Schedules

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Fall 2014 Class Schedule - updated December 19, 2014 at 09:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
POLI 100-01  US Politics
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Michael Zis
 
POLI 101-01  Argument and Advocacy
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
*First Year Course only* With a focus on the role of advocacy in the policy making process, this course expands your understanding of how arguments operate in our political culture and to cultivate your ability to read critically and creatively, make pertinent and well-substantiated claims, assess opposing arguments charitably, and communicate your judgments appropriately and effectively both orally and in writing.

POLI 120-01  International Politics
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 David Blaney
 
POLI 140-01  Comparative Politics
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Franklin Adler
 
POLI 141-01  Latin America Through Women's Eyes
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 212 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with LATI 141-01 and WGSS 141-01; S/D/NC with Written evaluation only*

POLI 160-01  Foundations of Political Theory
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
 
POLI 194-01  Math and Society: Politics and Mathematics of Elections
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Dolan, Saxe
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with MATH 116-01* It’s fall 2014 and so it’s time for midterm elections! Will the Republicans take control of the US Senate? How many governorships and state legislatures will change party hands?

How do elections work in the U.S. and in other democracies? What is meant by a ‘representative’ democracy? How is it decided how many Congressional representatives each state has? What are the costs and benefits of political participation?

We will focus on the various ways that mathematics and political science interact. Topics covered will include the role of elections and representative government in the United States, comparison of electoral systems used around the world, the apportionment problem, redistricting and gerrymandering, weighted voting systems and voting power, the costs and benefits associated with political participation, and how to predict electoral outcomes.

Work during the semester will include some ‘math’ problems (associated, for example, with weighted voting); student predictions on the outcome of numerous competitive congressional and gubernatorial elections across the country; and several short written assignments.

This First Year Seminar will be taught jointly by Julie Dolan (Professor of Political Science) and Karen Saxe (Professor of Mathematics). Important facts about the course:

• It has no prerequisites, either in math or in political science.

• It satisfies either the Social Science (if you sign up for POLI 194) OR the Natural Science/Math (if you sign up for MATH 116) distribution requirement. But, it is the same course no matter which way you sign up!



POLI 205-01  Politics and Policymaking
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Lesley Lavery
 
POLI 208-01  Immigration and Citizenship in American Political Development
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02*

POLI 215-01  Environmental Politics/Policy
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

POLI 221-01  Global Governance
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 214 Wendy Weber
 
POLI 245-01  Latin American Politics
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 212 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with LATI 245-01; S/D/NC with Written evaluation only*

POLI 250-01  Comparative-Historical Sociology
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Terry Boychuk
*Cross-listed with SOCI 275-01*

POLI 250-02  Comparative-Historical Sociology
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk
*Cross-listed with SOCI 275-02*

POLI 252-01  Water and Power
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 252-01 and GEOG 252-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor; ENVI/GEOL 120 or ENVI 133 or ENVI/GEOG 232 are useful background but not required*

POLI 266-01  Medieval Political Thought
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Andrew Latham
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-02 and PHIL 294-02* Interested in the roots of contemporary political life (including issues such as state sovereignty, separation of church and state, constitutionalism, just war, property rights, “the people”, nationalism, democracy, rule-of-law, and human rights)? Then this course is for you. Through a careful examination of the political thought of Latin Christendom (Western Europe) during the later Middle Ages (c. 1050-c. 1550) we explore the deep roots of the contemporary world order, demonstrating the ways in which medieval thinkers such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of Salisbury, John of Paris, Giles of Rome, Marsilius of Padua, Dante, Las Casas, ibn Sina, Moshe ben Maimon, and ibn Rushd “invented” many of the ideas that we – presumptuously and erroneously – have come to associate with the modern era. As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields (such as Philosophy or Classics) who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in political theory/philosophy or the medieval roots of contemporary political life. This course fulfills the Political Science Department’s Theory Requirement.

POLI 269-01  Empirical Research Methods
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Julie Dolan
*First day attendance required*

POLI 285-01  Ethnicity and Nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky
*Cross-listed with INTL 285-01*

POLI 294-01  Politics of the Great War
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Andrew Latham
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-07* The First World War – referred to simply as “The Great War” by contemporaries who had no idea that it would be followed by an even more catastrophic Second World War a mere two decades later – set the stage for global political life in the twentieth century. Indeed, it is impossible to understand the political, social, cultural and economic developments of the period stretching from 1918 until today without grasping the world-historical impact of the conflict unleashed by the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand on June 28, 1914 (one hundred years ago this upcoming summer). In this course, we explore the causes, character and consequences of the First World War. Among the questions we address are:

1. Why did the war break out, and what does this tell us about the causes of war more generally?

2. Who was to blame for the war, and what does this tell us about the morality of war?

3. What was the character of the war? How was it fought? How did it end? And what does this tell us about the relationship between economics, culture, technology and war?

4. How did the war transform the societies that fought it? And what does this tell us about the relationship between war and political development?

5. How did the war transform the international system? How did the First World War set the stage not only for the Second World War, but also the various conflicts in the Middle East (the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Gulf War, etc.) and Europe (the wars in Bosnia and Kosovo)? And what does this tell us about the impact of war on global political life?

Although this course will explore some of the ways in which the war was represented in popular culture (art, film, literature, poetry), those themes are addressed more fully in some Art topics courses, also offered in Fall 2014.

As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable to all students seeking to satisfy an interest in the relationship between The First World War and political life in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.



POLI 294-02  Art and Power: World War I and Inflicted traumas
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 202 Vicky Karaiskou
*Cross-listed with ART 294-03. This course counts for social science general distribution if registered as POLI and fine arts general distribution if registered as ART* The course will examine art as a potent means to establish political power and shape social notions. In particular it will approach modernity in the beginning of the 20th century as a revolt against the values established by the ‘old regime’ and its arts. In order to set the frame for the relationships between art and power, the course will call upon distinct artworks and artistic expressions from Greek-roman antiquity, the medieval era, renaissance, baroque and neoclassicism and will analyse their role in propagating political and social order. Having set that frame, the course will highlight especially artistic trends of the first thirty years of the 20th century that include the years of World War I. Visual artworks and writings will be explored as the result of an urgent need to reject the pre-existing cultural memory which was regarded as the cause for modern society’s traumatic experiences. The course will examine expressionism, dada and surrealism as illustrations of individual and social traumas resulting both from the despair of WW I and the disintegration of the pre-existing social and moral/social value-system. We will approach futurism as an attempt to erase past memory and create a new individual and social awareness. The course ends with an examination of art’s political and social context as expressed through Russian avant-garde.

POLI 300-01  American Government Institutions
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 213 Julie Dolan
 
POLI 316-01  Info Policy/Politics/Law
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt
*First Year Course only* It is easy to be amazed by changes in information technology, that is, the ways that information is produced, distributed, and consumed. If you love your cellphone, share music with your friends, are addicted to social media, enjoy digital books, or worry about your privacy, you might be familiar with some of the issues. In this course, we go much deeper: how do governments and institutions (such as corporations) shape the flow of information? What's at stake in the design of the policies and law governing information? We explore those questions across a range of topics, including surveillance and searches, privacy, transparency, copyrights, patents, and the regulation of the internet.

Students can come to this course from many different starting points. Some students are interested in policy-making and politics but haven't thought much about information policy, which is simply one area, like environmental policy, health policy or anything else. Other students follow technology closely, but haven't given much thought to government, politics and regulation. Still others are interested in the broadest historical and sociological questions: is the world different today because of how information technology has changed? If so, how? And, isn't my iPhone the most amazing invention in human history...or not? However often the class discusses the latest technological developments, we will never be far from the questions, "so what?" and "what does it all mean?".

This course will offer a variety of learning experiences. Class time will include introductory lectures, guest speakers, and "seminar style" discussions. On occasion we will join forces with another First Year Course: Ethics and the Internet, taught by Philosophy professor Diane Michelfelder. Other weeks, students will write essays for discussion in tutorials (small group meetings in my office). The class also will work on a project assisting Macalester College in the development of its own information policies.



POLI 320-01  Global Political Economy
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 David Blaney
*Cross-listed with INTL 320-01*

POLI 333-01  Power and Development in Africa
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN Ahmed Samatar
*Cross-listed with INTL 301-01; course to meet in Carnegie 411*

POLI 394-01  Gender Base Violence in Refugee Settings:A Macalester-ARC Collaborative Project
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 Wendy Weber
Addressing the problem of gender-based violence in refugee settings is a difficult and ongoing challenge for humanitarian organizations. While there is considerable research on approaches to gender-based violence (especially sexual violence) within the humanitarian sector, there is a need for more evidence about what actually works. In this course, students will work together with Professor Weber on a community-based research project for the American Refugee Committee. In this project, we will work to understand the problem of gender-based violence in refugee settings. Our specific focus will be on domestic or intimate partner violence. After this, we will research ‘best practices’ in addressing intimate partner violence in the domestic context (using the literature and engaging local organizations) in order the identify practices that might be adopted by humanitarian organizations.

POLI 400-01  Senior Research Seminar
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 David Blaney
 
POLI 400-02  Senior Research Seminar
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Paul Dosh
 
POLI 400-03  Senior Research Seminar
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Lesley Lavery
 
POLI 404-01  Honors Colloquium
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Andrew Latham
*2 credit course*

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Spring 2015 Class Schedule - updated December 19, 2014 at 09:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
POLI 100-01  US Politics
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Michael Zis
 
POLI 120-01  International Politics
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Wendy Weber
 
POLI 160-01  Foundations of Political Theory
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Franklin Adler
 
POLI 170-01  Theories of Rhetoric
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
 
POLI 200-01  Women and American Politics
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Julie Dolan
 
POLI 216-01  Legislative Politics
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Julie Dolan
*Instructor permission required*

POLI 222-01  Regional Conflict/Security
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Andrew Latham
 
POLI 242-01  Development Politics
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 112 David Blaney
 
POLI 244-01  Urban Latino Power
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 213 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with AMST 244-01 and LATI 244-01; first day attendance required*

POLI 260-01  Contemporary Political Theory
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
 
POLI 261-01  Feminist Political Theory
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 401 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
*Cross-listed with WGSS 261-01*

POLI 269-01  Empirical Research Methods
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Lesley Lavery
 
POLI 272-01  Researching Political Communication
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
 
POLI 294-01  Politics of Architecture and the Built Environment
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 Schmidt, Wells
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ENVI 294-01; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor* Are buildings political? What does the built environment--from buildings to roads and the entire layout of communities--say about us and to us? This collaboratively-taught course will explore the ways that architecture embodies the ideals and political tensions of the individuals and societies that create them, as well as how the physical landscape also shapes the political landscape. Beginning with a survey of themes in architectural history, we will explore both the expressive meaning and the behavioral significance of the human-built world. Topics will range from Greek temples to Occupy protests, from 19th century Paris to the American suburbs.

POLI 294-02  Political Psychology of Mass Behavior
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Philip Chen
*Cross-listed with PSYC 294-01* How does psychology help us understand the attitudes and behaviors of voters? Given these insights, what does this tell us about the quality of democracy in America? Are American voters living up to their civic duty as voters?

This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of political psychology. This field uses research and theory from social and personality psychology as well as mass communication to understand aspects of politics. Throughout the semester, we will examine the mass public (voters) and gain a better understanding of the ways ordinary people make political decisions and interact with the political world. This course is organized around four broad themes. After an introduction to the study of political psychology, we will explore voter’s attitudes, specifically the content of these beliefs and where they come from. The course then turns to a study of personality and emotions, followed by a section on political communication and the media. We end with a discussion of stereotyping and voting with a focus on the post-2008 political world.



POLI 294-03  Metaphysics in Secular Thought
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01 and RELI 394-01; counts as humanities general distribution credit*

POLI 294-04  Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 William Wilcox
*Cross-listed with PHIL 321-01; counts as humanities general distribution credit*

POLI 316-01  Info Policy/Politics/Law
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 208 Patrick Schmidt
 
POLI 321-01  International Security
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Andrew Latham
 
POLI 322-01  Advanced International Theory
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 David Blaney
 
POLI 323-01  Humanitarianism in World Politics
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber
 
POLI 335-01  Science and Citizenship
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 335-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

POLI 341-01  Comparative Social Movements
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with LATI 341-01*

POLI 352-01  Transitional Justice
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky
*Cross-listed with INTL 352-01*

POLI 390-01  Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Lesley Lavery
*Permission of instructor required*

POLI 394-01  Sustainability for Global Citizenship Seminar
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Michael Zis
*Permission of instructor required* The seminar invites students in their sophomore or junior year to deepen their understanding of sustainability through real-world problem solving. The seminar uses a sustainability framework for considering the political, economic, environmental, and social dimensions of these problems and their potential solutions. All seminar participants commit to a 6-month learning endeavor, comprised of (1) a spring semester course and (2) a paid summer practicum. In the paid practicum, students will be working with an organization to address a problem related to sustainability. The application deadline for participation in the 2015 Sustainability for Global Citizenship cohort is Oct. 27, 2014. Please see instructor for application information.

POLI 404-01  Honors Colloquium
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Andrew Latham
*2 credit course*

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