Terms and Definitions

The following is a list of words that we used in the other synesthesia pages that may not be generally understood. Hopefully these definitions and explanations will make the concepts more understandable. If you find any other words or concepts that you are having trouble with please feel free to contact us via the authors' page e-mail link for a more understandable explanation. Thanks.

Attention Deficit Disorder
A disorder associated with low attention spans and hyperactivity
Autism
From early childhood there is severe impairment in communication and social interactions, and actions are often repetitive and unchanging
Bimodal
Dealing with two modalities
Brain Stem
The hindbrain and midbrain of the vertebrate nervous system; it forms a cap of the top of the spinal cord and extend to the middle of the brain
Cognitive
thought processes
Cross-Modal Association
Crossing of sensory pathways
Degeneration
A process by which tissue deteriorates, loses functional activity and may become converted into or replaced by other kinds of tissue
Dominant
A part of a gene that is always expressed when it is there.
Dyslexia
A disorder where things are done or read backwards. For example, a "d" and a "b" might be confused
Epileptic
A person who has epilepsy, a chronic brain disorder characterized by recurrent seizures
Gustation
Sense of taste
Hippocampus
A region in the temporal lobe of the brain that is associated with learning and memory
Intermodal
see "cross-modal association"
Lesion
A damaged area
Limbic
Referring to the limbic system, an evolutionarily older section of the brain that is associated with emotion, learning, and memory
Metabolism
The sum processes or chemical changes in an organism by which energy is used
Modular
A distinct pathway
Neocortex
The most evolutionarily advanced part of the brain, found only in mammals and largest in humans; also called the cortex; associated with higher levels of processing information
Neonates
Newborns
Nerves
A bunch of neurons running in parallel
Neurons
A nerve cell; the fundamental unit of the nervous system that works by conducting electrical and chemical signals throughout the brain
Olfaction
sense of smell
Positron Emission Tomography(PET)
A technique used for imaging the brain activity by measuring the flow of blood containing radioactive atoms that emit positrons
Premotor Cortex
Area of the cortex in front of the motor area
Recessive
A part of the gene that is only expressed if a dominant allele is not present
Sensory modality
A pathway, such as the visual circuit
Synapse
Area between two nerve cells
Tactile
Sense of touch
Temporal Lobe
A part of the brain, located in both hemispheres near the temple area; associated with audition, speech, and memories
Transient
Remaining only for a short time
Ventral
A direction referring to areas closer to the belly, as opposed to the back (dorsal)
Main Page
Introduction
History
Types
How it Works

Living With Synaesthesia
Pseudosynaesthesia
Definitions
About the Authors
Credits