Frequency: Fall semester.

Cross-Listed as

ENVI 215

POLI 216 - Legislative Politics

This course explores legislative politics through a combination of academic theory and focused field experiences. Each student must simultaneously enroll in a credit-bearing internship at the Minnesota State Legislature. The class examines the basic structures, players and forces that shape legislative decision-making, the motivation or individual legislators, and their interactions with other political actors and institutions.

Frequency: Every spring.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 100 recommended. Course not available to First Year students.

POLI 220 - Foreign Policy

An exploration of US foreign policy as it relates to a country or region of pressing interest or particular significance in global political life.  For the next several years, the focus of the course will be on the foreign policy challenges posed by a "rising" China.  It is organized around the following questions:  What are the cultural, political, economic and strategic interests shaping the evolution of Chinese foreign policy?  What is China's "peaceful rise" policy?  What are the systemic implications of this policy?  What are the implications of China's rise for US regional and global interests?  And how should the US respond to the rise of China as a regional and global great power?

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 120 recommended, but not required

POLI 221 - Global Governance

This course is designed to introduce students to global governance. It begins with a discussion of the concept of global governance. It then turns to some of the central features of contemporary global governance, including the changing status of the state and of international/world organizations and the role of global civil society. The emphasis here is on how patterns of global governance have changed and are changing and on the implications of these changes for democracy, social justice, etc. The remainder of the course focuses on the areas of international peace and security, human rights and international humanitarian law, and economic governance. By addressing such topics as the International Criminal Court and the role of the IMF and the World Bank in economic development, these parts of the course highlight the contested nature of global governance in each of the three issue areas.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 120 recommended

POLI 222 - Regional Conflict/Security

This course is intended to introduce students to the military, political, economic, cultural and/or diplomatic dimensions of various regional conflicts or "security complexes." The specific region to be covered will vary from year to year, but it is expected that regions of pressing interest or greater significance to international peace and security will be covered most regularly. This course is designed for political science majors, but is also suitable for others who need to fulfill a distribution requirement in the social sciences or who simply want to satisfy an interest in a specific regional conflict or international politics/security more generally.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 120 recommended

POLI 241 - The Holocaust: Representation and Interpretations

Using a plurality of approaches and sources, this course aims at a fundamental understanding of the Holocaust. It examines a variety of situations (Germany, Poland, France), a variety of actors (perpetrators, bystanders, helpers, resisters, victims), and a variety of perspectives (intentionalist, functionalist, relativist).

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 242 - Development Politics

Analysis of theories, patterns, and policies of development in the Third World with emphasis on North-South political-economic and cultural relationships.

Frequency: Every year.

POLI 243 - Political Anthropology

Analysis of political structures and activities in diverse world societies. Emphases on pre-literate cultures, but societies examined range from hunting and gathering bands to agricultural tribes in industrial states.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

ANTH 111

Cross-Listed as

ANTH 364

POLI 244 - Urban Latino Power

Comparative study of Latino and Latina political struggles in the United States. We will explore the themes of subordination and empowerment through issues such as anti-immigrant ballot initiatives in California, the election of Latino mayors in Denver and San Antonio, Cuban dominance in Miami politics, multiracial violence in Los Angeles, and battles over labor conditions, affirmative action, bi-lingual education, and racial profiling. Student projects will involve field research among the Latino communities and organizations of the Twin Cities.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

LATI 244 and AMST 244

POLI 245 - Latin American Politics

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in several Latin American countries. Through a mix of empirical and theoretical work, we analyze concepts and issues such as authoritarianism and democratization, neoliberalism, state terror and peace processes, guerrilla movements, party systems, populism, the Cuban Revolution, and U.S. military intervention. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry. This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course "S/SD/N with Written Evaluation." This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-presure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism.

Frequency: Every year.

Cross-Listed as

LATI 245

POLI 246 - Comparative Democratization

This course focuses on theories of democratic breakdown, regime transitions, and democratization in Southern Europe, Latin America, and Post-Communist Europe. Some of the cases we will study include Pinochet's coup and Chile's return to elections, the end of the South African apartheid regime, and Russia's post-Cold War shift toward both democratic elections and new strands of authoritarianism. Building on the literatures on transitions, consolidation, civil society, and constitutional design, the course culminates in an examination of democratic impulses in Iran and the Middle East. Themes are explored through diverse teaching methods including discussion, debates, simulations, partisan narratives, lecture, film, and poetry.

Frequency: Offered every year.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 140 or POLI 141 recommended.

Cross-Listed as

LATI 246 and RUSS 246

POLI 250 - Comparative-Historical Sociology

The course introduces students to principles of cross-national and cross-cultural analysis. The class begins with a survey of the basic methodological orientations that distinguish various modes of analysis in the social sciences. The lectures and discussions in this section provide a general introduction to the logic of causal analysis, explore the relative strengths and weaknesses of differing methodological approaches to understanding social phenomena, and specifically, consider in greater detail the distinctive blend of theoretical, methodological, and empirical concerns that inform comparative-historical social science. The substantive topics of the course include: the Social Origins of the Modern State; the Sociology of Democracy and Authoritarianism; the Sociology of Revolution; and The Rise of the Welfare State.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 252 - Water and Power

This course develops an interdisciplinary approach to studying water resources development, drawing from geography, anthropology, history, politics, hydrology, and civil engineering. With a focus on large river basins, the course examines historical and emerging challenges to the equitable and sustainable use of transboundary waters. After first exploring the history of American water development, we will turn our attention to issues around sanitation, food production, gender and privatization in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Frequency: Fall semester.

Prerequisite(s)

ENVI 120, ENVI 133, or ENVI 232

Cross-Listed as

GEOG 252 and ENVI 252

POLI 260 - Contemporary Political Theory

Transition in the nature of domination from manifest coercion to cultural hegemony. The course will focus on critical theory, principally Marcuse and Habermas, but will also consider Marx, Weber, Freud, Gramsci, Lukacs and Foucault.

Frequency: Every year.

POLI 261 - Feminist Political Theory

Analysis of contemporary feminist theories regarding gender identity, biological and socio-cultural influences on subjectivity and knowledge, and relations between the personal and the political.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Cross-Listed as

WGSS 261

POLI 262 - American Political Thought

A study of selected writings and topics in political thought of the United States.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 100 recommended

POLI 265 - Work, Wealth, Well-Being

Wealth has held an allure for many modern thinkers; the creation of a wealthy society often associated with "civilization" itself. The relationships among work, wealth and well-being are a perennial concern and have been central to the study of political economy, since its inception in the mid- to late-18th century. How does work produce wealth for the individual and for society? How, or when, does individual and social wealth translate into individual and/or social well-being? And, how does the character of work affect individual well-being or happiness? This course will examine the answers given to these questions (and myriad corollary questions) by writers within the political economy tradition.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 266 - Medieval Political Thought

This course deals with the political thought of Latin Christendom (Western Europe) during the later Middle Ages (c. 1050 - c. 1550). This body of thought is worthy of sustained study for two reasons. First, it is one of the glories of human civilization. In seeking to answer the timeless question "how we should live our lives as individuals" and "how we should live together in peace and justice" late medieval political thinkers produced a body of political thought second to none in the history of human philosophical speculation. Second, late medieval political thought is worthy of study because it gave rise to many of the concepts that continue to shape our collective lives today (including state sovereignty, separation of church and state, constitutionalism, just war, property rights, "the people," nationalism, democracy, rule-of-law, and human rights). Indeed, it is impossible to really understand contemporary political life without delving deeply into the way in which late medieval thinkers engaged with the big political issues of their day. The main goal of this course is to provide a solid introduction to the political thought of this crucially important era in human history. In it, we will critically examine the relevant works of thinkers such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of Paris, Marsilius of Padua, Bartolus of Sasseferato, and Baldus de Ubaldi. To the extent that they shed light on late medieval thought, we will also touch on classical political theorists such as Aristotle and Cicero as well as Muslim and Jewish thinkers such as ibn Sina, Moshe ben Maimon, and ibn Rusd.

POLI 269 - Empirical Research Methods

Strategies and tactics of design, observation, description, and measurement in contemporary political research. Prerequisite: at least one political science foundations course. Every year. (4 credits) Empirical Methods: The department requires its majors to take one course in empirical research methodology, preferably before their junior year. There are a number of courses that fulfill this requirement, including:  POLI 269 (Empirical Research Methods), POLI 272, SOCI 269, SOCI 270, SOCI 275. In some cases, research methods courses taken in other social science disciplines may be used to fulfill this requirement following approval by the political science department chair.

Prerequisite(s)

at least one political science foundations course

POLI 270 - Rhetoric of Campaigns and Election

The course examines the range of persuasive language strategies and symbol use in Presidential or congressional elections. Students design a comprehensive communication plan for a real candidate running for office. Students produce campaign rhetoric such as prospectus for institutional donors, press releases, direct mail appeals, bumper stickers, scripts for radio/television ads, scripts for fundraising phone banks, and a candidate stump speech.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 271 - Politics of Public Space

Examination of the rhetoric and politics of public space and their relationship to civil society, liberal democracy, and public deliberation. Focuses on the public sphere as a location for the management of public memory through the building or destruction of monuments and other commemorative art, as well as a site for protests, strikes, and satiric demonstrations. Also examines state practices of encouraging, managing, and policing citizen expression in the public sphere.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 272 - Researching Political Communication

A study of how presidents, politicians, and social movement activists worldwide use language and persuasive symbols to increase influence and affect political change. Students complete a semester-long project in which they analyze a significant political text utilizing descriptive-analytic, historical-contextual, critical, and interpretive research methods.

Frequency: Every year.

POLI 285 - Ethnicity and Nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe

This course explores ethnic nationalism's causes and consequences in Eastern Europe. Drawing on several disciplines, we begin by examining the core concepts and theories in the contemporary study of nationalism. We then explore both the historical roots of Eastern European nationalisms, and their implications for democracy, minority inclusion, regional stability, and European integration.

Cross-Listed as

INTL 285

POLI 294 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

POLI 300 - American Government Institutions

Analysis of the formal institutions of American governance, including the U.S. Congress, Presidency, federal courts, and the bureaucracy. The course relies on extensive role playing to equip students with a hands-on understanding of the procedures utilized by all three branches of government, the complexity of public policy decision making, and the motivations and resources of various governmental actors.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 301 - Law, Economy, and Identity

This seminar-style course explores American political development, examining how law, when influenced by economic ideologies or the focus of contests among economic interests, has had a significant impact on persons of identity. Topics include the property rights of women in early America, the law of slavery, and the legal development of Native American law, before reaching contemporary questions of inclusion and exclusion in law. Prior course work in American history, political science, or legal studies strongly recommended.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 305 - Women's Voices in Politics

The course examines significant women persuaders as a force in Western history and culture. Concentrates on women's efforts to participate fully in public affairs and the social, political, religious, scientific, and rhetorical obstacles that have restricted women's access to the polis. Fundamental to the course is an analysis of how women have used speaking, writing, and protesting in attempts to overcome such obstacles, influence public policy and/or win elective office.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 170 or POLI 272 recommended.

Cross-Listed as

WGSS 306

POLI 315 - Advanced Topics in Policy: US Education Politics and Policy

This advanced research seminar explores the politics and policy of K-12 education in the United States. Several theoretical lenses are explored and competing perspectives are advanced. The workload will be intense, akin to a graduate level course. Students will compose a 20-25 page original research paper on an education topics of their choice.

Frequency: Alternate spring semesters.

Prerequisite(s)

Previous coursework in American politics or public policy as well as research methods is recommended.

POLI 316 - Information Politics, Policy and Law

Over the past century the world has witnessed incredible changes in the ways that information is produced, distributed, and consumed. Through tutorials, seminar discussions, and individual projects, this course explores the policy problems and conflicts at the cutting edge of the global Information Society. Topics include secrecy, transparency, access to information, surveillance, privacy, intellectual property (such as copyrights and piracy), freedom of expression in a digital world, and the regulation of technology.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 320 - Global Political Economy

Traces the evolution of (global) political economy as a peculiarly modern way of understanding and organizing (global) social life. Particular attention will be paid to how the distinction between the political and the economic is drawn and implemented in interconnected ways within nation-states and in international society. Course includes a detailed study of one of the key components of the international political economy: international trade, international finance, technological processes, etc.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 120 recommended.

Cross-Listed as

INTL 320

POLI 321 - International Security

This is a course designed to introduce students to global or world security studies as an academic field. It begins with a discussion of the various theoretical approaches to the study of international security (including traditional, critical and subaltern approaches). It then proceeds to explore a number of issues that are currently of interest to specialists in the field. While not an exhaustive survey, this course provides a solid introduction to the contemporary study of international security.

Frequency: Every year.

POLI 322 - Advanced International Theory

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of international relations theory as an academic discipline. It is intended to prepare students for graduate work in the field, but should be appropriate for those merely seeking to satisfy an interest in international relations theory. The course is intended primarily for advanced political science majors and non-majors in cognate fields who have significant experience in the discipline.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 120, a methods course, and at least one intermediate-level international relations expected

POLI 323 - Humanitarianism in World Politics

The past two decades appear to have been very successful ones for humanitarianism. Funding for humanitarianism has skyrocketed; humanitarian organizations have expanded their public support, as well as their activities; and, increasingly, humanitarian issues have found a place at the center of policy decisions. It is also generally agreed that humanitarianism is in crisis owing to the growing awareness of the sometimes harmful effects of aid; the expansion of the concept of humanitarianism to include human rights, development, and peace-building; and the increasing involvement of states in humanitarian operations. This advanced-level course explores the nature and dilemmas of contemporary humanitarianism.

Frequency: Every year.

POLI 333 - Power and Development in Africa

In a notable turn around, a significant number of African societies, in recent years, have experienced both economic growth and renewal of the spirit of women and men acting as citizens. These are commendable achievements. Yet, old quotidian urgencies such as precarious personal safety, hunger, poor health, and political disorder are still prevalent. This is the dialectic of development. This course explores these contradictions. Most of the attention will be given to the concepts of power, politics, and development in contemporary Africa. The course concludes with each student submitting a research paper on a specific problem (e.g. environment, economic, social, cultural, political) confronting one country of the student's choice.

Frequency: Every year.

Prerequisite(s)

Sophomore standing.

Cross-Listed as

INTL 301

POLI 335 - Science and Citizenship

This course focuses on environmental controversies as a means for exploring the dynamic relationship between science, technology and society. Through topics such as genetically modified foods, geoengineering and toxic waste disposal, the course will critically examine concepts of risk, uncertainty, trust, credibility, expertise and citizenship. Students will also examine the role of art and media in shaping of public consciousness.

Frequency: Spring semester.

Cross-Listed as

ENVI 335

POLI 340 - Fascism

A comparative exploration of fascism in Italy and Germany focusing on problems of modernization and interpretation.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 341 - Comparative Social Movements

Comparative study of social movements in Latin America and other world regions. This research seminar engages several major theories that attempt to explain the origins and development of movements struggling for subsistence rights, labor rights, gender and sexuality rights, social rights, and racial and ethnic rights. The course focuses principally on Latin American movements, but also engages cases from the United States and Europe through an examination of transnational advocacy networks and global activism.

Frequency: Alternate years.

Prerequisite(s)

POLI 140 recommended

Cross-Listed as

LATI 341

POLI 342 - Urban Politics of Latin America

Democratic elections have penetrated metropolitan Latin America, offering the urban poor new avenues for demand making. In this research seminar, we will explore how the changing rules of political competition affect urban struggles for land, racial equality, and municipal representation. The course focuses on mayoral elections, urban segregation, informal communities, and social movements in major cities such as Caracas, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Porto Alegre, and São Paulo. Major student responsibilities include seminar leadership roles, a research project, and presentation of your findings in a public colloquium. For students with previous coursework in Latin American or urban politics.

Frequency: Every year.

Cross-Listed as

LATI 342

POLI 352 - Transitional Justice

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and examines a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies.

Cross-Listed as

INTL 352

POLI 363 - Paradigms of Global Citizenship

In this course, we will read a number of classical and contemporary texts that attempt to address the -big- normative issues related to (global) civic life: -How should we think about the boundaries of civic or political community?-; -How should human beings live together, and govern themselves, within their political communities?-; -What rights, duties, responsibilities and virtues are necessarily associated with democratic citizenship?-; -Is there such a thing as `global citizenship?- ; and, if there is, -what is the relationship between human rights, cosmopolitan ethics and global citizenship?- The course approaches these questions from three normative perspectives: political liberalism, civic republicanism and cosmopolitanism. Although rooted in Western philosophical tradition, the course also draws on texts from other civilizations.

Frequency: Alternate years.

POLI 390 - Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship

In his 40-year career at Macalester, Professor Chuck Green functioned as a one-man `leadership academy,- inspiring and guiding students to make the transition from detached observers to engaged citizens. Through his teaching, mentoring, and example, Professor Green instilled in students a sense of confidence and optimism about their ability to engage proactively in the world. The Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship honors this legacy. Students with sophomore or junior standing may apply for this seven-month fellowship that includes a spring seminar and a full-time, fully-funded summer field experience. Chuck Green Fellows will study democratic engagement in social and organizational change, identify a client organization working for the public good with whom the student can analyze and address a problem, and then work with that client on a mutually agreed-upon solution. The Fellowship culminates in the early fall with an event in which Fellows, faculty, and clients have an opportunity to reflect on the fellowship experience. The Fellowship fulfills both the practicum and advanced course requirements of the political science major. Contact the political science department for a full description and application.

Frequency: Every spring.

POLI 394 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

POLI 400 - Senior Research Seminar

The research seminar is designed to fulfill partially the capstone experience requirement for political science majors. It is expected that students will have taken the required foundations, methods and intermediate courses prior to beginning the seminar. The goal of the Senior Research Seminar is to launch students on a culminating academic experience organized around the supervised independent study of a political science topic of particular interest and relevance to them. The Seminar is premised on the assumption that students will have a working familiarity with the foundational knowledge in the sub-field(s) relevant to their research project, a mastery of the practical skills introduced in the foundations courses and further developed in the intermediate courses, and a willingness to engage actively in a rigorous, sustained inquiry into an important topic. It is also premised on the assumption that students will take responsibility for managing their own self-directed learning processes. The Senior Research Seminar will normally involve one or more faculty members "coaching" students through the process of defining a significant and important political science research question, developing a thesis, designing an appropriate research program, and writing a substantial portion of a draft Honors thesis or senior independent project. Following successful completion of the Seminar, students participating in the Honors Program are required to enroll in political science independent project. Students not participating in the Honors Program who nevertheless wish to continue with their research should enroll in POLI 614.

Frequency: Every Fall.

POLI 404 - Honors Colloquium

A workshop for students pursing honors projects in the political science department. S/N grading.

Frequency: Every semester.

POLI 494 - Topics Course

Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing.

POLI 601 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

POLI 602 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

POLI 603 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

POLI 604 - Tutorial

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

POLI 611 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

POLI 612 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

POLI 613 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

POLI 614 - Independent Project

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

POLI 621 - Internship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

POLI 622 - Internship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

POLI 623 - Internship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

POLI 624 - Internship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office.

POLI 631 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

POLI 632 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

POLI 633 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

POLI 634 - Preceptorship

Frequency: Every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs.

POLI 641 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Offered every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

POLI 642 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Offered every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

POLI 643 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Offered every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.

POLI 644 - Honors Independent

Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project.

Frequency: Offered every semester.

Prerequisite(s)

Permission of instructor.