Fall 2012 Class Schedule

Fall 2012 Class Schedule - updated March 25, 2013 at 12:56 pm

This is a snapshot of the class schedule and enrollment information, updated only once daily. For the most current information on class schedule and enrollment, Macalester students, faculty and staff should log in to 1600grand and use the "Search Class Schedule" link.

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Chinese
Classics
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Neuroscience Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theatre and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
AMST 103-01 The Problems of Race in US Social Thought and Policy MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 216 Karin Aguilar-San Juan 0 / 17
*First Year Course only* In this discussion-based and residential course, we will explore the hypothesis that 21st century racism has morphed from simple and evil formulations of bigotry and exploitation into more nefarious and decentralized systems of cultural camouflage, spatial demarcation, physical surveillance, and ideological control. Our interdisciplinary and integrative approach will employ multiple methods of inquiry and expression, including: self-reflective essays and maps; a scavenger hunt in the Twin Cities; library research; and deep, critical analysis of arguments about race/ethnicity/assimilation/multiculturalism. We will hone writing and speaking skills through highly structured assignments paired with open-ended conversations in order to discover the questions that truly matter to us. The semester will culminate with a short (8-10 pages) college-level paper directed toward themes in the 2009 Oscar-award winning film “Precious.”
AMST 194-01 Culture and Theory of Women of Color Feminisms M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 213 Juliana Pegues 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with WGSS 194-03* This course examines women of color feminisms as historical, intellectual, cultural, and political formations in the U.S. from the 1960s to the present. Course texts will highlight creative modes of theorizing and will include original writing from women of color feminist movements (personal narratives, poetry, and analytic essays) alongside contemporary documents from queer of color scholarship and queer people of color movement organizing (social theory, spoken word, film/multimedia, organizational statements, political analyses).
AMST 194-02 American Violence to 1800: Warfare From The Age of Contact To The Revolutionary War TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 204 Eric Otremba 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 135-01*
AMST 200-01 Critical Methods for American Studies Research TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 SooJin Pate 11 / 25
AMST 202-01 Engaging the Public: Writing and Publishing in American Studies T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Teresa Fishel 19 / 25
*2 credit course*
AMST 202-01 Engaging the Public: Writing and Publishing in American Studies T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Duchess Harris 19 / 25
*2 credit course*
AMST 232-01 Immigration and Ethnicity in US History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 232-01* Immigration continues to be a controversial issue in the second decade of the 21st century, as does the changing landscape of race and ethnicity, on the one hand, and racism and xenophobia, on the other. This course, which is open to students with no experience in college-level history -- asks what we can learn from studying the ways that the U.S. government, economy, and culture received immigrants in the 19th and 20th centuries, and the ways those immigrants and their children responded to the challenges that they faced. These experiences provided templates, patterns, and structures which shape the present. The United States is in the midst of its third substantial wave of immigration, with more than one million new arrivals each year since 1990. We will employ critical historical studies, oral histories, memoirs, novels, drama, music, and graphic texts in our investigations, and we will learn how historians ask questions, seek and gather information, and provide analyses. We will explore how historians do not merely study the past but are engaged in constructing bridges and conversations between the past and the present.

AMST 256-01 Transatlantic Slave Trade TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Eric Otremba 16 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 256-01*
AMST 262-01 Asian American Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Sun No 15 / 24
*Cross-listed with PSYC 262-01*
AMST 280-01 Re-envisioning Education and Democracy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai -2 / 25
*Cross-listed with EDUC 280-01 and POLI 211-01*
AMST 294-01 Placing Race and Seeing Social Inequality TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 David Lanegran -5 / 25
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-02; first day attendance required* Many decades after the U.S. civil rights movement—and despite the fact of a black President in the White House—place, location, and separation still influence community activity and individual life chances throughout the nation. This new team-taught course will bring together several ways of understanding and analyzing place, race, and other social inequalities. Prof. Aguilar-San Juan will contribute a race-cognizant perspective drawn from urban sociology and Asian American Studies. Prof. Lanegran will contribute the place-oriented perspective of a geographer with well-established connections to the Twin Cities, and to the Minnesotan landscape.
AMST 294-01 Placing Race and Seeing Social Inequality TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 Karin Aguilar-San Juan -5 / 25
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-02; first day attendance required* Many decades after the U.S. civil rights movement—and despite the fact of a black President in the White House—place, location, and separation still influence community activity and individual life chances throughout the nation. This new team-taught course will bring together several ways of understanding and analyzing place, race, and other social inequalities. Prof. Aguilar-San Juan will contribute a race-cognizant perspective drawn from urban sociology and Asian American Studies. Prof. Lanegran will contribute the place-oriented perspective of a geographer with well-established connections to the Twin Cities, and to the Minnesotan landscape.
AMST 294-03 Gender, Race, and Health in 20th Century US TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Catherine Batza 6 / 25
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-03 and HIST 294-03*
AMST 294-04 Hip Hop Performance MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm THEATR STUDIO Harry Waters 1 / 30
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-04*
AMST 300-01 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 111 Duchess Harris 16 / 25
*First day attendance required*
AMST 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Galo Gonzalez 5 / 15
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 330-01 Mellon Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 113 Duchess Harris 0 / 10
*2 credits; permission of instructor required*
AMST 334-01 Cultural Studies and the Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am ARTCOM 202 Allyson Shaffer 9 / 16
*Cross-listed with MCST 334-01; screening times TBA*
AMST 345-01 Race, Culture, and Ethnicity in Education M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Ann Hite -3 / 25
*Cross-listed with EDUC 240-01*
AMST 370-01 Understanding and Confronting Racism TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 102 Kendrick Brown -1 / 16
*Cross-listed with PSYC 370-01; ACTC students may register for course April 25*
AMST 380-01 Topics in Twentieth Century African American Literature: Harlem Renaissance TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Daylanne English 2 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENGL 380-01*
AMST 394-01 Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in American Art MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot 7 / 20
*Cross-listed with ART 375-01*
AMST 394-02 Ethics of Civic Engagement TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 0 / 15
*Cross-listed with HISP 394-01 and EDUC 394-01 ; first day attendance required; course taught in Spanish*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ANTH 101-01 General Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Scott Legge 3 / 35
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology: Introduction to Asian Societies and Cultures MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Arjun Guneratne 12 / 40
*Cross-listed with ASIA 111-01* The culture concept is the most important item in anthropology's theoretical tool kit; it is the organizing concept underlying the discipline's holistic approach, which seeks to understand the human condition in the broadest possible context. As a discipline, anthropology seeks to document and explain the innumerable ways in which it is possible to be human, and by to understanding other cultural logics to hold up a critical mirror to our own assumptions, beliefs and ways of acting. This course introduces students to Cultural Anthropology through a comparative study of Asian societies and cultures, with a particular emphasis on the three main regions of Asia that are currently taught at Macalester: India, China, and Japan. It also serves to introduce students to the study of Asia by grounding them in the essential features of Asian societies, cultures, and religions.
ANTH 111-02 Cultural Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Arjun Guneratne 0 / 17
*First Year Course only* Anthropology is the study of human beings in all their variety through space and time, both as biological organisms and as a species with culture—which anthropologists define as the ability to symbolize and attribute meaning to the world and our experience of it. Human beings are distinguished from other animals in that we are the only organism that adapts to the world around us through cultural rather than biological means. This course is an introduction to the concept of culture and the way anthropologists use it to study humanity. Because I believe the best way to learn anthropology is by doing it, students will carry out a substantial fieldwork project during the semester. The culture concept underpins the discipline’s integrated approach, which seeks to understand human behavior in the total social and cultural context that produces it. The essential insight of cultural anthropology is that different human societies conceptualize reality and give meaning to it in different ways, and as a consequence, reproduce themselves as human beings in ways that vary; unlike other animals, we live in worlds of Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Ramadan, Christmas, Justin Bieber and TGIF, none of which occur in nature. Cultural anthropology seeks to document and explain the innumerable ways in which we are human, and by understanding the logic of other cultures, to hold up a critical mirror to our own assumptions, beliefs and ways of acting. Anthropology makes the strange familiar and the familiar strange; in the words of Rudyard Kipling, "You may end by (think of it!) looking on We/ As only a sort of They!"
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 4 / 16
*First day attendance required; limited to declared and intended Anthropology majors*
ANTH 241-01 Anthropology of Death and Dying W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Ron Barrett 0 / 14
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
ANTH 243-01 Psychological Anthropology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez -2 / 20
*Cross-listed with PSYC 243-01*
ANTH 248-01 Magic, Witchcraft and Religions MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 05 Diana Dean 11 / 20
ANTH 294-01 Indigenous Peoples of the Arctic MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06B Scott Legge 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
This course provides an introduction to the human settlement of the circumpolar region of the world. The Arctic represents one of the most extreme environments to which humans have adapted. These adaptations include both biological and cultural changes required to settle and flourish in this formidable setting. The course will look at some of the cultural practices that appear to be ubiquitous throughout the Arctic, as well as those specializations that have developed as a result of some of the more localized environmental pressures. Finally, it will explore the consequences of rapid global climate change as well as modernization on these unique cultures to get a sense of what the future might hold for the indigenous peoples of the Arctic. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 111.
ANTH 360-01 Anthropology of Tourism MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Sonia Patten 10 / 20
ANTH 381-01 Emerging Infectious Diseases TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Ron Barrett 1 / 20
ANTH 394-01 Gender, Power and Sexualities in Africa MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-01* This course uses gender, one of the most dynamic areas of Africanist research today, as a lens to examine struggles over power and human rights in Africa. It engages some of the most recent discussions on sexualities by examining the body as a site of political, legal, and social contestation. In particular, we will interrogate the local and global dimensions of the recent and highly controversial anti-homosexuality legislation in Uganda and the implications for discussions of human rights and sexualities throughout the continent. Through reading ethnographic and life history texts and researching their own projects, students will grapple with themes such as "the status" of women in hierarchical vs. complementary conceptualizations of social power, the making of men, the meaning of "tradition" in historical perspective, the relationship between kinship, politics, and civil order in Africa, the challenges of forming coalitions around gender-based human rights issues, the intersection of gender and patterns of production and reproduction, and the ways in which conflict and post-conflict settings bring intersections of gender, power, sexualities, and human rights to the fore.
ANTH 394-02 Darwin and Evolutionary Thought MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge 13 / 20
Through this course students will examine the influence of Charles Darwin on both the discipline of Anthropology and general scientific thought in the 20th century. It will begin with an exploration of the emergence of modern evolutionary biology, its role in society, and how it is essential to the understanding of biological anthropology. We will consider some of the work of Darwin's predecessors, who laid the intellectual and scientific foundations that Darwin built upon. Students will also read and discuss some of the biggest debates surrounding the theory of Natural Selection, both past and present. Finally, we will look at the future of evolutionary theory in light of recent developments in molecular biology and the fossil record.
ANTH 487-01 Theory in Anthropology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez 1 / 20

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ART 130-01 Drawing I MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 123 Megan Vossler 4 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 130-02 Drawing I MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm ART 123 Megan Vossler 3 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 131-01 Introduction to Ceramics MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 130 Gary Erickson 3 / 10
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; $100 Material fee will be charged*
ART 132-01 Introduction to Ceramics: The Human Figure MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm ART 130 Gary Erickson 3 / 10
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; $100 Material fee will be charged*
ART 149-01 Introduction to Visual Culture MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 0 / 34
ART 160-01 Art of the West I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau 4 / 30
*Cross-listed with CLAS 160-01*
ART 160-02 Art of the West I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 100 Vanessa Rousseau 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with CLAS 160-02*
ART 170-01 Art of the East I: China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 3 / 15
*Cross-listed with ASIA 170-01*
ART 194-01 Islamic Art TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 202 Nassim Rossi 6 / 20
*First day attendance required* This course will explore the idea that from its inception to its modern-day manifestation, ornament has had an important role in Islamic visual culture. Students will be introduced to the art and architecture of the Islamic world from the seventh century to the current art scene, and, through a balanced combination of theoretical and formal analysis, undertake consideration of ornament’s creation and practical function.
ART 234-01 Painting I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 128 Christine Willcox 0 / 15
*First Year Course only* An introduction to the studio practice of painting, using oil paint on a variety of supports ranging from paper, board and canvas. Both traditional and contemporary approaches will be explored through the techniques and mechanics of painting as well as a consideration of content and meaning. Color theory, compositional structure, perspective, figure/ground relationships, spatial concepts, and critical thinking skills will be emphasized. Powerpoint presentations, readings and class discussions of historical and contemporary painting practices and issues will develop a visual vocabulary as well as critical/theoretical knowledge to complement technical skills. Individual and group critiques will be utilized for the exchange of information, in order to gauge success, and to practice and build a visual vocabulary. Gallery/museum visits will supplement studio work.
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 135 Stanton Sears 3 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 119 Ruthann Godollei 2 / 15
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
ART 366-01 2-D Design MWF 01:10 pm-03:20 pm Gudrun Lock 7 / 15
*Course will meet in the Lampert Building, 3rd Floor.*
ART 367-01 3-D Design TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 135 Stanton Sears 0 / 11
*First year Course only* A series of three-dimensional projects using a basic visual language of line, texture, shape, plane, space, volume, and form will be explored. Critiques and structural testing of the projects lead to an understanding of functional and aesthetic relationships. The problem solving approach used in this class contributes to a resolution of spatial problems in a series of projects with references to sculpture, architecture, industrial design and interior design.
ART 371-01 Painting II TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 128 Christine Willcox 1 / 5
ART 372-01 Sculpture II TBA TBA ART 135 Stanton Sears 6 / 10
*First day attendance required*
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TBA TBA ART 119 Ruthann Godollei -3 / 5
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II TBA TBA ART 130 Gary Erickson 2 / 5
*First day attendance required; $100 material fee required*
ART 375-01 Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in American Art MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot 7 / 20
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01* This course focuses on the discussion of race, ethnicity, class and gender in American art of the 20th and 21st centuries. The course will trace how the social dynamics of race and ethnicity, along with gender and class, shaped American art and culture and the experiences of American artists and their audiences at various historical moments during the modernist and post-modern periods. This course challenges the traditional narratives of American art history, which tend to valorize arts produced by European-Americans. Instead it explores America’s diverse cultural heritage through the voices and visions of Native-Americans, African-Americans, Asian Americans, Mexicans, Chicanos, Latino-Americans, and other minorities.
ART 487-01 Art History Methodology Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 205 Joanna Inglot 2 / 6
ART 490-08 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Ruthann Godollei 0 / 1
ART 490-16 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Stanton Sears 0 / 1
ART 490-20 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Christine Willcox 0 / 1

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ASIA 111-01 Introduction to Asian Studies: Society and Culture MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Arjun Guneratne 12 / 40
*Cross-listed with ANTH 111-01* The culture concept is the most important item in anthropology's theoretical tool kit; it is the organizing concept underlying the discipline’s holistic approach, which seeks to understand the human condition in the broadest possible context. As a discipline, anthropology seeks to document and explain the innumerable ways in which it is possible to be human, and by to understanding other cultural logics to hold up a critical mirror to our own assumptions, beliefs and ways of acting. This course introduces students to Cultural Anthropology through a comparative study of Asian societies and cultures, with a particular emphasis on the three main regions of Asia that are currently taught at Macalester: India, China, and Japan. It also serves to introduce students to the study of Asia by grounding them in the essential features of Asian societies, cultures, and religions.
ASIA 140-01 Introduction to East Asian Civilization MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 10 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 140-01*
ASIA 170-01 Art of the East I: China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 3 / 15
*Cross-listed with ART 170-01*
ASIA 194-01 Goddess and Ghosts: Images of Women in Chinese Culture and Literature MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Xin Yang 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; Cross-listed with WGSS 194-02 and CHIN 194-01* Much like the vampire and mythical goddess in American and European novels, female ghosts and goddesses are also sources of fascination in Chinese culture. This course uses the trope of goddess and ghosts to unravel the gender politics in Chinese culture. We examine how ancient and modern literary texts revise and appropriate images of goddess and ghost to reflect changing attitudes towards gender, identity, body, and the female Other. Some specific topics include: how the literary representation of goddesses and ghosts intersects with Confucian ideology and its social structure; how the term goddess had been appropriated by male modern reformists for their utopian desire for modernity; how the contemporary obsession with ghost fiction/film is related to Taoist concepts and everyday anxiety; and how women writers intervene within the constraints of the political and social contexts and are therefore imaged as the paranoid in paternal framework. We will take an interdisciplinary, multimedia approach to gender relations in modern fiction, film, memoir, and other cultural genres. Students will learn the continuation and variation of Chinese tradition in contemporary contexts as well as its intersection with modern ideologies, and develop critical views from gendered perspective.
ASIA 274-01 The Great Tradition in China before 1840 MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 11 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 274-01*
ASIA 277-01 The Rise of Modern Japan W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 6 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 277-01*
ASIA 294-01 Chinese Poetic Tradition MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 111 Patricia Anderson 10 / 20
*Cross-listed with CHIN 294-01* From the earliest known collection of Chinese poetry, The Book of Odes, dating roughly to 600BCE, to the early Song Dynasty lyrical meter of the tenth century, humanistic themes of disillusionment, celebration, a draw to wilderness and the appreciation of nature’s beauty abound throughout this richly diverse yet essentially uninterrupted tradition of Chinese poetry. With readings and discussions of historical and biographical information to sufficiently contextualize the poets and their works, we will study these themes, as well as the major poetic forms of shi (poem), fu (prose poem), and ci (lyric meter) and their formal conventions. Our goal is a lofty one: to gain a clearer understanding and deeper appreciation for a literary tradition that has always enjoyed wide appeal and engendered great pride. I am certain it will prove to be a worthwhile endeavor. As this is a survey course, no prior knowledge of Chinese is required. All readings are in English. However, if interest warrants, we will form a reading group of students who would like to study works in their original Chinese.

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
BIOL 116-01 Community and Global Health: Biological Paradigms MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Timothy Boyer -1 / 32
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 194-01 Creatures and Curiosities MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Sarah Boyer 3 / 16
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th* This course focuses on the mysterious, beautiful, grotesque, overlooked, unknown, and literally spineless majority of animal life: the invertebrates. We will explore animal evolution and focus on the biology of creatures such as sponges, jellyfish, insects, starfish, spiders, and corals. In addition, we will discuss the cultural role of animals as curiosities - as specimens in cabinets and museums, or the subjects of phobias and urban legends. Drawing on topics from marine biology and entomology, students will learn about the ecology, life cycles, and anatomy of major groups of invertebrate animals through lectures, observation of live animals, and examination of preserved specimens. Two 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour lab per week. Students must complete 2 field trips outside of class time. This course counts toward a minor in biology, but not toward a biology major. No prerequisites.
BIOL 194-02 Biotechnology/Society MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Mary Montgomery 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* This course will serve as an introduction to the development and application of biotechnologies, and the impact these technologies have on society. Discussions will include stem cell research, in vitro fertilization and related reproductive technologies, genetic testing in the clinical setting, personal ("recreational") genomics, DNA fingerprinting and forensic applications, genetically modified organisms, and gene therapy. This course will introduce students to some basic concepts and techniques used in the fields of genetics, and molecular, developmental and cell biology. This course is aimed toward students not planning to major in biology but who are interested in learning about the science that underlies these techniques and in discussing the socio-cultural and ethical aspects of these issues. This course counts toward a minor in biology, but not toward a biology major. First year students planning to major in Biology should take Biol 260, 270, or 285 instead of this class. Note: there is a first year section of Biol 260 (Genetics) being offered.
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biol/Genetics Lab Methods R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Michael Anderson 3 / 21
*First day attendance required;ACTC students may register on April 27th; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biol/Genetics Lab Methods T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Randy Daughters 8 / 21
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biol/Genetics Lab Methods T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby 5 / 21
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th; 2 credit course*
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Paul Overvoorde 1 / 38
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 260-02 Genetics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Paul Overvoorde 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; writing lab component to be held Thursdays 9:40am-11:10am in Olin Rice 205* This course will introduce students to the central theories, vocabulary, and methodologies of genetics. Students who enroll will explore topics that range from classical Mendelian inheritance patterns to the contemporary idea of a gene and the regulation of its expression. Using specific case studies, we will examine issues such as eugenics, genetic testing, breeding for agricultural purposes, and the impact of the genomic revolution on biology. Class time will involve a mix of lecture, discussion, and collaborative group problem solving formats. Learning in the course will be monitored through writing assignments, problem sets, quizzes, and exams. This course is intended for students planning to major in biology. It is a section of one of the four introductory biology courses required to complete a biology major. Special attention will be devoted to improving expository and science writing skills.
BIOL 260-02 Genetics R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Paul Overvoorde 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; writing lab component to be held Thursdays 9:40am-11:10am in Olin Rice 205* This course will introduce students to the central theories, vocabulary, and methodologies of genetics. Students who enroll will explore topics that range from classical Mendelian inheritance patterns to the contemporary idea of a gene and the regulation of its expression. Using specific case studies, we will examine issues such as eugenics, genetic testing, breeding for agricultural purposes, and the impact of the genomic revolution on biology. Class time will involve a mix of lecture, discussion, and collaborative group problem solving formats. Learning in the course will be monitored through writing assignments, problem sets, quizzes, and exams. This course is intended for students planning to major in biology. It is a section of one of the four introductory biology courses required to complete a biology major. Special attention will be devoted to improving expository and science writing skills.
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Lin Aanonsen -9 / 48
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Kristina Curry Rogers -3 / 42
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Kristina Curry Rogers -4 / 21
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson -4 / 21
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson 1 / 21
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Kristina Curry Rogers 1 / 21
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Mark Davis 2 / 40
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students whom may register on April 27th*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 0 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students whom may register on April 27th*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis 2 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students whom may register on April 27th*
BIOL 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan 4 / 60
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 351-L3 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:00 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan 2 / 20
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L3; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 356-01 Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 270 Randy Daughters 7 / 12
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 356-L1 Cell/Molecular Neuroscience Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Randy Daughters 7 / 12
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 357-01 Immunology MW 10:50 am-12:20 pm HUM 228 Devavani Chatterjea 4 / 12
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 357-L1 Immunology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 277 Devavani Chatterjea 4 / 12
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 358-01 Microbiology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Steven Sundby 2 / 16
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 358-L1 Microbiology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Steven Sundby 2 / 16
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 361-01 Animal Diversity MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Sarah Boyer 2 / 12
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 361-L1 Animal Diversity Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Sarah Boyer 2 / 12
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 369-01 Developmental Biology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 270 Mary Montgomery 2 / 12
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 369-L1 Developmental Biology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Mary Montgomery 2 / 12
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
BIOL 394-01 Projects in Global Health W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MARKIM 303 Devavani Chatterjea 2 / 15
*Cross-listed with CHEM 394-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th* Students conduct multi-disciplinary collaborative research with faculty members and global partners on selected topics and current problems in global health. Students participate in intensive reading of primary literature, journal-club roundtable discussions, and written and oral presentations focused on selected challenges in health, health care, and public health in sub-Saharan Africa, with special focus on Uganda. Prerequisites: Chem211, at least three of the biology core courses (Biol 260, Biol 265, Biol 270 or Biol 285), at least one quantitative course, such as statistics (e.g., Math 153 or 155), Geographic Information Systems (Geog 225), and/or Research in Psychology (Psyc 201/202), and junior or senior standing. Students who have not completed all of the prerequisites but who feel that they can demonstrate scientific and quantitative competencies through other coursework should meet with one of the instructors to discuss their preparation for this course. All students must complete the application process and be accepted into the program in order to register for the course.
Instructors: D. Chatterjea (biology), R. Hoye (chemistry), E. Jansen (biology)
BIOL 394-01 Projects in Global Health W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MARKIM 303 Elizabeth Jansen 2 / 15
*Cross-listed with CHEM 394-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th* Students conduct multi-disciplinary collaborative research with faculty members and global partners on selected topics and current problems in global health. Students participate in intensive reading of primary literature, journal-club roundtable discussions, and written and oral presentations focused on selected challenges in health, health care, and public health in sub-Saharan Africa, with special focus on Uganda. Prerequisites: Chem211, at least three of the biology core courses (Biol 260, Biol 265, Biol 270 or Biol 285), at least one quantitative course, such as statistics (e.g., Math 153 or 155), Geographic Information Systems (Geog 225), and/or Research in Psychology (Psyc 201/202), and junior or senior standing. Students who have not completed all of the prerequisites but who feel that they can demonstrate scientific and quantitative competencies through other coursework should meet with one of the instructors to discuss their preparation for this course. All students must complete the application process and be accepted into the program in order to register for the course.
Instructors: D. Chatterjea (biology), R. Hoye (chemistry), E. Jansen (biology)
BIOL 394-02 Soil Ecology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson -2 / 12
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th* This course surveys the ecology of soil, focusing on the physical structure of soil, the communities of organisms that inhabit it, the ecosystem-level processes they perform, and the human processes such as agriculture that they support. Emphasis is placed on the diversity of soils and soil organisms, on the complexity of abiotic and biotic interactions in and around soil, and on the contributions of modern molecular methods to the current revolution in our knowledge about soils. Some of these methods are investigated in the lab component, which also includes an independent project. Prerequisites: Ecology (BIOL 285), and either General Chemistry I (CHEM111) or Accelerated General Chemistry (CHEM115).
BIOL 394-L1 Soil Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Michael Anderson -2 / 12
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHEM 111-01 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 150 Paul Fischer -10 / 41
CHEM 111-02 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata 1 / 17
*First Year Course only* This course provides a rigorous treatment of the concepts foundational for all subsequent study in chemistry. This course, along with General Chemistry II (CHEM 112), which is typically taken in the spring semester of the first year, together satisfy the prerequisites for Organic (CHEM 211) and Analytical (CHEM 222) Chemistry. The first two-thirds of the class is devoted to understanding the properties of individual atoms, and how atoms bond together to form the three-dimensional structures of molecules. Our detailed examination of atoms and molecules will draw upon insights from the most important scientific theory of the 20th century—quantum mechanics. In particular, quantum mechanics will help us explain electronic structure, that is, the ways electrons distribute themselves in atoms and molecules. We will also explore how the structure of individual atoms and molecules can help explain the bulk properties of macromolecules and materials. The last third of the class focuses on the concept of equilibrium. Equilibrium can be defined as the ultimate outcome of a physical process or chemical reaction. We will learn how to describe physical and chemical equilibria mathematically. We will also interpret our mathematical results in terms of the structure and bonding concepts learned in the first part of the course. We will pay particular interest to the chemistry of acids and bases, which are immensely important for any future study of organic, biochemical, or environmental systems. Problem solving is essential for learning chemistry, and a good part of your work outside of class will involve weekly assignments of textbook problems and analysis of laboratory data. Writing is another important part of this course. Writing assignments will include three formal reports on laboratory work and a research paper due at the end of the semester. This paper will give you the opportunity to apply what you will have learned about chemical structure to some real-world scientific phenomenon. Approximately 50% of your grade will be based on in-class examinations. The other 50% of your grade will be based on lab work, writing assignments, and homework problems out of your textbook. Students planning to enroll in this course should have taken one year of chemistry in high school, and should already be familiar with topics like nomenclature, oxidation states, stoichiometry (including balancing chemical equations and calculating solution concentrations), and simple chemical reactions in solution. Our class will meet for lectures MWF from 9:40 to 10:40 a.m. These class meetings will also involve discussion, in-class exercises, and demonstrations. We will also meet for lab every Monday night from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. Laboratory work, both with chemicals and with computer simulations, will illustrate concepts from lecture, teach key techniques, and provide experience with scientific reasoning and teamwork.
CHEM 111-03 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Susan Green 2 / 41
CHEM 111-04 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Susan Green 3 / 41
CHEM 111-L1 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Keith Kuwata 1 / 17
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required; $12 Lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L2 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice -2 / 21
*$12 Lab fee required; first day attendance required*
CHEM 111-L3 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 0 / 21
*$12 Lab fee required; first day attendance required*
CHEM 111-L4 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium W 01:10 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 5 / 21
*$12 Lab fee required; first day attendance required*
CHEM 111-L5 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 1 / 18
*$12 Lab fee required; first day attendance required*
CHEM 111-L6 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice -2 / 21
*$12 Lab fee required; first day attendance required*
CHEM 111-L7 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 0 / 21
*$12 Lab fee required; first day attendance required*
CHEM 115-01 Accelerated General Chemistry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg 3 / 16
*Available to new incoming First Years only*
CHEM 115-L1 Accel General Chemistry Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 380 Thomas Varberg 3 / 16
*$12 Lab fee required*
CHEM 211-01 Organic Chemistry I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Ronald Brisbois 12 / 45
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-02 Organic Chemistry I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye 0 / 50
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L1 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Susan Green 4 / 23
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L2 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Susan Green 9 / 23
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L3 Organic Chemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye 5 / 24
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L4 Organic Chemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye 1 / 25
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Paul Fischer 11 / 50
*1 Credit course*
CHEM 311-01 Thermodynamics and Kinetics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg 2 / 24
CHEM 311-L1 Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 378 Thomas Varberg 0 / 12
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 311-L2 Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 378 Keith Kuwata 2 / 12
CHEM 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan 4 / 60
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
CHEM 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
CHEM 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
CHEM 351-L3 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:00 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan 2 / 20
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L3; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on April 27th*
CHEM 394-01 Projects in Global Health W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MARKIM 303 Elizabeth Jansen 2 / 15
*Cross-listed with BIOL 394-01; ACTC students may register on April 27th; first day attendance required* Students conduct multi-disciplinary collaborative research with faculty members and global partners on selected topics and current problems in global health. Students participate in intensive reading of primary literature, journal-club roundtable discussions, and written and oral presentations focused on selected challenges in health, health care, and public health in sub-Saharan Africa, with special focus on Uganda. Prerequisites: Chem211, at least three of the biology core courses (Biol 260, Biol 265, Biol 270 or Biol 285), at least one quantitative course, such as statistics (e.g., Math 153 or 155), Geographic Information Systems (Geog 225), and/or Research in Psychology (Psyc 201/202), and junior or senior standing. Students who have not completed all of the prerequisites but who feel that they can demonstrate scientific and quantitative competencies through other coursework should meet with one of the instructors to discuss their preparation for this course. All students must complete the application process and be accepted into the program in order to register for the course.
Instructors: D. Chatterjea (biology), R. Hoye (chemistry), E. Jansen (biology)
CHEM 394-01 Projects in Global Health W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MARKIM 303 Devavani Chatterjea 2 / 15
*Cross-listed with BIOL 394-01; ACTC students may register on April 27th; first day attendance required* Students conduct multi-disciplinary collaborative research with faculty members and global partners on selected topics and current problems in global health. Students participate in intensive reading of primary literature, journal-club roundtable discussions, and written and oral presentations focused on selected challenges in health, health care, and public health in sub-Saharan Africa, with special focus on Uganda. Prerequisites: Chem211, at least three of the biology core courses (Biol 260, Biol 265, Biol 270 or Biol 285), at least one quantitative course, such as statistics (e.g., Math 153 or 155), Geographic Information Systems (Geog 225), and/or Research in Psychology (Psyc 201/202), and junior or senior standing. Students who have not completed all of the prerequisites but who feel that they can demonstrate scientific and quantitative competencies through other coursework should meet with one of the instructors to discuss their preparation for this course. All students must complete the application process and be accepted into the program in order to register for the course.
Instructors: D. Chatterjea (biology), R. Hoye (chemistry), E. Jansen (biology)
CHEM 411-01 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Paul Fischer 5 / 20
CHEM 411-L1 Adv Inorganic Chemistry Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 347 Paul Fischer 5 / 20
*First day attendance required*

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Chinese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHIN 101-01 First Year Chinese I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 402 Jin Stone 4 / 20
CHIN 101-02 First Year Chinese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 216 Jin Stone 2 / 20
CHIN 101-L1 First Year Chinese I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Lei Chen 3 / 15
CHIN 101-L2 First Year Chinese I Lab W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 111 Lei Chen 0 / 15
CHIN 101-L3 First Year Chinese I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Lei Chen 7 / 15
CHIN 194-01 Goddess and Ghosts: Images of Women in Chinese Culture and Literature MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Xin Yang 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ASIA 194-01 and WGSS 194-02* Much like the vampire and mythical goddess in American and European novels, female ghosts and goddesses are also sources of fascination in Chinese culture. This course uses the trope of goddess and ghosts to unravel the gender politics in Chinese culture. We examine how ancient and modern literary texts revise and appropriate images of goddess and ghost to reflect changing attitudes towards gender, identity, body, and the female Other. Some specific topics include: how the literary representation of goddesses and ghosts intersects with Confucian ideology and its social structure; how the term goddess had been appropriated by male modern reformists for their utopian desire for modernity; how the contemporary obsession with ghost fiction/film is related to Taoist concepts and everyday anxiety; and how women writers intervene within the constraints of the political and social contexts and are therefore imaged as the paranoid in paternal framework. We will take an interdisciplinary, multimedia approach to gender relations in modern fiction, film, memoir, and other cultural genres. Students will learn the continuation and variation of Chinese tradition in contemporary contexts as well as its intersection with modern ideologies, and develop critical views from gendered perspective.
CHIN 203-01 Second Year Chinese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Xin Yang 10 / 20
CHIN 203-02 Second Year Chinese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM 202 Xin Yang 10 / 20
CHIN 203-L1 Second Year Chinese I Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 113 Lei Chen 11 / 15
CHIN 203-L2 Second Year Chinese I Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Lei Chen 11 / 15
CHIN 203-L3 Second Year Chinese I Lab R 02:30 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 370 Lei Chen 4 / 15
CHIN 294-01 Chinese Poetic Tradition MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 111 Patricia Anderson 10 / 20
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-01* From the earliest known collection of Chinese poetry, The Book of Odes, dating roughly to 600BCE, to the early Song Dynasty lyrical meter of the tenth century, humanistic themes of disillusionment, celebration, a draw to wilderness and the appreciation of nature’s beauty abound throughout this richly diverse yet essentially uninterrupted tradition of Chinese poetry. With readings and discussions of historical and biographical information to sufficiently contextualize the poets and their works, we will study these themes, as well as the major poetic forms of shi (poem), fu (prose poem), and ci (lyric meter) and their formal conventions. Our goal is a lofty one: to gain a clearer understanding and deeper appreciation for a literary tradition that has always enjoyed wide appeal and engendered great pride. I am certain it will prove to be a worthwhile endeavor. As this is a survey course, no prior knowledge of Chinese is required. All readings are in English. However, if interest warrants, we will form a reading group of students who would like to study works in their original Chinese.
CHIN 303-01 Third Year Chinese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 111 Patricia Anderson 8 / 20
CHIN 303-L1 Third Year Chinese I Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 227 Lei Chen 7 / 12
CHIN 303-L2 Third Year Chinese I Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 227 Lei Chen 7 / 12
CHIN 407-01 Fourth Year Chinese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 113 Jin Stone 0 / 15

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CLAS 111-01 Elementary Latin I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Beth Severy-Hoven 15 / 25
CLAS 111-L1 Elementary Latin I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Beth Severy-Hoven 15 / 25
CLAS 113-02 Elementary Arabic I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Wessam El Meligi -1 / 25
CLAS 113-L1 Elementary Arabic I Lab TBA TBA Wessam El Meligi -1 / 25
CLAS 115-01 Elementary Greek I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Nanette Goldman 16 / 25
CLAS 115-L1 Elementary Greek I Lab T 02:30 pm-03:30 pm MAIN 003 Nanette Goldman 16 / 25
CLAS 117-01 Elementary Hebrew I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 002 Nanette Goldman 16 / 25
CLAS 117-L1 Elementary Hebrew I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm MAIN 001 Nanette Goldman 17 / 25
CLAS 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 150 James Laine 7 / 50
*Cross-listed with RELI 135-01*
CLAS 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 150 Andrew Overman 7 / 50
*Cross-listed with RELI 135-01*
CLAS 160-01 Intro to Ancient/Medieval Art MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau 4 / 30
*Cross-listed with ART 160-01*
CLAS 160-02 Intro to Ancient/Medieval Art MWF TBA Vanessa Rousseau 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with ART 160-02*
CLAS 194-01 Ancient Greek Polis: Real and Ideal MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Brian Lush 0 / 17
*First Year Course only* A millennium and a half before the emergence of the nation-state, the ancient Greeks developed a model of governance from which our word "politics" and (in many ways) our conception of political participation grew: the polis, or city-state. The form became so fundamental to Greek conceptions of identity and human nature that Aristotle would claim that every human being is a politikon zōon, a political animal, an animal of the polis. This course will examine the political model that became emblematic of Greek civilization during the Classical period. We will begin with a brief look at Minoan and Mycenaean roots, and examine the remarkably rapid birth of the polis out the chiefdoms described in the poetry of Homer. Having discussed the birth of the polis during the late Dark Age and the Archaic period, we will read about and critically examine the Greek polis (and Athens in particular) through two distinct but related lenses. We will discuss the historical polis through exposure to such authors as Herodotus (The Histories), Thucydides (History of the Peloponnesian War) and Aristotle (Constitution of the Athenians). At the same time, we will explore the Greeks’ own depictions of an ideal (and idealized) polis by discussing a broad range of literary and philosophical texts, including Aeschylus’ Persians, Sophocles’ Antigone, Aristophanes’ Birds, Plato’s Republic and Aristotle’s Politics. As we explore and formulate an understanding of the Greek polis, students will also devote substantial time and energy to strengthening their abilities in analytical writing, scholarly research and dialogical communication – skills that will prove crucial to their further academic endeavors at Macalester.
CLAS 231-01 Intermediate Latin: Prose MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Brian Lush 10 / 20
CLAS 241-01 Intermediate Arabic I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am ARTCOM 102 Wessam El Meligi 2 / 20
CLAS 241-L1 Intermediate Arabic I Lab M 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 202 Wessam El Meligi 3 / 20
CLAS 261-01 Intermediate Greek: Prose TR 09:40 am-11:10 am Andrew Overman 14 / 20
CLAS 261-L1 Intermediate Greek: Prose Lab TBA TBA Andrew Overman 14 / 20
CLAS 483-01 Advanced Reading in Latin MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 003 Nanette Goldman 12 / 20
CLAS 490-01 Senior Seminar MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Beth Severy-Hoven 9 / 20

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
COMP 120-01 Computing and Society: The Green Computing Revolution MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 256 Susan Fox 0 / 17
*First Year Course only* As interest in sustainability has grown, the information technology industry has been an important part of both problems and solutions. The IT industry has, in recent years, cast a critical eye on the impact of its technology over its "life cycle": manufacturing and materials, energy usage, through disposal of old technology. At the same time, improvements in computer and telecommunications technologies enable greater energy efficiency, smart electric grids, smart buildings, and more sustainable operations, as well as providing tools for monitoring and modeling environmental systems. This course is an introduction to the field of computer science, with an emphasis on issues relating computer technology to sustainability. Students will learn to program using the language Python, with applications that relate to course themes. The course will be divided into four thematic sections: "Green IT", "Smart Grid," "Vehicles, Computing, and Sustainability," and "Computing in Environmental Science." The "Green IT" theme will look at the lifecycle of information technology, from cell phones to servers. It will explore the issues involved in the creation, operation, and disposal of technology, and how the industry is attempting to improve its sustainability. The “Smart Grid” theme will examine the development of new systems for electric grids to improve energy efficiency. These new systems rely on computer and telecom technology to bring information closer to energy users. The "Vehicles" theme will look at the technology underlying hybrid vehicles, Personal Rapid Transit systems, and other transportation issues. "Computing in Environmental Science" will examine how computers are used to monitor or model environmental systems, both natural and manmade. Work in the course will include programming, reading and discussing articles, and writing related to each theme. The class may take field trips to the Katherine Ordway Natural History Area and local computer re-purposes and recyclers. This course is suitable for students who are considering a major in computer science, and also for students who are just interested in learning about computer science to support other interests. It serves as an alternative and replacement for Comp 121 or Comp 123. Students who complete this course successfully will be prepared to take Comp 124, the next course in the computer science curriculum. There are no prerequisites for this course.
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 258 Elizabeth Shoop -11 / 28
COMP 123-02 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 258 Elizabeth Shoop 6 / 25
*Lab is highly recommended but not required. Please see instructor with Lab time conflict questions. Student must also register for COMP 123 - L1 to qualify for General Education Requirement in Writing*
COMP 123-L1 Core Concepts in Computer Science F 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 258 Elizabeth Shoop 10 / 25
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Eric Theriault -1 / 20
COMP 124-L1 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Eric Theriault 0 / 20
COMP 221-01 Algorithm Design and Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 205 Shilad Sen -2 / 24
COMP 225-01 Software Design and Development TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop -2 / 20
COMP 346-01 Internet Computing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 205 Shilad Sen 6 / 20
COMP 369-01 Discrete Applied Mathematics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Stan Wagon 9 / 20
*Cross-listed with MATH 469-01; ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
COMP 484-01 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Susan Fox -5 / 30
*Cross-listed with NEUR 484-01*
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar WF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 205 Shilad Sen 16 / 30
*2 Credit course*

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Jeff Evans 9 / 25
ECON 113-02 Financial Accounting TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Jeff Evans 6 / 25
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 304 Mario Solis-Garcia 0 / 17
*First Year Course only* This course is an introduction to the concepts, tools, and ideas that shape modern economic theory. We’ll divide the course into two broad sections, each focusing on a main area of economics: micro and macroeconomics. In microeconomics, we’ll get to understand the process that helps individual consumers and firms make their (economic) decisions and define some notions of efficiency. Some relevant questions that can be answered here are the following: how do consumers choose to allocate their resources between two different goods? What is the role of prices and income in these decisions? How do firms choose their production scale and their inputs to production? Why should we worry about monopolies? Are their choices "efficient"? If they are not, can the government do something? Should it? In macroeconomics, the focus shifts towards the behavior of consumers and firms as an aggregate. Some questions that can be addressed by macro are potentially harder to tackle: why are standards of living a lot better today than 50 years ago? Why do some countries grow over time, but others don’t? Why is there unemployment? Why is it so high right now? What role does money play into this? What can the government do to "improve" the economy? Should it? Emphasis will be given to macro topics, especially those related to the 2008 recession and to macroeconomic policy. In addition, the course is aimed at developing the writing skills that are necessary to effectively communicate economic arguments. The final grade will be based on three exams, on several writing assignments, and on homework assignments. Q3 designation for this course is pending and anticipated to be received during Fall 2012 semester.
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Pete Ferderer -3 / 25
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Pete Ferderer 4 / 25
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Sarah West 0 / 16
*First Year Course only* This course is an introduction to micro- and macroeconomics. It develops tools to analyze contemporary economic policy issues. The course has a special focus on the development of writing skills necessary to effectively communicate economic arguments and reasoning. Policy topics include globalization, the environment, poverty and inequality, taxation, and economic development. Students that take this course satisfy a prerequisite for higher-level economics courses, add a valuable component to interdisciplinary majors, and develop skills necessary to understand the fundamentals of economic policy. Final grades are based on three exams, on a series of papers in a semester-long research project, and on homework assignments.
ECON 119-06 Principles of Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Liang Ding -1 / 25
ECON 119-07 Principles of Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer 1 / 25
ECON 210-01 Business Communications TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Joyce Minor 4 / 25
This course is intended to help students improve their own critical communication skills and explore how those skills can be best applied in business situations. Students will polish writing skills, with sessions that focus on resumes, cover letters, and everyday business communications like email. Students will learn best practices of effective presentations and will deliver several powerpoint presentations in class. The course will use the case method to review real corporate communication issues, such as crisis management, interpersonal communications challenges, negotiation simulations and the like. This course cannot count as the 200-level elective for the major or as fulfilling the 200-level prerequisite for 300-level courses. Prerequisite: Economics 113 or 119. (4 credits)
ECON 221-01 Introduction to International Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Raymond Robertson 4 / 25
ECON 221-02 Introduction to International Economics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 304 Raymond Robertson -1 / 25
ECON 231-01 Environmental Economics and Policy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Sarah West 4 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENVI 231-01; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ECON 256-01 Intro to Investment Banking TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Joyce Minor -4 / 20
ECON 333-01 Economics of Global Food Problems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Amy Damon 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENVI 333-01 and INTL 333-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ECON 342-01 Economics of Poverty in US TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 Karine Moe 9 / 25
ECON 353-01 Managerial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Jeff Evans 9 / 25
ECON 361-01 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 Vasant Sukhatme 11 / 30
ECON 361-02 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Vasant Sukhatme 15 / 30
ECON 371-01 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Mario Solis-Garcia 6 / 25
ECON 371-02 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 305 Mario Solis-Garcia 9 / 25
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger 11 / 22
ECON 381-02 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger 5 / 22
ECON 381-L1 Intro to Econometrics Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger 8 / 22
ECON 381-L2 Intro to Econometrics Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger 9 / 22
ECON 426-01 International Economic Development TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Amy Damon 14 / 25
ECON 442-01 Labor Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Karine Moe 20 / 25
ECON 444-01 Honors Seminar MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 304 Raymond Robertson 4 / 12
ECON 457-01 Finance TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Liang Ding 8 / 25
ECON 481-01 Advanced Econometrics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger 19 / 22

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
EDUC 194-01 Motivating Learners TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse 0 / 17
*First Year Course only* This course explores the critical yet complex area of educational psychology that addresses human motivation: What motivates people to learn, change, and grow? Why do some students give up while others prosper in response to specific circumstances or environments? What can teachers, mentors, and students themselves do to support and sustain active engagement in learning? We will study the overarching psychological theories of human motivation with specific attention to academic achievement. We will examine developmental and individual differences in motivation, as well as differences by context and group membership. Other topics include attribution theory, student self-beliefs, effects of grades and testing on achievement motivation, effects of reward or praise, and student empowerment in schools and community-based youth development programs to enhance motivation.
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse 0 / 26
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01*
EDUC 240-01 Race, Culture, and Ethnicity in Education M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Ann Hite -3 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 345-01*
EDUC 280-01 Re-envisioning Education and Democracy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai -2 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 280-01 and POLI 211-01*
EDUC 390-01 Teaching and Learning in Urban Schools W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse 1 / 12
*Permission of instructor required*
EDUC 392-01 Outdoor Environmental Educ W 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch -5 / 10
*Cross-listed with ENVI 392-01; 2 Credit course; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students* This course provides an introduction to outdoor environmental education at the elementary school level. Macalester students will partner with teachers and students from local schools, families with school-age children, and youth organizations to explore interdisciplinary approaches to outdoor environmental education. The course will utilize Macalester's field station, the Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area, as an outdoor classroom and will adapt curriculum from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and other sources to help elementary school teachers and students to fulfill Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards and assist youth organizations in achieving their environmental education goals. A weekly 90-minute seminar session incorporating readings, reflective writing, and individual and small group projects will complement the experiential aspects of the course. Students will participate in a weekend retreat early in the semester, one or two Saturday morning events, and one or two Wednesday afternoon (noon to 3:30) sessions at the Ordway. (2 credits - S/N Grading Only)
EDUC 392-01 Outdoor Environmental Educ W 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai -5 / 10
*Cross-listed with ENVI 392-01; 2 Credit course; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students* This course provides an introduction to outdoor environmental education at the elementary school level. Macalester students will partner with teachers and students from local schools, families with school-age children, and youth organizations to explore interdisciplinary approaches to outdoor environmental education. The course will utilize Macalester's field station, the Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area, as an outdoor classroom and will adapt curriculum from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and other sources to help elementary school teachers and students to fulfill Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards and assist youth organizations in achieving their environmental education goals. A weekly 90-minute seminar session incorporating readings, reflective writing, and individual and small group projects will complement the experiential aspects of the course. Students will participate in a weekend retreat early in the semester, one or two Saturday morning events, and one or two Wednesday afternoon (noon to 3:30) sessions at the Ordway. (2 credits - S/N Grading Only)
EDUC 394-01 Ethics of Civic Engagement TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 0 / 15
*Cross-listed with HISP 394-01 and AMST 394-02; first day attendance required; course taught in Spanish*
EDUC 460-01 Education and Social Change MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 0 / 10
*Permission of instructor required*

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENGL 101-01 College Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Rebecca Graham 5 / 16
ENGL 105-01 American Voices MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 001 Kristin Naca -2 / 20
As we speak, a caravan of freedom writers, named the Librotraficantes, are driving from Houston to Arizona, performing teach-ins on the way to the Arizona capital. This situation and several more like it across the U.S. will ground our conversation of Latina/o literature. In this course, we trace the development of Latina/o writing over the past fifty years, from collected personal narratives into complex American literary tradition. We read literary texts produced through grassroots publishing efforts, in English and English translations from the Spanish original. We read Mexican American cultural theory texts that address issues of race and indigenism, class, provisional citizenship, the status of migrant workers, border crossings, and gender and sexuality including transitional sexualities. We consider what multiple genres of literature—fiction, non-fiction essay, poetry and drama—and film have to offer audiences, and theorize how genre interacts, constructs, and/or up-ends audience expectations brought to bear on Latina/o representations. This course meets two General Education Requirements: Domestic Diversity and Writing.
ENGL 105-02 American Voices MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Kristin Naca 3 / 20
As we speak, a caravan of freedom writers, named the Librotraficantes, are driving from Houston to Arizona, performing teach-ins on the way to the Arizona capital. This situation and several more like it across the U.S. will ground our conversation of Latina/o literature. In this course, we trace the development of Latina/o writing over the past fifty years, from collected personal narratives into complex American literary tradition. We read literary texts produced through grassroots publishing efforts, in English and English translations from the Spanish original. We read Mexican American cultural theory texts that address issues of race and indigenism, class, provisional citizenship, the status of migrant workers, border crossings, and gender and sexuality including transitional sexualities. We consider what multiple genres of literature—fiction, non-fiction essay, poetry and drama—and film have to offer audiences, and theorize how genre interacts, constructs, and/or up-ends audience expectations brought to bear on Latina/o representations. This course meets two General Education Requirements: Domestic Diversity and Writing.
ENGL 125-01 Studies in Literature MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Casey Jarrin 1 / 17
*First Year Course only* From the violent anti-heroes of Dorian Gray, A Clockwork Orange, and American Psycho to the “nonfiction” experiments of In Cold Blood and the Vietnam War memoir Dispatches, from modernist stream-of-consciousness in Mrs. Dalloway to aesthetic anarchy in the graphic novel V for Vendetta, from celebrated to censored texts, we’ll explore the relationship between the novel as a literary form and its representation of violence in language, thought, and action. With a focus on the 20th-century, we’ll encounter modern, postmodern, and postcolonial revisions of the novel; we’ll read authors from a range of historical moments and national contexts (Wilde, Woolf, Capote, Burroughs, Burgess, Nabokov, Puig, Rushdie, Allende, McCarthy, Welsh) whose work challenges novelistic convention in iconoclastic and often shocking ways. Attention to formal and stylistic elements will underscore connections between the novel form and its violent content. We’ll ask:What’s the relation between aesthetic creation and (self)destruction? How might narrative perform gruesome acts of violence, insatiable consumption, or cannibalism? How do particular novels embody violent and/or criminal psychopathology? What’s the relationship between hyperviolence, pornography, and censorship? How do race, gender, and sexuality manifest themselves in these texts? How have the gothic, horror, and war genres shaped our cultural understanding of violence in literature, film, and image? Our discussion of novels and short fiction will be complemented by close analysis of selected films, paintings, and photographs.
Likely Texts (8-9 of the following): Novels: Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Nathanael West, Day of the Locust; Truman Capote, In Cold Blood; William S. Burroughs, Naked Lunch; Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire; Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange; Michael Herr, Dispatches; Salman Rushdie, Shame; Isabel Allende, Eva Luna; Manuel Puig, Kiss of the Spider Woman; Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian; Alan Moore, V for Vendetta; Bret Easton Ellis, American Psycho; Irvine Welsh, Trainspotting. Short fiction/essays: Flannery O’Connor, Tim O’Brien, Edgar Allan Poe, J.G. Ballard, Zadie Smith. Drama: Martin McDonagh, The Pillowman.
Likely Films: A Clockwork Orange (Dir. Stanley Kubrick, 1971); The Shining (Dir. Stanley Kubrick, 1980); Apocalypse Now (Dir. Francis Ford Coppola, 1979); Caravaggio (Dir. Derek Jarman, 1986) or War Requiem (Dir.Derek Jarman, 1989); The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover (Dir. Peter Greenaway, 1989); No Country For Old Men (Dir. Joel & Ethan Coen, 2007); Trainspotting (Dir. Danny Boyle, 1996); American Psycho (Dir. Mary Harron, 2000); Psycho (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
*Course fulfills 100-level / introductory requirement for the English major.*
ENGL 137-01 Novel: Art and Violence MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm THEATR 205 Casey Jarrin -2 / 20
Introduction to aesthetic, historical, and ideological transformations in the novel. From the violent anti-heroes of Dorian Gray and American Psycho to the “nonfiction” experiments of In Cold Blood and Vietnam War memoir Dispatches, from modernist stream-of-consciousness in Mrs. Dalloway to aesthetic anarchy in the graphic novel V for Vendetta, from celebrated to censored texts, we’ll explore the relationship between the novel as a literary form and its representation of violence in language, thought, and action. With a specific focus on the 20th-century, we’ll encounter modern, postmodern, and postcolonial revisions of the novel; we’ll read authors from a range of historical moments and national contexts (Wilde, Woolf, Capote, Burroughs, Nabokov, Puig, Rushdie, McCarthy, Welsh) whose work challenges novelistic convention in iconoclastic and often shocking ways. Attention to formal and stylistic elements will underscore connections between the novel form and its violent content. We’ll ask: What’s the relation between aesthetic creation and (self)destruction? How might narrative perform gruesome acts of violence, insatiable consumption, or cannibalism? How do particular novels embody violent and/or criminal psychopathology? What’s the relationship between hyperviolence, pornography, and censorship? How do race, gender, and sexuality manifest themselves in these texts? How have the gothic, horror, and war genres shaped our cultural understanding of violence in literature, film, and image? Our discussion of novels will be complemented by close analysis of selected films. Likely Novels (8-9 of the following): Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Nathanael West, Day of the Locust; Truman Capote, In Cold Blood; William S. Burroughs, Naked Lunch; Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire; Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange; Michael Herr, Dispatches; Salman Rushdie, Shame; Isabel Allende, Eva Luna; Manuel Puig, Kiss of the Spider Woman; Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian; Alan Moore, V for Vendetta; Bret Easton Ellis, American Psycho; Irvine Welsh, Trainspotting Likely Films: A Clockwork Orange (Dir. Stanley Kubrick, 1971); The Shining (Dir. Stanley Kubrick, 1980); Apocalypse Now (Dir. Derek Jarman, 1989); The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover (Dir. Peter Greenaway, 1989); Cat People (Dir. Jacques Tourneur, 1942); Capote (Dir. Bennett Miller, 2005); No Country For Old Men (Dir. Joel & Ethan Coen, 2007); Trainspotting (Dir. Danny Boyle, 1996); American Psycho (Dir. Mary Harron, 2000); Psycho (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1960) Requirements: Journals (20%); 3 Papers (60%); Participation/Presentation (20%) *Course fulfills 100-level/introductory English major requirement.
ENGL 150-01 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Peter Bognanni 6 / 16
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-02 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 James Cihlar 3 / 16
*First Day Attendance Required* In Introduction to Creative Writing we’ll study the genres of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction by reading contemporary examples and by writing our own pieces. Through close, textual reading of published work, we'll ask not only "what does it mean?" but "how does it mean?" By reading like a writer, we'll be inspired to try new approaches in our own work. We'll study the fundamentals of creative writing, discovering that some concepts-persona, ekphrasis, epiphany-carry across genres. We will do much writing in class to generate ideas, sharing the results on the spot. We'll workshop all of our assignments, meaning that we'll practice giving each other praise and constructive criticism in a group setting. After generating original material in the first two thirds of the semester, we'll shift gears to revision by the end.
ENGL 150-03 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Matthew Burgess 5 / 16
ENGL 150-04 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Matthew Burgess 3 / 16
ENGL 150-05 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 212 Jon Lurie 1 / 16
ENGL 150-06 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Ethan Rutherford 2 / 16
This course, which is intended for anyone interested in locating and developing his/her own voice as a writer, will serve as an introduction to three genres of creative writing: poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Though the course will be run mostly as a workshop—that is, we’ll be taking a look at your writing, providing feedback individually and as a group—we will also spend a good amount of time reading and responding to contemporary, published work. As always, the questions will be: what makes this particular piece successful? What makes it interesting? Unique? What keeps you engaged? We’ll look closely at the way language is mobilized, how characters are created, how voice is deployed. The point here is to not only get you writing (which—oh boy—you will be writing), but to help you become a better, more thoughtful reader of your own work. I will lecture occasionally, but for the most part this class will be discussion based. Also? It’ll be fun. A portfolio of your written work in all three genres will be due, with revisions, at the end of the semester.
ENGL 150-07 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 009 Ethan Rutherford 3 / 16
This course, which is intended for anyone interested in locating and developing his/her own voice as a writer, will serve as an introduction to three genres of creative writing: poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Though the course will be run mostly as a workshop—that is, we’ll be taking a look at your writing, providing feedback individually and as a group—we will also spend a good amount of time reading and responding to contemporary, published work. As always, the questions will be: what makes this particular piece successful? What makes it interesting? Unique? What keeps you engaged? We’ll look closely at the way language is mobilized, how characters are created, how voice is deployed. The point here is to not only get you writing (which—oh boy—you will be writing), but to help you become a better, more thoughtful reader of your own work. I will lecture occasionally, but for the most part this class will be discussion based. Also? It’ll be fun. A portfolio of your written work in all three genres will be due, with revisions, at the end of the semester.
ENGL 210-01 Film Studies: Film Violence & Voyeurism W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 226 Casey Jarrin -4 / 20
*First day atttenance required* Exploration of viewing desire and voyeuristic encounters with violence on screen, as well as forms of spectatorship and surveillance, from silent films and films noir through New Wave cinemas, Vietnam-era films, and recent neo-noir. Each week we'll conduct formal analysis of a single film with textual/visual counterparts and film criticism/theory. We’ll explore aesthetic questions, ideological/political frameworks, psychosexual contexts, and the ethics of voyeurism, with a focus on how noir style and the crime, war, and horror genres in particular have shaped our relationship to viewing violence. Directors will include: Alfred Hitchcock, Roman Polanski, Stanley Kubrick, Andy Warhol, Michelangelo Antonioni, Luis Bunuel, Jean Luc Godard, Francis Ford Coppola, David Cronenberg, David Lynch, Peter Greenaway, Pedro Almodovar, Michael Haneke, Gaspar Noe. Course divided into three segments: 1. Spectatorship, Gender, Desire; 2. New Wave Voyeurisms, Paranoid Spectatorship, War; 3. Neo-Noir and Technologies of Surveillance. Potential Films: M (Dir. Fritz Lang, 1931); Rear Window (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1954); Psycho (Dir. Hitchcock, 1960); Peeping Tom (Dir. Michael Powell, 1960); Repulsion (Dir. Roman Polanski, 1965); Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966); Straw Dogs (Dir. Polanski, 1971); Blow Up (Dir. Michelangelo Antonioni, 1966); Belle du Jour (Dir. Luis Bunuel, 1967); Alphaville (Dir. Jean Luc Godard, 1965); A Clockwork Orange (Dir. Stanley Kubrick, 1971);
The Shining (Dir. Kubrick, 1980), Full Metal Jacket (Dir. Kubrick, 1987); The Conversation (Dir. Francis Ford Coppola, 1974); The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (Dir. Tobe Hooper, 1974); Videodrome (Dir. David Cronenberg, 1983); Wings of Desire (Dir. Wim Wenders); Funny Games (Dir. Michael Haneke, 1997/2007); Cache (Dir. Haneke 2006); The Lives of Others (Dir. Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, 2006); The Skin I Live In (Dir. Pedro Almodovar, 2011); Enter the Void (Dir. Gaspar Noe, 2009); Andy Warhol silent films (Sleep; Eat; Blow Job); Shorts by Guy Maddin and Cindy Sherman. Potential Texts: Weegee, Naked City; Julio Cortazar short fiction; Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange; Michael Herr, Dispatches; Essays/Theory: Laura Mulvey, Miriam Hansen, Raymond Bellour, Griselda Pollack, Susan Sontag, Kaja Silverman, Carol Clover, Peter Gidal, Fredric Jameson, WJT Mitchell, Peggy Phelan, Slavoj Zizek, among other scholars of film & visual culture. Photography: Weegee, Robert Frank, Nan Goldin, Philip Jones Griffiths, Kohei Yoshiyuki, Cindy Sherman. Requirements: Weekly journals, Midterm paper, Final project. Prerequisite: Prior course in English, MCS, or film studies OR approval of instructor.
ENGL 220-01 Eighteenth-Century British Literature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 Neil Chudgar 2 / 20
This course is an introduction to the British literature of the long eighteenth century. Between the English civil wars of the mid-seventeenth century and the revolutionary turn of the nineteenth, Britons enjoyed a period of relative political stability, rapid technological innovation, unprecedented social mobility, and increasing material comfort. Yet the period’s literary works are anything but lacquered artifacts of a serene Age of Reason: they record readers’ and writers’ urgent efforts to register the consequences of global capitalism, to invent from scratch new forms of social and spiritual identity. Eighteenth-century Britons found themselves all at once in a newly modern world, and the literature they produced records their feelings about it. Reading from the passions of Thomas Hobbes to the sympathies of Adam Smith, from Jonathon Swift’s “savage indignation” to the “unutterable bliss” of Olaudah Equiano, we will explore the relationships between the historical forms of British literature and the forms of modern feelings to which they respond. Our texts may include works by, e.g., Burton, Descartes, Hobbes, Pepys, Dryden, Bunyan, Rochester, Locke, Defoe, Pope, Swift, Gay, Haywood, Goldsmith, Hume, Richardson, Gray, Johnson, Smith, Burney, and Wordsworth. We’ll spend most of our time in the long eighteenth century, but we will sometimes examine more recent texts that will help us think about the literary history of modern feeling. In your work for this course, you will develop some of our own cultures’ modern sensibilities to their literary origins, and develop crafts of reading and response that will help you reckon with the cultural forms you encounter. Our primary goal will be to explore relationships between eighteenth-century texts and the structures of modern feeling that inform our cultures in the here and how. English majors may count this course as one of the three required courses in literary history; it also satisfies general-education requirements in Internationalism and the Humanities. Students from all majors and of all intellectual orientations will find questions here to interest and challenge them: the British eighteenth century is nothing if not comprehensive.
ENGL 272-01 Love and Madness in 19th Century American Literature MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 James Dawes 0 / 20
Our common vocabulary of love presents it as a force that strikes and knocks down its victims. It comes like a fever and it disables cognition. Lovers "fall," they are "smitten," "head over heels," "crazy" for each other. Love is both mania and obsession, both a euphoria that alters one's view of the world as a whole and an exclusion of the whole world, a radical narrowing of our normally capacious imaginative and perceptual faculties down to the simplest and smallest of human frames: a face, or the sound of a voice. For American authors of the 18th and 19th century, love and madness were twinned sites of altered consciousness that represented the radical "others" of Enlightenment reason, psychic parallels to and extensions of the wilds of the New World and the uncontrollable crowds and freedoms of the new democracy. This course will examine love and madness from multiple perspectives, including the Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment, gender and sexuality, the American Gothic, violence, and sin. Authors will range from Benjamin Franklin and the Marquis de Sade to Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne.
ENGL 275-01 African American Literature to 1900 TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Daylanne English 0 / 20
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 280-01 Crafts of Writing: Poetry MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 003 James Cihlar 5 / 16
*First day attendance required* As developing poets, we will work efficiently and collaboratively to review familiar concepts, discover new ones, vet them through discussion and writing, and apply them in a workshop/laboratory setting. By reading contemporary examples of imagistic, lyrical, narrative, surrealistic, political, and experimental poems, we'll practice using persona, ekphrasis, history, juxtaposition, ellipses, sequence, villanelles, sestinas, and more in our writing. With a mix of texts that includes a practical guidebook, a candid critique of "po-biz," and an eclectic sampling of contemporary masters, our subject is both poetry and poetics. We'll learn by doing, by repetition, and by making connections across texts, weeks, and experience. Through frequent in-class writing, we'll generate many new ideas for pieces, and with a focus on revision in the latter half of the semester, we'll work toward polishing some of them. As we roll up our sleeves, we may find that poetry isn’t always easy, but it is definitely fun.
ENGL 281-02 Crafts of Writing: Fiction MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 204 Marlon James 1 / 16
*First day attendance required* In English 150 Introduction To Creative Writing you encountered the fundamentals of creative writing: plot, setting imagery, voice and character. Building on that foundation, Crafts is where you put those fundamentals to striking use—where you really begin to write. Crafts Of Fiction expands on your previous learning and reshapes it in more complex and unconventional ways, a lecture on Text as Seduction or Energy and Tension, instead of the usual nuts and bolts of creative prose. The course will conducted for the most part in workshop format with the emphasis on continuing to develop writing skills, but it will also involve extensive readings and discussion of several examples of short fiction, as well as four works assigned for group study. You will think like a writer. And write like a born storyteller. Prerequisite: English 150 (Introduction to Creative Writing) taken at Macalester.
ENGL 283-01 Crafts of Writing: Scriptwriting MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 011 Peter Bognanni -1 / 16
ENGL 294-01 The Anglo-Planetary World, 1450-1800 MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Dana Schumacher-Schmidt 9 / 20
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-03*
ENGL 331-01 Nineteenth Century British Novel TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Robert Warde 3 / 20
This survey of the nineteenth century British novel focuses on four works from the Victorian period: Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre; Charles Dickens, Bleak House; George Eliot, Middlemarch; and Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles. We will consider these novels as
reflections of their era (1840s to 1890s), as crafted works of art, and as embodiments of human experience. We begin with Bronte, whose novel opens with these words: "There was no possibility of taking a walk that day." We end with Hardy, whose novel closes with these words: "As soon as they had strength they arose, joined hands again, and went on." Between that thwarted walk ("the cold winter wind had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating, that further out-door exercise was now out of the question") and that manageable walk ("the sun's rays smiled on pitilessly"), between the somber clouds of Jane Eyre and the pitiless sun of Tess, we will explore four of Victorian England's most celebrated pieces of fiction. Along our journey we will meet birth, youth, courtship, marriage, separation, old age, and death. We will meet good people, bad people, and people like most of us. That's pretty much how it will go. Four pieces of writing are required during the course of the semester--a combination of in-class exams and papers according to student preference. Periodic, very brief objective quizzes will manifest themselves along the way. Class format is discussion based, and both attendance and participation are expected.
Fulfills the English Department's period literature requirement*
ENGL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 105 David Moore 3 / 20
*Cross-listed with INTL 367-01*
ENGL 380-01 Topics in African Amer Lit: Harlem Renaissance TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Daylanne English 2 / 20
*Cross-listed with AMST 380-01* In this course, we will ask a wide variety of literary, aesthetic, political, and historical questions about an equally wide variety of cultural productions from the Harlem Renaissance, roughly 1910-1938. We will study figures such as W. E. B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Bessie Smith, Oscar Micheaux, and James Van der Zee, among others. Our texts will include: ragtime, the blues, film, photography, poetry, novels, short stories, plays, autobiographies, fictional autobiographies and autobiographical fictions, and literary and cultural criticism. As we closely read, view, and listen, we will investigate: the movement’s chronological, geographic, and cultural boundaries; the imagination and representation of a "New Negro"; class, gender, and color conflict within the movement; tensions regarding “highbrow” versus “lowbrow” cultural production; the power and presence of gays and lesbians in what one scholar of the movement has termed "the gayest Renaissance in history"; debates regarding white patronage and audience; and the various "criteria of Negro art" being advanced by Harlem Renaissance figures. We will, finally, explore the current status of the Harlem Renaissance as a field of study and interest. Requirements for the course include: weekly 1-page responses to the reading, one paper of about 5 pages, one longer paper of about 15 pages, and one 20-minute presentation. This course fulfills the U.S. writers of color requirement for the English major.
ENGL 385-01 Los Angeles and the American Dream TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Robert Warde 0 / 16
*First day attendance required; Mandatory film screenings TBA* One out of eight Americans lives in California; Los Angeles has become the second largest city in the country; and United States history records a steady movement of people from East Coast to West Coast, from South (Latin America) to North, and across the Pacific Rim. In this course we will examine the growth and nature of Los Angeles (its need for water, its automobiles, its film industry, its ethnic makeup,its lurking potential for natural disaster) and this city's relationship to the evolving identity of the nation as a whole. It will be a study in the significance of place, the human and environmental impact of urban development, and the characteristics of the American dream. The focus is on literature, and the approximate reading list is as follows: Carey McWilliams, Southern California: An Island on the Land; Nathanael West, The Day of the Locust; Chester Himes, If He Hollers Let Him Go; James Ellroy, Black Dahlia; Joan Didion, Play It As It Lays; Mike Davis, City of Quartz; Anna Deavere Smith, Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992; Karen Tei Yamashita, Tropic of Orange; Brando Skyhorse, The Madonnas of Echo Park; D. J. Waldie, Where We Are Now: Notes from Los Angeles; and David Ulin's edited collection, Another City: Writing from Los Angeles. A companion film series tentatively includes Sunset Boulevard, Mulholland Drive, Chinatown, Blade Runner, L. A. Confidential, Boys n the Hood, Clueless, and The Big Lebowski, along with independent films such as Kent MacKenzie's The Exiles, and concluding with Thom Andersen's documentary, Los Angeles Plays Itself. A music component embraces a wide range of artists from Randy Newman, Madonna, Dave Alvin, and the Distillers, to Guns N' Roses, NWA, and 2Pac. Supplementary videos cover everything from riots and earthquakes to the famous slow-motion freeway pursuit of O. J. Simpson. This is a discussion-based course, and evaluation depends on attendance and participation, plus a combination of exams and papers according to student preference, these written assignments to total three. Occasional, very brief objective quizzes will measure the degree of enthusiasm with which students approach each day's assignment.

ENGL 394-01 The Self as A Character and the Writing Life MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm THEATR 204 Marlon James 1 / 16
*First day attendance required* Now that you are or want to be a writer what does that mean? How do we take the journal to the height of literary value? How does writing change from a piece to be read, to a piece to be performed, both of which you'll be expected to do? Reading moves on to become a reflexive act; meaning that you deliberately use what you have read to inform, influence and spur what you are writing, watching as that changes with each piece you read. The course is very free form and I wield a very light (some say too light) hand in the proceedings preferring to watch students develop a dynamic with each other. The coursework will include written pieces in several genres as well as presentations and performances.
ENGL 394-02 Crime, Horror, and Science Fiction W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Matthew Burgess 0 / 16
In this creative writing workshop, students will be expected to write a short story in three of the more popular genres: crime, horror, and science/speculative fiction. This course will not attempt to erect walls between so-called literary fiction and genre fiction, nor will we spend much time picking nits over what exactly is and isn't a ghost story or private eye story. Instead--through reading, writing, and discussion--we will attempt to resucitate the good name of entertainment. Readings may include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Patricia Highsmith, Shirley Jackson, William Faulkner, Joyce Carol Oates, Walter Moseley, Neil Gaiman, and Suzanne Collins's novel, The Hunger Games.
ENGL 394-03 Narrative Journalism M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 James Dawes 0 / 16
Co-taught with acclaimed writer and journalist Stephen Smith (Executive Editor and Host of American RadioWorks, the highly respected documentary series from American Public Media).This course will focus on creating vivid, economical prose as a foundation for many types of expository writing. Students will do research and interviews for print journalism pieces. Writing for audio/radio presentation will also be covered. Students will write frequently,
will edit each other, and will receive detailed suggestions on their writing from the instructors.
ENGL 394-04 Eccentricity and Mediocrity TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 217 David Martyn 12 / 25
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01; Taught in English* Tiring of heroism, modern prose fiction invented a new kind of figure beginning in the late 18th century: the mediocre protagonist whose distinguishing characteristic was not prowess or virtue but eccentricity, both real and imagined. What in Germany is called "the middle hero," in France "le bovarysme," and in Russia "poshlost'" (trivial bourgeois ordinariness) all designate aspects of this new literary space of the mediocre in which individuality depends increasingly on forms of deviance. The course traces this development from the dawn of romanticism to high modernism in German, French, and Russian fiction with the goal of understanding the way literature negotiates the tension between the need to be "different" and the injunction to be "normal." Readings from Goethe ("The Sorrows of Young Werther"), Flaubert ("Madame Bovary"), Gogol ("The Nose," "The Overcoat"), Musil (excerpts from "The Man without Qualities"), Kafka ("Letter to his Father," "Odradek," "The Metamorphosis"), and Thomas Mann ("Tristan"). Requirements: weekly reading reactions, three mid-length essays.
ENGL 400-01 Seminar: Literature and the Sense of Touch TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Neil Chudgar 1 / 12
*First day attendance required* In this senior seminar for English majors, we will explore the points of contact between literary language and the sense of touch. The connections between touch and literature begin when we hold a book in our hands (or don’t), but they hardly end there: we also say (or refuse to say) that a novel is “touching,” that some texts are “hard,” that some language is “fuzzy,” other language is “rough.” Beyond such tactile figures for literary phenomena, there’s also the fact that the worlds literature constructs for us are filled (or not) with sensitive creatures, who come into physical contact (or don’t) with the tangible objects that surround them. Some literary texts require us to think about touching in new and challenging ways; others need us to forget that touch is even possible. This course will help us think better about the many ways in which reading is (and isn’t) touching, and about the many ways in which touching can (and can’t) be read. We’ll begin or work by taking the first third of the term to explore some of the ways Western intellectual traditions have understood encounters between sensitive bodies and the tangible world. Readings in this part of the course will trace two lines of thought in particular: a philosophical tradition, from Aristotle through George Berkeley to Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and a psychoanalytic tradition, beginning with the works of Freud and continuing in writings by (e.g.) D. W. Winnicott, Didier Anzieu, and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick. During this period of reading, we will remind each other to keep the consequences of these theoretical traditions in touch with our thinking about literature. Having establish a common theoretical framework for our discussion, we’ll devote the remaining two-thirds of the semester reading, writing about, and discussing texts you and your colleagues have chosen to study on your own. You’ll sign up for a day to assign the rest of us an excerpt from the literature you’re studying read and comment on your colleagues’ written responses to it, and lead our discussion of it in class. Our conversation about your research will help you as you prepare your final project. That project may take any of several forms, from a scholarly essay to a work of prose fiction. To help graduating students prepare for their next steps in the world, we will also devote some of our time to professional development. This course is intended for senior English major, other students will be admitted only if space allows.
ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Kristin Naca 6 / 12

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENVI 133-01 Environmental Science MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Daniel Hornbach 3 / 18
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Daniel Hornbach 3 / 18
*Permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 160-01 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Kelly MacGregor 17 / 48
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-01; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 160-02 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with GEOL 160-02* In recent years it has become increasingly important to understand the consequences of human endeavor on the natural environment. Humans are now affecting the environment in an unprecedented way. Major dams affect the distribution of water and sediment; soils are being degraded or lost; groundwater levels are dropping; deserts are expanding; sea level is rising; and our hydrocarbon resources are in increasingly short supply. The Dynamic Earth and Global Change course provides a framework for understanding the natural processes of global change and the evolution of the Earth. The origins of mountains, the eruption of volcanoes, and the drifting of continents will be examined in the context of the unifying theory of plate tectonics. River systems, groundwater availability, earthquakes, desert environments, and coastal processes all have profound effects on the human condition and will also be studied.
The objectives of the course are 1) to help students develop a lifelong interest in learning about the Earth, and 2) to provide an introduction to materials and natural processes of the Earth. The course begins with an overview of the origin of the solar system and other planets. Students then learn to recognize and interpret the significance of important minerals and rocks. This is followed by a detailed examination of the composition, structure, the evolution of the Earth’s interior, and the plate tectonic model. The last portion of the course focuses on surface processes, including the hydrologic cycle, soil formation, stream processes, water resources, coastlines, deserts, and glacial environments. The course objectives will be accomplished using a variety of formats, including: lecture, readings, laboratory exercises, group projects, field trips, exams, and a final project. In particular, the course will emphasize active and problem-based learning in which students work in groups to solve real-world problems. This approach requires that students are fully engaged and active participants in their learning. Regular attendance in the classroom, laboratory, and field is essential for successful team performance. Emphasis will also be on developing skills of critical thinking, problem posing, data interpretation, map reading, 3D visualization, oral presentation and writing. Field trips will introduce students to important geological concepts and the geology of Minnesota. Students will be assessed on both individual and team performance.
ENVI 160-L1 Global Earth/Dynamic Chng Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 5 / 24
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-L1; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 160-L2 Global Earth/Dynamic Chng Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 12 / 24
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-L2; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 160-L3 Global Earth/Dynamic Chng Lab R 08:00 am-11:00 am Karl Wirth 0 / 17
*First Year Lab only; cross-listed with GEOL 160-L3*
ENVI 231-01 Environmental Economics and Policy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Sarah West 4 / 25
*Cross-listed with ECON 231-01; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 232-01 People, Agriculture and the Environment TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A William Moseley 1 / 30
*Cross-listed with GEOG 232-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Ryan Edgington 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 234-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 252-01 Water and Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with GEOG 252-01 and POLI 252-01; first day attendance required* "When you put your hand in a flowing stream, you touch the last that has gone before and the first of what is still to come" - Leonardo da Vinci
Water is power; power is water. Since ancient times, water has been one of the most fiercely guarded local and global physical, cultural and spiritual resources. Drawing from the fields of political science, geography, anthropology, history, geology and engineering, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to studying water and power. We will examine historical and emerging challenges to the equitable and sustainable use of transboundary waters. In addition to political borders, we will be concerned with ecological and social boundary crossings. We will address a range of controversial topics including endangered species, energy production, indigenous rights, and cultural preservation. We will also discuss the potentialities and limitations of environmental impact assessments, public participation and government institutional reform. The first part of the course introduces students to analytical tools for evaluating the design of water projects and policy. The second part of the course will ask students to apply these concepts toward assessing historical and contemporary case studies from the USA. Part Three will shift our attention to the international scene. We will examine inter-state/intra-state water conflicts and transnational social movements.
ENVI 258-01 Geog of Environmental Hazards MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Eric Carter 12 / 30
*Cross-listed with GEOG 258-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 270-01 Psychology of Sustainable Behavior TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Christina Manning 4 / 20
*Cross-listed with PSYC 270-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Mark Davis 2 / 40
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students whom may register on April 27th*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:00 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 0 / 20
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students whom may register on April 27th*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis 2 / 20
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students whom may register on April 27th*
ENVI 294-01 Urban Ecology: Communities, Politics, Sustainability TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Kathryn Pratt 13 / 25
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 294-02 Indigenous People of the Arctic MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06B Scott Legge 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with ANTH 294-01; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 333-01 Economics of Global Food Problems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Amy Damon 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with ECON 333-01 and INTL 333-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC student*
ENVI 343-01 Imperial Nature: The United States and the Global Environment TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Chris Wells 0 / 15
*Cross-listed with HIST 343-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 392-01 Outdoor Environmental Education W 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch -5 / 10
*Cross-listed with EDUC 392-01; 2 Credit course; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students* This course provides an introduction to outdoor environmental education at the elementary school level. Macalester students will partner with teachers and students from local schools, families with school-age children, and youth organizations to explore interdisciplinary approaches to outdoor environmental education. The course will utilize Macalester's field station, the Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area, as an outdoor classroom and will adapt curriculum from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and other sources to help elementary school teachers and students to fulfill Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards and assist youth organizations in achieving their environmental education goals. A weekly 90-minute seminar session incorporating readings, reflective writing, and individual and small group projects will complement the experiential aspects of the course. Students will participate in a weekend retreat early in the semester, one or two Saturday morning events, and one or two Wednesday afternoon (noon to 3:30) sessions at the Ordway. (2 credits - S/N Grading Only)
ENVI 392-01 Outdoor Environmental Education W 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai -5 / 10
*Cross-listed with EDUC 392-01; 2 Credit course; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students* This course provides an introduction to outdoor environmental education at the elementary school level. Macalester students will partner with teachers and students from local schools, families with school-age children, and youth organizations to explore interdisciplinary approaches to outdoor environmental education. The course will utilize Macalester's field station, the Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area, as an outdoor classroom and will adapt curriculum from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and other sources to help elementary school teachers and students to fulfill Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards and assist youth organizations in achieving their environmental education goals. A weekly 90-minute seminar session incorporating readings, reflective writing, and individual and small group projects will complement the experiential aspects of the course. Students will participate in a weekend retreat early in the semester, one or two Saturday morning events, and one or two Wednesday afternoon (noon to 3:30) sessions at the Ordway. (2 credits - S/N Grading Only)
ENVI 394-01 Food, Environment and Society in 20th Century America MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 228 Ryan Edgington -6 / 15
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-02; permission of instructor required for ACTC students.* This course will follow the history of 20th century American food from the farm through the factory and then to the table. In other words, students will come to know how Supermarket America came to dominate the landscape. We will explore the transformation of the family farm to industrial endeavor and the role of the federal government, farm lobbyists, and land grant universities in that process. The course will also examine the role of technology and science in making American food systems more efficient and complex through assembly lines, pesticides and herbicides, and the genetic modification of foods. Finally we will explore the political questions surrounding Supermarket America and why many Americans revolted against it by demanding organic foods and macrobiotic diets. The environmental impact of America's ways of eating will run throughout the course.
ENVI 478-01 Cities of the 21st Century TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau 2 / 15
*Cross-listed with GEOG 488-02; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all students*
ENVI 488-01 Comparative Environmental and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 William Moseley -3 / 15
*Permission of instructor required for all students; cross-listed with GEOG 488-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required*
ENVI 489-01 Environmental Leadership Pract M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke 0 / 20
*Permission of instructor required for all students; first day attendance required*
ENVI 490-01 Envi St Leadership Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke 0 / 20
*Permission of instructor required for all students; first day attendance required; 2 Credit course*

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
FREN 101-01 French I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 215 Annick Fritz 0 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L1 French I Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 111 Rokhaya Dieng 0 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L2 French I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Rokhaya Dieng 1 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 112 Annick Fritz 12 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Morgane Thiery 5 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L2 French II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 212 Morgane Thiery 7 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 112 Annick Fritz 9 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Morgane Thiery 7 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L2 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 270 Rokhaya Dieng 2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 194-01 LaBelle Epoque? The Best and Worst of France MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 402 Juliette Rogers 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* In this course, we will study the time period in France known as the “Belle Epoque” (1880-1914). This era was one of the richest in modern French cultural history, including the rise of the Impressionist and Cubist movements in art, the development of modern music by Debussy and Satie, and the expansion of French literature by authors Colette, Gide, and Proust. In popular culture, nightclubs such as the Moulin Rouge became major gathering places for artists, and the farce dominated popular theater. We will also briefly review the major technological and scientific advances of the time period, including the discoveries by Marie and Pierre Curie and the invention of cinema, the metro, and the automobile. However, we must also remember that this “beautiful” time included a darker side, and we will study several crucial events, such as the anti-semitism that spurred the Dreyfus Affair, the racist policies that promoted the continuing colonization of Africa during the period, and the political events leading up to World War I in 1914.
FREN 203-01 French III MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 111 Joelle Vitiello -2 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-02 French III MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 111 Joelle Vitiello 6 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-03 French III MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 Juliette Rogers -1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab T 09:10 am-10:10 am HUM 402 Rokhaya Dieng 4 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 227 Rokhaya Dieng 2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L3 French III Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 212 Morgane Thiery -4 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L4 French III Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 111 Morgane Thiery -2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L5 French III Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Rokhaya Dieng 1 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L6 French III Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Morgane Thiery 2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 Martine Sauret 4 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 202 Martine Sauret 0 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab T 09:10 am-10:10 am HUM 228 Morgane Thiery 1 / 10
*First day attenance required*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Rokhaya Dieng 3 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Morgane Thiery 3 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Rokhaya Dieng -3 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 Martine Sauret 9 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Rokhaya Dieng 5 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 226 Morgane Thiery 4 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 306-01 Introduction to Literary Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 6 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 407-01 Voix du Sud TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 102 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 7 / 20
*First day attendance required* This course is an introduction to francophone literature––specifically that of the sub-Saharan region––through literary, cultural, and political issues. By drawing from African text (poetry, theater, novels, and essays) and film, the course seeks to retrace several significant periods that have influenced African francophone literature to this day. The course will focus on four key axes: The first axis is that of "traditional African oral literature" from the pre-colonial period and the translation of these oral works into French. We will begin by visiting pre-colonial "oral" literature and its transcription into French translations by discussing the concept of literature in its relationship to the written and the oral, as well as the relationship of the author and the translator. The second axis will explore from the beginnings of a "written" literature until the 1950s based on the revaluation of traditional African cultures and a critique of colonization. This angle will essentially be organized around works of negritude and its critique. The third axis is the "disenchantment" of African independence and the denunciation of African dictators. This aspect will cover works from the 1960s to the 1980s. Finally, the fourth axis, from the 1990s to the present, will be studied from two orientations: francophone literature from the African Diaspora––"migritude"––and post-genocide literature. The course sessions will be organized in the form of a seminar. The instructor will begin each period with an introductory lecture that will be enriched in following sessions by reading analysis, personal reflection, and group exchanges. We will invite writers and specialists in francophone African literature. In addition to African films and several excerpts from texts, we will be studying Le Pauvre Christ de Bomba by Mongo Beti, Les soleils des Independances by Kourouma, Le ventre de l'Atlantique by Fatou Diome, and Murambi by Boris Diop.
FREN 408-01 French Intellectuals in/and the World: Literature, Critical Tools, and Engagement MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 102 Joelle Vitiello 10 / 20
*First day attendance required* This course presents an overview of French culture, theory and philosophy from the Middle Ages to today. The course focuses on how French intellectuals have engaged across time with issues such as gender, class, race, language, and the public and the private, among other issues. We will study how French intellectuals used their critical thinking, and theoretical and creative writing to propose ideas, take ethical positions (or not), and through writing and acting, engage in solidarity work. We will read Christine de Pizan on the role of intellectual women in the public sphere, Montaigne on colonialism, Pascal and Descartes on religion and science, Voltaire and Beccaria on torture and prisons, Michel Foucault on enlightenment, Victor Hugo on capital punishment, Pierre Bourdieu on "the organic intellectual" and more recent notions of commitment and civic engagement with war and peace, immigration, and postcolonial cultural history through the works of the Surrealists, Sartre, Camus, Duras, Cixous, Derrida, Assia Djebar and Boubacar Boris Diop.

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOG 111-01 Human Geography of Global Issues MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Kathryn Pratt 3 / 35
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 111-02 Human Geography of Global Issues MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran 11 / 35
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 112-01 Introduction to Urban Studies MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06A Daniel Trudeau 3 / 30
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Holly Barcus -11 / 20
*First day attendance required; $25 Lab fee required*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp 1 / 15
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 108 Ashley Nepp -1 / 15
GEOG 232-01 People, Agriculture and the Environment TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A William Moseley 1 / 30
*Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
GEOG 241-01 Urban Geography MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 David Lanegran 5 / 30
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 249-01 Regional Geog of Latin America MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Kathryn Pratt 21 / 35
*Cross-listed with LATI 249-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 252-01 Water and Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 252-01 and POLI 252-01; first day attendance required* "When you put your hand in a flowing stream, you touch the last that has gone before and the first of what is still to come" - Leonardo da Vinci
Water is power; power is water. Since ancient times, water has been one of the most fiercely guarded local and global physical, cultural and spiritual resources. Drawing from the fields of political science, geography, anthropology, history, geology and engineering, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to studying water and power. We will examine historical and emerging challenges to the equitable and sustainable use of transboundary waters. In addition to political borders, we will be concerned with ecological and social boundary crossings. We will address a range of controversial topics including endangered species, energy production, indigenous rights, and cultural preservation. We will also discuss the potentialities and limitations of environmental impact assessments, public participation and government institutional reform. The first part of the course introduces students to analytical tools for evaluating the design of water projects and policy. The second part of the course will ask students to apply these concepts toward assessing historical and contemporary case studies from the USA. Part Three will shift our attention to the international scene. We will examine inter-state/intra-state water conflicts and transnational social movements.
GEOG 254-01 Population 7 Billion: Global Population Issues and Trends MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 105 Holly Barcus 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* In 1798 Thomas Malthus first argued that population growth would exceed food production, which in turn, would lead to widespread starvation. Today we still have not conclusively answered the very controversial question of whether the world is or is not “overpopulated”. Questions of resource availability and distribution, world fertility and mortality rates and increasingly, the redistribution of populations through international migration change the ways in which we consider this question. In this introductory population geography course we will explore global population trends and the various factors that influence the volume and distribution of populations across the globe focusing on both contemporary and historical debates. Our objectives include understanding the current spatial patterns of global human population distribution and how the primary components of population change (fertility, mortality and migration) differentially affect world regions. Contemporary population issues (AIDS, refugees, immigration, fertility choices and migration decisions) will provide the lens through which we begin to develop an understanding of the historical and, possibly, future trends and debates. We will examine these issues from both a macro and micro perspective. For example, we will consider migration flows such as those between Mexico-US, rural-urban migration in China, and transnational migration in Mongolia, seeking to better understand why individuals decide to move from one place to another and how changes in the global economy influence these decisions. Directed exercises, guest lectures and local field trips will help you acquire the skills to measure and evaluate population structure and composition and independent projects will allow you to apply these skills to geographic areas of greatest interest to you, both locally and globally.
GEOG 256-01 Medical Geography: The Geography of Health and Health Care MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Eric Carter 2 / 30
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 258-01 Geography of Environmental Hazards MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Eric Carter 12 / 30
*Cross-listed with ENVI 258-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
GEOG 294-01 Urban Ecology: Communities, Politics, Sustainability TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Kathryn Pratt 13 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
GEOG 294-02 Placing Race and Seeing Social Inequality TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 David Lanegran -5 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-01; first day attendance required* Many decades after the U.S. civil rights movement—and despite the fact of a black President in the White House—place, location, and separation still influence community activity and individual life chances throughout the nation. This new team-taught course will bring together several ways of understanding and analyzing place, race, and other social inequalities. Prof. Aguilar-San Juan will contribute a race-cognizant perspective drawn from urban sociology and Asian American Studies. Prof. Lanegran will contribute the place-oriented perspective of a geographer with well-established connections to the Twin Cities, and to the Minnesotan landscape.
GEOG 294-02 Placing Race and Seeing Social Inequality TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 Karin Aguilar-San Juan -5 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-01; first day attendance required* Many decades after the U.S. civil rights movement—and despite the fact of a black President in the White House—place, location, and separation still influence community activity and individual life chances throughout the nation. This new team-taught course will bring together several ways of understanding and analyzing place, race, and other social inequalities. Prof. Aguilar-San Juan will contribute a race-cognizant perspective drawn from urban sociology and Asian American Studies. Prof. Lanegran will contribute the place-oriented perspective of a geographer with well-established connections to the Twin Cities, and to the Minnesotan landscape.
GEOG 394-01 Remote Sensing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Sanchayeeta Adhikari 6 / 15
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 394-02 Advanced Cartography and Geovisualization TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp 0 / 15
*First day attendance required; $25 Lab fee required*
GEOG 394-L1 Remote Sensing Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Sanchayeeta Adhikari 6 / 15
*First day attendance required; $25 Lab fee required*
GEOG 394-L2 Adv Cartography Geovisual Lab R TBA CARN 108 Ashley Nepp 1 / 15
GEOG 488-01 Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 William Moseley -3 / 15
*Permission of instructor required for all students; cross-listed with ENVI 488-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 488-02 Cities of the 21st Century TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau 2 / 15
*Cross-listed with ENVI 478-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all students*

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOL 101-01 Dinosaurs TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 100 Kristina Curry Rogers -5 / 48
*ACTC students must wait until September 5th for registration*
GEOL 103-01 Geocinema W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 100 John Craddock 14 / 30
GEOL 160-01 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Kelly MacGregor 17 / 48
*Cross-listed with ENVI 160-01; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
GEOL 160-02 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 160-02* In recent years it has become increasingly important to understand the consequences of human endeavor on the natural environment. Humans are now affecting the environment in an unprecedented way. Major dams affect the distribution of water and sediment; soils are being degraded or lost; groundwater levels are dropping; deserts are expanding; sea level is rising; and our hydrocarbon resources are in increasingly short supply. The Dynamic Earth and Global Change course provides a framework for understanding the natural processes of global change and the evolution of the Earth. The origins of mountains, the eruption of volcanoes, and the drifting of continents will be examined in the context of the unifying theory of plate tectonics. River systems, groundwater availability, earthquakes, desert environments, and coastal processes all have profound effects on the human condition and will also be studied.
The objectives of the course are 1) to help students develop a lifelong interest in learning about the Earth, and 2) to provide an introduction to materials and natural processes of the Earth. The course begins with an overview of the origin of the solar system and other planets. Students then learn to recognize and interpret the significance of important minerals and rocks. This is followed by a detailed examination of the composition, structure, the evolution of the Earth’s interior, and the plate tectonic model. The last portion of the course focuses on surface processes, including the hydrologic cycle, soil formation, stream processes, water resources, coastlines, deserts, and glacial environments. The course objectives will be accomplished using a variety of formats, including: lecture, readings, laboratory exercises, group projects, field trips, exams, and a final project. In particular, the course will emphasize active and problem-based learning in which students work in groups to solve real-world problems. This approach requires that students are fully engaged and active participants in their learning. Regular attendance in the classroom, laboratory, and field is essential for successful team performance. Emphasis will also be on developing skills of critical thinking, problem posing, data interpretation, map reading, 3D visualization, oral presentation and writing. Field trips will introduce students to important geological concepts and the geology of Minnesota. Students will be assessed on both individual and team performance.
GEOL 160-L1 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 5 / 24
*Cross-listed with ENVI 160-L1; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
GEOL 160-L2 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 12 / 24
*Cross-listed with ENVI 160-L2; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
GEOL 160-L3 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab R 08:00 am-11:00 am OLRI 187 Karl Wirth 0 / 17
*First Year Lab only; cross-listed with ENVI 160-L3*
GEOL 165-01 History and Evolution of the Earth MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 187 Raymond Rogers 2 / 17
*First Year Course only* This course provides an overview of major happenings in the history of Earth over the past ~4.6 billion years. We will explore the birth of Earth (and its moon), the making of mountains, the history of climate change, and the many cataclysmic events that punctuate Earth history. Major emphasis is placed on tracking the evolution of life, from the simplest single-celled organisms of ancient Earth to today’s diverse floras and faunas. Another major focus is the linkage among Earth’s major systems - the rocks, atmosphere, oceans, and life did not and do not evolve independently. The class includes a fossil-collecting field trip. Key lab exercises will be incorporated into class time. This course is required for geology majors, and counts toward the major.
GEOL 250-01 Mineralogy MWF 08:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth 3 / 18
GEOL 260-01 Geomorphology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor 2 / 18
GEOL 260-L1 Geomorphology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor 2 / 18
GEOL 300-01 Paleobiology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers 6 / 18
GEOL 300-L1 Paleobiology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers 7 / 18
GEOL 301-01 Geophysics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock 7 / 18
GEOL 301-L1 Geophysics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock 7 / 18

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GERM 101-01 Elementary German I MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Kiarina Kordela 10 / 20
GERM 101-L1 Elementary German I Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 214 Christine Hrncal 1 / 5
GERM 101-L3 Elementary German I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 226 Christine Hrncal 0 / 5
GERM 101-L4 Elementary German I Lab TBA TBA Christine Hrncal 4 / 5
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 214 Kiarina Kordela 6 / 20
GERM 110-L1 Accel Elementary German Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Christine Hrncal -2 / 5
GERM 110-L2 Accel Elementary German Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 404 Christine Hrncal 3 / 5
GERM 110-L3 Accel Elementary German Lab T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm HUM 214 Christine Hrncal 1 / 5
GERM 110-L4 Accel Elementary German Lab TBA TBA Christine Hrncal 5 / 5
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Rachael Huener 3 / 20
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Daniel Bambach 0 / 5
GERM 203-L2 Intermediate German I Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 213 Daniel Bambach -1 / 5
GERM 203-L5 Intermediate German I Lab TBA TBA Daniel Bambach 0 / 5
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 214 Linda Schulte-Sasse 8 / 20
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 401 Christine Hrncal 1 / 5
GERM 204-L2 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 370 Christine Hrncal 2 / 5
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab TBA TBA Christine Hrncal 4 / 9
GERM 255-01 German Cinema Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 401 Linda Schulte-Sasse 0 / 17
*First Year Course only* One often hears horror movies referred to as trash. Does horror necessarily “deserve” this condemnation (or plug)? Why does an occasional horror film like The Silence of the Lambs win respectability or even a best-picture Oscar? What are the criteria by which we determine whether any film or work of art is good, bad, or perhaps not art at all? The course will examine horror films from various periods and places, some of which were repudiated at their release only to be recuperated later as arthouse classics. But all challenge cultural assumptions about art and horror as mutually exclusive categories, and all employ shock, horror, and gore as compelling means of representing social anxieties and historical traumas. Our objective will be to reflect on questions of aesthetic valuation, and to explore the themes, narrative strategies, and audience effects of horror; we will draw on a variety of theoretical approaches like Freud’s notion of the uncanny or Todorov’s of the fantastic. Likely examples will include pre-World War II Germany (Wiene, Murnau, Lang), depression-era USA (Tod Browning), the invention of body horror (Franju, Powell, Hitchcock), and contemporary “post-modern” horror (Argento, Romero, Cronenberg, Haneke). Course prerequisite: guts. First, films like Tod Browning’s Freaks (1932) or Franju’s Les Yeux sans Visage (1960) will disabuse you of any notion that Quentin Tarantino invented grossness. Second, you may find that by seriously engaging film studies, introducing theoretical concepts, and doing what some call "over"-reading, the course will "ruin the fun." My hope is that the opposite will be the case (and that fun and work are no more mutually exclusive than art and horror). Student obligations: a series of short papers, oral presentations, and one longer research paper. Two exams and an informal log responding to class readings. Hopefully the Twin Cities will offer some cultural events relevant to our theme that we can visit as a class.
GERM 294-01 Reading the Critique of Pure Reason TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Janet Folina 10 / 15
*Cross-listed with PHIL 294-01; taught in English* We will begin by first reading the Prolegomena to any Future Metaphysics, which gives an overview of the thesis and vision of the Critique. Then we will turn to reading the Critique section by section. Interpreting this work is a wonderful intellectual challenge; assisting us will be a detailed, secondary resource on the main arguments. If time allows we will also read some more current scholarship on Kant's philosophy; depending on student interest this could include themes such as Kant's philosophy of science, his philosophy of mathematics, and/or his philosophy of religion. (Philosophy 231, Modern Philosophy, is recommended but not required. For German Studies majors, this course can be used to fulfill either the theory requirement or the extra-departmental German content requirement.)
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 216 Gisela Peters 11 / 20
GERM 305-L2 German Through the Media Lab M 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Daniel Bambach 9 / 10
GERM 305-L3 German Through the Media Lab TBA TBA Daniel Bambach 2 / 10
GERM 308-01 Introduction to German Studies MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 214 Rachael Huener 8 / 20
GERM 337-01 Dead White Men MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 226 Kiarina Kordela 3 / 30
This course is an introduction to the study of critical theory, and is organized in such a way as to benefit equally beginners and advanced students. The shift away from medieval feudalism and theocracy (wherein divinity grounded truth and political authority) to the modern capitalist economy and secular modes of thought entailed unforeseen reconceptualizations of time. We shall examine them by tracing two central developments that define modernity. First—as a triple consequence of the gradual obliteration of religious faith as the basis for legitimizing truth and political power—the emergence of (1) ideology and (2) biopolitics, and (3) the secularization of transcendence, i.e., its inclusion within the plane of immanence. Second, the concomitant double reconceptualization of secular time: on the one hand, as human history progressing toward a certain telos (end or aim), and, on the other hand, as a machinic or formal time within which elements of an autonomous structure (i.e., one that is not controlled by humans) determine each other through their inter-relations. Authors we shall read include: Descartes, Pascal, Spinoza, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Saussure, Levi-Strauss, Freud, Adorno, Gramsci, Kojeve, Lacan, Althusser, Blumenberg, Balibar, Foucault, Pfaller, Karatani, Holland, Zizek. Required Texts: Alexandre Kojeve: Introduction to the Reading of Hegel: Lectures on the Phenomenology of Spirit. Assembl. Raymond Queneau. Ed. Allan Bloom. Trans. James H. Nichols, Jr. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1980. Kojin Karatani: Architecture as Metaphor: Language, Number, Money. Ed. Michael Speaks. Trans. Sabu Kohso. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1995. Writing requirements: This course will be writing intensive, with weekly critical assessments of the assigned texts, one mid-term paper with extensive revision, and a final paper.
GERM 363-01 Romanticism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 David Martyn 11 / 20
This year's focus: The Fantastic. With the advent of a rationalistic worldview, modern literature set about inventing an alternative universe: the literature of the fantastic in which the laws of nature no longer applied. The course will explore the modern fascination with the uncanny, the unexplainable, the magical, and the demonic from romanticism to modernism. Readings from Goethe's "Faust," the Grimms' fairytales, the romantic tales of Tieck, Chamisso, Eichendorff, and E.T.A. Hoffmann through the fantastic realism of Gotthelf and Storm to Kafka's "Metamorphosis." Short theoretical texts by Freud, Callois, and Todorov. Requirements: a portfolio to include one mid-length expository essay; one fictional story or play; participation in a short film or stage production. Conducted in German. Prerequisites: German 307 or 308, study abroad, or permission of the instructor.
GERM 394-01 Eccentricity and Mediocrity TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 217 David Martyn 12 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-04; Taught in English* Tiring of heroism, modern prose fiction invented a new kind of figure beginning in the late 18th century: the mediocre protagonist whose distinguishing characteristic was not prowess or virtue but eccentricity, both real and imagined. What in Germany is called "the middle hero," in France "le bovarysme," and in Russia "poshlost'" (trivial bourgeois ordinariness) all designate aspects of this new literary space of the mediocre in which individuality depends increasingly on forms of deviance. The course traces this development from the dawn of romanticism to high modernism in German, French, and Russian fiction with the goal of understanding the way literature negotiates the tension between the need to be "different" and the injunction to be "normal." Readings from Goethe ("The Sorrows of Young Werther"), Flaubert ("Madame Bovary"), Gogol ("The Nose," "The Overcoat"), Musil (excerpts from "The Man without Qualities"), Kafka ("Letter to his Father," "Odradek," "The Metamorphosis"), and Thomas Mann ("Tristan"). Requirements: weekly reading reactions, three mid-length essays.

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HISP 101-02 Elementary Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 212 Rosa Rull-Montoya -2 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Antonella Morales 2 / 12
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 113 Antonella Morales 2 / 12
HISP 101-L5 Elementary Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 9 / 12
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 227 Leah Sand -2 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 6 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab M 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 113 Antonella Morales 1 / 12
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 113 Antonella Morales 2 / 12
HISP 102-L3 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 113 Antonella Morales 7 / 12
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Antonella Morales 2 / 12
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 12 / 12
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 110-01 Accelerated Beginning Spanish MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 213 Leah Sand -2 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz -3 / 15
*5 credits; first day attendance required*
HISP 151-01 Caribbean Literature and Culture: Aesthetics of Resistance MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 Margaret Olsen 3 / 17
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with LATI 151-01; first day attendance required* The Caribbean possesses one of the most complex cultural landscapes in the world. In fact, the Caribbean was global centuries before the term globalization came into vogue. But the forced cultural coexistences imposed by conquest, slavery and colonialism have not made globalization an easy process for the region. Moreover, tourism and our contemporary culture of consumption have only served to bolster neocolonial socioeconomic structures. In this course, our objective is to explore the ways in which literature, art and performance offer powerful tools of resistance against oppression. To that end, we will learn how Caribbean writers, intellectuals, artists and musicians use their art to confront the various challenges that islands of the region face, including political domination, racism, poverty and sexism. Students will also be encouraged to recognize the multiple realities that Caribbeans are often obliged to navigate as they migrate between the US and the Caribbean in an effort to economically survive. The course will challenge commonly-held notions of the Caribbean as merely a site for pleasure, full of gentle beaches, fruity tropical drinks and danceable music.
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 215 Philip Thornberry 2 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 215 Philip Thornberry 0 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-03 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 213 Cynthia Kauffeld 1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-04 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 213 Cynthia Kauffeld 7 / 20
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Cecilia Battauz 0 / 12
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Cecilia Battauz -1 / 12
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Antonella Morales 3 / 12
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Cecilia Battauz 1 / 12
HISP 203-L5 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 101 Antonella Morales 1 / 12
HISP 203-L6 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 404 Antonella Morales 2 / 12
HISP 203-L7 Intermediate Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 11 / 12
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Galo Gonzalez 2 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Galo Gonzalez 0 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 5 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-04 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 213 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 404 Cecilia Battauz 3 / 12
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Cecilia Battauz -1 / 12
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Cecilia Battauz -1 / 12
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Cecilia Battauz -2 / 12
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Cecilia Battauz 3 / 12
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 247 Cecilia Battauz 1 / 12
HISP 204-L7 Intermediate Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 11 / 12
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 228 Susana Blanco-Iglesias -3 / 15
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 305-01 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 215 Antonio Dorca 1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-02 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 214 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 3 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-03 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 Antonio Dorca -1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-04 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 113 Rosa Rull-Montoya 4 / 15
HISP 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 10 / 15
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Galo Gonzalez 5 / 15
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 394-01 Ethics of Civic Engagement TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 0 / 15
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-02 and EDUC 394-01 ; first day attendance required; taught in Spanish* This course is designed and organized as an interdisciplinary community learning course. Students and Latina/o youth from Minneapolis will work together throughout the semester conducting oral histories with Latina/o parents. The project titled A Journey North is part of the Heritage and Education Digital Resource Center for Centro Cultural Chicano. Taught as a seminar, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, study abroad or policy work, and will also examine issues of power and privilege as they relate to civic engagement both from a local and global standpoint.
HISP 414-01 Here and There: Superando Limites/Crossing Boundaries MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 216 Margaret Olsen 13 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 422-01 Modern Hispanic Novel and the Visual Arts MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 227 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 7 / 20
*Cross-listed with LATI 422-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 430-01 Adv Spanish Grammar: Meaning and Communication MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Cynthia Kauffeld -1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 443-01 The Reality of Contemporary Spain: Challenges and Dilemmas MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Antonio Dorca 9 / 20
*First day attendance required*

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HIST 110-01 Introduction to European History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Peter Weisensel 9 / 25
HIST 135-01 American Violence to 1800: Warfare From The Age of Contact To The Revolutionary War TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 204 Eric Otremba 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-02*
HIST 140-01 Introduction to East Asian Civilization MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 10 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 140-01*
HIST 194-01 African Life Histories TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Jamie Monson 1 / 14
*First Year Course only* In this course we will learn about African history through the stories that Africans themselves have told about their own lives. We will use oral history; songs of West Africa’s griots; slave narratives; political autobiographies; theatre and film to explore the personal narration of lived experience. To guide our class discussions we will also consult scholarly essays about life history as a genre, to help us understand the methodology behind the production of these important texts. Class activities will include seminar discussions, writing workshops, a field trip and intermittent background lectures. Each student will carry out an individual research project on a topic of their choice.
HIST 194-02 Mediterranean, Baltic, Black: Seas Identities, and History TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Igor Tchoukarine 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with INTL 194-01*
HIST 201-01 History of U.S. Feminisms TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 227 Catherine Batza 11 / 25
*Cross-listed with WGSS 201-01*
HIST 232-01 Immigration and Ethnicity in US History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 232-01* Immigration continues to be a controversial issue in the second decade of the 21st century, as does the changing landscape of race and ethnicity, on the one hand, and racism and xenophobia, on the other. This course, which is open to students with no experience in college-level history -- asks what we can learn from studying the ways that the U.S. government, economy, and culture received immigrants in the 19th and 20th centuries, and the ways those immigrants and their children responded to the challenges that they faced. These experiences provided templates, patterns, and structures which shape the present. The United States is in the midst of its third substantial wave of immigration, with more than one million new arrivals each year since 1990. We will employ critical historical studies, oral histories, memoirs, novels, drama, music, and graphic texts in our investigations, and we will learn how historians ask questions, seek and gather information, and provide analyses. We will explore how historians do not merely study the past but are engaged in constructing bridges and conversations between the past and the present.

HIST 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Ryan Edgington 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
HIST 256-01 Transatlantic Slave Trade TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Eric Otremba 16 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 256-01*Between 1492 and 1888, an estimated 11 million Africans were removed from their homes and transported to various ports in the Americas. Today, the Transatlantic Slave Trade remains the largest forced migration in world history. In the United States, most Americans are aware of slavery’s powerful influence on U.S. history. However few realize that North America only received 5% of all the slaves carried to the New World, while the rest were sent to the Caribbean and Latin America. This class will take a broader look at slavery and the slave trade by comparing U.S. slavery to other types of “slave societies” that developed in the New World. Topics will include: slavery and the slave trade in West Africa, the Middle Passage, gender dynamics within the trade, the commoditization of people, African and slave responses to the trade, the re-creation of African culture in the Americas, the interstate trade of the early U.S. republic, and the abolition of the trade throughout the Atlantic World in the early nineteenth century.
HIST 257-01 Empires MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Peter Weisensel 11 / 25
HIST 274-01 The Great Tradition in China before 1840 MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 11 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 274-01*
HIST 277-01 The Rise of Modern Japan W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 6 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 277-01*
HIST 294-01 Science, Magic and Belief in the Early Modern Atlantic MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Karin Velez 7 / 25
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-04* Events of the distant European past continue to shape our modern attitudes towards religion, magic and science. How did people in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Atlantic world use these frameworks to make sense of the world around them? In this course, we will journey back to the period of the "Scientific Revolution" to investigate how and why people began to distinguish sharply between the three systems. Who lost, and who profited, from this transition ? What similarities between religion, magic and science persisted ? To understand this turning point, we will compare contemporaneous cases of individuals who practiced magic, science and religion and ran afoul of authorities. Their trials highlight how the three spheres began to diverge. Cases we will consider might include the 1633 trial of Galileo, and the 1663 witchcraft trial of Tempel Anneke in Germany.
HIST 294-02 Asian American History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Peter Rachleff 19 / 25
The category "Asian-American" was constructed by student activists in the 1960s and 1970s. Inspired by the civil rights and black power movements, college students from Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, and South Asian families and communities came together, embraced their own histories as well as their common bonds, and called for curricular and cultural responses from institutions of higher education. These movements rippled outwards from the academia, influencing art, theater, poetry, music, and museums, as well as community and political organizing. They also impacted the construction of historical knowledge itself, creating "Asian-American Studies" and "Asian-American History." This course will take up this challenge by exploring the specific experiences of immigrants to the United States from Asian countries and regions, the receptions they were accorded, and the evolution of their identities, cultures, and communities over time. We will pay attention to difference among Asian-Americans as well as shared elements in their experiences, and we will be as interested in their relationships with specific groups within U.S. society (African Americans, Latinos, workers, etc.) as we will be in their changing locations within U.S. society as a whole. We will also be interested in the experiences of those Asian immigrants -- Vietnamese, Hmong, Cambodian, Laotian, South Asian, etc. -- who came after the emergence of "Asian-American" as a concept or a project. We will rely on critical historical scholarship, oral histories, memoirs, poetry, drama, and fiction, and primary documents in our journey. This course is open to students who do not yet have experience in college-level history.
HIST 294-03 Gender, Race, and Health in 20th Century US TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Catherine Batza 6 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-03 and WGSS 294-03* This course explores the complex historical relationships between gender, race, health, sickness, and oppression over time. Three main questions drive this course: 1) How do changing definitions of health construct, reinforce, and challenge racial and gender oppression? 2) How does race and gender impact experiences of health, sickness, and health care? 3) How, and to what effect, have social movements fighting gender and racial oppression employed health as a political tool? Likely topics include in-depth study of various epidemics, the Tuskegee Syphilis experiments, the Medical Committee for Human Rights, Black Panther Party health initiatives, the women’s health movement and reproductive rights, homosexuality, and genetics.
HIST 294-05 U.S. in the 1930s W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff 11 / 25
This history course is a rare treat to teach and to take -- devoting an entire semester to one decade of history. The 1930s deserves this sort of attention. It saw the greatest breakdown of institutions ever experienced in the U.S., and it also saw the reorganization of political, economic, social, and cultural institutions. We will use critical historical studies, oral histories, documentary and dramatic films, primary documents, novels, poetry, drama, visual art, and music, as resources in our effort to understand this period. Our three-hour class sessions will allow us to reach significant depths in our discussions, and writing assignments will allow you to develop your own investigations and arguments into key elements of this rich period. An intended by-product of the course is to give us experience in connecting economic, political, social, and cultural institutions and processes in our analytical thinking, to become better able to understand how race and class, or gender and race, or art and economics, etc., are interwoven. We will also be interested in building bridges and conversations between the past and the present, particularly as our society continues to face challenges that seem quite similar to those of the 1930s.
HIST 294-06 Vikings, Tartars, Slaves: Early Russia starting from the Viking Conquest TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Peter Weisensel 14 / 25
Viking chieftains sailing down the Volga in their dragon boats, Tatar hoards besieging Kiev, Slavic herders in a forest clearing sacrificing a bullock to the lightening god Perun, Arab traders plying the “Silk Road” between China and Constantinople – all of these people, and others, we will encounter in this course that covers the period from the 600s to 1703. In their own distinctive ways they will set the roots of Russian social, cultural and political institutions. How did a small band of Viking marauders come to dominate the much larger Slavic population? Why did the Russians become Orthodox Christians, and not Roman Catholics or Muslims, and how did that impact their future? What happened to the eastern Slavs under the Tatars (called the “Tatar yoke”)? How did Siberia become part of the Russian Empire? How did tsars like Ivan I (called “The Moneybag”) and Ivan IV (“The Terrible”) tilt Russian political behavior in ways that leave echoes even today? Why do they behave this way? How was it that the Russian peasant farmer was free in c. 1000 CE, when his equivalent in Western Europe was a serf, but by c. 1600 CE, when the Western European peasant farmer had become free, the Russian had become a serf? Why does the founding of St. Petersburg change the direction of Russian history? Our course will provide answers to these questions and many more. Classroom activities will vary: lectures, class discussions of readings, student reports and debates, and films and field trips. Students will be evaluated on the basis of three take-home essays, in-class quizzes and contributions to class discussions. The course is open to all students, to first-years with the permission of the instructor.
HIST 343-01 Imperial Nature: The United States and the Global Environment TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Chris Wells 0 / 15
*Cross-listed with ENVI 343-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
HIST 394-01 Oceans in World History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Karin Velez 15 / 25
*Cross-listed with INTL 394-01* Between 1450 and 1850, people started to venture farther outward into oceans that had previously been understood as dangerous and hostile environments. This course takes the Age of Sail as a starting point to track changes in human approaches to boundless waters. We will consider two questions in particular: How have oceans functioned as a means of global integration rather than division? How are historians using oceans to further the study of world (versus regional) history? Readings will cover and compare the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and address themes of diaspora, port cities, banditry, trade, and imperial encounters.
HIST 394-02 Food, Environment and Society in 20th Century America MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 228 Ryan Edgington -6 / 15
*Cross-listed with ENVI 394-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
HIST 490-01 Senior Seminar: Migration M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Karin Velez 6 / 12
HIST 490-02 Senior Seminar: Memory M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Jamie Monson -1 / 12

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Interdisciplinary Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTD 191-01 Supplementary Writing Workshop M 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 228 Geoffrey Gorham 0 / 10
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only*
Course begins Monday, September 24th.
INTD 191-02 Supplementary Writing Workshop M 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 100 Kelly MacGregor 0 / 10
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only*
Course begins Monday, September 24th.
INTD 191-03 Supplementary Writing Workshop T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm OLRI 170 Christina Manning 1 / 10
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only*
Course begins Tuesday, September 18th.
INTD 191-04 Supplementary Writing Workshop T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Adrienne Christiansen 0 / 10
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only*
Course begins Tuesday, September 18th.
INTD 191-05 Supplementary Writing Workshop W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 370 Susan Fox 0 / 10
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only*
Course begins Wedneday, September 19th.
INTD 191-06 Supplementary Writing Workshop W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 227 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 0 / 10
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only*
Course begins Wednesday, September 19th.
INTD 191-07 Supplementary Writing Workshop W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 228 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 0 / 10
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only*
Course begins Wednesday, September 19th.
INTD 191-08 Supplementary Writing Workshop W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Paula Cooey 0 / 10
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only*
Course begins Wednesday, September 19th.
INTD 191-09 Supplementary Writing Workshop R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm CARN 06A Erik Larson 1 / 10
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only*
Course begins Thursday, September 20th.
INTD 191-10 Supplementary Writing Workshop F 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 204 Andrew Latham 1 / 10
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only*
Course begins Friday, September 21st.
INTD 401-01 Urban Studies Colloquium W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau 1 / 15
*2 credit course; limited to Seniors who've already declared an Urban Studies concentration*

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTL 111-01 Intro to International Studies: Literature and Global Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 David Moore 6 / 25
*Course for First Years and sophomores only*
INTL 111-02 Intro to International Studies: Literature and Global Studies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 David Moore 3 / 25
*Course for First Years and sophomores only*
INTL 113-01 Intro to International Studies: Identities, Interests, and Community MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 1 / 25
*Course for First Years and sophomores only*
INTL 113-02 Intro to International Studies: Identities, Interests, and Community MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 3 / 25
*Course for First Years and sophomores only*
INTL 194-01 Mediterranean, Baltic, Black: Seas, Identities, and TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Igor Tchoukarine 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 194-02* People typically organize the world by its landmasses: but the regions around seas are just as integral and important. This course explores the civilizations around the Mediterranean, Baltic, and Black seas, which bridge Europe, Africa, and Asia. We will probe the history, culture, economy and politics of maritime and coastal zones, and extend to linked inland societies. Critical focus will be devoted to identity, nation, territory, border, culture, and coexistence. Readings, films and more will draw from diverse sources.
INTL 245-01 Intro to Intl Human Rights TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 James von Geldern -4 / 25
*First day attendance required*
INTL 280-01 Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Erik Larson 5 / 16
*Cross-listed with SOCI 280-01*
INTL 282-01 Introduction to International Public Health MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 Christy Hanson -4 / 25
*First day attendance required* This course introduces students to the major health problems facing developing countries, and main approaches to remediation. Focus is at country, international-organization, and donor levels. Attention will be given to major indicators, recent trends, the role of culture, policies, and criteria. A tuberculosis case study will serve as a focus, but final projects can range beyond.
INTL 294-02 Terrorism and Art: The Spectacle of Destruction MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 226 Julia Chadaga 0 / 25
*Cross-listed with RUSS 294-01*
INTL 294-03 The Anglo-Planetary World, 1450-1800 MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Dana Schumacher-Schmidt 9 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-01* This course explores the development of travel and travel narratives from 1450 to 1800 and their relationship to colonization, trade, religion, gender, identity, and curiosity. We will examine accounts of (largely but not only English) travel in North America, the Caribbean, India, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Middle East, and go to the moon via the first English work of science fiction, from 1638. Topics include pilgrimage, captivity, discovery, frontiers, national identity, ethnography, fictitious or vicarious travel, and scientific exploration.
INTL 317-01 Writers and Power: The European East in the 20th Century TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 402 Svetlana Rukhelman 20 / 25
*Cross-listed with RUSS 394-01*
INTL 333-01 Economics of Global Food Problems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Amy Damon 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with ECON 333-01 and ENVI 333-01; Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
INTL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 105 David Moore 3 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01*
INTL 372-01 Post-Nationalism: The European Union TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine 1 / 20
INTL 394-01 Oceans in World History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Karin Velez 15 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-01* Between 1450 and 1850, people started to venture farther outward into oceans that had previously been understood as dangerous and hostile environments. This course takes the Age of Sail as a starting point to track changes in human approaches to boundless waters. We will consider two questions in particular: How have oceans functioned as a means of global integration rather than division? How are historians using oceans to further the study of world (versus regional) history? Readings will cover and compare the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and address themes of diaspora, port cities, banditry, trade, and imperial encounters.
INTL 477-01 Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 William Moseley -3 / 15
*Permission of instructor required for all students; cross-listed with ENVI 488-01 and GEOG 488-01; first day attendance required*
INTL 494-01 Senior Seminar: Order and Chaos in Global Affairs TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MARKIM 303 James von Geldern -5 / 12
Globalization has created new international laws and powers that hold formerly wholly sovereign states, and individuals, accountable for rights violations. It has also empowered local agents to challenge states. These power shifts have liberated some, but caused chaos for others, since many old certainties no longer apply. This senior seminar therefore explores tensions between laws (at all levels and of all kinds) and globalization (likewise). Many student projects can be completed under this rubric. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.
INTL 494-02 Senior Seminar: Travel, Migration, Mobility W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine 3 / 12
The contemporary world is fueled by travel, migration, and mobility: voluntary, forced, virtual, and real. We will explore how humans relate while on the move: ourselves and others as travelers or migrants, the categories "others" and ourselves, and issues including immigration, refugees, statelessness, passports, hospitality, citizenship, and exile. Participants will develop extended final papers which can be grounded in any discipline, and focus on any geography or geographies. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
JAPA 101-01 First Year Japanese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 110 Arthur Mitchell -2 / 20
JAPA 101-02 First Year Japanese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 110 Arthur Mitchell 10 / 20
JAPA 101-L1 First Year Japanese I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Junko Fukuoka 3 / 15
JAPA 101-L2 First Year Japanese I Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 401 Junko Fukuoka 5 / 15
JAPA 101-L3 First Year Japanese I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Junko Fukuoka 8 / 15
JAPA 203-01 Second Year Japanese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita 7 / 20
JAPA 203-02 Second Year Japanese I MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita 10 / 20
JAPA 203-L1 Second Year Japanese I Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Junko Fukuoka 8 / 15
JAPA 203-L2 Second Year Japanese I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 250 Junko Fukuoka 7 / 15
JAPA 203-L3 Second Year Japanese I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Junko Fukuoka 7 / 15
JAPA 255-01 Japanese Film and Animation: From the Salaryman to the Shojo MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Arthur Mitchell 7 / 20
*Mandatory Monday evening screenings to be held in Olin Rice 250*
JAPA 305-01 Third Year Japanese I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita 1 / 20
JAPA 305-L1 Third Year Japanese I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Junko Fukuoka 0 / 12
JAPA 305-L2 Third Year Japanese I Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 404 Junko Fukuoka 5 / 12
JAPA 335-01 Analyzing Japanese Language MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 102 Satoko Suzuki 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with LING 335-01*
JAPA 407-01 Fourth Year Japanese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 102 Miaki Habuka 3 / 15

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LATI 141-01 Latin America Through Women's Eyes TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Paul Dosh 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with POLI 141-01 and WGSS 141-01*
LATI 151-01 Caribbean Literature and Culture: Aesthetics of Resistance MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 Margaret Olsen 3 / 17
First Year Course only; cross-listed with HISP 151-01; first day attendance required* The Caribbean possesses one of the most complex cultural landscapes in the world. In fact, the Caribbean was global centuries before the term globalization came into vogue. But the forced cultural coexistences imposed by conquest, slavery and colonialism have not made globalization an easy process for the region. Moreover, tourism and our contemporary culture of consumption have only served to bolster neocolonial socioeconomic structures. In this course, our objective is to explore the ways in which literature, art and performance offer powerful tools of resistance against oppression. To that end, we will learn how Caribbean writers, intellectuals, artists and musicians use their art to confront the various challenges that islands of the region face, including political domination, racism, poverty and sexism. Students will also be encouraged to recognize the multiple realities that Caribbeans are often obliged to navigate as they migrate between the US and the Caribbean in an effort to economically survive. The course will challenge commonly-held notions of the Caribbean as merely a site for pleasure, full of gentle beaches, fruity tropical drinks and danceable music.
LATI 245-01 Latin American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Paul Dosh 0 / 25
*Cross-listed with POLI 245-01*
LATI 249-01 Regional Geog of Latin America MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Kathryn Pratt 21 / 35
*Cross-listed with GEOG 249-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 10 / 15
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Galo Gonzalez 5 / 15
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 422-01 Modern Hispanic Novel and the Visual Arts MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 227 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 7 / 20
*Cross-listed with HISP 422-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 488-01 Senior Seminar MF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MARKIM 201 Paul Dosh 4 / 12

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 214 John Haiman 3 / 30
LING 104-01 The Sounds of Language TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Christina Esposito -7 / 10
LING 202-01 Origins/Evolution of Language MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 John Haiman 6 / 12
LING 204-01 Experimental Linguistics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 110 Christina Esposito -3 / 8
LING 206-01 Endangered/Minority Languages TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Marianne Milligan -1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
LING 300-01 Linguistic Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 113 John Haiman 3 / 10
LING 335-01 Analyzing Japanese Language MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 102 Satoko Suzuki 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with JAPA 335-01*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MATH 116-01 Math and Society: Who Votes? The Politics and Math Behind Elections MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Julie Dolan -3 / 25
*Cross-listed with POLI 294-03; ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor; cross-listed with MATH 116-01; ACTC students may register April 27th, with permission of instructor* How do elections work in the U.S. and other democracies? What is meant by a 'representative' democracy? How is it decided how many Congressional representatives each state has? What are the costs and benefits of political participation? Join us to predict who will win the 2012 elections! No prerequisites. This course counts for social science general distribution if you sign up for it as POLI 294-03 or math/natural science general distribution if you sign up for it as MATH 116-01.
MATH 116-01 Math and Society: Who Votes? The Politics and Math Behind Elections MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Karen Saxe -3 / 25
*Cross-listed with POLI 294-03; ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor; cross-listed with MATH 116-01; ACTC students may register April 27th, with permission of instructor* How do elections work in the U.S. and other democracies? What is meant by a 'representative' democracy? How is it decided how many Congressional representatives each state has? What are the costs and benefits of political participation? Join us to predict who will win the 2012 elections! No prerequisites. This course counts for social science general distribution if you sign up for it as POLI 294-03 or math/natural science general distribution if you sign up for it as MATH 116-01.
MATH 125-01 Epidemiology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 100 Daniel Kaplan -5 / 35
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 135-01 Applied Calculus TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Daniel Flath 8 / 24
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 135-02 Applied Calculus TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Daniel Flath 2 / 24
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 135-03 Applied Calculus MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 245 George Leiter 2 / 24
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 135-04 Applied Calculus TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Chad Higdon-Topaz 0 / 24
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 135-05 Applied Calculus MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 245 George Leiter 2 / 24
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Thomas Halverson 3 / 32
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 136-02 Discrete Mathematics: How to Be a Player MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 205 Andrew Beveridge -1 / 17
*First Year Course only* When you were very young, tic-tac-toe was fun to play, especially when your parents let you win. But once you were old enough (perhaps 5 years old), the real point of tic-tac-toe revealed itself: it is a game that can be mastered completely. Discovering this fact is, perhaps, the first truly mathematical act of your life. Discrete math is a branch of mathematics, independent from Calculus. While Calculus addresses continuous phenomena, discrete math studies collections of distinct, separate objects. This field provides the tools to analyze arrangements of objects and the relationships between them. In technical terms, discrete math studies sets, permutations, networks and relations. The methods of discrete mathematics are essential for solving problems in the current Information Age. Whether you want to design a computer algorithm, or understand the structure of a social network, you need discrete mathematics. This course incorporates the analysis of games and puzzles to introduce you to the world of the mathematician. Mathematicians are not number crunchers; they are problem solvers. Mastering a game strategy is very satisfying, and takes practice and insight. The same can be said about mathematics: discovering a proof of a mathematical theorem is much like finding a winning strategy for a game. In fact, discovering and explaining an optimal strategy is a purely mathematical endeavor. We'll talk about games you have probably encountered (dots and boxes, Set, sudoku), and ones that you probably haven't (nim, hex, hackenbush, cops and robbers). This is a serious course that will develop your ability to make a rigorous mathematical argument, but we will also have fun learning and playing games along the way.
MATH 137-01 Single Variable Calculus MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 David Ehren -6 / 32
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 137-02 Single Variable Calculus MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 David Ehren 0 / 32
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 153-01 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Lisa Lendway 1 / 28
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 153-02 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 258 Vittorio Addona -4 / 28
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan 1 / 28
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan -2 / 28
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 155-03 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 245 George Leiter 2 / 28
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Andrew Beveridge 10 / 28
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 236-02 Linear Algebra MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Andrew Beveridge 9 / 28
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 David Bressoud -4 / 30
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Stan Wagon 19 / 30
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Chad Higdon-Topaz 4 / 24
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 353-01 Modern Statistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 258 Vittorio Addona -1 / 24
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 354-01 Probability MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 Lisa Lendway 1 / 28
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 373-01 Number Theory TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud 15 / 24
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 377-01 Real Analysis MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 Karen Saxe 8 / 24
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*
MATH 469-01 Discrete Applied Mathematics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Stan Wagon 9 / 20
*Cross-listed with COMP 369-01; ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor* We will focus on graph algorithms such as the important algorithms to generate optimal matchings. Applications of those include the assignment of students to classes (a system based on past work in this course is in fact used at Macalester), assigning medical students to residency programs, and more recently, optimizing choices made when arranging kidney transplants. We will also cover other combinatorial algorithms such as network flow algorithms, algorithms for the traveling salesman problem, and, most important, the use of linear programming to solve a wide variety of problems.
MATH 471-01 Topics in Topology/Geometry MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 Thomas Halverson 8 / 20
*ACTC students may register on April 27th, with permission of instructor*

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MCST 110-01 Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 Bradley Stiffler -2 / 16
MCST 114-01 News Reporting and Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Howard Sinker -1 / 19
MCST 126-01 Local News Media Institutions MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm HUM 401 Michael Griffin 2 / 31
*First Years welcomed* In this course students analyze the social, cultural, economic, political, and regulatory factors shaping the nature of U.S. communications media, with special attention to local media organizations and their role in facilitating (or hindering) local community and civic participation.
We begin by taking an institutional approach to media studies. This involves focusing on the political economy of media production and distribution, including ownership and control, the role of government policy and regulation, systems of power within media organizations, and the influence of advertisers on news and programming practices.
We proceed to examine and discuss the degree to which contemporary media systems provide media access, foster diversity of content, and generally serve the interest of citizens and communities in a democratic society. We evaluate the history and practices of American journalism, current shifts in media technology and economics that threaten democratic access to news and information, and attempts to revitalize news delivery and civic discourse through local experiments in citizen journalism, community-based news aggregation, greater diversity of media production and other media innovations and reforms.
In light of this overview of contemporary media institutions and practices, class members will pursue field projects that explore and report on specific local and community media organizations (commercial and non-profit) with an eye towards understanding their role in the dissemination of specific types of news and information and the part they play in facilitating civic connections and community life. Through guided reading, participant-observation, and actual media contributions students will better familiarize themselves with the Twin Cities media landscape, and report on ways in which local media in Minneapolis-St. Paul address the needs of diverse communities and citizens in a shifting media environment. Opportunities for field observations and study include ethnic, immigrant, neighborhood, women’s, GLBT, metropolitan and public media organizations, often focusing on nascent media initiatives designed to facilitate new forms of citizen journalism and alternative avenues for civic and community media participation.
MCST 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture MW 01:10 pm-03:50 pm HUM 401 Michael Griffin 21 / 31
*Mandatory film screenings TBA* This course explores the nature of visual representation, building from a focus on the formal analysis of cinema (the basic features of film form and aesthetic style) and developing tools of visual analysis applicable to all visual media (photography, television, printed, digital and graphic representations of all kinds). We start by concentrating on the basic features of cinematic form: narrative and non-narrative structure, the shot, editing, sound, and the construction of visual style. Students will gain a familiarity with cinematic elements and the vocabulary of analysis, and will write a formalist critical analysis. Students will also make an abstract video. The study of formal analysis will be accompanied by an introduction to visual culture studies; we shall apply the tools and insights of visual analysis to various areas of visual culture, aesthetics, and cultural representation, including representations of nationality, ethnicity, race, class and gender in photography, television, advertising, art, and even journalism. The primary goal of the course is to develop a set of analytical tools that can be used to illuminate forms of visual representation and their aesthetic, cultural, social and ideological implications.
No prerequisites. MCST 128 is a required course for the Media and Cultural Studies Major, and counts for the Media Studies Minor.
MCST 194-01 Political Advertising in the 2012 Presidential Campaign MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 202 Leola Johnson 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; screening times TBA* In this course, we will study political advertising in the 2012 U.S. presidential campaign, which will be at its height when you arrive here in the fall, thereby providing us with a living laboratory where we can collectively watch the campaign unfold. We will begin by studying important moments in presidential campaign advertising before the fall of 2012, including the “Eisenhower Answers America” ads of 1952 (http://www.livingroomcandidate.org/commercials/1952/bus-driver), the infamous “Daisy Girl” ad of 1964 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExjDzDsgbww) and the “Yes We Can” You Tube mash-up by Will.I.Am in 2008 (http://youtu.be/jjXyqcx-mYY). We will read and debate critiques of the way these representations and others have affected democratic institutions, including their impact on the operation of the “marketplace of ideas” and also on political parties. Finally, we will closely follow the 2012 presidential campaign to record and discuss the particularities of political advertising in this presidential election. And as part of our deliberations on present circumstances and practices, we will make a set of mock ads for each presidential candidate. Course requirements include monitoring and recording ads; writing short critiques of ads; writing a term paper that examines a set of ads in historical and critical context; and making a set of alternative ads. The requirements are designed to provide opportunities to engage with media history, criticism and production.
MCST 294-01 Cinemas of Resistance W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Anand Patwardhan 1 / 12
*Prerequisite:MCST 128 Film Analysis & Visual Culture, or permission of instructor* Anand Patwardhan has been making political documentaries for nearly three decades pursuing diverse and controversial issues that are at the crux of social and political life in India. Many of his films were at one time or another banned by state television channels in India and became the subject of litigation by Patwardhan who successfully challenged the censorship rulings in court.
MCST 294-02 Experimental Film/Video TR 01:20 pm-04:00 pm HUM 401 Genevieve Yue 5 / 22
*Counts as new media theories and practices* The history and shape of experimental or avant-garde cinema has been deeply tied to, but also significantly separate from, the practices of the art world, on one hand, and commercial Hollywood filmmaking, on the other. Situated between these two poles, it has developed into a distinct culture characterized by artisanal modes of filmmaking, independent theatrical and distribution channels, auxiliary print and screening practices, and often highly charged debates concerning medium specificity, aesthetics, and politics. This course addresses the range of practices that make up experimental media in two chief ways. The first explores experimental film in its cultural contexts, examining the ways issues of industry, art, and institutional power are routed differently in relation to Hollywood and visual art. The second addresses a historic and contemporary avant-garde impulse to locate, in film, video, and digital media, a space of aesthetic possibility, personal expression, and political resistance. To both ends, the course surveys a broad range of experimental and often non-narrative media, including artist films, activist cinema, experimental documentary, diary or first-person film, found footage compilations, hand-painted film, expanded cinema, video art, and moving image installation.
MCST 294-03 New Media and the Written Word M 01:10 pm-04:30 pm HUM 402 Jay Gabler 10 / 24
*Will count as new media theories and practices* New Media and the Written Word will be taught Mondays from 1:10-4:30, by Jay Gabler, arts editor at the Twin Cities Daily Planet and co-founder of The Tangential. For much of the 20th century, new media—from motion pictures to radio to television to computers—were thought to be antithetical to the written word, harbingers of the demise of literacy. In this century, however, new media have evolved in such a manner as to make written language absolutely central to daily life online. This class looks at new media from a variety of perspectives: historical, sociological, psychological, critical, and aesthetic. Specifically, the class looks at language and its uses as a form of communication developed in the age of papyrus transitions into the digital era. Class discussion will make continual reference to the Internet and its many uses today. This class will count as new media theories and practices.
MCST 334-01 Cultural Studies and the Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am ARTCOM 202 Allyson Shaffer 9 / 16
*Cross-listed with AMST 334-01; screening times TBA*

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MUSI 110-01 Music Appreciation MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 113 Jonas Westover 16 / 35
MUSI 111-01 World Music MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MUSIC 113 Chuen-Fung Wong 3 / 35
MUSI 113-01 Theory I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 7 / 25
MUSI 113-02 Theory I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 16 / 25
MUSI 113-L1 Theory I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 10 / 25
MUSI 113-L2 Theory I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 13 / 25
MUSI 131-01 African Music TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 228 Sowah Mensah 3 / 20
MUSI 180-01 Music, Race, and Ethnicity MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Chuen-Fung Wong 0 / 13
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* Issues of race and ethnicity are central to processes of identity formation and social experience. Music often assumes critical roles in articulating senses of racial and ethnic differences. This course examines how race and ethnicity have informed the production and consumption of musical sound around the world. Course readings and audiovisual examples cover such major topics as authenticity, racism, representational politics, ethno-nationalism, diaspora, multiculturalism, and subaltern consciousness. This course is only open to first-year students in fall 2012. There is no prerequisite. No previous knowledge of musical instrument or notation is assumed.
MUSI 213-01 Theory III, Form and Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mandarano 13 / 25
MUSI 342-01 Medieval to Mozart MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mazullo 8 / 30
MUSI 425-01 Seminar in Composers: Late Beethoven MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mazullo 9 / 25
MUSI 72-01 African Music Ensemble TR 06:30 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 116 Sowah Mensah 12 / 50
MUSI 72-01 African Music Ensemble MW 05:00 pm-07:00 pm MUSIC 121 Sowah Mensah 12 / 50
MUSI 74-01 Macalester Concert Choir MWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie 15 / 50
MUSI 76-01 Highland Camerata R 06:30 pm-07:30 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie -2 / 50
MUSI 76-01 Highland Camerata T 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie -2 / 50
MUSI 80-01 Mac Jazz Band MW 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Joan Griffith 26 / 50
MUSI 82-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 121 Joan Griffith 28 / 50
MUSI 82-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 116 Joan Griffith 28 / 50
MUSI 84-01 Pipe Band W 06:00 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 228 Michael Breidenbach 23 / 50
MUSI 84-01 Pipe Band W 06:30 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 116 Michael Breidenbach 23 / 50
MUSI 86-01 Chamber Ensemble TBA TBA Mark Mandarano 28 / 50
MUSI 88-01 Orchestra TR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Mark Mandarano 4 / 55
MUSI 90-01 Mac Early Music Ensemble F 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Clea Galhano 39 / 50
MUSI 94-01 Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 21 / 25
Studio instruction may be taken by any Macalester student in voice, piano, harpsichord, organ, guitar, recorder, a variety of other standard orchestral instruments, as well as some non-Western instruments. Studio instruction fees are currently $350 for 12 half-hour lessons per semester (partial fee waiver for declared music majors/minors). Registration must be done in person in the Music Department. Please contact Rachel Hest, Department Coordinator (rhest@macalester.edu), for more information.
MUSI 94-03 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl 23 / 25
MUSI 94-06 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 22 / 25
MUSI 94-08 Organ TBA TBA Winston Kaehler 23 / 25
MUSI 94-09 Classical Trumpet TBA TBA Lynn Erickson 25 / 25
MUSI 94-10 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 14 / 25
MUSI 94-11 Voice TBA TBA William Reed 22 / 25
MUSI 94-13 African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 24 / 25
MUSI 94-14 Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson 23 / 25
MUSI 94-17 Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 22 / 25
MUSI 94-18 Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith 24 / 25
MUSI 94-1M Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor 24 / 25
MUSI 94-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 23 / 25
MUSI 94-23 Violin TBA TBA Stella Anderson 22 / 25
MUSI 94-27 Upright Jazz Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith 24 / 25
MUSI 94-29 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa 23 / 25
MUSI 94-32 Recorder TBA TBA Clea Galhano 24 / 25
MUSI 94-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson 22 / 25
MUSI 94-35 Jazz Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen 24 / 25
MUSI 94-38 Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor 23 / 25
MUSI 94-39 Tuba TBA TBA Charles Wazanowski 24 / 25
MUSI 94-42 African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 24 / 25
MUSI 94-43 Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball 22 / 25
MUSI 94-44 Sitar TBA TBA David Whetstone 24 / 25
MUSI 94-5M African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 21 / 25
MUSI 94-6M Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball 24 / 25
MUSI 94-C1 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin 24 / 25
MUSI 94-C9 Classical Trumpet TBA TBA Lynn Erickson 24 / 25
MUSI 94-CE Voice (Jazz) TBA TBA Rachel Holder 24 / 25
MUSI 94-CI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 24 / 25
MUSI 94-CJ Voice TBA TBA William Reed 24 / 25
MUSI 94-CW Oboe TBA TBA Julie Williams 9 / 10
MUSI 94-CY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 24 / 25
MUSI 94-HC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen 24 / 25
MUSI 94-HI Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 24 / 25
MUSI 94-HM Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson 24 / 25
MUSI 94-M Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 23 / 25
MUSI 94-M4 Jazz Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen 24 / 25
MUSI 94-M9 Classical Trumpet TBA TBA Lynn Erickson 24 / 25
MUSI 94-MB Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl 24 / 25
MUSI 94-MC Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 24 / 25
MUSI 94-MD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo 23 / 25
MUSI 94-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 21 / 25
MUSI 94-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 19 / 25
MUSI 94-ML African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 23 / 25
MUSI 94-MN Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 22 / 25
MUSI 94-MO Electric Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith 24 / 25
MUSI 94-MP Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 22 / 25
MUSI 94-MQ Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith 24 / 25
MUSI 94-MU Viola TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 24 / 25
MUSI 94-MV Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 20 / 25
MUSI 94-MW Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson 23 / 25
MUSI 94-MX Viola da Gamba TBA TBA Julie Elhard 24 / 25
MUSI 94-MY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 22 / 25
MUSI 94-VI Saxophone TBA TBA Shelley Hanson 24 / 25
MUSI 94-W2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa 23 / 25
MUSI 94-W9 Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen 24 / 25
MUSI 94-WC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen 23 / 25
MUSI 94-WD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo 24 / 25
MUSI 94-WH Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 21 / 25
MUSI 94-WJ Voice TBA TBA William Reed 23 / 25
MUSI 94-WM Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson 25 / 25
MUSI 96-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 11 / 25
MUSI 96-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl 14 / 25
MUSI 96-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Claudia Chen 24 / 25
MUSI 99-01 Piano Proficiency Exam TBA TBA Mark Mazullo 0 / 1

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Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
NEUR 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Wiertelak -8 / 60
*Cross-listed with PSYC 180-01*
NEUR 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund 6 / 24
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-01; prerequisite = PSYC/NEUR 180; permission of instructor is required for ACTC students*
NEUR 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Darcy Burgund 6 / 24
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-L1*
NEUR 300-01 Directed Research TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak 8 / 15
NEUR 362-01 Philosophy of Mind TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Joy Laine -9 / 20
*Cross-listed with PHIL 362-01*
NEUR 484-01 Intro Artificial Intelligence TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Susan Fox -5 / 30
*Cross-listed with COMP 484-01*
NEUR 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak 7 / 15

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHIL 115-01 Introduction to Philosophy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Janet Folina 2 / 20
PHIL 119-01 Critical Thinking MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder 3 / 20
PHIL 125-01 Ethics: Focus on Friendship TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 105 Martin Gunderson 0 / 17
*First Year Course only* All of us have significant moral commitments, though they are sometimes not explicitly stated. In addition, many of us wrestle with moral puzzles and dilemmas that are difficult to resolve. Some of our most important moral commitments and some of our deepest ethical puzzles concern friendship. What do we owe our friends? Can friendship ever justify violating what would otherwise be morally required? Certainly we are loyal to our friends, but what are the limits of this loyalty? For example, what support do we owe a friend who is acting immorally or illegally? Is an employer or public official ever justified in granting special favors to friends? Who is worthy of our friendship? What circumstances justify breaking off a friendship? In this seminar we will explore traditional ethical theories and consider classic works in moral philosophy by Aristotle, Kant and Mill with an eye to what light they shed on the nature of friendship. We will also consider recent philosophical and literary works on friendship.
PHIL 125-02 Ethics: Happiness and Philosophical Inquiry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 003 Diane Michelfelder 0 / 17
*First Year Course only* This course aspires to do three things. The first is to provide you with an opportunity to reflect on what philosophers have had to say about happiness, ethics, and the relationship between the two. The second is to give you a greater understanding of the dimensions of philosophy as an activity—or what it is to “do philosophy”--beginning with the formation of a philosophical question and arriving at the structured presentation of philosophical ideas. The third is to better your skills at close reading, innovative and critical thinking, analytic writing, and the use of library and internet resources to support your scholarly work. During this course we are going to immerse ourselves in a broad span of philosophical thinking about happiness. Long ago, the Greek philosopher Aristotle defined happiness as the best and ultimate goal of human existence. But was he right? What role does happiness play in the good life? Is there a relationship between happiness and ethical action, between being happy and being good? What are some reasons for thinking there might not be such a relationship? Is it possible to design one’s life so as to maximize one’s chances for being happy? Is happiness even attainable? And what do we mean when we talk about “happiness” anyway? At the center of our exploration of these questions will be three approaches to normative ethical theory that have played a key role in the development of ethics within the Western philosophical tradition: virtue-based ethics (as represented by Aristotle), consequentialism (as represented by Bentham and Mill), and deontological ethics (as represented by Kant). Complementing our exploration will be contemporary work on theories of happiness both by and influenced by philosophers, including work drawn from the emerging interdisciplinary field of happiness studies.
PHIL 125-03 Ethics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 219 William Wilcox 4 / 20
PHIL 230-01 Ancient/Medieval Philosophies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Geoffrey Gorham -4 / 22
PHIL 250-01 Philosophy of Human Rights TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Martin Gunderson 4 / 20
PHIL 294-01 Reading the Critique of Pure Reason TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Janet Folina 10 / 15
*Cross-listed with GERM 294-01; taught in English* We will begin by first reading the Prolegomena to any Future Metaphysics, which gives an overview of the thesis and vision of the Critique. Then we will turn to reading the Critique section by section. Interpreting this work is a wonderful intellectual challenge; assisting us will be a detailed, secondary resource on the main arguments. If time allows we will also read some more current scholarship on Kant's philosophy; depending on student interest this could include themes such as Kant's philosophy of science, his philosophy of mathematics, and/or his philosophy of religion. (Philosophy 231, Modern Philosophy, is recommended but not required. For German Studies majors, this course can be used to fulfill either the theory requirement or the extra-departmental German content requirement.)
PHIL 294-02 Ethics and the Internet MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder 0 / 15
In this course, we are going to be looking at ethical questions connected with the Internet as we know it today: an online environment where content is generated and shared through user activities such as blogging, media sharing, social networking, tagging, tweeting, virtual world gaming, wiki developing, and the like. The course will loosely be divided into three parts. We will start by considering debates over freedom of speech, privacy, surveillance, and intellectual property: issues that pre-exist the development of the Internet, but which because of it have taken on new dimensions. From here we will go on to take up some ethical questions arising from four different domains of activity on the social web: gaming, social networking, blog/wiki developing, and “hacktivism.” In the third part of the course, we will consider broad questions connected to the integration of the Internet with devices other than the personal computer and mobile phone and which open the prospect of a world of integrated networked systems. What are some of the impacts of such integration on our everyday ethical relations with others and on the overall quality of our lives? How does being networked affect the meaning of being human?

PHIL 301-01 Philosophy of Law TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 William Wilcox 6 / 15
PHIL 362-01 Philosophy of Mind TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Joy Laine -9 / 20
*Cross-listed with NEUR 362-01*
PHIL 489-01 Senior Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Geoffrey Gorham 1 / 12

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PE 02-01 Tennis I TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Martin Peper 5 / 20
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson 1 / 25
PE 04-01 Karate I TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson 19 / 25
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson 3 / 25
PE 06-02 Yoga I TR 10:01 am-11:10 am LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin 6 / 25
PE 06-03 Yoga I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 6 / 25
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Vanessa Seljeskog 14 / 30
PE 09-01 Conditioning TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 12 / 25
PE 12-01 Tennis II TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Martin Peper 8 / 10
PE 14-01 Karate II TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson 24 / 25
PE 18-01 Pilates MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard 5 / 25
PE 19-01 Conditioning II TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 25 / 25
PE 20-01 Weight Training MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 17 / 25
PE 27-01 Cardio Fitness MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 10 / 20
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Kristine Spangard 18 / 25
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance T 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson 1 / 25
PE 40-01 Self Defense MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 12 / 25
PE 51-01 Aqua Aerobics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth 20 / 25
PE 61-01 Water Polo MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth 12 / 25

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 22 / 63
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 32 / 63
PHYS 112-01 Cosmos: Perspectives and Reflections M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 41 / 63
PHYS 113-01 Modern Astronomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 150 John Cannon 29 / 63
PHYS 120-01 Astronomical Techniques M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 404 John Cannon 7 / 15
PHYS 194-01 Extrasolar Planets and Astrobiology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 404 John Cannon 1 / 17
*First Year Course only* This first-year course will discuss the exploding field of astrobiology. Specific discussion will be given to the properties of astrophysical bodies that are conducive to harboring life, using the Earth as a Rosetta Stone. We will discuss the prevalence of highly evolved molecular species in the interstellar medium, the properties of the quickly growing extrasolar planet population, and the observational techniques that are used and envisioned to infer the life-bearing signatures of such environments. This course is ideal for all students interested in one of the most rapidly-growing fields of science today; students with interests in physics and astronomy are particularly well-suited for this course. Previous or concurrent enrollment in calculus is required. This course will receive equivalent credit to PHYS 113 (Modern Astronomy) and satisfies the Q1 distribution requirement.
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 22 / 63
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab M 02:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 11 / 18
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab T 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 1 / 18
PHYS 226-L3 Principles of Physics I Lab T 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 2 / 18
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 James Doyle 5 / 25
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab R 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 9 / 18
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab R 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 9 / 18
PHYS 331-01 Modern Physics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 James Doyle 7 / 24
PHYS 331-L1 Modern Physics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Doyle 4 / 12
PHYS 331-L2 Modern Physics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Doyle 3 / 12
PHYS 443-01 Electromagnetic Theory MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 James Heyman 13 / 24
PHYS 481-01 Quantum Mechanics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 7 / 24
PHYS 494-01 Condensed Matter Physics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 James Heyman 14 / 24
Solids occur as crystals, amorphous materials, and nanostructures. They function as metals, insulators and semiconductors, and form the basis of nearly all electronic, optical and magnetic technology. This course is an introduction to the physics of solids. Topics will include bonding in solids, the band theory of crystalline solids, the physics of semiconductors,
nanostructures such as quantum wells, dots and wires, magnetism and superconductivity. Condensed Matter Physics is relevant to Applied Physics, Electrical Engineering, Solar Energy and Materials Engineering, and it is the largest sub-discipline in Physics. Prerequisites: Modern Physics (PHYS-334).

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
POLI 100-01 US Politics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Lesley Lavery 9 / 25
POLI 101-01 Argument and Advocacy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 6 / 25
POLI 120-01 Foundations of International Politics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 Wendy Weber 0 / 17
*First Year Course only* This first-year course is designed to introduce students to the academic study of international relations (also referred to as international, global or world politics). As an introductory course, it has three broad goals. The first is to develop the foundational knowledge and conceptual literacy necessary to engage with the field’s multidimensional concerns. These include power, gender, inequality, justice, political violence, international law, globalization, development, and human rights. The second is to introduce students to the different perspectives or intellectual frameworks for making sense of international relations. The third goal is to develop a range of critical, analytical, research and writing skills for more advanced work within the field. We will pursue these goals through an examination of contemporary International Relations scholarship as well as through different types of writing assignments and in-class simulations and other activities.
POLI 120-02 International Politics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Mark Hoffman 4 / 25
POLI 140-01 Comparative Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler 17 / 25
POLI 141-01 Latin America Through Women's Eyes TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Paul Dosh 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with LATI 141-01 and WGSS 141-01*
POLI 160-01 Foundations of Political Theory MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler 4 / 25
POLI 194-01 Getting Elected: Modern Campaign Communication TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Adrienne Christiansen 0 / 15
*First Year Course only* Using the 2012 Presidential Election as a case study, this course examines the quadrennial explosion of political speech that is the modern American campaign. How important are different types of political communication in leading Americans to vote for one candidate over another? Drawing on the history of modern campaigns since the advent of television, we study the array of communication and media strategies that candidates use to gain attention, raise money, and win votes. The course raises questions about the role of oratory, reason, rhetoric, emotion, narrative, and expression of group affiliations in election outcomes. We examine the relative influence of campaign speeches, interviews on fake news programs like The Daily Show, television ads, presidential and vice-presidential debates, YouTube videos, campaign websites, Facebook pages, Twitter feeds and other social media. This course also provides students with a unique opportunity to develop college-level writing and critical thinking skills through a teaching model that blends a once-a-week full class meeting with a once-a-week (every week of the semester) small group tutorial session. Commonly known for their use at Oxford and Cambridge, the tutorials will prepare students to excel at Macalester in the essential intellectual skills of writing, discussion, and oral argument. Students in the course will be assigned to a three-person tutorial group with whom they will meet all semester. Every tutorial group meets with the professor for an hour every week. The focus of each tutorial session is a 5-page paper written by one student that takes up a controversial question concerning political communication campaign strategies. During the tutorial that student reads aloud his or her 5-page paper. The other two students critically engage and discuss the ideas in the paper, raise objections, and make arguments of their own. They also bring written feedback to the student author via 2-page response papers. The professor comments on the longer paper and orally coaches the students in writing and reasoning.The following week, another student in the group of three writes the 5-page paper; the other two students respond with their own 2-page paper; and the cycle of discussion, argument, and critique repeats throughout the semester. For an illustration of the tutorial model at work, please watch the brief video at http://vimeo.com/33326381.As a result of the cycling tutorial process, each student in the course writes four 5-page papers and ten 2-page response papers. A Macalester senior will serve as a Writing Preceptor for the course and will hold office hours with students who wish to receive feedback on drafts of their 5-page papers. Students have the option to revise each of their 5-page papers before receiving a final grade on them. There will be no examinations in this course. If you have questions about the Oxford/Cambridge tutorial model, or other questions about how th
POLI 205-01 Politics and Policymaking TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Lesley Lavery 11 / 25
POLI 206-01 US Constitutional Law and Thought MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 105 Patrick Schmidt 1 / 25
POLI 211-01 Re-envisioning Education and Democracy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai -2 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 280-01 and EDUC 280-01*
POLI 212-01 Rights and Wrongs: Litigation and Public Policy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Patrick Schmidt 6 / 25
POLI 221-01 Global Governance TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Wendy Weber 1 / 25
POLI 245-01 Latin American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Paul Dosh 0 / 25
*Cross-listed with LATI 245-01*
POLI 250-01 Comparative-Historical Sociology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Terry Boychuk -1 / 16
*Cross-listed with SOCI 275-01*
POLI 250-02 Comparative-Historical Sociology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk 4 / 16
*Cross-listed with SOCI 275-02*
POLI 252-01 Water and Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 252-01 and GEOG 252-01; first day attendance required* "When you put your hand in a flowing stream, you touch the last that has gone before and the first of what is still to come" - Leonardo da Vinci
Water is power; power is water. Since ancient times, water has been one of the most fiercely guarded local and global physical, cultural and spiritual resources. Drawing from the fields of political science, geography, anthropology, history, geology and engineering, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to studying water and power. We will examine historical and emerging challenges to the equitable and sustainable use of transboundary waters. In addition to political borders, we will be concerned with ecological and social boundary crossings. We will address a range of controversial topics including endangered species, energy production, indigenous rights, and cultural preservation. We will also discuss the potentialities and limitations of environmental impact assessments, public participation and government institutional reform. The first part of the course introduces students to analytical tools for evaluating the design of water projects and policy. The second part of the course will ask students to apply these concepts toward assessing historical and contemporary case studies from the USA. Part Three will shift our attention to the international scene. We will examine inter-state/intra-state water conflicts and transnational social movements.
POLI 261-01 Feminist Political Theory TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 4 / 25
*Cross-listed with WGSS 261-01*
POLI 269-01 Empirical Research Methods MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Julie Dolan 1 / 25
POLI 294-01 Medieval Political Thought MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Andrew Latham 11 / 25
This course deals with the political thought of Latin Christendom (Western Europe) during the late Middle Ages (c. 1250-c. 1450). This body of thought is worthy of sustained study for two reasons. First, it is one of the glories of human civilization. In seeking to answer the timeless questions "how we should live our lives as individuals" and "how we should live together in peace and justice" late medieval political thinkers produced a body of political thought second to none in the history of human philosophical speculation. Second, late medieval political thought is worthy of study because it gave rise to many of the concepts that continue to shape our collective lives today (including state sovereignty, separation of church and state, constitutionalism, property rights, "the people" nationalism, democracy, rule-of-law, and human rights). Indeed, it is impossible to really understand contemporary political life without delving deeply into the way in which late medieval thinkers engaged with the big political issues of their day. The goal of this course it to provide a solid introduction to the political thought of this crucially important era in human history. In it, we will critically examine the relevant works of thinkers such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of Paris, Marsilius of Padua, Bartolus of Sasseferato and Baldus de Ubaldi. To the extent that they shed light on late medieval thought, we will also touch on classical political theorists such as Aristotle and Cicero as well as Muslim and Jewish thinkers such as ibn Sina, Moshe ben Maimon, and ibn Rushd. The course is structured to promote an understanding not only of how these thinkers sought to address the pressing political challenges of their day, but also of how they how they "invented" many of the ideas that we – arrogantly and erroneously – have come to associate with the modern era. As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields (such as Philosophy) who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in political theory/philosophy or the medieval roots of contemporary political life.
POLI 294-03 Math and Society: Who Votes? The Politics and Math Behind Elections MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Julie Dolan -3 / 25
*Cross-listed with MATH 116-01; ACTC students may register April 27th, with permission of instructor* How do elections work in the U.S. and other democracies? What is meant by a 'representative' democracy? How is it decided how many Congressional representatives each state has? What are the costs and benefits of political participation? Join us to predict who will win the 2012 elections! No prerequisites. This course counts for social science general distribution if you sign up for it as POLI 294-03 or math/natural science general distribution if you sign up for it as MATH 116-01.
POLI 294-03 Math and Society: Who Votes? The Politics and Math Behind Elections MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Karen Saxe -3 / 25
*Cross-listed with MATH 116-01; ACTC students may register April 27th, with permission of instructor* How do elections work in the U.S. and other democracies? What is meant by a 'representative' democracy? How is it decided how many Congressional representatives each state has? What are the costs and benefits of political participation? Join us to predict who will win the 2012 elections! No prerequisites. This course counts for social science general distribution if you sign up for it as POLI 294-03 or math/natural science general distribution if you sign up for it as MATH 116-01.
POLI 294-04 US National Security Policy M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 206 Andrew Borene -1 / 30
Beginning with a discussion to define "national security," students in U.S National Security: Organization, Policy and Practice will learn about the major tools of U.S. international power (Diplomatic, Intelligence, Military, and Economic) in addition to evolving concepts for U.S./International engagement in the fields of Law Enforcement and Development. Through classroom discussion, lecture, assigned readings, and guest speakers, we will explore the historical development of the U.S. national security infrastructure (in Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Branches) and address current issues such as review of the published National Security Strategy, operations against Al Qaeda and other international terrorist groups, domestic intelligence/foreign espionage, civil-military operations, economic development, and other issues directly linked to U.S. national security. The final segment of the class will include an investigation of the ethical dilemmas faced by national security leaders and policymakers in any era, in addition to specific challenges posed by current events.
Student evaluation will be based on A) class participation, B) one 500-700 word writing assignment, and C) one 3-5 minute presentation on a U.S. national security organization. There will also be opportunities for extra credit. It is recommended that students have an interest in current events. This is an ideal class for students considering all international careers, or who want to learn about the different entities that drive national security policy and practice.
ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR
Adjunct Professor of Political Science Andrew Borene is a Macalester College Alumnus (B.A. Economics, 1998) and a corporate executive with experience in government and academics. Andrew is a former Associate Deputy General Counsel at the U.S. Department of Defense, and has been adjunct faculty at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs. Andrew is currently Executive Director of Robotics Alley™ and Director and Counsel at ReconRobotics. He serves as Director-at-Large with the FBI's InfraGard Alliance Minnesota Executive Board. He served as a U.S. Marine military intelligence officer in Iraq, and was a U.S. Department of State funded fellow for the study of post-conflict peace-building in Northern Ireland. He is editor-in-chief of the American Bar Association’s U.S. Intelligence Community Law Sourcebook. Andrew also holds a J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School and completed an executive education program at Harvard University’s Institute for International Development.
POLI 320-01 Global Political Economy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 Mark Hoffman 4 / 16
This course examines the political arrangements and antagonisms that have shaped modern economic theory and practice in selected local, regional, national, international, and global contexts. Drawing on theorists of international political economy, we will subject dominant apolitical modes of economic analysis and their underlying assumptions about political rationality and "national economies" to politically engaged analysis and critique. We will focus on the material effects, in theory and practice, of insulating economics from political contestation. In this vein, we will also examine the current economic crisis in its historical context, enduring structures of economic inequality, persisting gendered divisions of labor, and the phenomena of uneven- and under-development within systems of imperialism, colonialism, the nation-state, and global capitalism.
POLI 400-01 Senior Research Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt 0 / 20
POLI 400-02 Senior Research Seminar MF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MARKIM 201 Paul Dosh 3 / 12
POLI 400-03 Senior Research Seminar MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 228 Wendy Weber -3 / 16
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Andrew Latham 10 / 16

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Jaine Strauss -3 / 35
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Jason Weaver 0 / 35
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 1 / 20
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 301 Jamie Atkins 1 / 20
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 8 / 20
PSYC 100-L4 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins -3 / 20
PSYC 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Wiertelak -8 / 60
*Cross-listed with NEUR 180-01*
PSYC 194-01 Minding the Body MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 300 Joan Ostrove 1 / 17
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with WGSS 194-04* This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the body primarily from the perspectives of psychology, disability studies, and feminist studies. We will rely on analysis of theoretical and empirical research, personal narrative, and film, as well as visits from a variety of guest speakers, to explore such questions as: What is a "normal" body? A "beautiful" body? How does the media inform how we feel about our bodies? How are bodies – especially women’s bodies – objectified, exploited, commodified, and regulated? How and why do we discriminate against people with non-normative bodies? How do people represent the experience of having a disabled body? How can we think critically about the various ways in which people change, regulate, and enhance their bodies (e.g., via body building, cosmetic surgery, diet, etc.)? How do sexism, racism, classism, and other forms of oppression influence how different bodies are viewed, treated, educated, etc.? This will be a writing-intensive course in which students will write (and re-write) personal essays, analytical and reflective essays, and a research paper.
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 401 Julia Manor 1 / 30
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Julia Manor 2 / 15
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 354 Julia Manor 0 / 15
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 352 Jason Weaver 11 / 30
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse 0 / 26
*Cross-listed wtih EDUC 220-01*
PSYC 242-01 Cognitive Psychology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Brooke Lea -1 / 24
PSYC 242-L1 Cognitive Psychology Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Brooke Lea 0 / 24
PSYC 243-01 Psychological Anthropology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez -2 / 20
*Cross-listed with ANTH 243-01*
PSYC 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund 6 / 24
*Cross-listed with NEUR 244-01; Prerequisite = PSYC/NEUR 180; permission of instructor is required for ACTC students*
PSYC 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Darcy Burgund 6 / 24
*Cross-listed with NEUR 244-L1*
PSYC 250-01 Developmental Psychology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Anna Johnson 1 / 34
PSYC 256-01 Personality Psychology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Jason Weaver 4 / 34
PSYC 262-01 Asian American Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Sun No 15 / 24
*Cross-listed with AMST 262-01*
PSYC 270-01 Psychology of Sustainable Behavior TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Christina Manning 4 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENVI 270-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Darcy Burgund 18 / 35
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss 18 / 35
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Joan Ostrove 18 / 35
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 STAFF 18 / 35
PSYC 370-01 Understanding and Confronting Racism TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 102 Kendrick Brown -1 / 16
*Cross-listed with AMST 370-01; ACTC students may register April 25th*
PSYC 374-01 Clinical and Counseling Psych TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss -5 / 18
*ACTC students may register on April 27th*
PSYC 379-01 Cultural Psychology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 300 Sun No 7 / 16
PSYC 488-01 Pain and Suffering MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Eric Wiertelak 4 / 16
PSYC 488-02 Lives in Context TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 301 Joan Ostrove -2 / 16
*Cross-listed with WGSS 405-01*

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RELI 120-01 Hebrew Bible MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Barry Cytron 2 / 24
RELI 125-01 Love and Death TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Paula Cooey 2 / 20
RELI 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 150 James Laine 7 / 50
*Cross-listed with CLAS 135-01*
RELI 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 150 Andrew Overman 7 / 50
*Cross-listed with CLAS 135-01*
RELI 194-03 Folklore and Religion W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Peter Harle 0 / 15
This course will introduce students to the study of folklore, belief and religious folklife. We will consider examples of folktales, myths, material arts, paranormal experience narratives, magic, healing and other traditions as they relate to religion. By examining folklore that emerges within, between, and in reaction to religious traditions, students will be challenged to move beyond simple notions of culture, religious authority, and doctrine. Participants in the course should be prepared for a heavy but exciting reading load.
RELI 194-04 Sufis, Saints and Society in Islamic South Asia TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Brendan LaRocque 17 / 20
This course provides an introduction to the history of Islam in the countries of South Asia – particularly India, Pakistan and Bangladesh – which are collectively home to the world’s largest Muslim population. We will begin by examining the appearance of Islam and the Qu’ran, and then explore the rich history of the spread of the religion into the Indian subcontinent. Our topics will include Sufism and Islamic mysticism, the role of Muslim Sultans, and processes of conversion to Islam. We will also explore the impact of British imperialism on Islamic society, Muslim relations with Hindus and other non-Muslim communities, women, gender and Islam, the historical meanings of jihad, and non-violent Islamic social movements. Course materials will include texts, primary sources, poetry, films, and music.
RELI 194-05 Islam: Classical Traditions and Modern Challenges MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 James Laine 11 / 20
This will be an introductory course on Islam. We will study a variety of classical Islamic traditions (Shari’ah law, Sufism, Shi’i piety, kingship) and their legacy in the modern world. We will pay close attention to the Muslim quest for unity and a singular Islam in the face of the great variety of Muslim practices and perspectives in the world past and present.
RELI 235-01 Theory and Method in the Study of Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Paula Cooey 5 / 20
RELI 294-01 Religion and Politics in India M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 James Laine 2 / 20
RELI 294-01 Religion and Politics in India M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Anand Patwardhan 2 / 20
RELI 294-02 Native American Religious Studies W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06A Monica Siems 4 / 15
Native American traditions figured prominently in the early days of Religious Studies as scholars sought the origins of human religiosity among "primitive" peoples. Now, however, the few scholars in the discipline who pursue this specialty face numerous controversies. These often revolve around the boundaries of sacred knowledge – what can be shared, when, how, with whom, by whom, and for what purpose – and the ethics of representing "others." Outside the academy, Native traditions have been suppressed and outlawed on one hand, but commodified and embraced by non-Natives on the other, further complicating matters. This course will approach the study of Native American religious traditions cautiously, with a focus on the Dakota people indigenous to Minnesota and a continual awareness of the tensions being navigated, in the hope of both challenging the purposes and methods of the discipline of Religious Studies and suggesting some appropriate ways to seek knowledge about Native American traditions.
RELI 294-04 Science, Magic and Belief in the Early Modern Atlantic MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Karin Velez 7 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-01*

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RUSS 101-01 Elementary Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 402 Julia Chadaga 4 / 25
RUSS 101-L1 Elementary Russian I Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 217 Elizaveta Kundas 6 / 15
RUSS 101-L2 Elementary Russian I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Elizaveta Kundas 1 / 13
RUSS 203-01 Intermediate Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 217 Svetlana Rukhelman 20 / 25
RUSS 203-L1 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 217 Elizaveta Kundas 10 / 13
RUSS 203-L2 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Elizaveta Kundas 11 / 13
RUSS 251-01 19th Century Russian Lit: Fate/Narrative in Russian Culture MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 212 Svetlana Rukhelman 17 / 20
*Appropriate for first-year students. All readings in English.*
Russians are uniquely preoccupied with the idea of fate. In this course, we will try to understand why this is so -- and we'll carry out this inquiry by examining vital aspects of Russian culture, literature, and intellectual and political history. The focus of our course will be texts by Pushkin ("Eugene Onegin," "The Queen of Spades"), Lermontov ("A Hero of Our Time"), Dostoevsky ("Notes from Underground," "The Gambler"), Tolstoy ("The Death of Ivan Ilyich"), Zamyatin ("We"), and Pasternak ("Doctor Zhivago"), as well as a film by Tarkovsky. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which these works address, and shed light on, questions of personal and national destiny, chance and divine predestination, fatalism as a belief system, scientific determinism and free will, the narrative arc of a person's life, and the peculiar attitude known as the "russkii avos'" -- "the Russian maybe"
RUSS 294-01 Terrorism and Art: The Spectacle of Destruction MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 226 Julia Chadaga 0 / 25
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-02; taught in English* Russia presents an excellent case study for the topic of political violence. Terrorism as a means of political persuasion originated in the land of the tsars; Russian history features an incendiary cycle of repressions, revolts, and reprisals. Studying the origins and depictions of these events in works of art reveals how culture mediates between the world of ideas and the sphere of action. We will consider the tactics and motives of revolutionary conspirators as well as the role that gender and religion played in specific acts of terror. We will strive to understand the emphasis that Russian terrorists placed on the aesthetics of violence as we explore the ways in which Russian revolutionary thought and action served as a model for radicals around the world. The Russian case will provide a framework for in-depth study of examples of terrorism from Algeria, Ireland, Germany, the U.S., and the Middle East. Texts will include novels, poems, manifestoes, letters, diaries, historical and journalistic accounts, paintings, and films, as well as readings in cultural history and political theory.
RUSS 394-01 Writers and Power: The European East in the 20th Century TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 402 Svetlana Rukhelman 20 / 25
*Cross-listed with INTL 317-01* Throughout the twentieth century, writers in Eastern Europe engaged in prominent confrontations with oppressive governments and reigning ideologies. This course explores major literary works that respond not only to specific political regimes, but also to authority in the abstract and to such forms of oppression as domineering fathers and the tyranny of bureaucracy. Special attention will be paid to texts that tackle the relationship between the writer (or artist) and the state, and we will re-examine the truthfulness, in the Eastern-European context, of the adage "The pen is mightier than the sword." Authors read include Kafka, Hasek, Nabokov, Bulgakov, Kundera, and Herta Mueller.

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Mahnaz Kousha 0 / 17
*First Year Course only* Sociology offers a new window on the world we inhabit. It provides a fresh outlook on what seems to be familiar while shedding light on the unfamiliar world. A sociological perspective examines the social context and explores the ways in which people’s life chances are shaped by societal forces. Sociology addresses a wide range of issues and questions our common sense understanding of the social phenomenon. It challenges our ordinary perception or personal experiences and proposes a deeper appreciation and analysis of the world. As a discipline, sociology deals with a variety of topics. Any social phenomenon can be studied from a sociological perspective: socialization, culture, race, ethnicity, gender, and class stratification, deviance and crime, economic and global inequality, families and intimate relationships, education, religion, and globalization. Sociology explores minute aspects of social life (microsociology) as well as global social processes and structures (macrosociology). This course is designed to introduce you to the study of society and what Mills calls the “sociological imagination:” a way of viewing the events, relationships and social phenomena that shape our individual lives and much of our collective experience. Throughout the course we will examine some of the central concepts, theories, and problems that have preoccupied both classical and contemporary sociologists, and gain a sense of how the sociological imagination can illuminate the social forces that have a concrete impact on our everyday lives. This course encourages you to develop your own “sociological imagination,” and to apply that perspective to an understanding of your experience and the larger society.
Required Books: Witt, Jon (2007). The Big Picture: A Sociology Primer. McGraw Hill.
Shipler K. David (2004). The Working Poor: Invisible in America. Knopf.
Schor B. Juliet (2004). Born to Buy. Scribner.
Supplementary Books: (Students will choose one or two of these books for analysis and review). Klinenberg, Eric (2002). Heat Wave. A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago. University of Chicago Press. Kozol, Jonathan (2000). Ordinary Resurrections. Perennial.
Pollan, Michael (2007). Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. Penguin Books.
Sandweiss, A. Martha (2009). Passing Strange. Penguin Books.
SOCI 110-02 Introduction to Sociology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Mahnaz Kousha 2 / 25
SOCI 272-01 Social Theories MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 208 Khaldoun Samman 0 / 16
SOCI 275-01 Comparative-Historical Sociology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Terry Boychuk -1 / 16
*Cross-listed with POLI 250-01*
SOCI 275-02 Comparative-Historical Sociology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk 4 / 16
*Cross-listed with POLI 250-02*
SOCI 280-01 Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Erik Larson 5 / 16
*Cross-listed with INTL 280-01*
SOCI 283-01 Economic Sociology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 208 Erik Larson 4 / 19
SOCI 335-01 Family Bonds W 01:10 pm-04:10 pm MUSIC 219 Mahnaz Kousha 8 / 16
SOCI 480-01 Senior Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Khaldoun Samman 3 / 16
SOCI 480-01 Senior Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk 3 / 16

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Theatre and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
THDA 105-01 Theater and Performance in the Twin Cities W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 205 Beth Cleary 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* The Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul are second only to New York City in the number of “live performance” tickets sold annually: this is a creative community with active artistic institutions! In this class, we examine the many forms, signifying systems and strategies of performance-making in these Twin Cities. We will attend theatre and dance performances in urban venues as various as professional theatres, small puppet-show venues, dance concert halls, among others; we will read playscripts, scholarly articles and research documents, as appropriate, in preparation for attending shows, and we will practice the vocabularies of analysis and critique, and the art of reflection and review, after the performances. The course meets once a week, Wednesday nights, in a seminar format. This scheduling allows for some class meetings to occur in transit to and from performance, with the “curriculum” of the evening being the performance itself. Alternations between these off-campus excursions and on-campus seminars allow us to prepare for the interpretative encounters of live performance, and to learn and practice technical terms and vocabularies of re-collection crucial to discussing and analyzing performance. We will consider the histories and innovations in the forms we see, developing a capacity for what Brecht called “complex seeing” as we actively watch, hear and make critical new meanings in the performance event. We will see 4-6 professional productions in the Cities including: Waiting for Godot at the Jungle Theatre and The Brothers Size, a new work by Tarell Alvin McCraney produced by Pillsbury House Theatre at the Guthrie. Other venues may include Frank Theatre, Walker Art Center, and Ordway Center for the Performing Arts (seasons and directors still being announced). In the Theatre and Dance Department, the 2012-13 season theme is *Youth Cultures,* and we will attend the First-Year devised show in mid-October, the November production of Romeo & Juliet, and the dance concert. Even with this impartial list, there is a variety of spectating practices compelled by genre and the historical/aesthetic circumstances that have produced these works. How do producing organizations and directors/choreographers talk about their work? What does it means to produce work in relation to a mission and a theme? How do themes find articulation at a college? At professional organizations?
Required Course Texts will include:
Beckett, Samuel. Waiting for Godot.
Leach, Robert. Theatre Studies: The Basics.
McCraney, Tarell Alvin. The Brother/Sister Plays.
Required texts will be available in the bookstore, and when possible, they are also on reserve in the Library.
Course Requirements:
This class requires Wednesday evening classroom and performance. Due to theaters’ season scheduling, several non-Wednesday evening performances may be required. Attendance at THDA post-show discussions (usually occurring a
THDA 110-01 Introduction to Theatre Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Lara Nielsen 12 / 20
THDA 115-01 Cultures of Dance MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 205 Wynn Fricke -2 / 20
THDA 115-01 Cultures of Dance MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke -2 / 20
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory and Performance I MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 3 Harry Waters 1 / 16
*First day attendance required*
THDA 121-01 Beginning Dance Composition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke 8 / 15
THDA 125-01 Technical Theater MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett 9 / 16
*First day attendance required*
THDA 125-L1 Technical Theater Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett 3 / 8
THDA 125-L2 Technical Theater Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett 6 / 8
THDA 230-01 Physical Approaches MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Robert Rosen 4 / 12
This laboratory course offers intensive training in making theatre from action. Based on the teaching of Jacques Lecoq and his school of physical theatre training in Paris, work will focus on the observation, re-creation and transposition of daily life to create a theatre that is at once playful, emotional and creative. Course work will include an examination of the natural world and all its movements, our realtionship with space and time, the neutral and larval masks and object manipulation. We will use improvisation, games and exercises to develop physical and creative skills with which to create original work; training includes basic acrobatics, balancing and juggling. Applied analyses of professional productions are required, as are written analyses of course work and individual progress. The goal of the course is to encourage curiosity and exploration and to engage the student as creator, designer and performer. Enrollment limited to 12 students. No prerequisites, but Theater/Dance 120 or other performance training strongly encouraged. Alternate years.
THDA 235-01 Fundamentals of Scene Design TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser 9 / 16
THDA 262-01 Performing Feminisms W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 204 Lara Nielsen 6 / 20
*Cross-listed with WGSS 262-01; first day attendance required*
THDA 294-02 Hip Hop Performance MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm THEATR STUDIO Harry Waters 1 / 30
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-04* Hip Hop Culture is at the core of the emerging 21st Century aesthetic. In 2012 MASHUP, we will address the specific elements of Hip Hop's history, social innovation, and global influence. The course will host local as well as national Hip Hop performance artists in the classroom, and students will experiment with elements of hip hop in performance. In the class we will examine key questions about the genre: What is Hip Hop Theatre? How does it differ from Hip Hop "Performance?" What's the place of Hip Hop Journalism? What is the Hip Hop visual culture? Our questions more than our answers will guide the final performance project in the course, and inspire the devised Hip Hop piece on the THDA mainstage in February, 2013. No special skills or performance history needed. There is room for all levels of interest. If you are a Hip Hop Head or if you are just wanting to understand the nature of cultural change, this is the course for you.
THDA 310-01 Theatre Methods: Shakespeare to Viewpoint MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 205 Beth Cleary 3 / 12
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required* This course is an experiential survey of major European and U.S. performance methods, 1600-present. Through readings in theatre and performance history and theory, students will investigate the social forces that have shaped acting-as-representation: from Shakespeare's Globe through commedia dell'arte, from Stanislavski's "magic if" to Brecht's -effekt-, Barba's "paper canoe" to the ongoing U.S. performance inquiry into "presence." In a weekly intensive lab component, students will learn the specific techniques developed by and required of these practitioners and genres. Research projects will culminate in an open community workshop of exercises and techniques, incorporated by the students as part of their comprehensive inquiry into additional innovators or genres. Requirement for Theater and Dance majors. Preference given to Theater and Dance major and/or minors.
THDA 310-L1 Theatre Methods Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR STUDIO Beth Cleary 3 / 12
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
THDA 489-01 Seminar in Performance Theory and Practice TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen 2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
THDA 21-01 African Dance WF 10:10 am-11:40 am THEATR 6 Patricia Brown 12 / 20
THDA 41-01 Modern Dance I TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 2 / 15
THDA 43-01 Modern Dance III MW 03:50 pm-05:20 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 3 / 15
THDA 51-01 Ballet I MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile 3 / 10
THDA 52-01 Ballet II MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile 6 / 10
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile 6 / 15

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
WGSS 105-01 Transnational Perspectives on Gender, Race, Class, and Sexuality TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker 0 / 25
WGSS 141-01 Latin America Through Women's Eyes TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Paul Dosh 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with LATI 141-01 and POLI 141-01*
WGSS 194-01 The Culture Wars: The Struggle over Feminism, Abortion, and Queer Politics since 1970 MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Ryan Murphy 3 / 25
WGSS 194-02 Goddess and Ghosts: Images of Women in Chinese Culture and Literature MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Xin Yang 0 / 17
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ASIA 194-01 and CHIN 194-01* Much like the vampire and mythical goddess in American and European novels, female ghosts and goddesses are also sources of fascination in Chinese culture. This course uses the trope of goddess and ghosts to unravel the gender politics in Chinese culture. We examine how ancient and modern literary texts revise and appropriate images of goddess and ghost to reflect changing attitudes towards gender, identity, body, and the female Other. Some specific topics include: how the literary representation of goddesses and ghosts intersects with Confucian ideology and its social structure; how the term goddess had been appropriated by male modern reformists for their utopian desire for modernity; how the contemporary obsession with ghost fiction/film is related to Taoist concepts and everyday anxiety; and how women writers intervene within the constraints of the political and social contexts and are therefore imaged as the paranoid in paternal framework. We will take an interdisciplinary, multimedia approach to gender relations in modern fiction, film, memoir, and other cultural genres. Students will learn the continuation and variation of Chinese tradition in contemporary contexts as well as its intersection with modern ideologies, and develop critical views from gendered perspective.
WGSS 194-03 Culture and Theory of Women of Color Feminisms M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 213 Juliana Pegues 1 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-01* This course examines women of color feminisms as historical, intellectual, cultural, and political formations in the U.S. from the 1960s to the present. Course texts will highlight creative modes of theorizing and will include original writing from women of color feminist movements (personal narratives, poetry, and analytic essays) alongside contemporary documents from queer of color scholarship and queer people of color movement organizing (social theory, spoken word, film/multimedia, organizational statements, political analyses).
WGSS 194-04 Minding the Body MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 300 Joan Ostrove 1 / 17
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with PSYC 194-01* This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the body primarily from the perspectives of psychology, disability studies, and feminist studies. We will rely on analysis of theoretical and empirical research, personal narrative, and film, as well as visits from a variety of guest speakers, to explore such questions as: What is a "normal" body? A "beautiful" body? How does the media inform how we feel about our bodies? How are bodies – especially women’s bodies – objectified, exploited, commodified, and regulated? How and why do we discriminate against people with non-normative bodies? How do people represent the experience of having a disabled body? How can we think critically about the various ways in which people change, regulate, and enhance their bodies (e.g., via body building, cosmetic surgery, diet, etc.)? How do sexism, racism, classism, and other forms of oppression influence how different bodies are viewed, treated, educated, etc.? This will be a writing-intensive course in which students will write (and re-write) personal essays, analytical and reflective essays, and a research paper.
WGSS 200-01 Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Ryan Murphy 12 / 20
WGSS 201-01 History of U.S. Feminisms TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 227 Catherine Batza 11 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 201-01*
WGSS 261-01 Feminist Political Theory TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 4 / 25
*Cross-listed POLI 261-01*
WGSS 262-01 Performing Feminisms W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 204 Lara Nielsen 6 / 20
*Cross-listed with THDA 262-01; first day attendance required*
WGSS 294-01 Whiteness and Postcolonialism TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Sonita Sarker 14 / 25
WGSS 294-03 Gender, Race, and Health in 20th Century US TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Catherine Batza 6 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-03 and HIST 294-03*
WGSS 394-01 Gender, Power and Sexualitites in Africa MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-01*
WGSS 405-01 Lives in Context TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 301 Joan Ostrove -2 / 16
*Cross-listed with PSYC 488-02*

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