Fall 2011 Class Schedule

Fall 2011 Class Schedule - updated March 30, 2012 at 01:56 pm

This is a snapshot of the class schedule and enrollment information, updated only once daily. For the most current information on class schedule and enrollment, Macalester students, faculty and staff should log in to 1600grand and use the "Search Class Schedule" link.

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Chinese
Classics
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Neuroscience Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theater and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
AMST 103-01 Race in US Social Thought MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 213 Karin Aguilar-San Juan 0 / 16
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*

AMST 110-01 Intro to African American St MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Duchess Harris -1 / 25
*First day attendance required*
AMST 200-01 Critical Methods M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 212 Jane Rhodes 10 / 20
*First day attendance required*
AMST 202-01 Engaging the Public W 02:20 pm-04:20 pm HUM 304 Teresa Fishel 13 / 20
*2 credit course; course meets in the Library* Students enrolled in this course form the editorial collective for the American Studies on-line journal Tapestries published on Macalester's Digital Commons. Course content will focus on writing, editing, and the art of preparing a journal article for publication. It will also consider how to engage various publics, including students, the College, and local communities, through digital publishing. Students are part of a collaborative model for circulating scholarship, art and criticism. The class is involved in all aspects of layout and design and peer-review, and discuss issues including verifying facts, copyright, intellectual property, author rights, and open access.
AMST 202-01 Engaging the Public W 02:20 pm-04:20 pm HUM 304 Jane Rhodes 13 / 20
*2 credit course; course meets in the Library* Students enrolled in this course form the editorial collective for the American Studies on-line journal Tapestries published on Macalester's Digital Commons. Course content will focus on writing, editing, and the art of preparing a journal article for publication. It will also consider how to engage various publics, including students, the College, and local communities, through digital publishing. Students are part of a collaborative model for circulating scholarship, art and criticism. The class is involved in all aspects of layout and design and peer-review, and discuss issues including verifying facts, copyright, intellectual property, author rights, and open access.
AMST 225-01 Native American History TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Scott Shoemaker 12 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 225-01*
AMST 233-01 Intro Hist US Working Class MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 Peter Rachleff 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 233-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 280-01 Re-envisioning Educ/Democracy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with POLI 211-01 and EDUC 280-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 294-01 Native American Cultural Revitalization TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 350 Erik Redix 16 / 25
*First day attendance required.* This will course focus on Ojibwe cultural practices and their historical context. Topics include revitalization of Ojibwe language, meaning of Ojibwe stories, Ojibwe music, traditional and contemporary art, and the practice of Ojibwe off-reservation treaty rights. The role of gender in traditional culture and how these have changed over time will be a reoccurring theme. The course will also look at the international context of Ojibwe cultural revitalization, examining communities on both sides of the US-Canada border.
AMST 294-03 African Amer Lit to 1900 MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Daylanne English 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENGL 275-01*
AMST 294-04 Environmental Justice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Chris Wells -1 / 20
*Cross-listed with HIST 237-01 and ENVI 237-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
AMST 300-01 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 Duchess Harris 17 / 25
*First day attendance required*
AMST 308-01 Intro to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 228 Galo Gonzalez 2 / 15
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 310-01 Comparative Freedom Movements W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Peter Rachleff 3 / 25
*Cross-listed wtih HIST 235-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 334-01 Cultural Studies and the Media TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Leola Johnson 4 / 16
*Cross-listed with MCST 334-01; plus screening times TBA*
AMST 340-01 Living on the Edge: Asian American Experience TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Karin Aguilar-San Juan 21 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 340-01; first day attendance required*

AMST 345-01 Race/Culture/Ethnicity M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Ann Hite 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with EDUC 340-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 354-01 Blackness in the Media TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Leola Johnson 2 / 16
*Cross-listed with MCST 354-01; screening times TBA*
AMST 394-01 Race, Gender, and Science MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Lynn Hudson 17 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 350-01 and WGSS 394-03; first day attendance required*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Arjun Guneratne 7 / 35
ANTH 111-02 Cultural Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Diana Dean 2 / 35
ANTH 115-01 Biological Anthropology MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06B Marcia Regan 1 / 24
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Arjun Guneratne 4 / 16
*First day attendance required; non-Anthropology majors need permission of instructor*
ANTH 239-01 Medical Anthropology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06A Sonia Patten -11 / 35
ANTH 246-01 Refugees/Humanitarian Response TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 0 / 16
*First Year Course only*
ANTH 246-02 Refugees/Humanitarian Response TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 1 / 20
ANTH 255-01 Peoples/Cultures Latin America W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez 4 / 20
*Cross-listed with LATI 255-01*
ANTH 258-01 Peoples/Cultures of Africa MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 05 Sonia Patten 5 / 20
ANTH 294-01 Tibet, Nepal, and the Himalaya: Anthropological Perspectives TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06B Arjun Guneratne 10 / 20
This course is an introduction to the anthropology of complex societies through a study of the ethnography of the Himalayan region, with particular reference to the societies of Tibet and Nepal. The course has three aims: To understand how the anthropology of the region developed; to examine the research topics that have interested anthropologists of the Himalaya over the years through a reading of selected ethnographies; and to develop an approach to understanding the anthropology of a complex, multi-ethnic society, that of Nepal. The course will also draw on ethnographic and feature films to understand the complexity of Himalayan lives. Students will also have the opportunity to attend sessions of the first Himalayan Studies Conference organized by the Association for Nepal and Himalayan Studies, which will be held at Macalester during fall break.
ANTH 394-02 Gender and Development in Africa MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Sonia Patten 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-02.* Development in Africa has many players - national governments, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations both international and domestic, private contractors, religious organizations, community-based organizations, individual development experts. In the midst of all the development policies, activities, projects and money, there is a very big question: how is development working out for the women and men of Africa, for their families and communities. In the course we will use the works of anthropologists and other scholars to examine this and related questions such as whose voices are heard when development agendas are set, who gains and who loses when development projects are mounted, what recourse exists for individuals and families who suffer losses as a result of development, and how have African women and men organized to address these and other issues linked to development.
ANTH 394-03 Sex, Family, Kinship TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06B Diana Dean 9 / 20
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-04*This course considers sex, desire, and kinship as central and vigorously contested topics within anthropology. In an era of new reproductive technologies, sex , gender and family are topics of international debate. How have anthropological considerations of human reproduction and family changed over time? What are the current debates within the discipline? The course draws from biological, cultural, and critical traditions within anthropology and the social sciences and will consider concepts of human nature, sexual difference, desire, and some political and economic dimensions of the categories of gender, family, and kinship.

ANTH 487-01 Theory in Anthropology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez 2 / 20
*First day attendance required*

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ART 130-01 Drawing I MWF 09:40 am-11:50 am ART 123 Megan Vossler 2 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 130-02 Drawing I MWF 01:10 pm-03:20 pm ART 123 Megan Vossler 0 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 131-01 Introduction to Ceramics MW 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 130 Gary Erickson 2 / 10
*First day attendance required; $100 Material fee required*
ART 132-01 The Human Figure MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 130 Gary Erickson 3 / 10
*First day attendance required; $100 Material fee required*
ART 149-01 Intro to Visual Culture TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ART 113 Nassim Rossi 20 / 40
*First day attendance required*
ART 160-01 Art of the West I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am ART 113 Vanessa Rousseau 3 / 30
*Cross-listed with CLAS 160-01; first day attendance required*
ART 170-01 Art of the East I: China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Sonja Kelley 14 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 170-01; first day attendance required*
ART 234-01 Painting I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 128 Christine Willcox 7 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 135 Stanton Sears 12 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 119 Ruthann Godollei 1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 264-01 Contemporary Art MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm OLRI 370 Joanna Inglot 5 / 20
ART 270-01 Art/Religion Along Silk Road TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 402 Sonja Kelley 5 / 15
*Cross-listed with ASIA 270-01; first day attendance required*
ART 366-01 2-D Design MWF 01:10 pm-03:20 pm Gudrun Lock 4 / 15
*Course to meet on the 3d floor of the Lampert building.*
ART 367-01 3-D Design TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 135 Stanton Sears 4 / 16
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
ART 371-01 Painting II TR TBA ART 208 Christine Willcox 3 / 8
*First day attendance required*
ART 372-01 Sculpture II TR TBA ART 135 Stanton Sears 4 / 10
*First day attendance required*
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TR TBA ART 119 Ruthann Godollei 0 / 5
*First day attendance required*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II MW TBA ART 130 Gary Erickson 3 / 5
$100 Material fee required; first day attendance required*
ART 487-01 Art Hist Methodology Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 170 Joanna Inglot 3 / 6
ART 490-08 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Ruthann Godollei 1 / 2
ART 490-20 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Christine Willcox 1 / 2

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ASIA 140-01 Intro to East Asian Civ MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 14 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 140-01*
ASIA 149-01 Shanghai, Global City: Urban Culture in China from the Opium Wars until the Present TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Frederik Green 11 / 20
*Cross-listed with CHIN 149-01* This interdisciplinary course explores Shanghai's importance in China's turbulent cultural and political trajectory from the late 19th Century until the present. It attempts to illustrate how the experience of living in China's first and foremost modern metropolis has manifested itself through the city's literature, music, film, and art. We will explore a variety of artistic responses to Shanghai's urban modernity, analyze the impact of global modernism on Shanghai's urban culture, and comment on the degree to which the particular social and political context of Shanghai has shaped the arts and architecture of this East-Asian metropolis. [Was formerly Metropolis as Muse] No knowledge of China or Chinese required.
ASIA 170-01 Art of the East I: China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Sonja Kelley 14 / 25
*Cross-listed with ART 270-01; first day attendance required*
ASIA 194-01 India There and Here TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker 17 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENGL 194-01, MCST 194-02 and WGSS 194-01*
ASIA 270-01 Art/Religion Along Silk Road TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 402 Sonja Kelley 5 / 15
*Cross-listed with ART 270-01; first day attendance required*
ASIA 274-01 History of Traditional China MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 011 Yue-him Tam 15 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 274-01*
ASIA 294-02 Sanskrit MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 003 James Laine 4 / 15
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-02, CLAS 294-01, and LING 294-01*
ASIA 294-03 Language Variation in Japan MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 Satoko Suzuki 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with JAPA 294-01 and LING 294-02*
ASIA 294-04 The Double Life of Modern Japanese Literature MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Kendall Heitzman 11 / 20
ASIA 340-01 Living on the Edge: Asian American Experience TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Karin Aguilar-San Juan 21 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 340-01; first day attendance required*

ASIA 394-01 Gender, Caste, and Deity MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 009 James Laine 1 / 15
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-01 and WGSS 394-01*
ASIA 394-02 Uyghur Culture and Society TR 09:40 am-11:10 am GDAY 306 Chuen-Fung Wong 8 / 16
*Cross-listed with MUSI 394-01.* The Uyghur are Central Asian Turkic Muslims residing in northwest China. Their conflict with the Chinese state have turned into uprisings and brutal suppression in recent years, calling into question issues of sovereignty, religious freedom, and social justice. This course approaches the Uyghur problem from both ethnographic and historical perspectives. Course readings address topics such as minority nationalism, language policy, contested histories, representation, resistance, and the recent discourse of terrorism. Music and performing arts constitute an important part of the course, with examples from the classical muqam, folk singing, instrumental traditions, pop, theatrical works, and modernized performances. No prior knowledge of musical notation, Turkic languages, or Chinese is assumed.

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
BIOL 144-01 Lakes, Streams and Rivers MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Gaston Small 3 / 24
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students; cross-listed with ENVI 144-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 194-01 The Heart and Soul of Biology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 301 Lin Aanonsen 0 / 16
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
BIOL 194-02 Mind and Matter TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Lin Aanonsen -1 / 16
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-01; first day attendance required. This course will count toward the math/natural science general distribution requirement if you register for it as BIOL 194; it will count toward the fine arts distribution requirement if you register for it as ENGL 394. There are no science prerequisites for this course.* How can the flutter of a butterfly's wings in Beijing lead to a hurricane in the Pacific Ocean? How can a falling apple lead to the Universal Law of Gravitation? How can a word, a metaphor, fly us across time and space? How can a whiff of a petites madeleines cookie led Proust to his masterpiece Remembrance of Things Past? This course will look into the basic architecture of our brain, from the cell level to the nervous system, how we are wired to be who we are, biologically, artistically, and spiritually, and look out to natural and cultural structures, rivers, land, our class and school and city as a community, and how we fit in as part of ecological and social network. Through the hands-on experiments in the lab and poetry/prose workshops, we'll explore and connect the two seemingly opposite worlds: science and art, physical and spiritual, mind and matter, brain and body, pain and healing, human and nature, etc., and finally, the underlying concept of the interconnectedness of all things. Writing Project: A 10-15 page project that combines your research topic (please talk to Prof. Aanonsen), creative non-fiction/poetry (based on the self interview and the people from river communities (please talk to Prof. Wang). In other words, this project will bridge science and art, mind and matter, physical and spiritual, etc. You'll create the pathways and pattern of the inner and outer worlds. The course format will include lectures, writing workshops, readings and discussions, and occasional excursions to the lab and/or field.

BIOL 194-02 Mind and Matter TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Ping Wang -1 / 16
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-01; first day attendance required. This course will count toward the math/natural science general distribution requirement if you register for it as BIOL 194; it will count toward the fine arts distribution requirement if you register for it as ENGL 394. There are no science prerequisites for this course.* How can the flutter of a butterfly's wings in Beijing lead to a hurricane in the Pacific Ocean? How can a falling apple lead to the Universal Law of Gravitation? How can a word, a metaphor, fly us across time and space? How can a whiff of a petites madeleines cookie led Proust to his masterpiece Remembrance of Things Past? This course will look into the basic architecture of our brain, from the cell level to the nervous system, how we are wired to be who we are, biologically, artistically, and spiritually, and look out to natural and cultural structures, rivers, land, our class and school and city as a community, and how we fit in as part of ecological and social network. Through the hands-on experiments in the lab and poetry/prose workshops, we'll explore and connect the two seemingly opposite worlds: science and art, physical and spiritual, mind and matter, brain and body, pain and healing, human and nature, etc., and finally, the underlying concept of the interconnectedness of all things. Writing Project: A 10-15 page project that combines your research topic (please talk to Prof. Aanonsen), creative non-fiction/poetry (based on the self interview and the people from river communities (please talk to Prof. Wang). In other words, this project will bridge science and art, mind and matter, physical and spiritual, etc. You'll create the pathways and pattern of the inner and outer worlds. The course format will include lectures, writing workshops, readings and discussions, and occasional excursions to the lab and/or field.

BIOL 194-03 AIDS, influenza and malaria: ancient pathogens in a brave new world MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Devavani Chatterjea 0 / 16
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby 12 / 21
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Michael Anderson 6 / 21
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Michael Anderson 7 / 21
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Mary Montgomery -1 / 55
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Paul Overvoorde -1 / 48
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Sarah Boyer 9 / 44
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson 5 / 22
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson 4 / 22
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Mark Davis 3 / 44
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students; cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 3 / 22
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students; cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1; first day attendance required*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis 0 / 22
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students; cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2; first day attendance required*
BIOL 344-01 Aquatic Ecology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 284 Daniel Hornbach 1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 344-L1 Aquatic Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Daniel Hornbach 1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 345-01 Field Botany MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 0 / 13
*First day attendance required; non-Biology majors need permission of instructor*
BIOL 345-L1 Field Botany Lab R 08:00 am-11:15 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 0 / 13
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan -1 / 36
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-01*
BIOL 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan -1 / 18
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L1*
BIOL 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan 0 / 18
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L2*
BIOL 355-01 Virology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Steven Sundby 2 / 16
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 357-01 Immunology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Devavani Chatterjea -4 / 12
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 357-L1 Immunology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Devavani Chatterjea -3 / 12
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 360-01 Neuroanatomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 205 Elizabeth Jansen -4 / 12
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 360-L1 Neuroanatomy Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Elizabeth Jansen -4 / 12
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 472-01 Research in Molecular Biology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 270 Mary Montgomery 1 / 6
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 472-L1 Research in Molecular Bio Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 264 Mary Montgomery 1 / 6
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 476-01 Research in Biodiversity/Evol MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 247 Sarah Boyer 0 / 6
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 476-L1 Research Biodiversity/Evol Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 280 Sarah Boyer 0 / 6
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 489-01 Biology Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Mary Montgomery 8 / 60
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 494-01 Topics in Cancer Biology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 170 Randy Daughters -1 / 15

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHEM 111-01 General Chemistry I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Paul Fischer 1 / 35
CHEM 111-02 General Chemistry I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Susan Green -2 / 35
CHEM 111-03 General Chemistry I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata 0 / 16
*First Year Course only*
CHEM 111-04 General Chemistry I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Susan Green -4 / 35
CHEM 111-L1 General Chemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice 0 / 21
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L2 General Chemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 0 / 21
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L3 General Chemistry I Lab W 01:10 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 5 / 21
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L4 General Chemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice 3 / 21
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L5 General Chemistry I Lab M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Keith Kuwata 0 / 16
*First Year Lab only; first day attendance required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L6 General Chemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 5 / 21
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L7 General Chemistry I Lab W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 243 Amy Rice 2 / 18
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 115-01 Accelerated General Chemistry MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 205 Thomas Varberg -1 / 16
*Available to new incoming first year students only*
CHEM 115-L1 Accel General Chemistry Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 380 Thomas Varberg -1 / 16
*Available to new incoming first year students only; first day attendance required;$12 lab fee required*
CHEM 211-01 Organic Chemistry I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 205 Ronald Brisbois 16 / 40
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-02 Organic Chemistry I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye 3 / 52
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L1 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois 14 / 23
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L2 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois 10 / 23
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L3 Organic Chemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye -2 / 23
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L4 Organic Chemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye -3 / 23
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Paul Fischer 8 / 50
*1 Credit course*
CHEM 311-01 Thermodynamics and Kinetics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata 1 / 22
CHEM 311-L1 Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 378 Thomas Varberg -1 / 11
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 311-L2 Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 378 Keith Kuwata 2 / 11
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan -1 / 36
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-01*
CHEM 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan -1 / 18
*Cross-listed with BIOL 251-L1; first day attendance required*
CHEM 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan 0 / 18
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L2; first day attendance required*
CHEM 361-01 Advanced Organic Chemistry M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Ronald Brisbois 3 / 20
CHEM 411-01 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Paul Fischer 8 / 20
CHEM 411-L1 Adv Inorganic Chemistry Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 347 Paul Fischer 8 / 20
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 471-01 Molecular Spectroscopy T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI Thomas Varberg 1 / 5

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Chinese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHIN 101-01 Elementary Chinese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 111 Frederik Green 7 / 25
CHIN 101-02 Elementary Chinese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 112 Frederik Green 12 / 25
CHIN 101-L1 Elementary Chinese I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 228 Yan Wang 4 / 15
CHIN 101-L2 Elementary Chinese I Lab W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 113 Yan Wang 4 / 15
CHIN 101-L3 Elementary Chinese I Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am THEATR 204 Yan Wang 7 / 15
CHIN 149-01 Shanghai, Global City: Urban Culture in China from the Opium Wars until the Present TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Frederik Green 11 / 20
*Cross-listed with ASIA 149-01* This interdisciplinary course explores Shanghai's importance in China's turbulent cultural and political trajectory from the late 19th Century until the present. It attempts to illustrate how the experience of living in China's first and foremost modern metropolis has manifested itself through the city's literature, music, film, and art. We will explore a variety of artistic responses to Shanghai's urban modernity, analyze the impact of global modernism on Shanghai's urban culture, and comment on the degree to which the particular social and political context of Shanghai has shaped the arts and architecture of this East-Asian metropolis. [Was formerly Metropolis as Muse] No knowledge of China or Chinese required.
CHIN 203-01 Intermediate Chinese I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 112 Jin Stone 10 / 20
CHIN 203-02 Intermediate Chinese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 227 Jin Stone -3 / 15
CHIN 203-L1 Intermediate Chinese I Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Yan Wang 1 / 15
CHIN 203-L2 Intermediate Chinese I Lab R 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Yan Wang 6 / 15
CHIN 203-L3 Intermediate Chinese I Lab R 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 228 Yan Wang 12 / 15
CHIN 303-01 Advanced Chinese I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 204 Patricia Anderson 2 / 20
CHIN 303-L1 Advanced Chinese I Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 Yan Wang 4 / 12
CHIN 303-L2 Advanced Chinese I Lab W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 102 Yan Wang 2 / 12
CHIN 407-01 Fourth Year Chinese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 Jin Stone 11 / 20

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CLAS 111-01 Elementary Latin I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Jeffrey Pearson 13 / 25
CLAS 111-L1 Elementary Latin I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm MAIN 001 Jeffrey Pearson 13 / 25
CLAS 113-01 Elementary Arabic I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 009 Antoine Mefleh -2 / 17
*First day attendance required*
CLAS 113-02 Elementary Arabic I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Antoine Mefleh -4 / 17
*First day attendance required*
CLAS 115-01 Elementary Greek I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Brian Lush 16 / 25
CLAS 115-L1 Elementary Greek I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm LEOCTR 36 Brian Lush 19 / 25
CLAS 115-L2 Elementary Greek I Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 227 Brian Lush 9 / 12
CLAS 121-01 The Greek World TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Brian Lush 4 / 25
*Cross-listed wtih HIST 121-01*
CLAS 160-01 Intro to Ancient/Medieval Art MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am ART 113 Vanessa Rousseau 3 / 30
*Cross-listed with ART 160-01; first day attendance required*
CLAS 231-01 Intermediate Latin: Prose MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Beth Severy-Hoven 12 / 25
CLAS 237-01 Intermediate Hebrew I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 002 Nanette Goldman 19 / 25
CLAS 241-01 Intermediate Arabic I TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Antoine Mefleh 1 / 25
CLAS 241-L1 Intermediate Arabic I Lab W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 05 Antoine Mefleh 1 / 25
CLAS 261-01 Intermediate Greek: Prose MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Nanette Goldman 16 / 25
CLAS 294-01 Sanskrit MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 003 James Laine 4 / 15
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-02, RELI 294-02, and LING 294-01*
CLAS 301-01 Research Forum: Greco-Roman Egypt TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Jeffrey Pearson 9 / 20
This course examines the fascinating and often surprising world of Greco-Roman Egypt. Following its conquest by Alexander the Great in 332 BCE, Egypt fell under the sway of the Greek Ptolemaic dynasty and then-after the death of Cleopatra in 30 BCE-of the Romans, who ruled it as a special province of their empire until the Arab conquest. In examining this period, students will learn how to conduct research using the rich variety of surviving ancient evidence, including papyri, coins, paintings, sculptures, and architecture, both sacred and secular. Alongside primary sources, they will also be reading and engaging critically with modern discussions and controversies about a range of issues and interpretive problems. A key component of the course will be a final research project, which will allow students to apply and showcase the skills they have acquired in handling this unique subject. Topics covered during the semester will include, but not be limited to, mummy portraits; literature and literacy; women and society; the economy; political history; the city of Alexandria; science and technology; and religion, including the Jewish experience, traditional Egyptian religion, and early Christian monasticism.
CLAS 394-01 Arabic Reading and Translation W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Brett Wilson 5 / 15
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-01*
CLAS 487-01 Advanced Reading in Greek MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Brian Lush 20 / 25
CLAS 490-01 Senior Seminar MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Beth Severy-Hoven 11 / 25

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
COMP 120-01 Computing and Society: The Data and Digital Media Revolution: the Next Big Thing in the Liberal Arts MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop 2 / 16
*First Year Course only*
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Comp Sci MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 258 Susan Fox 0 / 28
COMP 123-02 Core Concepts in Comp Sci MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 256 Yu Zhang 0 / 20
*Contact Professor Susan Fox or Karen Saxe with questions*
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 256 Yu Zhang 2 / 16
*Contact Professor Susan Fox or Karen Saxe with questions*
COMP 124-L1 Object-Oriented Program Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 256 Yu Zhang 2 / 16
*Contact Professor Susan Fox or Karen Saxe with questions*
COMP 221-01 Algorithm Design/Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 205 Susan Fox 0 / 24
COMP 225-01 Software Design/Devpt TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop 9 / 20
COMP 445-01 Parallel/Dist Processing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 256 Elizabeth Shoop 6 / 15
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 245 Susan Fox 5 / 12
COMP 494-01 Multi-Agent Systems MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Yu Zhang 6 / 15
*Contact Professor Susan Fox or Karen Saxe with questions.* Prerequisites: Math 136 and Computer Science 124.

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans 0 / 25
ECON 113-02 Financial Accounting TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Jeff Evans -1 / 25
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Kristine Lamm West 4 / 25
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Kristine Lamm West -3 / 25
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Kristine Lamm West 0 / 25
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Amy Damon 3 / 25
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Liang Ding 0 / 16
*First Year Course only*
ECON 227-01 Adam Smith and Karl Marx TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Vasant Sukhatme 5 / 25
ECON 256-01 Intro to Investment Banking TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 100 Joyce Minor 2 / 20
ECON 294-01 Business Communications TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A Joyce Minor 13 / 25
ECON 325-01 China/Russia/C Eur Transition MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Gary Krueger 18 / 25
*Cross-listed with INTL 325-01*
ECON 342-01 Economics of Poverty in US TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Karine Moe 11 / 25
ECON 353-01 Managerial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans 12 / 25
ECON 361-01 Intermed Microecon Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 226 Sarah West 1 / 35
ECON 371-01 Intermed Macroecon Analysis MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Mario Solis-Garcia 6 / 25
ECON 371-02 Intermed Macroecon Analysis MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 304 Mario Solis-Garcia 7 / 25
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger 4 / 22
ECON 381-02 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger 5 / 22
ECON 381-L1 Intro to Econometrics Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger 10 / 22
ECON 381-L2 Intro to Econometrics Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger -1 / 22
ECON 426-01 Intl Economic Development TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Amy Damon 13 / 25
ECON 442-01 Labor Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Karine Moe 9 / 25
ECON 444-01 Honors Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 304 Sarah West 1 / 12

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse -3 / 25
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 280-01 Re-envisioning Educ/Democracy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with POLI 211-01 and AMST 280-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 340-01 Race/Culture/Ethnicity M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 213 Ann Hite 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 345-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 392-02 Environmental Education in Theory and Practice W 01:10 pm-04:10 pm OLRI 273 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai -1 / 10
*Cross-listed with ENVI 392-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students; 2 credit course.* This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of environmental education at the elementary school level. The purpose of this course is to partner Macalester students with teachers and students from a local elementary school in opportunities to explore interdisciplinary environmental education in a natural, outdoor setting. The course will utilize Macalester's field station, the Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area, as an outdoor classroom and curricular materials from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' Project WILD and Project Learning Tree to help elementary school teachers and students meet their Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards. A weekly seminar session, readings, reflective writing, and individual and small group projects complement the experiential aspects of the course. (2 credits - S/N Grading Only)
EDUC 392-02 Environmental Education in Theory and Practice W 01:10 pm-04:10 pm OLRI 273 Jerald Dosch -1 / 10
*Cross-listed with ENVI 392-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students; 2 credit course.* This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of environmental education at the elementary school level. The purpose of this course is to partner Macalester students with teachers and students from a local elementary school in opportunities to explore interdisciplinary environmental education in a natural, outdoor setting. The course will utilize Macalester's field station, the Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area, as an outdoor classroom and curricular materials from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' Project WILD and Project Learning Tree to help elementary school teachers and students meet their Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards. A weekly seminar session, readings, reflective writing, and individual and small group projects complement the experiential aspects of the course. (2 credits - S/N Grading Only)
EDUC 460-01 Education and Social Change MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 7 / 12
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required.*
EDUC 480-01 Urban Educ Theory/Policy M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse 7 / 12
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENGL 101-01 College Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Rebecca Graham 1 / 16
ENGL 101-02 College Writing TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 300 Rebecca Graham 2 / 16
ENGL 105-01 American Voices MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 001 Kristin Naca -2 / 20
ENGL 115-01 Shakespeare TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Theresa Krier 3 / 20
ENGL 125-01 Studies in Literature MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 001 Daylanne English 0 / 16
*First Year Course Only*
ENGL 135-01 Poetry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 228 Neil Chudgar 1 / 20
ENGL 136-01 Drama: Staging Violence TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Casey Jarrin 9 / 20
ENGL 137-01 Novel MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Robert Warde 7 / 20
*First day attendance required.* This course focuses on the novel as a generic form. If you imagine each novel you encounter as a building, you can pose certain questions about it. When was this building constructed? In what environment is it situated? What does its architectural framework look like? What ought we to make of its interior decor? What purposes does it serve? What sorts of people get to occupy it? These are the types of questions we'll be asking about the novel. The reading list includes six books. We begin with two classic nineteenth-century novels: Jane Austen's Emma (about Emma Woodhouse), and Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary (about Emma Bovary). Having studied the two Emmas, we will move on to consider four novels from the second half of the twentieth century: John Fowles' The French Lieutenant's Woman, Susan Sontag's The Volcano Lover, Giuseppe di Lampedusa's The Leopard, and Vladimir Nabokov's Pale Fire. Evaluation is based on a combination of papers and exams. There will be occasional very brief objective quizzes to measure each student's enthusiasm for the task at hand. Attendance and participation in class discussion are expected. Suitable for First Year students. Fulfills the 100-level course requirement for the major.
ENGL 137-02 Novel MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Robert Warde 5 / 20
*First day attendance required.* This course focuses on the novel as a generic form. If you imagine each novel you encounter as a building, you can pose certain questions about it. When was this building constructed? In what environment is it situated? What does its architectural framework look like? What ought we to make of its interior decor? What purposes does it serve? What sorts of people get to occupy it? These are the types of questions we'll be asking about the novel. The reading list includes six books. We begin with two classic nineteenth-century novels: Jane Austen's Emma (about Emma Woodhouse), and Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary (about Emma Bovary). Having studied the two Emmas, we will move on to consider four novels from the second half of the twentieth century: John Fowles' The French Lieutenant's Woman, Susan Sontag's The Volcano Lover, Giuseppe di Lampedusa's The Leopard, and Vladimir Nabokov's Pale Fire. Evaluation is based on a combination of papers and exams. There will be occasional very brief objective quizzes to measure each student's enthusiasm for the task at hand. Attendance and participation in class discussion are expected. Suitable for First Year students. Fulfills the 100-level course requirement for the major.
ENGL 150-01 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 011 Peter Bognanni 0 / 16
*Open to First Year or Sophomore only*
ENGL 150-02 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Jon Lurie 6 / 16
*Open to First Year or Sophomore only*
ENGL 150-03 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 003 James Cihlar 1 / 16
ENGL 150-04 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 228 James Cihlar 3 / 16
ENGL 150-05 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 James Dawes 1 / 16
ENGL 150-06 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Kristin Naca 1 / 16
*First Year Course only*
ENGL 194-01 India There and Here TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker 17 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 194-01, MCST 194-02 and WGSS 194-01*
ENGL 220-01 18th Century British Lit TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Neil Chudgar -3 / 20
ENGL 240-01 20th Century British Literature: Modern/Postmodern Apocalypse TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Casey Jarrin 4 / 20
ENGL 272-01 19th Century American Lit MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 James Dawes -1 / 20
ENGL 275-01 African Amer Lit to 1900 MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Daylanne English 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-03*
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 010 Peter Bognanni 0 / 16
ENGL 281-02 Crafts of Writing: Fiction TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 Matthew Burgess 5 / 16
This course is designed for writers with previous experience writing fiction. The class will focus on basic elements of narrative craft such as plot structures, characterization, point-of-view, description, setting, dialogue, interiority, fictional time, narration, acute tension, and defamiliarization. Students will be asked to read and discuss fiction by major writers, to critique each other's work, and to write multiple drafts of two original works of short fiction.
ENGL 294-01 Ecstasy and Apocalypse MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Daylanne English 1 / 20
In this course, we will investigate how contemporary fiction represents extreme human experiences and feelings. As we read a wide range of novels and short stories, we will ask ourselves aesthetic, and even political and ethical, questions: Must literary form stretch itself to represent an individual's or a family's joy or misery? How can an author show us and help us to understand the end of a world or of a people? Must writers invent new forms when faced with unprecedented traumas? Can apparently opposed extremes, such as joy and misery, have common sources or take common aesthetic forms? We will supplement our reading of fiction with the reading of poetry and creative nonfiction to see if other genres and literary modes work differently at, and with, the extreme. We will also view some films and listen to some music to discover if other media or art forms may offer alternative, related, or possibly even better, ways of representing ecstasy and apocalypse, joy and misery. Fiction will include such texts as: Baker's The Mezzanine, DeLillo's White Noise, Kerouac's On the Road, McCarthy's The Road, and Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale. Films may include Blade Runner and Soylent Green.
ENGL 294-02 The Contemporary American Memoir W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Robert Warde 4 / 20
*First day attendance required.* American author Lawrence Weschler argues that "every narrative voice-and especially every nonfiction narrative voice-is a fiction. And the world of writing and reading is divided into those who know this and those who don't." Think of Weschler's assertion as a stone dropped into water. This course explores the concentric ripples widening out from that stone's point of impact. Through an examination of American memoirs, mostly written over the past two decades, we will reflect on what constitutes a memoir, while discussing the form as a literary construct, an expression of self, an articulation of human experience, and a chronicle of particular cultures at particular moments in time. An approximate reading list is: Katherine Dunham, A Touch of Innocence; Frank Conroy, Stop-Time; Mary Karr, The Liars' Club; Art Spiegelman, Maus, Volumes I and II; Tobias Wolff, In Pharaoh's Army; Natalie Kusz, Road Song; Patricia Hampl, The Florist's Daughter; D. J. Waldie, Holy Land; David Sedaris, Naked, and Lynn Sharon Schwartz, Not Now, Voyager. We will also look at selected short essays from The Business of Memory, an anthology edited by Charles Baxter. Evaluation will be based on a combination of exams, analytical essays, and personal essays, depending on preference. There will be occasional very brief in-class quizzes which strive to measure each student's level of passion and commitment to the enterprise at hand. Attendance and participation in group discussion are both expected.
ENGL 294-03 Crafts of Writing: Novella MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Peter Bognanni 2 / 16
ENGL 325-01 British Poetry Between Rev M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Neil Chudgar 10 / 20
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 David Moore 5 / 20
*Cross-listed with INTL 367-01*
ENGL 394-01 Mind and Matter TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Lin Aanonsen -1 / 16
*Cross-listed with BIOL 194-02; first day attendance required. This course will count toward the math/natural science general distribution requirement if you register for it as BIOL 194; it will count toward the fine arts distribution requirement if you register for it as ENGL 394. There are no science prerequisites for this course.* How can the flutter of a butterfly's wings in Beijing lead to a hurricane in the Pacific Ocean? How can a falling apple lead to the Universal Law of Gravitation? How can a word, a metaphor, fly us across time and space? How can a whiff of a petites madeleines cookie led Proust to his masterpiece Remembrance of Things Past? This course will look into the basic architecture of our brain, from the cell level to the nervous system, how we are wired to be who we are, biologically, artistically, and spiritually, and look out to natural and cultural structures, rivers, land, our class and school and city as a community, and how we fit in as part of ecological and social network. Through the hands-on experiments in the lab and poetry/prose workshops, we'll explore and connect the two seemingly opposite worlds: science and art, physical and spiritual, mind and matter, brain and body, pain and healing, human and nature, etc., and finally, the underlying concept of the interconnectedness of all things. Writing Project: A 10-15 page project that combines your research topic (please talk to Prof. Aanonsen), creative non-fiction/poetry (based on the self interview and the people from river communities (please talk to Prof. Wang). In other words, this project will bridge science and art, mind and matter, physical and spiritual, etc. Youâ??ll create the pathways and pattern of the inner and outer worlds. The course format will include lectures, writing workshops, readings and discussions, and occasional excursions to the lab and/or field.

ENGL 394-01 Mind and Matter TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Ping Wang -1 / 16
*Cross-listed with BIOL 194-02; first day attendance required. This course will count toward the math/natural science general distribution requirement if you register for it as BIOL 194; it will count toward the fine arts distribution requirement if you register for it as ENGL 394. There are no science prerequisites for this course.* How can the flutter of a butterfly's wings in Beijing lead to a hurricane in the Pacific Ocean? How can a falling apple lead to the Universal Law of Gravitation? How can a word, a metaphor, fly us across time and space? How can a whiff of a petites madeleines cookie led Proust to his masterpiece Remembrance of Things Past? This course will look into the basic architecture of our brain, from the cell level to the nervous system, how we are wired to be who we are, biologically, artistically, and spiritually, and look out to natural and cultural structures, rivers, land, our class and school and city as a community, and how we fit in as part of ecological and social network. Through the hands-on experiments in the lab and poetry/prose workshops, we'll explore and connect the two seemingly opposite worlds: science and art, physical and spiritual, mind and matter, brain and body, pain and healing, human and nature, etc., and finally, the underlying concept of the interconnectedness of all things. Writing Project: A 10-15 page project that combines your research topic (please talk to Prof. Aanonsen), creative non-fiction/poetry (based on the self interview and the people from river communities (please talk to Prof. Wang). In other words, this project will bridge science and art, mind and matter, physical and spiritual, etc. Youâ??ll create the pathways and pattern of the inner and outer worlds. The course format will include lectures, writing workshops, readings and discussions, and occasional excursions to the lab and/or field.

ENGL 394-02 Wilde and Warhol W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 011 Casey Jarrin 1 / 20
ENGL 394-03 French Interdisc St: Contemporary Literature from Aotearoa/New Zealand, French Polynesia and Hawai'i MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 102 Andrew Billing 11 / 20
*Cross-listed with FREN 416-01 and INTL 394-02*
ENGL 400-01 Special Topics in Literary Studies: British Authors TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Theresa Krier 2 / 12
ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 217 Ping Wang 4 / 12
ENGL 494-01 Performance Theory Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen 11 / 16
*Cross-listed with THDA 489-01.*

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENVI 130-01 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 404 James Doyle 0 / 16
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with PHYS 130-01*
ENVI 130-L1 Science Renewable Energy Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Doyle 0 / 16
*First Year Lab only; cross-listed with PHYS 130-L1*
ENVI 140-01 The Earth's Climate System MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Louisa Bradtmiller 3 / 21
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students; first day attendance required*
ENVI 140-L1 The Earth's Climate System Lab R 01:10 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 187 Louisa Bradtmiller 3 / 21
* First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 144-01 Lakes, Streams and Rivers MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Gaston Small 3 / 24
*Cross-listed with BIOL 144-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 150-01 Climate and Society MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Louisa Bradtmiller 0 / 16
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
ENVI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Kathryn Pratt 0 / 25
*Cross-listed with POLI 215-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 232-01 People/Agriculture/Environ TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 William Moseley 0 / 16
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with GEOG 232-01; first day attendance required*
ENVI 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Chris Wells 1 / 25
*Cross-listed wtih HIST 234-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 237-01 Environmental Justice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Chris Wells -1 / 20
*Cross-listed with HIST 237-01 and AMST 294-04; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 270-01 Psyc of Sustainable Behavior TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning 0 / 20
*Cross-listed with PSYC 270-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 280-01 Environmental Classics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 247 Christina Manning 12 / 18
*Permission of instructor required for all students; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Mark Davis 3 / 44
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 3 / 22
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis 0 / 22
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 294-01 Cities/Sustainability/Campus TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Suzanne Savanick Hansen 6 / 16
This interdisciplinary class will make direct connections between global environmental issues, such as climate change, and life on an urban campus. With Macalester College as our case study, we will explore how the daily activities on a campus (energy use, food, transportation, water use, etc.) translate into issues such as greenhouse gas emissions, solid waste, and urban stormwater. We will examine a number of campus resource and energy flows and have the opportunity to combine theory with application through real-world projects. The results of these projects will help campus decision makers reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote sustainability on campus. No prerequisites required; all interdisciplinary perspectives are needed and welcome.
ENVI 294-02 Remote Sensing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Sanchayeeta Adhikari 5 / 15
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 294-L1 Remote Sensing Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Sanchayeeta Adhikari 4 / 14
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-L1; first day attendance required; $25 lab fee required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 340-01 US Urban Environmental Hist TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Chris Wells 4 / 15
*Cross-listed with HIST 340-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 392-01 Envi Educ Theory and Practice W 01:10 pm-04:10 pm OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch -1 / 10
*Cross-listed with EDUC 392-01; 2 credit course; permission of instructor required for ACTC students.* This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of environmental education at the elementary school level. The purpose of this course is to partner Macalester students with teachers and students from a local elementary school in opportunities to explore interdisciplinary environmental education in a natural, outdoor setting. The course will utilize Macalester's field station, the Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area, as an outdoor classroom and curricular materials from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' Project WILD and Project Learning Tree to help elementary school teachers and students meet their Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards. A weekly seminar session, readings, reflective writing, and individual and small group projects complement the experiential aspects of the course. (2 credits - S/N Grading Only)
ENVI 392-01 Envi Educ Theory and Practice W 01:10 pm-04:10 pm OLRI 284 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai -1 / 10
*Cross-listed with EDUC 392-01; 2 credit course; permission of instructor required for ACTC students.* This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of environmental education at the elementary school level. The purpose of this course is to partner Macalester students with teachers and students from a local elementary school in opportunities to explore interdisciplinary environmental education in a natural, outdoor setting. The course will utilize Macalester's field station, the Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area, as an outdoor classroom and curricular materials from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' Project WILD and Project Learning Tree to help elementary school teachers and students meet their Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards. A weekly seminar session, readings, reflective writing, and individual and small group projects complement the experiential aspects of the course. (2 credits - S/N Grading Only)
ENVI 477-01 Comp Environment/Development TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley 2 / 15
*Permission of instructor required for all students; cross-listed with GEOG 488-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required*
ENVI 489-01 Environmental Leadership Pract M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 247 Christina Manning 9 / 20
*Permission of instructor required for all students; S/D/NC grading only; concurrent registration required with ENVI 490-01; first day attendance required*
ENVI 490-01 Envi St Leadership Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 247 Christina Manning 9 / 20
*Permission of instructor required for all students; concurrent registration required with ENVI 489-01; 2 credit course; first day attendance required*
ENVI 494-01 Cities of the 21st Century TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau 5 / 15
*Permission of instructor required for all students; cross-listed with GEOG 488-02; first day attendance required*

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
FREN 101-01 French I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 111 Andrew Billing 7 / 25
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-02 French I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Andrew Billing 6 / 25
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L1 French I Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 111 Meryem Belkaid 0 / 12
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L2 French I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Meryem Belkaid 3 / 13
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L3 French I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 404 Meryem Belkaid 1 / 12
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L4 French I Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am HUM 102 Meryem Belkaid 9 / 13
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 111 Annick Fritz 15 / 25
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Caroline Richard 7 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L2 French II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 404 Meryem Belkaid 7 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L3 French II Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am THEATR 204 Caroline Richard 6 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 111 Annick Fritz 6 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 217 Caroline Richard 0 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L2 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Caroline Richard 6 / 10
FREN 194-01 Mapping Identity in Conflicting Cultures: the Local, Race, Gender, and Religion MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 6 / 16
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
FREN 203-01 French III MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 111 Joelle Vitiello 0 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-02 French III MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 112 Joelle Vitiello 3 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-03 French III MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Martine Sauret 6 / 20
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab T 09:10 am-10:10 am OLRI 247 Caroline Richard 3 / 12
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 227 Meryem Belkaid -1 / 12
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L3 French III Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 247 Caroline Richard 3 / 12
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L4 French III Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Caroline Richard -2 / 12
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L5 French III Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Caroline Richard 6 / 12
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 111 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 0 / 25
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 Martine Sauret 4 / 25
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab T 09:10 am-10:10 am THEATR 205 Meryem Belkaid 1 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Meryem Belkaid 2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Meryem Belkaid -2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 112 Meryem Belkaid -1 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L5 Text, Film and Media Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Meryem Belkaid 4 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 216 Annick Fritz 10 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Meryem Belkaid 4 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Caroline Richard 7 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 306-01 Intro to Literary Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 Juliette Rogers 10 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 412-01 Parisiennes: Women of Paris TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 402 Juliette Rogers 9 / 20
*First day attendance required.* In this course we will examine the lives of "Parisiennes" - women who have lived in or come from the city of Paris from 1730 to the present. We will begin with the powerful salonnieres of the aristocratic 18th century, intersections of sexism, racism, and colonialism, and the peasant women's march on Versailles during the French Revolution of 1789. For the 19th century, we will examine women's roles during the industrial revolution and the modernization of Paris, and the activists of the first wave of French feminism. In the first half of the 20th-century, we will study women artists and writers in Paris, including some Americans who lived in Paris during that time. For the second half of the 20th century, we will look at changing roles for Parisian women, including the second wave of French feminism, women in politics, and the changing attitudes toward women in French law and society during the 1970s and later. Readings will include Claire de Duras' Ourika (1823), Colette's La Vagabonde (1910), excerpts of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex (1949), and Christiane Rochefort's Children of Heaven (1962). We will also study recent works by francophone women writers living in Paris today, and will view several recent films that focus on the lives of Parisian women.
FREN 416-01 French Interdisc St: Contemporary Literature from Aotearoa/New Zealand, French Polynesia and Hawai'i MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 102 Andrew Billing 11 / 20
*Cross-listed as ENGL 394-03 and INTL 394-02* This course is a comparative introduction to postcolonial literature (and some film) from the Pacific region, in particular from the so-called "Polynesian Triangle." The course will examine recent works by major literary figures through a postcolonial prism, and will focus on literary representations of the political and social legacy of colonialism in these territories. For each country studied, we will begin with a brief historical review of colonization in dialogue with a text written by a colonial visitor or settler. We will then examine resistance to dominant colonialist discourse in the works of prominent contemporary "indigenous" authors, in dialogue with current political debates in each territory. Course themes will include differing conceptions of race, ethnicity and indigeneity in each country, and their relation to the histories of British, French and U.S. imperialism in the Pacific; the rise of indigenous nationalist movements, and the question as to whether political independence defined in ethnic terms remains a feasible goal in an era of globalization; questions of language in a Pacific space still dominated by its colonial division into distinct "Anglonesian" and "Franconesian" spheres; and the island as a unit of political organization as opposed to alternative pan-Oceanic conceptions of inter-relation. Authors studied will include Katherine Mansfield; Patricia Grace; Witi Ihimaera; Victor Segalen; Chantal Spitz; Celestine Vaite; Herman Melville; Lee Cataluna; Lois-Ann Yamanaka. The course will be taught in English, and English translations will be provided of all French-language materials (although students with sufficient French-language skills will read these texts in French).
FREN 494-01 Literature/Art/Cartography: 'Regards' from Antiquity to the 21st century in France MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 102 Martine Sauret 7 / 20
*First day attendance required.* Maps are one of the oldest forms of human communication, they ultimately express the many ways we attempt to understand the world and be part of it. The class will expose the different interactions between art, maps, explorers, and writers from Antiquity to present. Readings will include Ptolemee, Apian, Jean de Lery, Oronce Fine, Theodore de Bry, Rabelais, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Madame de Scudery (Carte du Tendre), Delacroix, Victor Hugo, Apollinaire, Sophie Calle, and Andree Chedid. One of the great problems in the history of cartography - and indeed, in the intellectual history of early modern Europe - is the sudden emergence and success of production of maps in Europe starting in 1600. This change, which amounted to a revolution in the European way of 'seeing' the world, no doubt emerged from a variety of causes that we will study through maps, paintings, diaries, novels, aesthetics and economical pamphlets. The role of the Renaissance and the fashionable admiration for Antiquity was exemplified by the rediscovery of Ptolemy. His Geography circulated in many editions in 1477 and spread rapidly all over Europe changing the role of the mapmaker and the viewer. Another strand leading to the development of a new map consciousness can be followed back into the artistic developments of the 15th and 16th century. Other scholars have insisted on the Scientific Revolution with its emphasis on quantification and measurement. Whatever the reasons, they seem to continue. We will explore how cartography was crucial for the development of important spatial relations and concepts such as 'territory' 'frontiers' 'nations' 'individuality' and 'alterity' and how these concepts still affect the contemporary viewer in 2011. This class will include visits to the Walker Art Center, The MIA museum and the James Ford Library (University of Minnesota). Prerequisite: French 306.

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOG 111-01 Human Geog of Global Issues MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Kathryn Pratt 7 / 35
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 111-02 Human Geog of Global Issues MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran 2 / 35
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 112-01 Introduction to Urban Studies MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06A Daniel Trudeau 1 / 30
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Holly Barcus -3 / 30
*First day attendance required; $20 lab fee required*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab W 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp 1 / 15
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp -4 / 15
GEOG 232-01 People/Agriculture/Environ TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 William Moseley 0 / 16
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 232-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 241-01 Urban Geography MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 David Lanegran 0 / 30
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 242-01 Regional Geog of US/Canada TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Laura Smith 1 / 25
*First day attendance required; $35 course fee required*
GEOG 254-01 Population 7 Billion MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 107 Holly Barcus 8 / 25
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 256-01 Medical Geography M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen 8 / 30
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 262-01 Metro Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith 5 / 25
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 294-01 Introduction to Environmental Remote Sensing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Sanchayeeta Adhikari 5 / 15
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students* This course provides an introduction to the use of remotely sensed data in environmental studies. Remote sensing is the science of acquiring data using techniques that do not require actual contact with the object or area being observed. Remote sensing technology has a multidisciplinary application and has been widely used by disciplines such a Geography, Geology, Ecology, Climatology, Urban and Regional Planning, Soil Sciences and Disaster Management. This course will briefly discuss many different uses of remotely sensed data, but the main focus will be on natural resource management and ecological application. The overall goal is for students to develop a comprehensive understanding of remote sensing principles and methods and their applications in geography and environmental science. Secondary objectives are: development of strategies for incorporating remote sensing in students' research and related areas; and introduction to some practical, hands-on skills for processing, analysis, display, and discussion of remote sensing data with applications. The class will describe and explain the broad range of remote sensing techniques, instruments, data acquisition formats, systems, and platforms that have applications in geographical and environmental sciences, including black and white, color, and color-infrared film and digital photography/imaging; multispectral sensors; thermal infrared imaging/thermography; and ground, aerial, and satellite/space platforms. The course will include lectures, labs, field trips, and group projects. Field trips for the class will be organized in and around the Twin-Cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis, MN and will involve data collection and validation techniques. Group projects will include application of the techniques learnt in the class on any real environmental issue at hand.

GEOG 294-L1 Remote Sensing Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Sanchayeeta Adhikari 4 / 14
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-L1; first day attendance required; $25 lab fee required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
GEOG 364-01 GIS: Concepts/Applications TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 108 Holly Barcus 5 / 15
*First day attendance required; $25 lab fee required*
GEOG 364-L1 GIS: Concepts/Applications Lab TBA TBA CARN 108 STAFF 5 / 15
GEOG 377-01 Qualitative Research Methods MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau 8 / 15
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 394-01 Geographies of Health Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Helen Hazen 1 / 15
*First day attendance required.* Geographic approaches to health offer a unique way to approach public health and wellness issues, focusing on the importance of space and place in health and disease. Moving beyond topics covered in the 200-level introductory "Medical Geography" course, this seminar focuses on topics at the cutting edge of health geographies. The course considers predominantly social approaches to health, owing to the recent proliferation of research in this area, including geographies of disability, power and health, feminist geographies of health, and geographies of care. The course also introduces students to some advanced spatial methods and qualitative geographic approaches, in recognition of the unique contributions that geographic techniques can make to the study of health issues. Using a primarily seminar format, students will be actively involved in both class preparation and leading the discussion-based class itself. The class emphasizes the application of theoretical approaches from health geography to topics of current concern, including those identified by students themselves. Prerequisite: GEOG 256 or permission of the instructor.

GEOG 488-01 Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley 2 / 15
*Permission of instructor required for all students; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 488-02 Cities of the 21st Century: the Political Economy of Urban Sustainability TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau 5 / 15
*Permission of instructor required for all students; cross-listed with ENVI 494-01; first day attendance required.* The purpose of this course is to understand the practices and concepts that constitute the movement for sustainable cities and investigate the ways in which urban sustainability initiatives are generated and how they vary geographically. The course adopts a political economy perspective to trace the complex interactions of institutions, politics, and economic systems that shape initiatives for more sustainable cities. Students will work in the first part of the course to enhance their understanding of core concepts and best practices that constitute the professional field of sustainable urban development and assemble a framework for analyzing the ways in which sustainability initiatives come to fruition and approach the idea of sustainability in a particular way. Equipped with these foundations, we then analyze case studies in the second part of course that focus on the meaning of sustainability, its practice internationally, and the ultimate impact of these practices on ecological balance, economic sustainability, and social equity in the urban environment. Toward these ends, students will conduct a semester-long senior capstone research project that investigates a particular urban sustainability initiative in the world by tracing the political economy of its creation and considering its impact on society, economy, and environment.

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOL 103-01 Geocinema M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 100 Colin Robins -1 / 48
GEOL 150-01 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Colin Robins 29 / 48
GEOL 150-02 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 187 Karl Wirth 0 / 11
*First Year Course only*
GEOL 150-L1 Dynamic Earth/Global Chg Lab M 07:00 pm-09:30 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 13 / 24
GEOL 150-L2 Dynamic Earth/Global Chg Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 16 / 24
GEOL 150-L3 Dynamic Earth/Global Chg Lab R 08:00 am-11:00 am OLRI 187 Karl Wirth 0 / 11
*First Year Lab only*
GEOL 194-01 Natural History of the National Parks TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 John Craddock 26 / 48
GEOL 250-01 Mineralogy MWF 08:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth 8 / 18
GEOL 260-01 Geomorphology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor -2 / 18
GEOL 260-L1 Geomorphology Lab T 08:00 am-11:00 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor -2 / 18
GEOL 394-01 Global Tectonics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock 13 / 18
GEOL 394-L1 Global Tectonics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock 13 / 18

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GERM 101-01 Elementary German I MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela 8 / 20
GERM 101-L1 Elementary German I Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 217 Jannik Kloft 0 / 5
GERM 101-L2 Elementary German I Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 404 Jannik Kloft 1 / 5
GERM 101-L3 Elementary German I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 113 Jannik Kloft 2 / 5
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 402 Brigetta Abel 8 / 20
GERM 110-L1 Accel Elementary German Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Jannik Kloft 1 / 5
GERM 110-L2 Accel Elementary German Lab T 10:10 am-11:01 am HUM 102 Jannik Kloft 2 / 5
GERM 110-L3 Accel Elementary German Lab T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm HUM 217 Jannik Kloft 0 / 5
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 214 Brigetta Abel 9 / 20
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Nina Kohlmeyer 1 / 5
GERM 203-L2 Intermediate German I Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 217 Nina Kohlmeyer 2 / 5
GERM 203-L4 Intermediate German I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm HUM 113 Nina Kohlmeyer 1 / 5
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 215 Linda Schulte-Sasse 9 / 20
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 113 Nina Kohlmeyer 7 / 7
GERM 204-L2 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 228 Nina Kohlmeyer 0 / 7
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab TBA TBA Nina Kohlmeyer 3 / 7
GERM 255-01 German Cinema Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 401 Linda Schulte-Sasse 3 / 16
*First Year Course only*
GERM 294-01 Modernity in Music and Text MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Kiarina Kordela 11 / 30
*Cross-listed with MUSI 294-01* Students will receive Fine Arts distribution credit if taken as Music and Humanities Distribution credit if taken as German Studies. This course explores intersections between intellectual history and artistic texts (music, literature, painting) in Western Europe from the birth of modernity through the twentieth century. Tracing the idea of modernity from the early seventeenth century, course units will identify central concepts and theories in readings from philosophy and other academic disciplines (musicology, literature, cultural studies) and demonstrate their embeddedness in artistic texts. Organized chronologically, the course begins with the seventeenth-century Baroque, examining the impact of secular thought and capitalism on emergent modern subjectivity. We proceed with the eighteenth century - the age of Enlightenment, reason, and tonality in music - Romanticism in the nineteenth century, and the fin-de-siecle. Finally, we turn to the twentieth century to examine the impact of late capitalist developments, such as technology and internationalism, on thought and music production. The course is appropriate for all students, from advanced to adventurous first-year students. All readings in English. No prior knowledge of German language, score reading, or music theory is required.

GERM 294-01 Modernity in Music and Text MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Mark Mazullo 11 / 30
*Cross-listed with MUSI 294-01* Students will receive Fine Arts distribution credit if taken as Music and Humanities Distribution credit if taken as German Studies. This course explores intersections between intellectual history and artistic texts (music, literature, painting) in Western Europe from the birth of modernity through the twentieth century. Tracing the idea of modernity from the early seventeenth century, course units will identify central concepts and theories in readings from philosophy and other academic disciplines (musicology, literature, cultural studies) and demonstrate their embeddedness in artistic texts. Organized chronologically, the course begins with the seventeenth-century Baroque, examining the impact of secular thought and capitalism on emergent modern subjectivity. We proceed with the eighteenth century - the age of Enlightenment, reason, and tonality in music - Romanticism in the nineteenth century, and the fin-de-siecle. Finally, we turn to the twentieth century to examine the impact of late capitalist developments, such as technology and internationalism, on thought and music production. The course is appropriate for all students, from advanced to adventurous first-year students. All readings in English. No prior knowledge of German language, score reading, or music theory is required.

GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 Rachael Huener 8 / 20
GERM 305-L1 German Through the Media Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 404 Jannik Kloft 7 / 10
GERM 305-L2 German Through the Media Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 Jannik Kloft 6 / 10
GERM 305-L3 German Through the Media Lab TBA TBA Jannik Kloft 6 / 10
GERM 307-01 Berlin and Vienna MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 216 Rachael Huener 11 / 20
*Taught in German*
GERM 327-01 Darwin/Nietzsche/Freud MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 214 David Martyn -1 / 20
*Cross-listed with PHIL 283-01; taught in English; not open to first-year students* "God is dead! God remains dead! And we have killed him!" cries the madman in Nietzsche's Gay Science; and in Totem and Taboo, Freud identifies the murder of "God-Father" as the origin of civilization. Both Nietzsche and Freud were reacting to Darwin's discovery of natural selection, which dispelled nature's divine aura and inaugurated the secular age. Writing at a moment when religious faith had lost credence as a foundation for ethics, Nietzsche and Freud were the great debunkers of the noble ideals and beliefs we all ascribe to and that give our lives meaning. But while both confronted the groundlessness of value systems, they also acknowledged and even stressed the impossibility of living without values. The course explores this tension, centering on the four domains of ethics, subjectivity, aesthetics, and theories of the social. Topics of discussion will include: the genesis of moral values; "agency" and the loss of the subject ("there is no doer behind the deed" - Nietzsche); the split self; the will to power; art, science, and religion as sublimation; the transience of culture; the death drive. Requirements: Two papers, reading journal, midterm and final exams. No prerequisites.
GERM 364-01 The Birth of Modern Germany MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 217 David Martyn 4 / 20
*Taught in German* The German 19th century was marked by the fault lines of modernity: revolutionary radicalism and stodgy conservatism, Victorian prudishness and deviant sexuality, religious piousness and an avowedly atheist scientific revolution. All of these tensions are discernable in the literary innovations of the period. The course will introduce students to the four major movements of the century: the politically radical Junges Deutschland and its reactionary twin, Biedermeier; bourgeois Realism, which helped invent the notion of the "norma" and the "deviant"; and Naturalism, which made literature into a scientific experiment and inaugurated modernism. Discussion topics include: prostitutes, madmen, and alcoholics; the desire and fear of being normal; the advent of urban life, aka sex and the city; Darwinism, science, and literature; the colonial imagination. Readings by BĂĽchner, Heine, Marx, Nietzsche, Raabe, Fontane, Hauptmann, Foucault and others. Requirements: three short papers; oral report; reading journal. Prerequisite: German 307 or 308 (may be taken concurrently), study abroad, and/or permission of the instructor.

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 402 Alicia Munoz 0 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-02 Elementary Spanish I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Maria Chavarria 1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Lucrecia Zanolli -1 / 12
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MARKIM 201 Lucrecia Zanolli 3 / 12
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 102 Lucrecia Zanolli 5 / 12
HISP 101-L4 Elementary Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 Lucrecia Zanolli 4 / 12
HISP 101-L5 Elementary Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 10 / 12
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 214 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 205 Leah Sand 1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab M 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 102 Lucrecia Zanolli 0 / 12
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Cecilia Battauz 3 / 12
HISP 102-L3 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 102 Lucrecia Zanolli 2 / 12
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Lucrecia Zanolli 5 / 12
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 12 / 12
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 110-01 Accel Beginning Spanish MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 113 Leah Sand 0 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 110-02 Accel Beginning Spanish MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 113 Leah Sand 1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 194-01 Latino/a Expressions of City MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 300 Alicia Munoz 4 / 16
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required.*
HISP 194-02 Three Masters of Hispanic Fiction: Cervantes, Galdos, and Garcia Marquez MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca 2 / 16
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 214 Rosa Rull-Montoya -4 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 214 Rosa Rull-Montoya 0 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-03 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 227 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 0 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-04 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 228 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 5 / 20
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Cecilia Battauz 0 / 15
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 110 Lucrecia Zanolli 2 / 15
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Cecilia Battauz 7 / 15
*Lab to meet in the Spanish House*
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 Cecilia Battauz -1 / 15
HISP 203-L5 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MARKIM 201 Lucrecia Zanolli 5 / 15
HISP 203-L6 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR 36 Lucrecia Zanolli -1 / 15
HISP 203-L7 Intermediate Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 14 / 15
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 402 Margaret Olsen -1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 213 Galo Gonzalez 0 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Galo Gonzalez 1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 228 Cecilia Battauz 3 / 12
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 Cecilia Battauz 2 / 12
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Cecilia Battauz 0 / 12
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 113 Cecilia Battauz 0 / 12
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Cecilia Battauz 4 / 12
*Lab to meet in the Spanish House*
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 300 Cecilia Battauz 4 / 12
HISP 204-L7 Intermediate Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 12 / 12
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 227 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 0 / 15
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 305-01 Oral and Written Expression MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Antonio Dorca -1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-02 Oral and Written Expression MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 214 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 0 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-03 Oral and Written Expression MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Antonio Dorca 1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 2 / 15
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 308-01 Intro to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 228 Galo Gonzalez 2 / 15
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01; first day attendance requ;ired*
HISP 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Maria Chavarria 8 / 15
*Cross-listed with LING 309-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 416-01 Mapping the New World MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 402 Margaret Olsen 5 / 20
*Cross-listed with LATI 416-01 and INTL 394-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 437-01 Spanish 2nd Lang Acquisition MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 227 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 5 / 20
*Cross-listed with LING 437-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 446-01 Constructions of a Female Killer TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 Alicia Munoz 10 / 20
*Cross-listed with LATI 446-01 and WGSS 446-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 494-01 Brazil MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 228 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 13 / 20
*Cross-listed with LATI 494-01; first day attendance required*

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HIST 110-01 Intro to European History MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 010 Peter Weisensel 15 / 25
HIST 114-01 History of Africa to 1800 MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Lacy Ferrell 13 / 25
HIST 121-01 The Greek World TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Brian Lush 4 / 25
*Cross-listed with CLAS 121-01*
HIST 140-01 Intro to East Asian Civ MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 14 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 140-01*
HIST 181-01 Latin America/Caribbean TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Ernesto Capello 4 / 16
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with LATI 181-01*
HIST 194-04 Religious Reform and Violence: Catholic, Protestant, and Radical TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Paula Cooey 4 / 18
*Cross-listed with RELI 194-02; first day attendance required; first year friendly course*
HIST 194-05 History on the Dark Side: Mystery, Mischief and Magic in Early America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Andrea Cremer 2 / 25
American culture is steeped in arcane belief and the occult. From the Salem witch trials to 19th century spiritualism the history of the US carries an undercurrent of the strange and inexplicable. This course mines the history of myth, magic and monsters in early American society, making links to the social, political, economic, and psychological climates that spurred interest and obsession with the "Wonders of the Invisible World." Particular attention will be given to the ways in which multiculturalism in the American past created a diverse foundation of mythologies and folklore with lasting legacies in the historical imagination.
HIST 213-01 Women in African History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 Lacy Ferrell 19 / 25
HIST 225-01 Native American History TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Scott Shoemaker 12 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 225-01*
HIST 233-01 Intro Hist US Working Class MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 Peter Rachleff 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 233-01*
HIST 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Chris Wells 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
HIST 235-01 Comparative Freedom Movements W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Peter Rachleff 3 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 310-01*
HIST 237-01 Environmental Justice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Chris Wells -1 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENVI 237-01 and AMST 294-04; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
HIST 274-01 History of Traditional China MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 011 Yue-him Tam 15 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 274-01*
HIST 281-01 The Andes: Race, Nation, Region TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Ernesto Capello 15 / 25
*Cross-listed with LATI 281-01*
HIST 294-01 Amazon: A Cultural History TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Ernesto Capello 10 / 25
*Cross-listed with LATI 294-01* This course seeks to trace cross-cultural encounters in and surrounding the Amazon rainforest. It will emphasize the interlacing of cultural representation within distinct socioeconomic models: slavery, commodity extraction, internal colonization, and environmental activism and tourism. In focusing upon the intertwined nature of the forest's natural, economic, racial, and representational history, the course hopes to evoke the similarities and distinctions between historic discourses and contemporary politics. It will be organized according to a roughly chronological engagement with three key allegories of lasting import in the history of the forest: 1. The Amazon as crosscultural arena; 2. The Amazon as untapped economic resource; 3. The Amazon as a-historical paradise (or hell). Topics to be discussed include the myth of El Dorado, the chimerical 1599 Jivaro rebellion, the great 18th-century European and Ibero-American natural histories, the 19th-century rubber boom, 20th-century internal colonialism and development, missionaries, indigenous politicians, and environmental activism.
HIST 294-02 War and Society in Modern Europe TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Peter Weisensel 5 / 25
This course will study European warfare and European armed forces in their historical context from the Thirty Years War in the seventeenth century to the "small wars" of the late twentieth century. We will talk and read about medals, battles, tanks and bayonet charges. However, we will place the conduct of war in the total context of the ideas, politics and economies of the countries that made war. The course will demonstrate the proposition that war is the product of the society that makes war. The course will focus on the Thirty Years War, the French Revolution and Napoleon, the Franco-Prussian War, the World Wars of the twentieth century, and the "small wars" of post-1945. War on film will also be a theme that runs through the course, in connection with which there will be a film series. You will be expected to watch these films, ideally on the Tuesday evenings they are shown. The films will also be on reserve in Media Services. Students will be evaluated on the basis of ten-minute quizzes, contributions to class discussions, individual class reports, two 5-7 pp. essays and a term paper. Open to all students, and to first years with the approval of the instructor.
HIST 294-05 Socialism MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 216 Peter Weisensel 13 / 25
This class will study the idea of socialism from its earliest forms in ancient times to its present through a series of original socialist texts. Two professors, one in history and the other in philosophy will teach it. We will engage thinkers like Plato, Thomas More, the early French communists, the Utopians, Marx and Engels (the heart of the course) and their Revisionists, the Fabians (an Anglo-Saxon alternative), Lenin and Stalin, the Frankfurt School, the socialist feminists, and contemporary socialist thinkers. We will study socialism critically: we will recognize its strengths but also identify its flaws when we see them. We will contextualize these socialist texts, that is, study how changes in real-world circumstances change the way socialism is written or used. Lastly, we will try to understand the gap between socialist theory as written by intellectuals and the way socialism is understood by ordinary working people. The class is discussion-based. Exams will be in class. Often students will be expected to lead class discussions. Students who have already taken History 255/Philosophy 255 may not take this course. Otherwise, the course is open to all students, first year students with the permission of the instructor.
HIST 294-07 Pirates/Missionaries/Translators: Between Atlantic Empires 1450-1800 MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Karin Velez 6 / 25
Why are cultural intermediaries often remembered as villains or traitors? This course calls the popular stereotype into question by focusing on four dramatic case studies of notorious but pivotal mediators who moved between the Spanish, Aztec, English, French, Kongolese and Portuguese empires of the early modern period. Among others, we will consider conflicting primary source accounts and current scholarship about Doña Marina, the Mexica translator for the army of Cortes; Nathaniel Courthope, an English profiteer who made a fortune peddling nutmeg between India and New York; two competing French pirates who sacked the South American port city of Cartagena de Indias twice in a single month; and Dona Beatriz, a Kongolese convert to Christianity who was burned at the stake for professing that she was possessed by the spirit of Saint Anthony. This diverse group of pirates, missionaries and translators walked a similar tightrope between worlds, both liberated and constrained by their border crossings. We will evaluate how gender, race, religion, and imperial loyalties affected the survival of this small group of interlopers, and how, in spite of this, they came to disproportionately influence events in the Atlantic world.

HIST 330-01 Historians/Crit Race Theory W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 111 Peter Rachleff 17 / 25
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; 2 credit course*
HIST 340-01 US Urban Environmental Hist TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Chris Wells 4 / 15
*Cross-listed with ENVI 340-01; first day of attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
HIST 350-01 Race, Gender, and Science MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Lynn Hudson 17 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01 and WGSS 394-03; first day attendance required*
HIST 379-01 The Study of History W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Andrea Cremer 17 / 25
*First day attendance required*
HIST 490-01 Senior Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Karin Velez 0 / 14
*First day attendance required*
HIST 490-02 Senior Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Lynn Hudson 1 / 14
*First day attendance required*

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Interdisciplinary Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTD 401-01 Urban Studies Colloquium W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 208 Daniel Trudeau 1 / 15
*1 credit; limited to Seniors who've already declared an Urban Studies concentration.*

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTL 111-01 Intro to Intl St: Lit/Global MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 David Moore 2 / 25
INTL 111-02 Intro to Intl St: Lit/Global MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 David Moore 0 / 16
*First Year Course only*
INTL 113-01 Intro to International Studies MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 5 / 25
INTL 113-02 Intro to International Studies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky -1 / 25
INTL 194-01 Mediterranean, Baltic, Black: Seas, Identities, and History TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine 10 / 25
We typically imagine the world by its landmasses. But this course explores the civilizations around three critical seas, bridging Europe, Africa, and Asia. We will probe the history, culture, economy and politics of maritime and coastal zones, and extend to inland societies. Critical focus will be devoted to concepts including identity, nation, territory, border, culture, and coexistence.

INTL 245-01 Intro to Intl Human Rights TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 James von Geldern -1 / 25
*First day attendance required*
INTL 253-01 The Islamic World MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Jenna Rice 14 / 25
INTL 265-01 Translation Cross-Cult Comm MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 228 Gunvor Hammarberg 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with RUSS 265-01*
INTL 286-01 Media/Cultural St Latin Amer W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone 0 / 25
*Cross-listed with LATI 286-01 and MCST 286-01*
INTL 294-02 Intro to Intl Public Health MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Christy Hanson -8 / 25
This course introduces students to the major health problems facing developing countries, and main approaches to remediation. Focus is at country, international-organization, and donor levels. Attention will be given to major indicators, recent trends, the role of culture, policies, and criteria. A tuberculosis case study will serve as a focus, but final projects can range beyond.

INTL 322-01 Culture and Global Capitalism MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone 0 / 20
*Cross-listed with MCST 367-01 and LATI 322-01*
INTL 325-01 China/Russia/C Eur Transition MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Gary Krueger 18 / 25
*Cross-listed with ECON 325-01*
INTL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 David Moore 5 / 20
*Cross listed with ENGL 367-01*
INTL 372-01 Post-Nationalism: Euro Union TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine 8 / 20
INTL 394-02 French Interdisc St: Contemporary Literature from Aotearoa/New Zealand, French Polynesia and Hawai'i MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 102 Andrew Billing 11 / 20
*Cross-listed with FREN 416-01 and ENGL 394-03*
INTL 416-01 Mapping the New World MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 402 Margaret Olsen 5 / 20
INTL 477-01 Comp Environment/Development TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley 2 / 15
*Permission of instructor required for all students; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and GEOG 488-01; first day attendance required*
INTL 485-01 Sr Sem: Global Hatred M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 1 / 14

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
JAPA 101-01 Elementary Japanese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 110 Kendall Heitzman 7 / 25
JAPA 101-02 Elementary Japanese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 110 Kendall Heitzman 8 / 25
JAPA 101-L1 Elementary Japanese I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Nodoka Kuwabara 1 / 15
JAPA 101-L2 Elementary Japanese I Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 113 Nodoka Kuwabara 6 / 15
JAPA 101-L3 Elementary Japanese I Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Nodoka Kuwabara 3 / 15
JAPA 203-01 Intermediate Japanese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita 4 / 20
JAPA 203-02 Intermediate Japanese I MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita 7 / 20
JAPA 203-L1 Intermediate Japanese I Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Nodoka Kuwabara 5 / 15
JAPA 203-L2 Intermediate Japanese I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 113 Nodoka Kuwabara 7 / 15
JAPA 203-L3 Intermediate Japanese I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Nodoka Kuwabara 4 / 15
JAPA 294-01 Language Variation in Japan MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 Satoko Suzuki 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-03 and LING 294-02* This course will explore diversity of language forms and communication styles in Japan. Topics related to issues of identity and relationship such as regional dialects, bilingualism/biculturalism, and (alternative) literacy will be discussed. The course also examines how the medium of communication influences creativity of language users. Students will be engaged with questions such as the following: How do people view and use regional dialects? How do bilingual individuals negotiate their identity? Do Japanese children acquire literacy by reading manga (comics)? How does the prevalence of online communication affect language use? No Japanese language ability is required.
JAPA 294-02 The Double Life of Modern Japanese Literature MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Kendall Heitzman 11 / 20
This course is an introduction to modern Japanese literature from 1868 to the present, focusing on representative short stories, novels, and manga. As befits a literature rife with foreshadowings, echoes, and secret histories, we will explore subjects in tandem, including: the twin advent of the modern Japanese language and the modern novel, the rise of the autobiographical "I-novel" and the Japanese bundan (literary establishment), modernity and ero guro nansensu ("erotic grotesque nonsense"), the war and its endless postwar, the avant-garde and postmodernism, and economic collapse and internationalization. All readings for this class will be in English translation; no knowledge of Japanese is necessary.
JAPA 305-01 Advanced Japanese I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita 1 / 20
JAPA 305-L1 Advanced Japanese I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Nodoka Kuwabara -2 / 12
JAPA 305-L2 Advanced Japanese I Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 102 Nodoka Kuwabara 7 / 12
JAPA 407-01 Fourth Year Japanese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 212 Satoko Suzuki 6 / 15

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LATI 141-01 Latin Amer Through Womens Eyes TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Paul Dosh 0 / 16
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with POLI 141-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 181-01 Latin America/Caribbean TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Ernesto Capello 4 / 16
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with HIST 181-01*
LATI 245-01 Latin American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Paul Dosh 3 / 25
*Cross-listed with POLI 245-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 255-01 Peoples/Cultures Latin America W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez 4 / 20
*Cross-listed with ANTH 255-01*
LATI 281-01 The Andes: Race, Nation, Region TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Ernesto Capello 15 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 281-01*
LATI 286-01 Media/Cultural St Latin Amer W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone 0 / 25
*Cross-listed with INTL 286-01 and MCST 286-01*
LATI 294-01 Amazon: A Cultural History TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Ernesto Capello 10 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-01*
LATI 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 2 / 15
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 322-01 Culture and Global Capitalism MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone 0 / 20
*Cross-listed with MCST 322-01 and INTL 322-01*
LATI 416-01 Mapping the New World MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 402 Margaret Olsen 5 / 20
*Cross-listed with HISP 416-01 and INTL 394-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 446-01 Constructions of a Female Killer TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 Alicia Munoz 10 / 20
*Cross-listed with HISP 446-01 and WGSS 446-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MARKIM 201 Paul Dosh 6 / 10
*First day attendance required*
LATI 494-01 Brazil MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 228 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 13 / 20
*Cross-listed with HISP 494-01; first day attendance required*

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 213 John Haiman 19 / 30
LING 104-01 The Sounds of Language TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Christina Esposito -5 / 10
LING 201-01 Historical Linguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 John Haiman 7 / 15
LING 204-01 Experimental Linguistics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 370 Christina Esposito -1 / 8
LING 206-01 Endangered/Minority Languages MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Marianne Milligan -2 / 20
LING 294-01 Sanskrit MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 003 James Laine 4 / 15
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-02, ASIA 294-02 and CLAS 294-01*
LING 294-02 Language Variation in Japan MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 Satoko Suzuki 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-03 and JAPA 294-01*
LING 300-01 Linguistic Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 102 John Haiman 2 / 10
LING 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Maria Chavarria 8 / 15
*Cross-listed with HISP 309-01; first day attendance required*
LING 364-01 Philosophy of Language TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Joy Laine -1 / 20
*Cross-listed with PHIL 364-01*
LING 437-01 Spanish 2nd Lang Acquisition MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 227 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 5 / 20
*Cross-listed with HISP 437-01; first day attendance required*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MATH 116-01 Math and Society: Math and Music TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 James Walker 1 / 28
*Cross-listed with MUSI 194-02; ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor* This course counts for fine arts distribution if taken as MUSI 194 and math/natural science if taken as MATH 116. Music has pitch, harmony, rhythm, and many other dimensions. This class explores the many ways that mathematics can be used to understand what makes music tick. For example, the graph below is an analysis of a clip from the song, Bohemian Rhapsody. It precisely identifies the pitch of the music's tones, also the overtones, vibrato, and percussion. Spectrograms are just one of several mathematical tools we use for analyzing music. The course will use free software, Audacity and Musescore, with lots of hands-on processing and playing of music. You do not have to be able to read music or play an instrument to take this course - although musicians are strongly encouraged to take the class, as their insights will be most valuable. We will be using only basic high-school mathematics. Rather than studying math for its own sake, the emphasis in this course will be on what mathematics can tell us about music.

MATH 116-02 Math and Society: Newton's Principia TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud 0 / 15
*First Year Course only*
MATH 125-01 Epidemiology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Daniel Kaplan -4 / 35
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 135-01 Applied Calculus MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan -3 / 24
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 135-02 Applied Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan -3 / 24
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 135-03 Applied Calculus MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 205 Daniel Flath 6 / 24
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 135-04 Applied Calculus TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Chad Higdon-Topaz -2 / 20
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 241 Thomas Halverson 8 / 24
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 136-02 Discrete Mathematics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Thomas Halverson 10 / 24
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 137-01 Single Variable Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud -1 / 32
*$25 course material fee; ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 137-02 Single Variable Calculus MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Karen Saxe 0 / 30
*$25 course material fee; ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 153-01 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 David Ehren 1 / 30
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 153-02 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 David Ehren 4 / 30
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 258 Vittorio Addona -1 / 28
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Alicia Johnson 5 / 28
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 155-03 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 258 Vittorio Addona -2 / 28
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Daniel Flath 10 / 20
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 236-02 Linear Algebra TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Daniel Flath 1 / 20
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Stan Wagon 13 / 32
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 Stan Wagon 10 / 32
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Stan Wagon 9 / 32
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 353-01 Modern Statistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 245 Vittorio Addona 3 / 24
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 354-01 Probability TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 Alicia Johnson -1 / 30
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 377-01 Real Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Karen Saxe 2 / 20
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 379-01 Combinatorics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Andrew Beveridge 0 / 20
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 432-01 Mathematical Modeling TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Chad Higdon-Topaz 3 / 20
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*
MATH 476-01 Topics in Modern Algebra MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 Thomas Halverson 9 / 20
*ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor*

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MCST 110-01 Texts and Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 111 John Kim 1 / 16
MCST 114-01 News Reporting and Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 214 Howard Sinker 0 / 19
MCST 126-01 Local News Media Institutions MW 01:10 pm-02:40 pm HUM 401 Michael Griffin 16 / 31
*First Year students welcomed; first day attendance required; mandatory film screening TBA*
MCST 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture MW 07:00 pm-09:30 pm HUM 401 Clay Steinman 13 / 31
*First day attendance required*
MCST 194-01 Silent Film/Race: Oscar Micheaux/D. W. Griffith TR 01:20 pm-04:20 pm HUM 401 Clay Steinman 6 / 16
*First Year Course only*
MCST 194-02 India There and Here TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker 17 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 194-01, ENGL 194-01 and WGSS 194-01*
MCST 234-01 New Media Theories/Practices TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 402 John Kim 6 / 24
MCST 256-01 Mass Culture Under Communism TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 212 James von Geldern 13 / 25
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with RUSS 256-01.*
MCST 286-01 Media/Cultural St Latin Amer W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone 0 / 25
*Cross-listed with INTL 286-01 and LATI 286-01*
MCST 322-01 Culture and Global Capitalism MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone 0 / 20
*Cross-listed with INTL 322-01 and LATI 322-01*
MCST 334-01 Cultural Studies/Media TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Leola Johnson 4 / 16
*Cross-listed with AMST 334-01; plus screening times TBA*
MCST 354-01 Blackness in the Media TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Leola Johnson 2 / 16
*Cross-listed with AMST 354-01; screening times TBA*

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MUSI 111-01 World Music MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 100 Chuen-Fung Wong 0 / 35
MUSI 113-01 Theory I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am GDAY 306 Victoria Malawey 3 / 25
*Lab required*
MUSI 113-02 Theory I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am GDAY 306 Victoria Malawey 8 / 25
*Lab required*
MUSI 113-L1 Theory I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm GDAY 306 Victoria Malawey 7 / 25
MUSI 113-L2 Theory I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm GDAY 306 Victoria Malawey 5 / 25
MUSI 194-01 Songs TR 09:40 am-11:10 am GDAY 308 Randall Bauer 0 / 16
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
MUSI 194-02 Math and Society: Math and Music TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 James Walker 1 / 28
*Cross-listed with MATH 116-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, April 29th with permission of instructor* This course counts for fine arts distribution if taken as MUSI 194 and math/natural science if taken as MATH 116. Music has pitch, harmony, rhythm, and many other dimensions. This class explores the many ways that mathematics can be used to understand what makes music tick. For example, the graph below is an analysis of a clip from the song, Bohemian Rhapsody. It precisely identifies the pitch of the music's tones, also the overtones, vibrato, and percussion. Spectrograms are just one of several mathematical tools we use for analyzing music. The course will use free software, Audacity and Musescore, with lots of hands-on processing and playing of music. You do not have to be able to read music or play an instrument to take this course - although musicians are strongly encouraged to take the class, as their insights will be most valuable. We will be using only basic high-school mathematics. Rather than studying math for its own sake, the emphasis in this course will be on what mathematics can tell us about music.

MUSI 213-01 Theory III, Form and Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm GDAY 308 Randall Bauer 11 / 25
MUSI 294-01 Modernity in Music and Text MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Kiarina Kordela 11 / 30
*Cross-listed with GERM 294-01* Students will receive Fine Arts distribution credit if taken as Music and Humanities Distribution credit if taken as German Studies. This course explores intersections between intellectual history and artistic texts (music, literature, painting) in Western Europe from the birth of modernity through the twentieth century. Tracing the idea of modernity from the early seventeenth century, course units will identify central concepts and theories in readings from philosophy and other academic disciplines (musicology, literature, cultural studies) and demonstrate their embeddedness in artistic texts. Organized chronologically, the course begins with the seventeenth-century Baroque, examining the impact of secular thought and capitalism on emergent modern subjectivity. We proceed with the eighteenth century - the age of Enlightenment, reason, and tonality in musicâ??Romanticism in the nineteenth century, and the fin-de-siecle. Finally, we turn to the twentieth century to examine the impact of late capitalist developments, such as technology and internationalism, on thought and music production. The course is appropriate for all students, from advanced to adventurous first-year students. All readings in English. No prior knowledge of German language, score reading, or music theory is required.

MUSI 294-01 Modernity in Music and Text MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Mark Mazullo 11 / 30
*Cross-listed with GERM 294-01* Students will receive Fine Arts distribution credit if taken as Music and Humanities Distribution credit if taken as German Studies. This course explores intersections between intellectual history and artistic texts (music, literature, painting) in Western Europe from the birth of modernity through the twentieth century. Tracing the idea of modernity from the early seventeenth century, course units will identify central concepts and theories in readings from philosophy and other academic disciplines (musicology, literature, cultural studies) and demonstrate their embeddedness in artistic texts. Organized chronologically, the course begins with the seventeenth-century Baroque, examining the impact of secular thought and capitalism on emergent modern subjectivity. We proceed with the eighteenth century - the age of Enlightenment, reason, and tonality in musicâ??Romanticism in the nineteenth century, and the fin-de-siecle. Finally, we turn to the twentieth century to examine the impact of late capitalist developments, such as technology and internationalism, on thought and music production. The course is appropriate for all students, from advanced to adventurous first-year students. All readings in English. No prior knowledge of German language, score reading, or music theory is required.

MUSI 342-01 Medieval to Mozart MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm GDAY 308 Mark Mazullo 7 / 25
MUSI 361-01 Composition TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm GDAY 308 Randall Bauer 5 / 12
*Permission of instructor required*
MUSI 394-01 Uyghur Culture and Society TR 09:40 am-11:10 am GDAY 306 Chuen-Fung Wong 8 / 16
*Cross-listed with ASIA 394-02.* The Uyghur are Central Asian Turkic Muslims residing in northwest China. Their conflict with the Chinese state have turned into uprisings and brutal suppression in recent years, calling into question issues of sovereignty, religious freedom, and social justice. This course approaches the Uyghur problem from both ethnographic and historical perspectives. Course readings address topics such as minority nationalism, language policy, contested histories, representation, resistance, and the recent discourse of terrorism. Music and performing arts constitute an important part of the course, with examples from the classical muqam, folk singing, instrumental traditions, pop, theatrical works, and modernized performances. No prior knowledge of musical notation, Turkic languages, or Chinese is assumed.
MUSI 72-01 African Music Ensemble TR 05:30 pm-07:00 pm Sowah Mensah 21 / 50
*Meets in Turck Lounge*
MUSI 74-01 Macalester Concert Choir MWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm Matthew Mehaffey 18 / 50
*Meets at Immanuel Lutheran Church.*

MUSI 76-01 Highland Camerata T 04:45 pm-06:15 pm Matthew Mehaffey 3 / 65
*Also meets Thursdays 6:30-7:30pm; location for all day/time meetings is Immanuel Lutheran Church.*
MUSI 80-01 Mac Jazz Band TR 07:00 pm-08:30 pm Joan Griffith 30 / 50
*Meets in GDD 015*
MUSI 82-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:30 pm Joan Griffith 19 / 50
*Meets in GDD 015*
MUSI 84-01 Pipe Band W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Michael Breidenbach 24 / 50
*Meets in Turck Lounge*
MUSI 86-01 Chamber Ensemble TBA TBA Cary Franklin 34 / 50
MUSI 88-01 Orchestra TR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm Cary Franklin 13 / 50
*Meets in Ramsey Junior High band room*
MUSI 90-01 Mac Early Music Ensemble TBA TBA Clea Galhano 43 / 50
MUSI 94-01 Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 46 / 50
MUSI 94-03 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl 48 / 50
MUSI 94-06 Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich 49 / 50
MUSI 94-07 Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder 49 / 50
MUSI 94-09 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 43 / 50
MUSI 94-10 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 43 / 50
MUSI 94-11 Voice TBA TBA William Reed 44 / 50
MUSI 94-12 African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 49 / 50
MUSI 94-15 Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 47 / 50
MUSI 94-17 Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson 48 / 50
MUSI 94-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 46 / 50
MUSI 94-23 Violin TBA TBA Stella Anderson 47 / 50
MUSI 94-24 Viola TBA TBA Stella Anderson 50 / 50
MUSI 94-26 Percussion TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 49 / 50
MUSI 94-2M Tuba TBA TBA Charles Wazanowski 48 / 50
MUSI 94-32 Recorder TBA TBA Clea Galhano 49 / 50
MUSI 94-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson 48 / 50
MUSI 94-35 Jazz Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen 49 / 50
MUSI 94-38 Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor 47 / 50
MUSI 94-41 Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball 46 / 50
MUSI 94-42 African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 49 / 50
MUSI 94-4M Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball 48 / 50
MUSI 94-5M African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 46 / 50
MUSI 94-7M Sitar TBA TBA David Whetstone 49 / 50
MUSI 94-C1 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin 49 / 50
MUSI 94-C2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa 49 / 50
MUSI 94-CC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen 45 / 50
MUSI 94-CI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 48 / 50
MUSI 94-HB Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl 49 / 50
MUSI 94-HI Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 49 / 50
MUSI 94-KD Viola TBA TBA Stella Anderson 49 / 50
MUSI 94-M Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 46 / 50
MUSI 94-M0 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen 49 / 50
MUSI 94-M2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa 47 / 50
MUSI 94-M5 Jazz Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen 49 / 50
MUSI 94-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson 49 / 50
MUSI 94-M7 Trumpet TBA TBA Lynn Erickson 48 / 50
MUSI 94-M9 Jazz Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen 48 / 50
MUSI 94-MD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo 49 / 50
MUSI 94-ME Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich 49 / 50
MUSI 94-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 46 / 50
MUSI 94-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 38 / 50
MUSI 94-MJ Voice TBA TBA William Reed 48 / 50
MUSI 94-MK Viola da Gamba TBA TBA Julie Elhard 49 / 50
MUSI 94-ML African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 49 / 50
MUSI 94-MN Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 48 / 50
MUSI 94-MO Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith 49 / 50
MUSI 94-MP Jazz Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith 49 / 50
MUSI 94-MU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 46 / 50
MUSI 94-MY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 47 / 50
MUSI 94-W2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa 49 / 50
MUSI 94-WE Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich 49 / 50
MUSI 94-WH Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 49 / 50
MUSI 94-WN Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 49 / 50
MUSI 96-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 37 / 50
MUSI 96-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl 39 / 50
MUSI 96-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Claudia Chen 48 / 50

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Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
NEUR 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Wiertelak -8 / 60
*Cross-listed with PSYC 180-01*
NEUR 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Darcy Burgund -3 / 24
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-01*
NEUR 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund -3 / 24
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-L1*
NEUR 300-01 Directed Research TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak 13 / 16
*Permission of instructor required.*
NEUR 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak 6 / 16

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHIL 115-01 Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy and Film TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 401 Geoffrey Gorham -1 / 16
*First Year Course only*
PHIL 115-02 Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy and Film TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Geoffrey Gorham -2 / 20
PHIL 115-03 Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophical Persons: Persons and Personal Iden/Philosophical Tradition TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Joy Laine 0 / 16
*First Year Course only*
PHIL 119-01 Critical Thinking MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder 6 / 20
PHIL 120-01 Introduction to Symbolic Logic MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Janet Folina 5 / 20
PHIL 120-02 Introduction to Symbolic Logic MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 Janet Folina 11 / 20
PHIL 125-01 Ethics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 305 Martin Gunderson 2 / 20
PHIL 125-02 Ethics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 William Wilcox 3 / 20
PHIL 230-01 Ancient/Medieval Philosophies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Geoffrey Gorham 6 / 20
PHIL 235-01 Existentialist Metaphysics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder 11 / 20
PHIL 251-01 Human Rights and Healthcare MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Martin Gunderson 8 / 20
PHIL 283-01 Darwin/Nietzsche/Freud MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 214 David Martyn -1 / 20
*Cross-listed with GERM 327-01; taught in English*
PHIL 360-01 Philosophy of Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Janet Folina 7 / 20
PHIL 364-01 Philosophy of Language TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Joy Laine -1 / 20
*Cross-listed with LING 364-01*
PHIL 489-01 Senior Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder 4 / 20

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PE 01-01 Swimming I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 13 / 20
PE 02-01 Tennis I TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Martin Peper 14 / 20
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson -2 / 25
PE 04-01 Karate I TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson 16 / 25
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 2 / 25
PE 06-02 Yoga I TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin 7 / 25
PE 06-03 Yoga I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 STAFF 4 / 25
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Vanessa Seljeskog 6 / 30
PE 10-01 Racquetball I MW 01:10 pm-02:10 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Matthew Parrington 4 / 6
PE 11-01 Swimming II TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 19 / 20
PE 12-01 Tennis II TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Martin Peper 8 / 10
PE 14-01 Karate II TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson 20 / 25
PE 18-01 Pilates MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard 8 / 25
PE 20-01 Weight Training MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 18 / 25
PE 21-01 Swim for Fitness TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 13 / 20
PE 26-01 Tai Chi Chuan MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Phyllis Calph 12 / 25
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Kristine Spangard 21 / 25
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance T 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson 7 / 25
PE 40-01 Self Defense MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 15 / 25
PE 61-01 Water Polo MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth 18 / 25

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 32 / 65
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 46 / 65
PHYS 112-01 Cosmos: Perspectives M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 48 / 65
*2 credit course*
PHYS 113-01 Modern Astronomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 150 John Cannon 34 / 63
PHYS 120-01 Astronomical Techniques M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 404 John Cannon 8 / 16
*2 credit course*
PHYS 130-01 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 404 James Doyle 0 / 16
First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 130-01*
PHYS 130-L1 Science Renewable Energy Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Doyle 0 / 16
*First Year Lab only; cross-listed with ENVI 130-01*
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 150 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 17 / 63
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab M 01:10 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 5 / 18
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 2 / 18
PHYS 226-L3 Principles of Physics I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 2 / 18
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 100 James Heyman 16 / 36
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 9 / 18
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 7 / 18
PHYS 331-01 Modern Physics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 James Doyle 8 / 24
PHYS 331-L1 Modern Physics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Doyle 2 / 12
PHYS 331-L2 Modern Physics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Doyle 6 / 12
PHYS 394-01 Astrophysical Origins of Life MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 John Cannon 11 / 24
*Permission of instructor required.* This course will discuss the exploding field of astrobiology. Specific discussion will be given to the properties of astrophysical bodies that are conducive to harboring life, using the Earth as a Rosetta Stone. We will discuss the prevalence of highly evolved molecular species in the interstellar medium, the properties of the quickly growing extrasolar planet population, and the observational techniques that are used and envisioned to infer the life-bearing signatures of such environments. This course is ideal for all students interested in one of the most rapidly-growing fields of science today.

Registration requires the consent of the instructor.

PHYS 443-01 Electromagnetic Theory I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm THEATR 205 James Heyman 2 / 24
PHYS 481-01 Quantum Mechanics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 9 / 24

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
POLI 100-01 US Politics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Michael Zis 4 / 25
POLI 120-01 International Politics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 101 Wendy Weber 0 / 16
*First Year Course only*
POLI 120-02 International Politics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 David Blaney 1 / 25
POLI 140-01 Comparative Politics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler 18 / 25
POLI 141-01 Latin Amer Through Womens Eyes TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Paul Dosh 0 / 16
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with LATI 141-01; first day attendance required*
POLI 160-01 Foundations-Political Theory MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler 11 / 25
POLI 204-01 Urban Politics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 Michael Zis 15 / 25
POLI 205-01 Politics and Policymaking MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 208 Michael Zis 3 / 25
In historical terms, national health reform is considered to be President Obama's most significant legislative achievement to date. While most agree on its historic significance, there's wide ranging disagreement over how the law will impact the costs, quality, and accessibility of health care in America. This course is divided into three main parts. First, we study the basics of America's health care system, looking at how it's changed over time and how it compares to other countries. Second, we explore the politics of the law's passage and the potential for repeal. Third, we discuss and debate whether the 2010 Affordable Care Act will make health care more affordable and rein in health care costs (and at what price). We do this through a mix of lectures and guest speakers, class discussions and class debates, and, finally, a class-led legislative simulation of a 2011 congressional hearing over its future.
POLI 211-01 Re-envisioning Educ/Democracy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with EDUC 280-01 and AMST 280-01; first day attendance required*
POLI 214-01 Cyber Politics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Adrienne Christiansen 13 / 25
POLI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Kathryn Pratt 0 / 25
*Cross-listed ENVI 215-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
POLI 220-01 Foreign Policy MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Andrew Latham -6 / 25
POLI 221-01 Global Governance TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 Wendy Weber 1 / 25
POLI 245-01 Latin American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Paul Dosh 3 / 25
*Cross-listed with LATI 245-01; first day attendance required*
POLI 261-01 Feminist Political Theory TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 4 / 25
*Cross-listed with WGSS 261-01*
POLI 269-01 Empirical Research Methods MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Julie Dolan 1 / 25
*First day attendance required*
POLI 272-01 Researching Political Comm TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 20 / 25
POLI 301-01 Law, Economy, and Identity TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt 3 / 20
POLI 321-01 International Security MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 208 Andrew Latham 5 / 20
POLI 363-01 Paradigms Global Citizenship TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 David Blaney 13 / 20
POLI 400-01 Senior Research Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt 1 / 12
POLI 400-02 Senior Research Seminar MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 304 David Blaney 0 / 12
POLI 400-03 Senior Research Seminar MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MARKIM 201 Paul Dosh 5 / 10
*First day attendance required*
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium W 07:00 pm-09:00 pm CARN 204 Julie Dolan 12 / 16
*2 Credit course; S/NC grading only*

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Daniel Graham 1 / 35
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Megan Shroat 5 / 35
PSYC 100-L1 Intro to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 2 / 20
PSYC 100-L2 Intro to Psychology Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 0 / 20
PSYC 100-L3 Intro to Psychology Lab R 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 5 / 20
PSYC 100-L4 Intro to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 9 / 20
PSYC 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Wiertelak -8 / 60
*Cross-listed with NEUR 180-01*
PSYC 194-01 Psychology of Immigration and Acculturation TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Sun No 1 / 16
*First Year Course only*
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 352 Rachel Lucas-Thompson -4 / 24
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Rachel Lucas-Thompson -5 / 12
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Rachel Lucas-Thompson 1 / 12
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Sun No 2 / 24
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse -3 / 25
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; first day attendance required*
PSYC 242-01 Cognitive Psychology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Brooke Lea 0 / 24
PSYC 242-L1 Cognitive Psychology Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Brooke Lea 0 / 24
PSYC 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Darcy Burgund -3 / 24
*Cross-listed with NEUR 244-01*
PSYC 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund -3 / 24
*Cross-listed with NEUR 244-L1*
PSYC 250-01 Developmental Psychology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Rachel Lucas-Thompson 0 / 30
PSYC 256-01 Personality Psychology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Jason Weaver 2 / 30
PSYC 264-01 The Psychology of Gender TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Joan Ostrove 3 / 30
*Cross-listed with WGSS-264-01*
PSYC 270-01 Psyc of Sustainable Behavior TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning 0 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENVI 270-01; first day attendance required*
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Joan Ostrove 12 / 30
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Darcy Burgund 12 / 30
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Rachel Lucas-Thompson 12 / 30
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Sun No 12 / 30
PSYC 382-01 Hormones and Behavior MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 401 Eric Wiertelak -6 / 18
PSYC 394-01 Psychology and the Law TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 370 Jillian Peterson -1 / 15
This course will explore how psychology is applied within the criminal justice system, with an emphasis on social and clinical psychology. Topics for discussion will include the relationship between mental illness and violence, interrogation and confessions, eyewitness testimony,competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, violence risk assessment, jury decision making, sentencing and the death penalty, juvenile justice, and treatment and intervention strategies within the criminal justice system. There will be a student-led discussion component to this course. Prerequisites: Psychology 100 and Psychology 201 (or Mathematics 153, 154, or 155). Background in social and/or clinical psychology (e.g., Psychology 252; Psychology 254) is helpful.

PSYC 394-02 Acting, Feeling, Thinking: Integrative Modalities TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 Alvina Kittur -1 / 15
This seminar examines the relationship between acting, feeling, and thinking. In a previous era of cognitive psychology, interactions between the body and the mind were de-emphasized in favor of an abstract symbolization of mental processes. Researchers are now beginning to revisit the integration of these different aspects of being. Through discussion, reflection, and research, we will investigate the implications of these integrative modalities. Possible topics include: the link between positive thinking and physical health (psychoneuroimmunology), cutting edge research in embodied cognition, and the impact of meditation on the brain. There will be a student-led discussion component to this course. Prerequisites: Psychology 100 and Psychology 201 (or Mathematics 153, 154, or 155).
PSYC 488-01 Lives in Context TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 370 Joan Ostrove 4 / 16
*Cross-listed with WGSS 405-01*

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RELI 100-01 Introduction to Islam TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Brett Wilson 0 / 20
RELI 100-02 Introduction to Islam TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Brett Wilson -1 / 20
RELI 111-01 Introducing Buddhism: Mind, Morals, and Meditation MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Erik Davis 2 / 16
*First Year Course only.*
RELI 111-02 Introducing Buddhism: Mind, Morals, and Meditation MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Erik Davis -2 / 15
This course introduces students to the tradition of Theravada Buddhism, the type of Buddhism found most commonly in South and Southeast Asia. We focus primarily on the core Buddhist concepts of Samsara, Karma, and Anatman - the last being the Buddhist denial of a persistent soul or self. We also focus on the core Buddhist ascetic practice of meditation. A number of classes are given over to meditation labs, guided by the instructor. The goals of the class, beyond the introduction of the Buddhist tradition and its central components, is to encourage student reflection, self-awareness, and the crucially important skill of meta-cognition (thinking about thinking), and to introduce the field of religious studies as a scholarly pursuit.
RELI 120-01 Hebrew Bible TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Katherine Brink 4 / 15
Where did the Hebrew Bible (aka Old Testament) come from? In what way do the worldviews and traditions expressed by its ancient authors compare with those of the superpowers of their day, including the Canaanites (from Ugarit), the Hittites, the Egyptians, and the Mesopotamians? How did the text of the Hebrew Bible come to represent a millennium of beliefs, desires, and customs from ancient Israel and Judah, many of which still reverberate in our society today? Integrating a cross-disciplinary spectrum of religion, history, and literature, students in this class will interpret Hebrew Bible texts in English, using methods employed by biblical scholars, asking questions about language and meaning, literary effects, and the Hebrew Bible's social and historical contexts. Since we will engage in secular study only, analytically examining all relevant religious texts and traditions, students are required to have an open mind and willingness to read and discuss the Bible in a new way.
RELI 194-01 After the Holocaust MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 402 Barry Cytron -3 / 20
The systematic murder of millions during World War II has challenged most every relationship-between neighbors, faiths, peoples. The language of genocide and ghetto has come to inform how one speaks of faith, morality, even our common humanity. After an introductory study of the events, we turn to a study of the Holocaust's impact on religious life, and on interreligious and intergroup relations. We will examine questions of collective memory and the search for justice, and the problems raised to personal and communal life by the call to forgiveness and the command to "never forget." Class meets Monday and Wednesdays during the week, and Sunday evenings for special events, guest speakers and films.
RELI 194-02 Religious Reform and Violence: Catholic, Protestant, and Radical TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Paula Cooey 4 / 18
*Cross-listed with HIST 194-04; first day attendance required; first-year friendly course* Why do people often equate religion with belief? Where does the understanding of secular as religiously neutral come from? Why do people think of national identity as a birthright and religious identity as a personal choice? Why do scholars often privilege sacred text and belief over religious practice, art, architecture, and music? Many modern assumptions about what counts as religion, secularism, and knowledge begin to take their present shape during the 16th and early 17th centuries in Europe. Throughout this period Protestant and Radical groups formed and reformed their Christian identities in relation to each other and over against the Catholic Church in the midst of great economic, political, and social upheaval. The Catholic Church underwent its own internal reformation as well. These processes of formation and reformation produced large numbers of Jewish, Muslim, and so-called heretic Christian refugees fleeing across Europe, often to the Ottoman Empire on the east or to newly discovered territories across the Atlantic. The Ottoman Empire absorbed its refugees with relative lack of conflict, though with an eye to expanding its own territories into Europe. Meanwhile within Europe religious wars raged well into the 17th century, as emerging nation-states enslaved Africans and devastated indigenous populations across the Atlantic. How did religious thought and practice figure into this drama? What role did apocalypticism play in religious reform and revolution? How did Christian discourse on witchcraft legitimate the slaughter of European women and men, along with the colonized of both genders, to reinforce elite European male privilege? How did the concept human shape and get reshaped by theological debate over the status of indigenous people and African slaves in what became the Americas? To address these questions, this course will focus on Catholic, Protestant, and Radical reform movements in relation to the violence that attended them. We will approach this subject by drawing on primary religious texts in translation, secondary historical sources, art, architecture, music, and film.
RELI 235-01 Theory/Method in Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Paula Cooey 5 / 20
*First day attendance required*
RELI 294-01 Arabic Reading and Translation W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Brett Wilson 5 / 15
*Cross-listed with CLAS 394-01*
RELI 294-02 Sanskrit MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 003 James Laine 4 / 15
*Cross-listed wth CLAS 294-01, ASIA 294-02, and LING 294-01* Like Latin and Greek in Europe, Sanskrit is a highly inflected language of scholarship and revered as the perfect medium for discourse on everything from science and sex to philosophy and religion. It flourished in its classical form after the age of the Buddha (5th century BC) and served as a scholarly lingua franca in India until the Islamic period. This course serves as an introduction to the grammar and script of Sanskrit, and we will advance to a point of reading simplified texts from the classical epic Ramayana. Students will be expected to attend class regularly and spend at least ten hours a week outside class studying the grammar and vocabulary. Without this sort of effort, no progress is possible in such a complex language. In addition to the rigorous study of the language, we will consider both the role of the language in classical Indian culture and religion, and some texts from the Ramayana, looking at both English translations and Sanskrit originals.
RELI 311-01 Ritual TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Erik Davis 5 / 15
RELI 394-01 Gender, Caste, and Deity MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 009 James Laine 1 / 15
*Cross-listed with ASIA 394-01 and WGSS 394-01*

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RUSS 101-01 Elementary Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 215 Julia Chadaga 8 / 25
RUSS 101-L1 Elementary Russian I Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 226 Elizaveta Kundas 6 / 13
RUSS 101-L2 Elementary Russian I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Elizaveta Kundas 2 / 12
RUSS 151-01 The Material World MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 215 Julia Chadaga 0 / 16
*First Year Course only*
RUSS 203-01 Intermediate Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 217 Gunvor Hammarberg 12 / 25
RUSS 203-L1 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 226 Elizaveta Kundas 9 / 13
RUSS 203-L2 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Elizaveta Kundas 4 / 12
RUSS 251-01 19th C Russian Lit Translation MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 212 Gunvor Hammarberg 20 / 25
RUSS 256-01 Mass Culture Under Communism TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 212 James von Geldern 13 / 25
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with MCST 256-01.*
RUSS 265-01 Translation Cross-Cult Comm MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 228 Gunvor Hammarberg 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with INTL 265-01*

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Khaldoun Samman -5 / 16
SOCI 190-01 Criminal Behavior/Social Control MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Erik Larson 0 / 16
*First Year Course only*
SOCI 194-01 Public Schooling in America TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Terry Boychuk -1 / 15
This course offers a broad historical overview of key political controversies surrounding public schooling, including seminal conflicts over public funding of religious schools and racially segregated schools in the nineteenth century, progressive era debates about the relationship between public schools and colleges and universities in the early twentieth, the ordeal of school integration in the late twentieth century, and lastly, contemporary disputes over school choice and no-child-left behind.
SOCI 220-01 Sociology of Race/Ethnicity MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Lesley Kandaras 5 / 20
SOCI 270-01 Interpretive Social Research TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Deborah Smith -1 / 16
*Must be a declared Sociology Major, or obtain permission of instructor*
SOCI 290-01 Islam and the West W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06A Khaldoun Samman -2 / 16
SOCI 294-01 Church and State in America TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Terry Boychuk 7 / 15
This course examines the historical origins and transformation of religious pluralism in the US, its complex relationship with democratic politics and governance, and of long-standing controversies over of government funding of religiously affiliated schools and charities.
SOCI 370-01 Political Sociology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 105 Erik Larson 5 / 20
SOCI 480-01 Senior Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Erik Larson 4 / 20
SOCI 480-01 Senior Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Deborah Smith 4 / 20

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Theater and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
THDA 105-01 Theater in the Twin Cities W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen 1 / 16
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
THDA 110-01 Intro to Theatre Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Lara Nielsen 10 / 24
THDA 115-01 Cultures of Dance MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 205 Wynn Fricke 0 / 20
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory and Performance I MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 3 Cheryl Brinkley 6 / 16
*First day attendance required*
THDA 125-01 Technical Theater MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett 5 / 16
THDA 125-01 Technical Theater MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser 5 / 16
THDA 125-L1 Technical Theater Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett -1 / 8
THDA 125-L1 Technical Theater Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Daniel Keyser -1 / 8
THDA 125-L2 Technical Theater Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett 6 / 8
THDA 125-L2 Technical Theater Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Daniel Keyser 6 / 8
THDA 340-01 Mask Improvisation MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Robert Rosen 5 / 12
*Permission of Department Chair, Dan Keyser, required; $15 material fee will be charged*
THDA 394-01 Theatre Methods: Shakespeare to Viewpoints MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 205 Beth Cleary 5 / 16
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
THDA 394-L1 Theatre Methods: Shakespeare to Viewpoints Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR STUDIO Beth Cleary 5 / 16
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
THDA 489-01 Performance Theory Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen 11 / 16
*Cross-listed with ENGL 494-01.*
THDA 21-01 African Dance WF 10:10 am-11:40 am THEATR 6 Patricia Brown 1 / 20
THDA 41-01 Modern Dance I TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 4 / 15
THDA 43-01 Modern Dance III MW 03:50 pm-05:20 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 10 / 15
THDA 51-01 Ballet I MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Stanchfield 7 / 20
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Sharon Varosh 6 / 15

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
WGSS 102-01 Gender and Sport TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Corie Hammers 9 / 16
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
WGSS 105-01 Transnational Perspectives TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker 8 / 25
*First day attendance required*
WGSS 194-01 India There and Here TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker 17 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 194-01, ENGL 194-01 and MCST 194-02* India is still described as "exotic" in current cultural vocabularies, by Indians and others. We will investigate the material realities on which these cultural vocabularies rest, through the mirrors held up by Indian women writers who are this nation-state's citizens, expatriates, and diasporans. These writers' historico-political contexts, tussles with language, and other self-imagings, create a compelling force in developing the idea of "India" and its relationships to East Africa, North America and Western Europe.
WGSS 200-01 Feminist/Queer Theories M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Corie Hammers -2 / 20
*First day attendance required*
WGSS 261-01 Feminist Political Theory TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 4 / 25
*Cross-listed with POLI 261-01*
WGSS 264-01 Psychology of Gender TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Joan Ostrove 3 / 30
*Cross-listed with PSYC 264-01*
WGSS 294-01 Sociology of Gender TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Corie Hammers 14 / 25
*First day attendance required*
WGSS 394-01 Gender, Caste, and Deity MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 009 James Laine 1 / 15
*Cross-listed with ASIA 394-01 and RELI 394-01*
WGSS 394-02 Gender and Development in Africa MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Sonia Patten 1 / 20
*Cross-listed wtih ANTH 394-02*
WGSS 394-03 Race, Gender, and Science MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Lynn Hudson 17 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01 and HIST 350-01; first day attendance required*
WGSS 394-04 Sex, Family, Kinship TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06B Diana Dean 9 / 20
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-03*
WGSS 405-01 Lives in Context TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 370 Joan Ostrove 4 / 16
*Cross-listed with PSYC 488-01*
WGSS 446-01 Female Killer TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 Alicia Munoz 10 / 20
*Cross-listed with HISP 446-01 and LATI 446-01; first day attendance required.*

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