Spring 2012 Class Schedule

Spring 2012 Class Schedule - updated May 18, 2012 at 09:56 am

This is a snapshot of the class schedule and enrollment information, updated only once daily. For the most current information on class schedule and enrollment, Macalester students, faculty and staff should log in to 1600grand and use the "Search Class Schedule" link.

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Chinese
Classics
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Neuroscience Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theater and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
AMST 101-01 Explorations of Race and Racism MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 Duchess Harris -2 / 25
*First day attendance required*
AMST 112-01 Intro to LGBTQ Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Corie Hammers 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with WGSS 110-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 194-01 Great Lakes Native American History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Scott Shoemaker 13 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 194-02*
AMST 194-02 American Jews, American Judaism MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Barry Cytron -2 / 20
*Cross-listed with RELI 194-03*
AMST 194-03 American Catholics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 James Laine -1 / 20
*Cross-listed with RELI 194-04*
AMST 222-01 Imagining the American West TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Lynn Hudson 9 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 222-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 224-01 African American History: Slavery, Emancipation, and Reconstruction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Peter Rachleff 10 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 224-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 254-01 Peoples/Cultures Native Amer TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Diana Dean -3 / 20
*Cross-listed with ANTH 254-01*
AMST 260-01 Race, Cultural Politics and Social Movements TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Jane Rhodes 4 / 25
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with HIST 294-05* Since the nineteenth century, the struggles for racial equality and ethnic identity formation in the United States have been situated within formal and informal social movements. This course examines the central role of culture - including music, art, performance, literature, and media - in race-based activism. We will consider various aspects of the African American freedom struggle, Asian American and Latino/a activism, and the indigenous rights movement, paying particular attention to how culture functions as a tool for organizing, group cohesion, and outreach. The course will also consider how popular culture reflects and shapes social movements.

AMST 262-01 Asian American Psychology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Sun No 14 / 24
*Cross-listed with PSYC 262-01*
AMST 294-01 Feminism and the Law MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 212 Duchess Harris 7 / 25
*First day attendance required; crosslisted with WGSS 294-02*
AMST 294-02 School to Prison Pipeline: An Introduction TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Karin Aguilar-San Juan -3 / 20
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with EDUC 294-01* When we look at the shocking rates with which poor black and brown students are disproportionately punished, suspended and expelled from classrooms across the nation - and often, within a few months, drawn into the juvenile correctional system - we cannot help but wonder: What is going on, and what can we do to fix it? This lecture-based, introductory level course will focus on Zero Tolerance policies in the U.S. public schools and juvenile corrections as connected and overlapping sites of structural racism, social segregation, and potential violations of universal human rights. We will explore these concepts from a variety of inter/disciplinary and theoretical perspectives. The question of "civil rights and human rights" will provide a central frame for thinking about the fate of youth who are funneled into the pipeline. No prerequisites.

AMST 294-03 Mixed Race America: Identity, Culture, and Politics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 SooJin Pate 6 / 25
This course is an introduction to the animating debates, themes, and issues in Critical Mixed Race Studies. Utilizing critical race theory and postcolonial analysis, we will examine the identities and experiences of multiracial or mixed race people, as well as the ways in which they have played a fundamental role in constructing race and shaping race relations, politics, and culture in the U.S. Topics in this course address the following: conquest and slavery, miscegenation laws, debates about the U.S. Census categories, U.S. militarism, representations of "mixed" people in the media, cultural expressions of "mixed" Americans, transracial adoption, queering mixed race studies, and the Mixed Race/Multiracial Movement.
AMST 294-04 American Indians in American Thought MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Scott Shoemaker 23 / 25
AMST 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 Alicia Munoz 6 / 15
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 341-01 Urban Social Geography: City Life and Landscapes TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Daniel Trudeau 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with GEOG 341-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 380-01 Postmodern African American Literature TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Daylanne English 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENGL 380-01*
AMST 400-01 Senior Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 113 Duchess Harris 16 / 25
*First day attendance required*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ANTH 101-01 General Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Ron Barrett 3 / 35
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Olga Gonzalez 3 / 35
ANTH 123-01 Introduction to Archaeology MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Jeffrey Pearson 0 / 25
*Cross-listed with CLAS 123-01*
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 2 / 16
*First day attendance required; available to declared Anthropology majors only*
ANTH 240-01 Human Osteology and Paleopathology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge 5 / 16
ANTH 254-01 Peoples and Cultures of Native America TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Diana Dean -3 / 20
*Cross-listed with AMST 254-01*
ANTH 294-01 Defense Against the Dark Arts W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Erik Davis 0 / 20
*Please note that as of Nov. 16 the waitlist for this course is long and there's no magical way for everyone to get in; cross-listed with RELI 294-04* This class is a comparative survey of magic and witchcraft across cultures. As such, students in this class will be expected to simultaneously learn details from particular magical traditions studied in class, as well as to relate these details to theories about magic and witchcraft within the discipline of Anthropology and the field of Religious Studies. Special themes addressed in the class are the reasonableness of belief in magic, social panics, magical efficacy, and magic as a form of prefigurative politics.
ANTH 294-01 Defense Against the Dark Arts W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Ron Barrett 0 / 20
*Please note that as of Nov. 16 the waitlist for this course is long and there's no magical way for everyone to get in; cross-listed with RELI 294-04* This class is a comparative survey of magic and witchcraft across cultures. As such, students in this class will be expected to simultaneously learn details from particular magical traditions studied in class, as well as to relate these details to theories about magic and witchcraft within the discipline of Anthropology and the field of Religious Studies. Special themes addressed in the class are the reasonableness of belief in magic, social panics, magical efficacy, and magic as a form of prefigurative politics.
ANTH 294-02 Museum Anthropology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Olga Gonzalez 5 / 20
This course introduces students to critical perspectives in museum studies. We will begin by examining the historical setting within which these institutions evolved, giving careful consideration to the relationship with anthropology and to how the discipline contributed to the construction of the "exotic" objects contained within the "cabinets of curiosities" that filled museums. In this course we will engage in both theoretical and practical terms with museums as public culture. Thus, we will pay close attention to the processes of collection, archives and exhibits in order to examine how curatorial practices and the gazes of visitors also contribute to make of museums sites for contestation, reconciliation, dialogue, fragmentation and community. The critical aspect of this course also includes perspectives of groups that are critical of museums but propose alternative "post-museum" experiences that enable multi-vocality and defy the monumentality of Western museum practice. Students are required to do two fieldsite visits for this course. Prerequisite: ANTH 111, Introduction to Cultural Anthropology.
ANTH 340-01 Paleoanthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge 12 / 20
ANTH 358-01 Anthropology of Violence MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez 2 / 20
ANTH 365-01 Environmental Anthropology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Arjun Guneratne 14 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENVI 365-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ANTH 490-01 Senior Seminar TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 0 / 10
ANTH 490-02 Senior Seminar TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A Arjun Guneratne 0 / 10

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ART 130-01 Drawing I MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 123 Megan Vossler 0 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 130-02 Drawing I MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm ART 123 Megan Vossler 0 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 131-01 Introduction to Ceramics MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm ART 130 Gary Erickson 0 / 10
*First day attendance required; $100 material fee required*
ART 149-01 Introduction to Visual Culture TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ART 113 Nassim Rossi 40 / 60
ART 161-01 Art of the West II MW 10:50 am-12:20 pm ART 113 Sonja Kelley 3 / 25
ART 171-01 Art of the East II: Japan MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ART 113 Sonja Kelley 8 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 171-01*
ART 234-01 Painting I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 128 Christine Willcox 3 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 234-02 Painting I TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART Christine Willcox 1 / 5
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 135 Stanton Sears 5 / 15
*First day attendance required*
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 119 Ruthann Godollei 0 / 15
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
ART 263-01 Modern Art MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot 8 / 20
This course will explore the major developments in Modern Art, from the1900s through the 1970s. It will cover movements such as Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, Constructivism, Dadaism, Surrealism and examine post-WWII art scene in Europe and the US. Central themes include: the relationship between art and politics; abstraction vs. figuration; primitivism and Orientalism; reactions to modernity and the rise of technology; the tension between the avant-garde and popular culture; the institutional critique, and the special role of art and artists in modern society.
ART 294-01 Performance Studies Praxis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot -2 / 15
*Cross-listed with THDA 260-01; first day attendance required*
ART 294-01 Performance Studies Praxis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Lara Nielsen -2 / 15
*Cross-listed with THDA 260-01; first day attendance required*
ART 294-02 Intro to Digital Photography MW 01:10 pm-04:10 pm Justin Newhall 2 / 15
*First day attendance required; course to meet in in Lampert Building 3rd Floor; Required: An entry-level digital SLR camera (new or used). A very limited number of cameras available for check out.* This course is an introduction to the technical, conceptual and historical aspects of digital photography. Students will learn about camera operation, image processing, and final output within a fine-arts context.
ART 294-03 Art and Revolution in China MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ART 113 Sonja Kelley 11 / 20
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-03* This course will focus on artistic development in China during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This has been a period of extensive political upheaval including the fall of imperial rule, the growth of warlordism, the war with Japan, a civil war, and the Communist rise to power. In addition, China has been transformed by rapid economic changes since the 1980s. In this course, we will explore the effect these changes have had on the visual arts in China, including painting, sculpture, printmaking, and film. This period provides an opportunity to examine how a country with long-standing artistic traditions can alter its visual language in response to great political, economic, and social change.
ART 294-05 Public Art TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 135 Stanton Sears 6 / 15
In this course, we will explore different forms of public art, and apply what we have learned to a number of studio projects. Beginning with an overview of public/civic artworks over a broad span of time, the course will include visits/guest lectures from regional artists working in the public realm, and will examine the following questions: What is public art? How does work created for a particular site or context differ from traditional studio practice? How are new technologies influencing the production of public artworks? What are the differences between officially sanctioned and "guerrilla" artworks? This is a studio course with a significant hands-on component. Students will develop their own temporary public artworks during the semester, with group discussions of their projects. Students will develop an awareness of the broad interdisciplinary approach this type of art-making demands.
ART 294-06 Latin America: Art/Nation MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Ernesto Capello 10 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 282-01 and LATI 282-01*
ART 334-01 Figure Painting MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 128 Christine Willcox 9 / 14
ART 370-01 Drawing II: The Natural World TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 123 Megan Vossler 0 / 10
This course will explore in-depth various components of the natural world, including the human figure, animals, plants, and landscape. Special attention will be paid to comparative anatomy (human and animal), and to the principles of botanical drawing. Students will work from live figure models, and there will be numerous field trips to such venues as the Como Conservatory, Bell Museum of Natural History, and the University of Minnesota's Raptor Center. This course will also include an introduction to color materials. Prerequisite: Drawing 1 or instructor permission. Email: mvossler@macalester.edu
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TR TBA ART 119 Ruthann Godollei -5 / 5
*Permission of instructor required*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 130 Gary Erickson 1 / 5
*First day attendance required; $100 material fee required**
ART 488-01 Senior Studio Seminar MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Ruthann Godollei 14 / 25
*To meet in the Art Gallery*
ART 490-17 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Gary Erickson 0 / 1
ART 490-20 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Christine Willcox 0 / 1

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ASIA 111-01 Introduction to Asian Studies W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 370 Frederik Green 1 / 20
Introduction to Asian Studies explores the three main regions of Asia that are currently taught at Macalester: India, China, and Japan. The course offers an interdisciplinary and trans-regional approach to the study of Asia that emphasizes the historical interconnectivity of the three civilizations in terms of religion, trade, the arts and politics.
ASIA 171-01 Art of the East II: Japan MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ART 113 Sonja Kelley 8 / 25
*Cross-listed with ART 171-01*
ASIA 194-01 Japanese Horror Film/ Lit TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Kendall Heitzman 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with JAPA 194-01*
ASIA 236-01 Indian Philosophies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 Joy Laine 5 / 20
*Cros-listed with PHIL 236-01*
ASIA 255-01 China on Screen MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 113 Xin Yang 13 / 20
*Cross-listed with CHIN 255-01; first day attendance required; Monday evening screenings 7-10pm, Humanities 402.*
ASIA 275-01 History of Modern China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 14 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 277-01*
ASIA 277-01 History of Modern Japan TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 12 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 277-01*
ASIA 294-02 Japanese Theater TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 204 Kendall Heitzman 10 / 20
*Cross-listed with JAPA 294-02 and THDA 294-03*
ASIA 294-03 Art and Revolution in China MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ART 113 Sonja Kelley 11 / 20
*Cross-listed with ART 294-03*
ASIA 378-01 War Crimes and Memory in East Asia W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 11 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 378-01*

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
BIOL 112-01 Origins MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm THEATR 204 Sarah Boyer 4 / 24
BIOL 117-01 Women, Health and Reproduction MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 Elizabeth Jansen -7 / 24
*Cross-listed with WGSS 171-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby 5 / 21
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Michael Anderson 1 / 21
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Paul Overvoorde 1 / 21
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Christopher Calderone -6 / 48
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 Devavani Chatterjea -1 / 48
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Kristina Curry Rogers 0 / 44
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Kristina Curry Rogers 0 / 22
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson 0 / 22
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Kristina Curry Rogers 0 / 22
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson 0 / 22
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 226 Jerald Dosch 1 / 44
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch 2 / 22
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson 0 / 22
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
BIOL 342-01 Animal Behavior/Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis -2 / 15
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 342-L1 Animal Behavior/Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis -2 / 15
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Christopher Calderone 5 / 16
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 352-L1 Biochemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Christopher Calderone 5 / 16
*Cross-listed wtih CHEM 352-L1; first day attendance required*
BIOL 358-01 Microbiology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 Steven Sundby 5 / 16
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 358-L1 Microbiology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Steven Sundby 5 / 16
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 365-01 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 270 Kristina Curry Rogers 2 / 16
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 365-L1 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Kristina Curry Rogers 2 / 16
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 367-01 Human Physiology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 150 Lin Aanonsen 2 / 32
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 367-L1 Human Physiology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen -2 / 16
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 367-L2 Human Physiology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen 4 / 16
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 368-01 Plant Physiology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Paul Overvoorde 6 / 12
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 368-L1 Plant Physiology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 287 Paul Overvoorde 6 / 12
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 473-01 Research in Immunology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Devavani Chatterjea 0 / 8
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 473-L1 Research in Immunology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 277 Devavani Chatterjea 0 / 8
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 481-01 Seminar in Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Sarah Boyer -2 / 12
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 489-01 Biology Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Paul Overvoorde 9 / 60
*First day attendance required*

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHEM 112-01 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Paul Fischer -1 / 28
CHEM 112-02 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan 0 / 28
CHEM 112-03 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Susan Green 0 / 30
CHEM 112-04 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Susan Green 6 / 30
CHEM 112-L1 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice -1 / 20
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L2 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 0 / 20
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L3 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice 0 / 20
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L4 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Kathryn Splan 3 / 20
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L5 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity W 01:10 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 4 / 18
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L6 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 1 / 18
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 212-01 Organic Chemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 100 Ronald Brisbois 12 / 38
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-02 Organic Chemistry II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye 2 / 38
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L1 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois 7 / 19
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L2 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois 5 / 19
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L3 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye 3 / 19
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L4 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye -1 / 19
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 222-01 Analytical Chemistry MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata 15 / 35
CHEM 222-L1 Analytical Chemistry Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Keith Kuwata 4 / 20
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 222-L2 Analytical Chemistry Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 380 Robert Rossi 11 / 15
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Paul Fischer 7 / 50
*1 credit course*
CHEM 312-01 Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 205 Thomas Varberg 13 / 24
CHEM 312-L1 Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 205 Thomas Varberg 13 / 24
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Christopher Calderone 5 / 16
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-01; first day attendance required*
CHEM 352-L1 Biochemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Christopher Calderone 5 / 16
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-L1; first day attendance required*
CHEM 394-01 Organometallic Chemistry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Paul Fischer 11 / 16
*Permission of instructor required*
CHEM 394-02 Research in Biochemistry MW 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 370 Kathryn Splan 2 / 8
*Permission of instructor required*
CHEM 394-L1 Research in Biochemistry Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan 2 / 8

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Chinese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHIN 102-01 First Year Chinese II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 112 Jin Stone 9 / 20
CHIN 102-02 First Year Chinese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 112 Jin Stone 5 / 15
CHIN 102-L1 First Year Chinese II Lab T 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 102 Yan Wang 9 / 15
CHIN 102-L2 First Year Chinese II Lab W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 113 Yan Wang 6 / 15
CHIN 102-L3 First Year Chinese II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 113 Yan Wang 10 / 15
CHIN 204-01 Second Year Chinese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Patricia Anderson 7 / 20
CHIN 204-02 Second Year Chinese II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 112 Patricia Anderson 10 / 20
CHIN 204-L1 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 09:30 am-10:30 am HUM 227 Yan Wang 1 / 15
CHIN 204-L2 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 102 Yan Wang 9 / 15
CHIN 204-L3 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 102 Yan Wang 13 / 15
CHIN 255-01 China on Screen MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 113 Xin Yang 13 / 20
*Cross-listed with ASIA 255-01; first day attendance required; Monday evening screenings 7-10pm, Humanities 402.* This course is an overview of China on the silver screen. Adopting the "nation" as its primary structuring device, the course examines how Chinese films represent the development and transformation of Chinese national identity. Topics under discussion include: how masculine and feminine virtues became emblems of a nation striving for modernity; how films were politically appropriated for socialist construction; how the revolutionary past has been cinematically framed, remembered and critiqued in the post-Mao era; and how China's deep tradition was consciously or unconsciously re-created and revised as a spectacle to engage the curious gaze of the global market. Coverage begins with silent film and extends to the fifth generation directors, underground filmmaking, and the revival of marital arts genre in greater China area. Feature films from mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong will be screened and discussed. Secondary articles will also be assigned in conjunction with the films. No prior knowledge of China or Chinese language is required.
CHIN 304-01 Third Year Chinese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 112 Patricia Anderson 7 / 20
CHIN 304-L1 Third Year Chinese II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Yan Wang 4 / 12
CHIN 304-L3 Third Year Chinese II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 102 Yan Wang 8 / 12
CHIN 408-01 Fourth Year Chinese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Xin Yang 10 / 20
CHIN 452-01 Translating Chinese: Theory and Practice TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 Frederik Green 6 / 15
*Cross-listed with LING 494-02; How and why did the first translators who began to translate English into Chinese and Chinese into English, choose the texts they translated? What problems, both linguistically and culturally, did (and do) they encounter? Did the same issues arise when translating

into Chinese and English, and how were they respectively addressed? Who did the translating? This course approaches the topic of Chinese translation simultaneously from a socio-historical, empirical, & theoretical perspective. At the same time, we will study and

back-translate existing translations, and attempt our own translations; Prerequisite: 2 Years of Chinese*

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CLAS 122-01 The Roman World TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Jeffrey Pearson 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 122-01*
CLAS 123-01 Introduction to Archaeology MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Jeffrey Pearson 0 / 25
*Cross-listed with ANTH 123-01*
CLAS 127-01 Women, Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Beth Severy-Hoven 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with WGSS 127-01*
CLAS 129-01 Greek Myths MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 009 Brian Lush 5 / 25
CLAS 212-01 Elementary Latin II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 011 Jeffrey Pearson 15 / 25
CLAS 212-L1 Elementary Latin II Lab T 10:00 am-11:00 am MAIN 011 Jeffrey Pearson 15 / 25
CLAS 214-01 Elementary Arabic II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Antoine Mefleh 2 / 25
CLAS 235-01 Elementary Greek II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Brian Lush 17 / 25
CLAS 235-L1 Elementary Greek II Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm Brian Lush 20 / 25
CLAS 235-L2 Elementary Greek II Lab TBA TBA Brian Lush 22 / 25
CLAS 294-01 Martyrdom Then/Now TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Susanna Drake 6 / 20
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-05*
CLAS 294-01 Martyrdom Then/Now TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Paula Cooey 6 / 20
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-05*
CLAS 301-01 Research Forum: Crisis Literature MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 003 Nanette Goldman 15 / 20
What characterizes literary responses to collective or individual crises? This course will lead us down a path of investigation of ancient literature, primarily poetic, generated out of national or private catastrophe. We start in the east, the Mesopotamian civilization of the 3rd millennium B.C.E. and move through time and space, culminating in classical Arabic elegy and lament. This course will be framed by a variety of questions, foremost of which is what is crisis literature. Other questions of import focus on stylistic features of the genres, nature of the intended audience, the topoi of sorrow, gendered rhetoric, portrayal of the enemy/source of crisis, ritual function of the literature, concepts of self/group, intertextuality and referential language, to name but a few. We will use as our primary sources English translations of the Akkadian, Sumerian, Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, Latin and Arabic texts.

Prerequisite: One of the following or permission of the instructor: CLAS 121 Greek World, 122 Roman World, 127 Women, Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome, 129 Greek Myths, 145 Pagans, Christians and Jews, 135 India and Rome; RELI 100 Introduction to Islam, 120 Hebrew Bible, 121 New Testament.

CLAS 332-01 Intermediate Latin: Poetry MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Nanette Goldman 9 / 25
CLAS 338-01 Intermediate Hebrew II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 011 Nanette Goldman 19 / 25
CLAS 342-01 Intermediate Arabic II TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 212 Antoine Mefleh 11 / 25
CLAS 342-L1 Intermediate Arabic II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 110 Antoine Mefleh 11 / 25
CLAS 362-01 Intermediate Greek: Poetry TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Beth Severy-Hoven 16 / 25
CLAS 362-L1 Intermediate Greek: Poetry Lab M TBA Beth Severy-Hoven 16 / 25
CLAS 392-01 Seminar on the Middle East Conflict R 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 003 Nanette Goldman 8 / 20
*2 credits; permission of instructor required* This upper level seminar is a cross-cultural dialogue with an upper level seminar on the same topic at Tel Hai College. The dialogue focuses on Mideast conflicts and is intended for those with in-depth knowledge of the region.

CLAS 485-01 Advanced Arabic MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Antoine Mefleh 20 / 25
CLAS 485-L1 Advanced Arabic Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 110 Antoine Mefleh 20 / 25

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
COMP 121-01 Introduction to Scientific Programming MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 258 Susan Fox 1 / 32
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 258 Yu Zhang 6 / 28
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 258 Yu Zhang -4 / 16
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
COMP 124-L1 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 256 Yu Zhang -4 / 16
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
COMP 240-01 Computer Systems Organization MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop 4 / 20
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
COMP 261-01 Theory of Computation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 245 Susan Fox 0 / 25
*Cross-listed wtih MATH 361-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
COMP 302-01 Introduction to Database Management Systems TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop 4 / 20
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
COMP 340-01 Digital Electronics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 101 James Doyle 4 / 24
*Cross-listed with PHYS 340-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
COMP 340-L1 Digital Electronics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 147 James Doyle 3 / 12
*Cross-listed with PHYS 340-L1; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
COMP 340-L2 Digital Electronics Lab M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 147 James Doyle 1 / 12
*Cross-listed with PHYS 340-L2; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
COMP 365-01 Computational Linear Algebra TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 245 Thomas Halverson 2 / 24
*Cross-listed with MATH 365-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar TBA TBA Susan Fox 8 / 15
*2-credit course*

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ECON 108-01 Quantitative Thinking for Policy Analysis TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 David Bressoud 11 / 36
*Cross-listed with MATH 108-01; ACTC students may register on December 2nd with signature of instructor*
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans 4 / 25
ECON 113-02 Financial Accounting TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans 1 / 22
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Karine Moe 0 / 25
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Karine Moe 6 / 25
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Paul Aslanian 4 / 25
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 05 Kristine Lamm West 8 / 25
ECON 194-01 Intro to American Economy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Karine Moe 1 / 16
*First day attendance required; Course not available to Economics majors or any student who's already taken Economics 119* This course provides a non-technical introduction to the basic concepts in economics, with a focus on the United States. Using a small number of fundamental economic concepts, this course provides a foundation for informed decision making regarding current economic debates. The course is intended for non-majors and does not count for the economics major. The goal of the course is to teach economic literacy so as to understand debates as described in the popular press.
ECON 221-01 Introduction to International Economics TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Raymond Robertson -1 / 25
ECON 225-01 Comparative Economic Systems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 226 Gary Krueger 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with INTL 225-01*
ECON 294-01 Economics of Education TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 101 Kristine Lamm West 4 / 25
ECON 356-01 Capital Markets MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 304 Liang Ding 11 / 25
ECON 356-02 Capital Markets MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Liang Ding 10 / 25
ECON 361-01 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 305 Sarah West 3 / 25
ECON 361-02 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Sarah West 14 / 25
ECON 371-01 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 226 Mario Solis-Garcia 5 / 25
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 309 Raymond Robertson 0 / 25
ECON 381-L1 Intro to Econometrics Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 309 Raymond Robertson 0 / 25
ECON 394-01 Deals TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Karl Egge -1 / 26
This is a unique class. Nearly all classes are taught by former Macalester students, most of whom graduated with an Economics major. These guest professors generally will share their post-Macalester career and educational journey with you, then spend more time talking about their current or most recent business venture (some might be nonprofit), and then focus on a particular transaction or "deal" that they were part of. Most of the presentations probably will be finance oriented. Students in the class are evaluated four ways: The first is class participation - they are expected to be excited about not only being in the class, but meeting some of the guest professors either over lunch or dinner with a few other students from the class. Students will work in 2-person teams to daily write up a short overview of what they heard and learned from each guest speaker. That is due prior to the next class. Again working in 2-person teams students will research and write a term paper whose theme is triggered by one of the guest speaker's lectures. Finally, there will be an all-inclusive final exam based on the speakers' remarks. It is important to the professors that there be some juniors and sophomores in the class. To the extent there is an excess demand to get into it by seniors (we hope the total enrollment is not over 25), we will hold back senior enrollment to between 15 and 20. Prerequisite: minimum requirement to take the class is Economics 113 (Financial Accounting), 119 (Principles of Economics), and one other course in Economics.

ECON 394-01 Deals TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Paul Aslanian -1 / 26
This is a unique class. Nearly all classes are taught by former Macalester students, most of whom graduated with an Economics major. These guest professors generally will share their post-Macalester career and educational journey with you, then spend more time talking about their current or most recent business venture (some might be nonprofit), and then focus on a particular transaction or "deal" that they were part of. Most of the presentations probably will be finance oriented. Students in the class are evaluated four ways: The first is class participation - they are expected to be excited about not only being in the class, but meeting some of the guest professors either over lunch or dinner with a few other students from the class. Students will work in 2-person teams to daily write up a short overview of what they heard and learned from each guest speaker. That is due prior to the next class. Again working in 2-person teams students will research and write a term paper whose theme is triggered by one of the guest speaker's lectures. Finally, there will be an all-inclusive final exam based on the speakers' remarks. It is important to the professors that there be some juniors and sophomores in the class. To the extent there is an excess demand to get into it by seniors (we hope the total enrollment is not over 25), we will hold back senior enrollment to between 15 and 20. Prerequisite: minimum requirement to take the class is Economics 113 (Financial Accounting), 119 (Principles of Economics), and one other course in Economics.

ECON 394-02 Economic History TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer 15 / 25
*First day attendance required*
ECON 431-01 Public Finance MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Sarah West 17 / 25
ECON 457-01 Finance MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Liang Ding 3 / 25
ECON 490-01 Behavioral Economics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Pete Ferderer 16 / 25
ECON 494-01 Entrepreneurship: New Ventures TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Joyce Minor 1 / 25
ECON 494-02 Quantitative Macroeconomics Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 Mario Solis-Garcia 18 / 25
The goal of the course is to understand and apply dynamic general equilibrium models to analyze a variety of macroeconomic issues. With the help of a computer, we will “replicate” a number of key journal articles published in the last 20 years; emphasis will be given to New Keynesian and financial frictions models. The course puts equal weight in theory and applications: by the end of the course, students should be able to construct and solve dynamic models for use in their own projects. MATLAB will be used extensively yet no prior knowledge is assumed. Prerequisites: Econ 371, 381, and Math 237. Math 236 recommended but not required. Lacking these prerequisites, permission of instructor required.

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Tina Kruse -1 / 25
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 230-01 Community Youth Development in Multicultural America TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Tina Kruse -1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
EDUC 260-01 Philosophy of Education MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai -1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
EDUC 292-01 Experiences in Education T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Steven Jongewaard 2 / 12
*2 credits; S/NC grading only* This course provides opportunities to explore, reflect upon and contribute to life in contemporary urban classrooms. Weekly internships will be arranged allowing students to work closely with teachers, educational support staff and diverse young people of varied ages (kindergarten, elementary, or secondary levels). A weekly seminar session, readings, reflective writing, and individual and small group projects complement the experiential aspects of the course. This course is offered on S/NC grading option only.
EDUC 294-01 School to Prison Pipeline TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Karin Aguilar-San Juan -3 / 20
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with AMST 294-02*
EDUC 300-01 Education/Family/Community M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 214 Tina Kruse 1 / 20
*2 credit course; meets second 7 weeks of the semester; S/NC grading only,first day attendance required*
EDUC 320-01 Educating Exceptional Students M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse -4 / 20
*2 credit course; meets first 7 weeks of the semester; S/NC grading only; first day attendance required*
EDUC 360-01 Education and Emerging Technologies W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Brad Belbas 3 / 12
*First day attendance required*
EDUC 370-01 Education and the Challenge of Globalization MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 214 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENVI 370-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students *

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENGL 101-01 College Writing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Jake Mohan 3 / 16
ENGL 105-01 American Voices TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Daylanne English 0 / 20
*First day attendance required* In this introductory English course, we will listen to a range of voices in U.S. and will read a rich variety of experiences and imaginings of what it means to be American in the contemporary United States. We will organize our readings according to themes about time: 1) coming to terms with an often traumatic collective or individual past, 2) imagining the future, and 3) representing an "ethnic" American self in the present. In the first section of the course, we will read short stories and novels by Sherman Alexie, Louise Erdrich, Lan Cao, Tim O'Brien, and Edwidge Danticat. In the second section, we will read speculative fiction by African American authors, including Octavia Butler, Samuel Delany, and Colson Whitehead. In the last section of the course, we will read short stories and novels about contemporary Chicana and Latin American identities, by authors such as Sandra Cisneros and Junot Diaz. Course requirements include three 5-7 page essays, an in-class presentation, and participation in discussion. This course fulfills the literature by U.S. writers of color/diasporic/postcolonial literature requirement for English majors.
ENGL 135-01 Poetry MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Neil Chudgar 0 / 20
This course is an introduction to poetry. This is its grand question: By what specific means can language make meaning? To find answers-and there are many-we will read broadly in the English verse of a period during which poets arranged words in a staggering variety of ways: the era of revolutionary change extending from the late Renaissance through the Enlightenment to early romanticism, from Shakespeare through Pope and Swift to Wordsworth. The men and women whose poems we'll read (some famous, many obscure) use language to make meanings about a vast range of topics, in an amazing range of ways, to a startling range of purposes. They discuss theology and syphilis, trees and injustice, the universe and a single pearl; they construct metaphors, pictures, emblems and paradoxes; they curse and pray, moralize and seduce, describe and defy description. Our aim will be to understand how the poems we read make the meanings they do, so that you may learn new ways of using language to make meanings of your own-this semester and forever. You'll earn your grade for the course by good-faith participation in our class discussion, by submitting brief response papers as assigned, and by completing four small works of different kinds. You will be able, within bounds, to choose the kinds of works that best suit your interests and abilities: you might choose, for example, to recite poetry from memory; to discover and report on interpretable objects from beyond our syllabus; or to interpret the poetry we encounter in poetry of your own. This course counts toward the English major as an introductory course. But Poetry is emphatically comprehensive in its welcome: students of all majors, all years, and all intellectual persuasions will find here both instruction and delight.
ENGL 136-01 Drama: Staging Violence MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Casey Jarrin 8 / 20
Introduction to drama, with attention to genealogies of literary/dramatic form, performance practice, and modes of stage/screen adaptation. Particular focus on the staging of physical, psychological, and political violence, across a range of national and cultural landscapes (Irish, German, Chilean, Argentinian, Serbian, Congolese, South African, British, American). We'll explore the spectacle and choreography of on-stage violence, the ethics of violent action and its representation, violence in language, and the relation between acts of storytelling and bloodletting, confession and interrogation, silence and speech/action. In addition to encounters with violence and its staging in Greek and Elizabethan contexts (Aeschylus, Oresteia; Euripides, Hippolytus; Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus), we'll examine influential, iconoclastic, and "in-your-face" works of twentieth-century drama. Potential plays: Oscar Wilde, Salome; Samuel Beckett one acts and Endgame/Happy Days; Peter Weiss, The Investigation; Frank McGuinness, Someone Who'll Watch Over Me; Ariel Dorfman, Death and the Maiden; Lynn Nottage, Ruined; Sarah Kane, Blasted, Phaedra’s Love, 4:48 Psychosis; John Osborne, Look Back in Anger; Edward Albee, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?; Enda Walsh, The Walworth Farce; Martin McDonagh, The Pillowman, Lieutenant of Inishmore. Required screenings and performances in the Twin Cities. Films include adaptations of stage plays (Julie Taymor, Titus; Ken Russell, Salome’s Last Dance; Mike Nichols, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?), as well as those which revisit/reenact historical scenes of violence (Oliver Hirschbiegel, Das Experiment; Quentin Tarantino, Inglourious Basterds; Pablo Larraín, Tony Manero; Juan Jose Campanella, El Secreto de sus Ojos; Vladimir Perisic, Ordinary People; Jeff Malmberg, Marwencol). Course fulfills the Intro/Gateway requirement for the English major.
ENGL 150-01 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 217 Kristin Naca 1 / 16
*Open to first year or sophomore only*
ENGL 150-02 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 James Dawes 0 / 16
ENGL 150-03 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 011 Matthew Burgess 5 / 16
ENGL 150-04 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Jon Lurie 6 / 16
ENGL 150-05 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 217 Ping Wang 7 / 16
*Open to first year or sophomore only*
ENGL 150-06 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 217 Ping Wang 3 / 16
ENGL 150-07 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Ping Wang 3 / 16
ENGL 208-01 Literary Publishing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Eric Lorberer 8 / 20
ENGL 260-01 Science Fiction: From Matrix Baby Cannibals to Brave New Worlds TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 401 James Dawes -6 / 16
*Cross-listed as ENVI 260-01*
ENGL 262-01 Studies in Literature and the Natural World MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Theresa Krier 10 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENVI 262-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students* This semester we study five modern Nature poets: Gerard Manley Hopkins, Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, Wallace Stevens, Alice Oswald. These five will allow us to investigate the poetic, religious, and cultural traditions that shape our range of ideas about what the term "Nature" refers to, with what stances poets respond to it (with praise and delight, or expansiveness, or a sense of mortality, for example), and how we might refine our own sense of nature so as to dwell in it and do right by it. No previous experience with poetry is necessary; this course aims to provide a good introduction to poetry for general readers, as well as to provide a rich array of poetic traditions for English majors. This course fulfills the Humanities requirement for Environmental Studies majors. This course serves as an elective for English majors.

ENGL 280-01 Crafts of Writing: Poetry M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Kristin Naca -1 / 16
Students build a vocabulary based in the conventions of poetry. These terms guide us in the development of a critical practice for writing poems. That practice includes: read and write about several collections of contemporary poetry; study and experiment writing various forms and modes of poetry; workshop peer work; and experience lectures and readings performed by published poets. Texts include: Aslin’s A Moon Over Wings, Bok Lee's Whorled, Cisewski's Ghost Fargo, Derricotte's Captivity, Erdrich's National Monuments.
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Peter Bognanni 0 / 16
ENGL 283-01 The Crafts of Writing: Scriptwriting TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Peter Bognanni 0 / 16
ENGL 294-01 Global Shakespeares: All the World TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Dana Schumacher-Schmidt 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-03*
ENGL 294-02 Playwrighting/Textual Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Beth Cleary 5 / 16
*Cross-listed with THDA 242-01*
ENGL 294-03 Feminist Re-construction MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker 21 / 25
*Cross-listed with WGSS 220-01*
ENGL 294-04 Whiteness and Postcolonialism MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker 17 / 25
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-01*
ENGL 304-01 Medieval Heroic Narrative MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 003 Theresa Krier 9 / 20
ENGL 315-01 Milton MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Theresa Krier 8 / 20
John Milton's epic Paradise Lost will be at the center of this course about seventeenth-century English literature, which arose amidst great religious tensions, the emergence of modern science, an English Civil War, even the beheading of a monarch. We’ll study books from the Bible and books of early scientific prose, major religious lyrics and love lyrics of the period, and of course most of John Milton's poetry. This will give us a wide range of writers, genres, and styles - Galileo as well as Milton, biblical books as well as amorous lyrics, small and large forms. Throughout the course we'll be inquiring how notions of liberty and revolution fueled not only political thinking but also religious debates, scientific thinking, and controversies about gender; we'll also study how a desire to restore Eden informs the writing of the seventeenth century. This course fulfills a pre-1900 requirement for English majors.

ENGL 321-01 Eighteenth-Century British Novels MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 204 Neil Chudgar -3 / 20
This is a course about the origins of a strange fact of modern life: we are surrounded by long prose accounts of the lives and experiences of ordinary human beings who never actually existed. Such accounts are so common today as to seem natural and necessary, but that was not always so. "The novel," as we call it, is a cultural form with a history-and that history is bound up with our deepest questions about who we can be, how we must behave, and what we may expect from our lives in the modern world. To explore that history, we will read four important stories about make-believe people: Defoe's Roxana (a pretend celebrity memoir from 1724), Richardson's Pamela (a forged collection of letters from 1740), Fielding's Joseph Andrews (a "heroical, historical prosaic poem" from 1742), and Burney's Evelina (a "novel" from 1778). We'll think through these fictions with the help of eighteenth-century theorists of persons (like Locke, Hume, and Bentham) and more recent theorists of literary forms (like Watt, McKeon, and Armstrong). Our primary goal will be to learn about how eighteenth-century stories about imaginary people inform the stories we tell about people (ourselves and others) today. You will complete brief weekly response papers and one longer formal work, which may take the form of an essay or a work of prose fiction. This is a course in eighteenth-century British literature, and will contribute the literary-history requirement of the English major. Creative writers are particularly encouraged to enroll; so too are novel-readers, historians of culture, social scientists, and persons who are interested in the lives of others.
ENGL 331-01 Nineteenth Century British Novel TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Robert Warde 3 / 20
*First day attendance required.* This survey of the nineteenth century British novel will focus on four works from the Victorian period: Charles Dickens, Dombey and Son; Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South; George Eliot, Middlemarch; and Thomas Hardy, The Woodlanders. We will consider these novels as reflections of their era, as crafted works of art, and as embodiments of human experience. Four pieces of writing are required during the course of the semester - a combination of in-class exams and papers according to student preference. Periodic, very brief objective quizzes will manifest themselves along the way. Class format is discussion based, and both attendance and participation are expected.
ENGL 366-01 Nabokov TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Julia Chadaga 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with RUSS 366-01; no prerequisites*
ENGL 380-01 Postmodern African American Literature TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Daylanne English 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with AMST 380-01* In this topics course, we will closely read a wide range of innovative, possibly "postmodern" texts written by African American authors in the last twenty years. We will attend to literary form and to the politics of form, considering how our authors resist realism and the content of racial protest, even as they frequently engage questions of race, identity, and power. Texts will include novels, short stories, comics, and poetry, as well as some film and music. Authors will include Samuel Delany, Colson Whitehead, C. Van Jordan, Harryette Mullen, Toni Morrison, and John Edgar Wideman, among others. We will ask a number of questions as we read: What does it mean to be writing and studying African American literature in an era often termed "post-racial"? What happens when African American literature becomes "unnationed" or unmoored from time? How does traumatic content shape literary form? What do we make of the contemporary resurgence of Afro-Futurism? How might radical interdisciplinarity affect meaning and aesthetic form in our texts? These and many other questions, generated by the class itself, will guide our semester's exploration, as will our reading of much relevant literary criticism and theory. Requirements for the course include: presenting extensively on one of our texts, writing a brief response paper for most of our primary readings, and writing one brief 5-page paper as well as a longer, 12-15 page paper. This course fulfills the literature by U.S. writers of color/diasporic/postcolonial literature requirement for English majors.
ENGL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore 0 / 20
*Cross-listed with INTL 384-01*
ENGL 394-01 LA and the American Dream TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Robert Warde 2 / 20
*First day attendance required; mandatory film screenings TBA* One out of eight Americans lives in California; Los Angeles has become the second largest city in the country; and United States history involves, among other things, a steady movement of people both East to West and South (Mexico) to North. In this course we will examine the growth and nature of Los Angeles (its need for water, its automobiles, its film industry, its ethnic makeup, its lurking potential for natural disaster) and this city's relationship to the evolving identity of the nation as a whole. It will be a study in the significance of place, the human and environmental impact of urban development, and the characteristics of the American dream. The focus is on literature, and the tentative reading list is as follows: Carey McWilliams, Southern California: An Island on the Land; Nathanael West, The Day of the Locust; Chester Himes, If He Hollers Let Him Go; James Ellroy, Black Dahlia; Joan Didion, Play It As It Lays; Mike Davis, City of Quartz; Anna Deavere Smith, Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992; Karen Tei Yamashita, Tropic of Orange; Brando Skyhorse, The Madonnas of Echo Park; D. J. Waldie, Holy Land; and David Ulin's edited collection, Another City: Writing from Los Angeles. A companion film series includes feature films such as Sunset Boulevard, Mulholland Drive, Chinatown, Blade Runner, L. A. Confidential, Boys n the Hood, Clueless, and The Big Lebowski, supplemented by some seldom-viewed documentaries, Kent MacKenzie's The Exiles and Thom Andersen's Los Angeles Plays Itself, among others. A music component will embrace a wide range of artists from Randy Newman, Madonna, Dave Alvin, and the Distillers, to Guns N' Roses, NWA, and 2Pac. This is a discussion-based course, and evaluation depends on attendance and participation, plus a combination of exams and papers, according to student preference, these written assignments to total three. Occasional, very brief objective quizzes will measure the degree of enthusiasm with which students approach each day's assignment.

ENGL 394-02 Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Sonita Sarker 11 / 25
*Cross-listed with WGSS 300-01*
ENGL 400-01 Senior Seminar: Anatomy of a Crime: Fiction, Film, Forensics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 011 Casey Jarrin -2 / 16
*Permission of instructor required.* From 20th-century detective fiction, crime scene photography, and "true crime" novels through international film, crime journalism, and the television obsession with forensics, in this seminar we'll examine transformations in the crime genre in text and image. We'll encounter Poe's short stories; James Cain's hard-boiled novel Double Indemnity (inspired by the 1927 Ruth Snyder murder trial); Weegee's New York crime photography; Patricia Highsmith's Talented Mr. Ripley; Truman Capote's genre-defying In Cold Blood; Don DeLillo's portrait of Lee Harvey Oswald, Libra, with Abraham Zapruder's 8mm film of the Kennedy assassination; Michael Ondaatje's Collected Works of Billy the Kid; Eoin McNamee's Resurrection Man, a recasting of sectarian murders committed by Belfast's Shankill Butchers; Errol Morris and Philip Gourevitch's anatomy of the Abu Ghraib prison scandal, Standard Operating Procedure; as well as selections from Norman Mailer's Executioner's Song, Vincent Bugliosi's Helter Skelter, and David Simon's Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets. In dialogue with these texts, photographs, and historical/theoretical contexts, we'll look at classic film noir, international crime cinema, and television crime sagas (Dexter; The Sopranos; Homicide: Life on the Street; The Wire; CSI; The Shield; Twin Peaks). Potential films include Double Indemnity (Billy Wilder); Rope or Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock); Naked City or Rififi (Jules Dassin); Plein Soleil (Rene Clement); Bonnie and Clyde (Arthur Penn); Rosemary's Baby (Roman Polanski); The Conversation (Francis Ford Coppola); Mean Streets (Martin Scorsese); Reservoir Dogs or Pulp Fiction (Quentin Tarantino); Silence of the Lambs (Jonathan Demme); Zodiac (David Fincher); Ichi the Killer (Takashi Miike); Red Riding Trilogy; Mesrine: Killer Instinct (Jean Francois-Richet); The Thin Blue Line or Standard Operating Procedure (Errol Morris). Note: This is a senior seminar designed for senior English majors. Students will be responsible for weekly journals, an annotated bibliography, and a 20-25 page final project.

ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Kristin Naca 1 / 12
*First day attendance required* The capstone for majors in the creative writing track. Students examine areas of the writer's professional practice. Each student strategizes a writing plan for a longer manuscript or collection of work. Then, executes the plan. In the process, students research and collect a bibliography of work that informs their writing project. They draft pages and workshop those pages. Students also practice writing critically about his/her own work, using the language of conventions. Then, extends the discussion in the form of proposal, grant, and/or program artist statement. We read texts about craft by published authors and research current literary journals in the various field. We read one long piece or collection of each poetry/fiction/non-fiction. Finally, students may apply for funding to attend the AWP Conference in Chicago (February). This activity is limited to individuals with demonstrated interest, effort, and availability.

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENVI 133-01 Environmental Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Daniel Hornbach 2 / 18
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch 2 / 18
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Daniel Hornbach 2 / 18
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 150-01 Climate and Society TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Louisa Bradtmiller 9 / 25
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Kathryn Pratt 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with POLI 215-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Martin Gunderson 3 / 20
*Cross-listed with PHIL 229-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 236-01 Consumer Nation: American Consumer Culture in the 20th Century TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Chris Wells 3 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 236-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 258-01 Geog of Environmental Hazards TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 Helen Hazen 1 / 30
*Cross-listed with GEOG 258-01; first day attendance required*
ENVI 260-01 Science Fiction: From Matrix Baby Cannibals to Brave New Worlds TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 401 James Dawes -6 / 16
*Cross-listed as ENGL 260-01*
ENVI 262-01 Studies in Literature and the Natural World MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Theresa Krier 10 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENGL 262-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 280-01 Environmental Classics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning 2 / 18
*Permission of instructor required for all students; first day attendance required*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 226 Jerald Dosch 1 / 44
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch 2 / 22
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson 0 / 22
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 294-01 Psychology in a Material World TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning 10 / 20
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with PSYC 294-02; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students* This course is an in-depth psychological analysis of consumerism and the human relationship to "stuff". Consumerism, materialistic aspirations, and "affluenza" (the disease of affluence) all exert profound and often undesirable effects on both people's individual lives and on society as a whole. These phenomena, and the consumerist culture they are embedded in, affect our psyches, our families, our local communities, the peoples of the world, and the integrity of our ecological system. This course draws from a range of theoretical, clinical, and methodological approaches to explore several key questions: Where does the drive to consume originate? Do we control our consumer behavior, or does it control us? Is it possible to live in our culture and not be a consumer? What are the alternatives to the status quo? We will analyze and discuss both the scholarly ramifications of these ideas and also how to act upon them in our lives and society more broadly.
ENVI 294-02 Urban Ecology: Communities, Politics, Sustainability MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 05 Kathryn Pratt 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-01; first day attendance required.
ENVI 345-01 Car Country: The Automobile and the American Environment TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Chris Wells 0 / 15
*Cross-listed with HIST 345-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 365-01 Environmental Anthropology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Arjun Guneratne 14 / 20
*Cross-listed with ANTH 365-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 370-01 Education and the Challenge of Globalization MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 214 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with EDUC 370-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 488-01 Sr Seminar in Environmental St TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Louisa Bradtmiller 17 / 24
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 111 Anne Carayon 6 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-02 French II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 111 Anne Carayon 5 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Meryem Belkaid 3 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L2 French II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Meryem Belkaid -1 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L3 French II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 370 Meryem Belkaid 4 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L4 French II Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am HUM 404 Meryem Belkaid 6 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 216 Anne Carayon 13 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 404 Caroline Richard 4 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L2 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Caroline Richard 8 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-02 French III MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 215 Andrew Billing 1 / 25
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 111 Caroline Richard 4 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Caroline Richard 2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L3 French III Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Caroline Richard 1 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 402 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 6 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 402 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 4 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-03 Text, Film and Media MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 270 Andrew Billing 0 / 20
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab T 09:10 am-10:10 am HUM 404 Meryem Belkaid 2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Meryem Belkaid 0 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Meryem Belkaid 0 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Meryem Belkaid -2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L5 Text, Film and Media Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Meryem Belkaid 0 / 10
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 4 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 150 Meryem Belkaid 2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Caroline Richard 2 / 10
*First day attendance required*
FREN 306-01 Introduction to Literary Analysis MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 216 Martine Sauret 10 / 20
*First day attendance required*
FREN 307-01 Culture Francaise: La civilisation francaise en evolution de Lascaux a 1789 MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Martine Sauret 13 / 20
The course La civilisation francaise en evolution from Lascaux to 1789 offers non-French students the possibility to acquaint the fundamental notions that form the basis of the bagage culturel that their French counterparts would have. In the case of 'small c' contemporary culture, this goal makes explicit those everyday aspects of life that are truly second nature to the individual and to which he or she rarely gives much thought. The class will open with a Panorama de la France. This preliminary section provides a brief and schematic overview of France, including descriptions of basic geographical features and sociopolitical structures, a listing of significant historical milestones and maps of France and the Francophone world. The body of the class consists of six dossiers, each treating a particular aspect of French culture: Dossier un: la présence du passé describes examples of the physical manifestations of French History that provide constant reminders to the French of their rich and varied civilization. Dossier deux: quelques personnages clés is composed of a series of portraits of personalities that the French learn, from the early age, to identify as key figures who played pivotal roles in the creation of their culture. Dossier trois: de la monarchie a la Republique traces the evolution of political institutions in France from the beginnings of the monarchy and the establishment of the Ancien Régime through the death of that system and the progressive maturation of republican ideals. Dossier quatre: La societe describes the development of social structures, including the changing role of women in France, from the simplistic and hierarchical society of the Middle Ages to the complex and shifting social situation of the modern world. Dossier cinq: les mouvements et les idees provides a sketch of key philosophical movements and intellectual concepts as they evolved. Dossier six; les mouvements litteraires et arttstiques offers an overview of French cultural life in all its diversity, focusing on pivotal authors, artist and works. The class prerequisite is French 204.
FREN 415-01 20th Century Literature and Cinema: The century of ruptures and sutures: The Avant-Garde (s) TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 Joelle Vitiello 10 / 20
*First day attendance required* The course will expose students to some of the most important writers, poets, playwrights, and thinkers of the twentieth-century. It will serve both as a survey of the most important literary, artistic, and intellectual movements and as a sampling of the most brilliant and innovative prose, poetry, and performance. The objective of the course is to familiarize students with some of the cultural productions that have been strongly influenced by scientific, linguistic, psychoanalytical, colonial, anti-colonial, post-colonial, racial, and gender-based theories of the century. Virtually all literary and artistic genres were affected by the ruptures caused by various wars. Academic rules were subverted, and new forms of expression emerged - several times. Moving images were but one of the technological inventions that allowed people to attempt to restore their identities, national and individual. Through the study of Surrealism, the use of social realism narratives, the Absurd, Negritude, Existentialism, the New Wave and the New Novel, structuralism, post-structuralism and deconstruction, the impact of feminism on language, the course will expose students to readings of texts and images that represent the long lasting effects of the twentieth-century ruptures on writers and artists. Some of the films viewed for the course include the Freres Lumiere first films, Georges Melies, Louis Feuillade, Bunuel, Renoir, Jean Rouch, Jean-Luc Godard, Michel Drach, Alain Resnais, Marguerite Duras, Guy Debord, Ariane Mnouchkine and Sembene Ousmane. Readings include surrealist poetry, Samuel Beckett, Helene Cixous, Andree Chedid, Sembene Ousmane, Assia Djebar, Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Marguerite Duras, Michel Butor, Jean Genet, Delphine de Vigan, Annie Ernaux, Sembene Ousmane, Roland Barthes and Jacques Derrida. The course is taught in French.

Prerequisite: 306 or permission of instructor

FREN 416-01 French Interdisc Study: Haiti: Haitian Culture, Human Rights, and Humanitarianism TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 402 Joelle Vitiello 13 / 20
*First day attendance required* The January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, that killed more than 250.000 people, brought a lot of attention to the country traditionally described as "the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere." This course aims to provide students interested in humanitarianism, human rights, the Caribbean, cultural studies, and French and Francophone Studies an introduction to Haiti and Haitian culture throughout its history, including pre-and post-earthquake culture. It also aims at providing a thoughtful critical frame to the extraordinary humanitarian situation after the earthquake and the responses it generated at the Haitian and international levels. Throughout the course, students will become more familiar with Haitian history, its rich cultural production, and the relevance of culture to human rights representations, abuses, and responses to abuses as well as its relevance to various humanitarian crises in Haiti, especially the post-earthquake daily situation. Students will also gain knowledge about Haitian society, local organizations working in human rights and humanitarianism, the geography of Human Rights, local IDP environment, and humanitarian distribution of resources, and they will acquire the critical tools necessary to understand, assess, and participate in the current debates about human rights and humanitarianism practices in Haiti (including issues related to health, gender, economic rights, education, and access to resources of any kind). Materials for the course include interdisciplinary readings and reports (including various human rights reports, humanitarian assistance reports and updates, C.L.R. James, Paul Farmer, Michael Dash, Peter Hallward, Elizabeth McAlister, Edwidge Danticat, Myriam Chancy, Beverly Bell, Jacqueline Regis, and Anne-Christine d'Adesky among others) and films (by Raoul Peck, Anne Lescot and Laurence Magloire, Rachel Magloire, Jonathan Demme, Maya Deren). Speakers will include human rights lawyers, writers, and humanitarian aid specialists about and from Haiti. Technology permitting, students will meet members of the Haitian community involved in relief work via Skype. This course will be taught in English. Students taking it for credit counting toward the French major or Minor will be able to read some of the material and conduct their research in French. Students interested in doing an internship with one of the many organizations in the Twin Cities linked with Haiti should speak to the instructor. Approved for use on the Human Rights and Humanitarianism concentration.

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOG 111-01 Human Geography of Global Issues MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran 11 / 35
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Holly Barcus -3 / 30
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab W 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp -1 / 15
*$25 lab fee required*
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 108 Ashley Nepp -2 / 15
*$25 lab fee required*
GEOG 248-01 The Political Geography of Nations and Nationalism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Daniel Trudeau 1 / 20
*First day attendance required* This course investigates how nations and nationalism affect social identity and the organization of territory in our world. Political geography offers concepts and approaches to help us think through the complex intersections of people, place, and politics that constitute the struggle to create and maintain nation-states. Thus the first part of the course is devoted to enhancing your understanding of core concepts, such as nation, state, territory, sovereignty, scale, borders, and geographical imagination. The ultimate purpose of this first part of the course then is to assemble a framework for understanding why our contemporary organization of territory throughout the world looks the way it does. Equipped with these foundations, we explore topics in the second part of class that help you think critically about the stability of nations and the organization of territory into the nation-state system as well as challenges to these institutions. Towards this end, you will also conduct an independent research project on a single group's attempt to create a nation-state. Throughout this course, we will bring our investigations to bear on everyday life, exploring how nations and nationalism shape our world in dramatic and mundane ways. No prerequisites. (4 Credits)
GEOG 249-01 Regional Geog of Latin America MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Kathryn Pratt 16 / 35
*Cross-listed with LATI 249-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 256-01 Medical Geography: The Geography of Health and Health Care M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen 1 / 30
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 258-01 Geog of Environmental Hazards TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 Helen Hazen 1 / 30
*Cross-listed wtih ENVI 258-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 261-01 Geog of World Urbanization MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 David Lanegran 3 / 30
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 294-01 Urban Ecology: Communities, Politics, Sustainability MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 05 Kathryn Pratt 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02; first day attendance required.
GEOG 341-01 Urban Social Geography: City Life and Landscapes TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Daniel Trudeau 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with AMST 341-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 365-01 Urban GIS TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 108 Laura Smith 0 / 15
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
GEOG 365-L1 Urban GIS Lab TBA TBA CARN 108 Laura Smith 0 / 15
*$25 lab fee required*
GEOG 378-01 Statistical Research Methods in Geography MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith -11 / 25
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 394-01 Environmental GIS MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Sanchayeeta Adhikari 1 / 15
*First day attendance required; $25 lab fee required; prerequisite is Geography 225*
GEOG 394-L1 Environmental GIS Lab TBA TBA CARN 108 Sanchayeeta Adhikari 1 / 15
*First day attendance required; $25 lab fee required*
GEOG 488-01 Transportation Geography W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Laura Smith 6 / 15
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
GEOG 488-02 Migrants, Migration and the Global Landscape of Population Change TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Holly Barcus 4 / 15
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required* Castles and Miller argue that we are living in the age of migration - a period in history when a greater proportion of the human population is on the move than ever before. This course examines migration through a geographic lens seeking to elucidate the connections between theory and the changing and complex lived experiences of migrants. We will consider different approaches to studying migration including primary migration theories, the analyses of major flows, and micro models of individual decision-making behavior, life course and livelihood perspectives and the implications of these movements for both sending and receiving communities. We will pay particular attention to gendered perspectives and experiences with migration, transnationalism, and the migration-development nexus that permeates migration dialogues. Students with interests or experiences pertaining to different world regions are encouraged to bring these perspectives to class in order that we may more fully appreciate how different migration trajectories differentially affect individuals, places and the theories we utilize to understand this dynamic process. This course is organized as a senior capstone seminar. As such, we will utilize readings, discussion, lectures, guest speakers and local events to enhance our understanding of the many dimensions and perspectives inherent in study of migratory movements, at scales ranging from global to local. As you will come to appreciate, migration has many dimensions and is influenced as much by global structural processes and constraints as by local ethnic, cultural, and economic geographies.

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOL 100-01 Oceanography TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 John Craddock 39 / 48
*No permission required to add course until Jan 30th*
GEOL 102-01 Exploring the Solar System MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Karl Wirth 20 / 48
GEOL 103-01 Geocinema M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 100 Kelly MacGregor 26 / 55
*First day attendance required*
GEOL 165-01 History/Evolution of Earth MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Colin Robins 29 / 48
GEOL 165-L1 History/Evolution of Earth Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 13 / 24
GEOL 165-L2 History/Evolution of Earth Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 17 / 24
GEOL 255-01 Structural Geology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock 2 / 18
GEOL 255-L1 Structural Geology Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock 2 / 18
GEOL 265-01 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 175 Colin Robins 7 / 18
GEOL 265-L1 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy Lab R 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 175 Colin Robins 7 / 18
GEOL 302-01 Petrology and Geochemistry MWF 08:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth 13 / 18
GEOL 303-01 Surface/Groundwater Hydrology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor 3 / 18
GEOL 303-L1 Surface/Groundwater Hydro Lab R 08:00 am-11:00 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor 3 / 18
GEOL 450-01 Senior Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 Kelly MacGregor 4 / 18

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GERM 102-01 Elementary German II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 214 Brigetta Abel 9 / 20
GERM 102-L1 Elementary German II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Jannik Kloft 3 / 5
GERM 102-L2 Elementary German II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 Jannik Kloft 1 / 5
GERM 102-L3 Elementary German II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 228 Jannik Kloft 3 / 5
GERM 102-L4 Elementary German II Lab TBA TBA Jannik Kloft 3 / 5
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 214 Brigetta Abel 14 / 20
GERM 110-L1 Accel Elementary German Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 102 Jannik Kloft 2 / 5
GERM 110-L3 Accel Elementary German Lab T 04:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Jannik Kloft 2 / 5
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 215 David Martyn 7 / 20
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 110 Nina Kohlmeyer -1 / 5
GERM 203-L2 Intermediate German I Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 113 Nina Kohlmeyer 3 / 5
GERM 203-L3 Intermediate German I Lab T 02:45 pm-03:45 pm OLRI 350 Nina Kohlmeyer 3 / 5
GERM 203-L4 Intermediate German I Lab TBA TBA Nina Kohlmeyer 2 / 5
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 215 David Martyn 10 / 20
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am OLRI 247 Nina Kohlmeyer 4 / 7
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 228 Nina Kohlmeyer 3 / 7
GERM 204-L4 Intermediate German II Lab T 10:15 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Nina Kohlmeyer 4 / 7
*Will meet in HUM 224A*
GERM 255-01 German Cinema Studies: Nazi Movies and Movie Nazis MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 401 Linda Schulte-Sasse 12 / 20
*Cross-listed with MCST 294-04*
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 214 Brigetta Abel 13 / 20
GERM 305-L1 German Through the Media Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Jannik Kloft 7 / 10
GERM 305-L2 German Through the Media Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 102 Jannik Kloft 7 / 10
GERM 308-01 Introduction to German Studies MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 402 Rachael Huener 12 / 20
*Taught in German*
GERM 365-01 Modernism and Avant-Garde MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 227 Linda Schulte-Sasse 10 / 20
GERM 394-01 Concepts of Freedom from Erasmus to Agamben MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 David Martyn 4 / 20
*Taught in English* "Free choice" is a concept we can neither explain nor do without. Democracy, the "free" market, the various emancipation movements of the 20th century: these and other institutions could not function without the assumption that humans are free agents; but writers from Luther on have been unable to formulate a coherent theory of freedom. This course will explore the history of the concept of freedom in key German and European authors from Erasmus, Luther, Leibniz, and Kant to contemporary critical theorists such as Foucault, Badiou, and Agamben. Particularly in view of the current function of "freedom" as a political rallying call of the American right (think Tea Party), the course aims at developing a historical awareness of what the word "freedom" has meant and can mean today. Discussion topics will include free will in religious and in secular thought; freedom and natural causality in Leibniz and Kant; the questionable freedom of "coming out" (Foucault); art, science, politics, and love as forms of freedom (Badiou); freedom and states of exception (Agamben). Selected readings from the authors mentioned. Course requirements: one reading response per week, two 6-page papers. The course is taught in English. Counts towards the Critical Theory Concentration as a core course.
GERM 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 227 Rachael Huener 13 / 20
*Taught in German* This seminar will take as its starting point the "68ers" or West German "student movement" of the late 1960s. As in the United States, the late 60s and early 70s were a time of generational tension and political activism and occasional violence in the Federal Republic of Germany. Both the American and German 60s movements criticized the disparity between the "1st" and the "3rd" worlds, gender discrimination, exploitation of the environment, and the imperialist actions of the U.S. in Southeast Asia. Germany’s 60s-generation grappled additionally with a backward-looking university system, an unfolding nuclear energy industry precisely on the border of the cold war, a society that had, in the minds of some, embraced consumerism as the predominant virtue of democracy, and the as yet barely discussed Nazi past. As the movements comprising the Studentenbewegung ebbed in the 1970s, a number of radicalized participants turned to terrorism in the RAF (Rote Armee Faktion ), and many more joined the "establishment" in one form or another. The 68ers and the issues of that era have shaped much of the social policy, political activism and cultural expression of Germany today: Many ongoing efforts for gender equality and gay and lesbian rights have their roots in this era. The Green Party is an outcome of 60s environmentalism and anti-nuclear activism. Various social contracts ranging from workers rights to health care have been shaped by conscensuses formed several decades ago. Even the coming to grips with the Nazi past (Vergangenheitsbewältigung) has in the wake of the 60s critique of the national silence become an essential component of school curricula, national memorialization, and journalistic watchfulness. The student movement of the 60s did not resolve every conflict in West Germany, but it provoked the uncomfortable questions and framed many of the debates that make Germany what it is today. This seminar will examine the issues, ideologies, and cultural representations of this era. In addition to historical and theoretical texts, we will read novels and short fiction such as Stefan’s Hautungen and Bolls Du fahrst zu oft nach Heidelberg, watch films such as Verhoeven's Das schreckliche Madchen and Von Trotta's Marianne u. Juliane, and examine visual art and other artifacts. Participants will develop a significant research paper on a topic related to this era or to the issues of these movements, and present regularly on the progress of their work. The course will also include library research assistance, a field trip, and guest speakers. Taught in German

Prerequisite: At least one 360s-level German course. This course may be taken in the junior year.

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 213 Maria Chavarria 6 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 227 Cecilia Battauz 9 / 15
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Cecilia Battauz 8 / 15
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab W 01:30 pm-02:00 pm HUM 217 STAFF 14 / 15
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 214 Rosa Rull-Montoya 0 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 213 Rosa Rull-Montoya -1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-03 Elementary Spanish II MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Sara Mack 8 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Cecilia Battauz 8 / 17
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 215 Cecilia Battauz -1 / 17
HISP 102-L3 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 101 Cecilia Battauz 3 / 17
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Cecilia Battauz 6 / 17
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 14 / 15
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 102-L6 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 101 Antonella Morales 15 / 15
HISP 110-01 Accelerated Beginning Spanish TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Leah Sand 1 / 15
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 110-L1 Accelerated Beginning Spanish MW 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 213 STAFF 9 / 10
HISP 110-L2 Accelerated Beginning Spanish MW 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 STAFF 10 / 10
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 111 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 216 Galo Gonzalez 8 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 228 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 4 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-03 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 2 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 227 Cecilia Battauz 6 / 15
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Cecilia Battauz 9 / 15
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Cecilia Battauz 9 / 15
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 214 Cecilia Battauz 4 / 15
HISP 203-L6 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 404 Antonella Morales 11 / 15
HISP 203-L7 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Antonella Morales 6 / 15
HISP 203-L8 Intermediate Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 14 / 15
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 213 Margaret Olsen -1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 214 Rosa Rull-Montoya -1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 228 Alicia Munoz -1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-04 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Philip Thornberry 1 / 20
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am Antonella Morales 1 / 15
*Lab will meet in Casa Hispana*
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Antonella Morales 4 / 15
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 150 Antonella Morales 3 / 15
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 404 Antonella Morales 5 / 15
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 404 Antonella Morales 2 / 15
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 101 Antonella Morales 5 / 15
HISP 204-L7 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Antonella Morales 4 / 15
HISP 204-L8 Intermediate Spanish II Lab F 01:15 pm-02:15 pm HUM 217 STAFF 14 / 15
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 Leah Sand -2 / 15
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required*
HISP 220-02 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 1 / 15
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required*
HISP 220-L1 Accel Intermediate Spanish Lab MW 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 247 STAFF 10 / 10
HISP 220-L2 Accel Intermediate Spanish Lab MW 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 170 STAFF 5 / 10
HISP 305-01 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 3 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-02 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 111 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 1 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-03 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 3 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca 0 / 15
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 Alicia Munoz 6 / 15
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Maria Chavarria 5 / 15
*Cross-listed with LING 309-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 331-01 Luso-Brazilian Voices: Conversations and Composition MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 404 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 7 / 15
*First day attendance required*
HISP 417-01 El Quijote as Timeless Text MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Margaret Olsen 11 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 431-01 Spanish in the Workplace MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 228 Susana Blanco-Iglesias -1 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 442-01 Nation and Identity in the Hispanic World TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca 7 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 488-01 Senior Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 212 Galo Gonzalez 16 / 20
*First day attendance required*
HISP 494-01 Oral History and Literary Traditions in Peruvian Amazonia MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 Maria Chavarria 4 / 20
*Cross-listed with LING 494-01; first day attendance required* At the beginning of time all things existed in the world as people; they took human form and led a human life. In the Amazonian oral tradition, identity is constructed in the daily interaction with the environment: the respect for the land, the forest, the water, and all the natural resources. In this course students will learn about indigenous cosmology and history, current socio-political situations and environmental issues, and the struggles for human rights and cultural survival through the voices of Amazonian authors and artists. Open to students from different disciplines and backgrounds. Taught in Spanish.

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HIST 100-01 Discovering World History TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 Karin Velez 21 / 25
HIST 115-01 Africa Since 1800 MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Lacy Ferrell 15 / 25
HIST 122-01 The Roman World TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Jeffrey Pearson 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with CLAS 122-01*
HIST 194-02 Great Lakes Native American History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Scott Shoemaker 13 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-01* This course examines the competing ways in which Native histories of the Great Lakes region have been constructed. Primary sources are drawn from Native origin and migration stories, and oral histories. Secondary sources include studies of Ojibwe spearfishing, Indigenous religious, cultural and language revitalization movements, and the Dakota War of 1862 as both an event and remembrance. We investigate other themes such as European contact, labor, gender roles, material culture, removal, federal relationships, land tenure, treaty rights, and federal recognition.

HIST 222-01 Imagining the American West TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Lynn Hudson 9 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 222-01*
HIST 224-01 African American History: Slavery, Emancipation, and Reconstruction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Peter Rachleff 10 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 224-01*
HIST 236-01 Consumer Nation: American Consumer Culture in the 20th Century TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Chris Wells 3 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENVI 236-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students.*
HIST 258-01 Europe Since 1945 MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Peter Weisensel 12 / 25
HIST 261-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Peter Weisensel 15 / 25
*Cross-listed with RUSS 261-01*
HIST 261-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Julia Chadaga 15 / 25
*Cross-listed with RUSS 261-01*
HIST 275-01 History of Modern China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 14 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 275-01*
HIST 277-01 History of Modern Japan TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 12 / 25
*Cross-listed with ASIA 277-01*
HIST 282-01 Latin America: Art and Nation MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Ernesto Capello 10 / 25
*Cross-listed with ART 294-06 and LATI 282-01*
HIST 294-01 Commodities and Exchange in Urban Africa MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Lacy Ferrell 12 / 25
Whether talking about slaves, toothpaste, or "modernity," people, things, and ideas are commodified and traded, particularly in urban environments where different cultures and peoples meet. In this course we will explore different types of commodities and exchanges in African cities from the slave trade through the twentieth century. Assuming that a commodity is "anything that one 'trades' or 'deals'," and expanding that to include ideas, we will study everything from human bodies and consumer goods to leisure activities and status symbols in the context of cultural exchange in urban environments.
HIST 294-02 Schooling and Childhood in Anglophone Africa MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 003 Lacy Ferrell 14 / 25
In this course we will engage with schooling in Anglophone Africa as it influenced and was influenced by various ideas of education, childhood, and gender in Britain and local African societies. Though we will consider broader patterns in education and schooling in the British Empire in Africa, we will focus on the Gold Coast (Ghana) as a case study for the various aspects of educational experience. Topics we study will include: writing, literary and vocational education, missionary education, gendered schooling and education, and the transformative effects of schooling on social, political, and economic structures.
HIST 294-03 Conversion and Inquisition: Religious Change 1550-1750 TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Karin Velez 14 / 25
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-06* What causes people to change their religious beliefs? How have societies handled those who do alter their spiritual attitudes? This course focuses on several dramatic case studies of men and women who self-consciously changed their religion during the turbulent period of imperial encounters between the mid-1500 and the 1700s. Among others, we will examine and interrogate reports of converts to Christianity including Jewish and Muslim prisoners of the Inquisition, captives of Mediterranean pirates, and the nearly canonized Mohawk convert, Catherine Tekakwitha. We will consider how violence, national loyalities, gender, charisma, local power dynamics, environmental upheaval, and serendipity affected the choices and fates of these converts.
HIST 294-04 American Indians in American Thought MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Scott Shoemaker 23 / 25
American Indians factor heavily within American thought. Representations of American Indians have served to legitimate the foundations of the United States and American identity, however American Indians have also engaged in American thought as an anti-colonial endeavor. Beginning with constructions of American Indians in the colonial period to recent issues of representation in the realm of mascots, this course traces the genealogy of how America has constructed and appropriated an "Indian" identity through cultural productions and historiography. Against this genealogical investigation, this course juxtaposes the critiques of American Indian intellectuals and artists spanning from the works of early nineteenth century Pequot activist and writer William Apess, to contemporary Ojibwe poet, novelist, and critic Gerald Vizenor and Luiseno performance artist James Luna . Primary sources include the writings of American Indian intellectuals, visual representations, novels, captivity narratives, and cinema.
HIST 294-05 Race, Cultural Politics and Social Movements TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Jane Rhodes 4 / 25
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with AMST 260-01*
HIST 294-06 Kaiser to Kanzlerin: Creating German Unity from 1848 to the Present MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 009 Eric Roubinek 12 / 25
From the 19th century to the current Federal Republic, Germany has had to create and recreate itself over and over again. This process of creating Germany and Germanness, goes beyond the political unifications of the late 19th and 20th centuries and includes contestations betweens social classes, religions, and regions. This process, too, has not been limited to the context of central Europe, but has been deeply implicated by Germany's relationship to the globe. In this course we will investigate the tensions between attempts at national unity and the real political, social, and cultural divisions from the failed revolution of 1848 to German (re)unification in 1990. At stake in our investigation of competing visions and narratives of German history is an understanding of how Germans could be responsible for some of the most impressive advancements in art, literature, and science in the world, but also play a major role in the outbreak of two world wars and be responsible for the Holocaust. How Germany has come to terms with its own tumultuous past in the postwar years serves as a model for broader, global processes as Germany now stands at the center of European unification.
HIST 330-01 Advanced Studies: Historians and Critical Race Theory W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 111 Peter Rachleff 14 / 25
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; 2 credit course.*
HIST 345-01 Car Country: The Automobile and the American Environment TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Chris Wells 0 / 15
*Cross-listed with ENVI 345-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
HIST 376-01 Public History W 01:10 pm-04:00 pm CARN 05 Lynn Hudson 14 / 25
*First day attendance required*
HIST 378-01 War Crimes and Memory in East Asia W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Yue-him Tam 11 / 25
*Cross-listed ASIA 378-01*
HIST 379-01 The Study of History W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Andrea Cremer 13 / 25
HIST 381-01 Transnational Latin Americas MW 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 105 Ernesto Capello 9 / 15
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with INTL 381-01 and LATI 381-01*
HIST 394-01 Minnesota History M 01:10 pm-04:00 pm CARN 05 Peter Rachleff 22 / 25
This course will provide students with the opportunity for a deeper research project than they have found in 100 or 200 level courses, but not the full commitment of a capstone paper as in the senior seminar. We will take our inspiration from the Minnesota Historical Society's new, major exhibit on the year 1968, developed in collaboration with historical organizations in Oakland, Atlanta, and Chicago, but we will cast our net across the "long 1960s," from 1954-1975. This was a turbulent, dynamic period in U.S. and Minnesota history, and students will be able to conduct directed research into a wide range of topics -- the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the women's movement, the labor movement, conflicts over the Vietnam War itself, political campaigns including Hubert Humphrey and Eugene McCarthy, art, music, and theater, and more. These projects will be situated within a national context, and they will be in conversation with each other and the 1968 exhibit. Students will produce a significant paper which engages secondary literature and rests on primary sources.

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Interdisciplinary Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTD 411-01 Sr Seminar in Community and Global Health W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Devavani Chatterjea 3 / 25

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTL 114-01 Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 James von Geldern 6 / 25
INTL 114-02 Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 James von Geldern 1 / 25
INTL 194-01 Tourism in the Modern Age MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine 0 / 25
Tourism is one of the world's largest industries and a global phenomenon. But what does it mean to be a tourist, and why are they so often despised? Is there good and bad tourism, and what is its past? Drawing on history, anthropology, cultural studies, and other fields, we will examine how worldwide tourism is intertwined with, and reveals much about, cultures, stereotypes, politics, consumption, heritage, and life. No prerequisites.
INTL 202-01 Global Media Industries MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Michael Griffin 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with MCST 202-01*
INTL 225-01 Comparative Economic Systems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 226 Gary Krueger 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with ECON 225-01*
INTL 245-01 Intro to Intl Human Rights MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 404 Wendy Weber 2 / 25
*First day attendance required*
INTL 272-01 The Post-Soviet Sphere MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine 3 / 20
*Cross-listed with RUSS 272-01*
INTL 285-01 Ethnicity and Nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 5 / 20
INTL 294-01 Cinema and Translation MW 01:10 pm-03:40 pm HUM 402 Jessica Ka Yee Chan 11 / 20
*Cross-listed with MCST 294-03* Cinema is a border-crossing medium-but how do images and messages get across? This course examines Hollywood's global reach, as well as film translations and adaptations in Soviet, Chinese, European, Indian, and other cinematic traditions. We draw perspectives from film, media, translation, gender, and postcolonial studies. Prior preparation in film studies, translation, or international studies (as with MCST 128, any of INTL 110-114, or a course on translation) is strongly recommended.
INTL 294-02 Indigenous Peoples in Global-Comparative Perspective MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Boyd Cothran 10 / 24
This course explores indigenous experiences worldwide across space and time, at local, regional, and global levels. Case studies will be drawn from North and South America, Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, Africa, the Middle East, Norway, and Asia. Topics will include the environment, resource extraction, tourism, land rights, diasporas, sovereignty, education, Western vs. indigenous knowledges, anti-colonial movements, and indigeneity in the global age.
INTL 294-03 Global Shakespeares: All the World TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Dana Schumacher-Schmidt 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-01* This course looks at selected works of William Shakespeare in four interlocking ways: the already-global circa 1600 aspects of his great plays Othello, Macbeth, and The Tempest; various modern adaptations such as the Voodoo Macbeth, Zulu Macbeth, and the recent Indian film Maqbool; multiple translations and worldwide stagings; and Shakespeare's global afterlife. Shakespeare is often termed a "universal" author: we will critically gaze upon this claim.
INTL 352-01 Transitional Justice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky -3 / 20
This course explores the rapidly evolving field of transitional justice, examining how and why regimes respond to wide-scale past human rights abuses. Drawing on examples worldwide, it asks why states choose particular strategies and looks at a variety of goals (truth, justice, reconciliation, democracy-building), approaches (trials, truth commissions, file access, memorialization, reparation, rewriting histories), actors (state, civil society, religious institutions), experiences, results, and controversies.
INTL 381-01 Transnational Latin Americas MW 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 105 Ernesto Capello 9 / 15
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with HIST 381-01 and LATI 381-01*
INTL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore 0 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENGL 384-01*
INTL 394-02 Poverty/Health/Development MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Christy Hanson -16 / 20
*Enrollment limited to International Studies majors, Community and Global Health Concentrators, or International Development concentrators, or by permission of the instructor.* This course explores the links among poverty, health and socio-economic development in low-income countries. Key principles, methodologies and approaches to designing and evaluating programs to improve the health of poor populations will be discussed. We will explore several contemporary approaches to linked poverty reduction, public health improvement, and development in low-income settings.
INTL 494-01 Senior Sem: Travel, Migration, Mobility W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine 2 / 14
The contemporary world is fueled by travel, migration, and mobility: voluntary, forced, virtual, and real. We will explore how humans relate while on the move: ourselves and others as travelers or migrants, the categories "others" and ourselves, and issues including immigration, refugees, statelessness, passports, hospitality, citizenship, and exile. Participants will develop extended final papers which can be grounded in any discipline, and focus on any geography or geographies.

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
JAPA 102-01 First Year Japanese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki 11 / 25
JAPA 102-02 First Year Japanese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki 14 / 25
JAPA 102-L1 First Year Japanese II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Nodoka Kuwabara 3 / 15
JAPA 102-L2 First Year Japanese II Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am OLRI 170 Nodoka Kuwabara 9 / 15
JAPA 102-L3 First Year Japanese II Lab M 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 113 Nodoka Kuwabara 8 / 15
JAPA 194-01 Japanese Horror Film and Literature TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Kendall Heitzman 8 / 20
*Cross-listed with ASIA 194-01* This class will look at the concept of "horror" across modern Japanese culture, considering it both in terms of genre and as a lens through which to consider moments of rupture in modern Japan: modernity, "Westernization," war, the nuclear age, and high technology. We will locate horror in traditional culture (as a descendant of traditional ghost stories and legends), in Western culture (via translations of Poe and others), and in the transnational (through "J-Horror" and Hollywood remakes). This course will include weekly film screenings outside of class.
JAPA 204-01 Second Year Japanese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita 9 / 20
JAPA 204-02 Second Year Japanese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita 2 / 20
JAPA 204-L1 Second Year Japanese II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 110 Nodoka Kuwabara 8 / 15
JAPA 204-L2 Second Year Japanese II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 370 Nodoka Kuwabara 2 / 15
JAPA 204-L3 Second Year Japanese II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Nodoka Kuwabara 6 / 15
JAPA 294-02 Japanese Theater: From Noh to Now TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 204 Kendall Heitzman 10 / 20
*Cross-listed as ASIA 294-02 and THDA 294-03* This class will survey major forms of Japanese theater and performance, including: Noh, the bunraku puppet theater, kabuki, shingeki "Western" theater, benshi film narration, Butoh, counterculture and street theater of the 1960s, and Japanese megamusicals. We will focus on both textual analysis and performance practices. Class activities will include screenings of performances and student-led staged readings of contemporary performances. This course will include weekly film screenings outside of class.
JAPA 306-01 Third Year Japanese II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 102 Sachiko Dorsey 10 / 20
JAPA 306-L1 Third Year Japanese II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Nodoka Kuwabara 6 / 12
JAPA 306-L2 Third Year Japanese II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 113 Nodoka Kuwabara 9 / 12
JAPA 408-01 Fourth Year Japanese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 102 Sachiko Dorsey 5 / 12

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LATI 249-01 Regional Geog of Latin America MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Kathryn Pratt 16 / 35
*Cross-listed with GEOG 249-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 282-01 Latin America: Art and Nation MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Ernesto Capello 10 / 25
*Cross-listed with ART 294-06 and HIST 282-01*
LATI 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca 0 / 15
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 Alicia Munoz 6 / 15
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 341-01 Comparative Social Movements TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Paul Dosh 4 / 20
*Cross-listed with POLI 341-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 381-01 Transnational Latin Americas MW 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 105 Ernesto Capello 9 / 15
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with HIST 381-01 and INTL 381-01*

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Christina Esposito 0 / 30
LING 104-01 The Sounds of Language TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MARKIM 201 Christina Esposito -4 / 10
LING 175-01 Sociolinguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Marianne Milligan -1 / 20
*Cross-listed with SOCI 175-01*
LING 175-02 Sociolinguistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Marianne Milligan 2 / 20
*Cross-listed with SOCI 175-02*
LING 200-01 English Syntax MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 401 John Haiman -5 / 15
LING 205-01 Phonology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 217 Christina Esposito -4 / 8
LING 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Maria Chavarria 5 / 15
*Cross-listed with HISP 309-01; first day attendance required*
LING 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 300 Mark Lewis 2 / 18
*Cross-listed with PSYC 378-01; please see Brooke Lea, Dept Chair, for prerequisite waiver/signature*
LING 400-01 Field Methods in Linguistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 217 John Haiman 4 / 10
*6 credit course*
LING 494-01 Oral History and Literary Traditions in Peruvian Amazonia MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 Maria Chavarria 4 / 20
*Cross-listed with HISP 494-01; first day attendance required*
LING 494-02 Translating Chinese TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 Frederik Green 6 / 15
*Cross-listed with CHIN 452-01*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MATH 108-01 Quantitative Thinking for Policy Analysis TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 David Bressoud 11 / 36
*Cross-listed with ECON 108-01; ACTC students may register on December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 135-01 Applied Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan 2 / 24
*Permission of instructor required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 135-02 Applied Calculus MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan -5 / 24
*Permission of instructor required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Thomas Halverson 21 / 32
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 137-01 Single Variable Calculus MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 David Bressoud 9 / 32
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 137-02 Single Variable Calculus MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 David Ehren 18 / 32
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 153-01 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Karen Saxe 2 / 28
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 153-02 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Karen Saxe 1 / 28
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 258 Vittorio Addona -4 / 28
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Lisa Lendway 1 / 28
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 155-03 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 258 Alicia Johnson -2 / 28
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Andrew Beveridge -2 / 35
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Wayne Roberts -9 / 35
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 Daniel Flath 16 / 35
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 253-01 Applied Mulitivariate Stats MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Alicia Johnson -2 / 16
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 253-02 Applied Mulitivariate Stats MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Alicia Johnson 2 / 24
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Wayne Roberts 8 / 35
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 361-01 Theory of Computation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 245 Susan Fox 0 / 25
*Cross-listed with COMP 261-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 365-01 Computational Linear Algebra TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 245 Thomas Halverson 2 / 24
*Cross-listed with COMP 365-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 369-01 Advanced Symbolic Logic TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 Janet Folina 10 / 20
*Cross-listed with PHIL 369-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 371-01 Modern Geometry MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 205 Daniel Flath 16 / 20
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 376-01 Algebraic Structures TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Andrew Beveridge 5 / 25
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 455-01 Mathematical Statistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Vittorio Addona 8 / 28
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
MATH 478-01 Complex Analysis MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud 8 / 24
*ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MCST 110-01 Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 John Kim 2 / 16
MCST 110-02 Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies MW 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 John Kim 7 / 16
MCST 114-01 News Reporting and Writing TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 301 Aron Kahn 5 / 19
MCST 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture TR 01:20 pm-03:50 pm HUM 401 Michael Griffin 22 / 31
MCST 202-01 Global Media Industries MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Michael Griffin 1 / 20
*Cross-listed with INTL 202-01*
MCST 247-01 Documentary Film and Video MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 401 Michael Griffin 17 / 24
MCST 294-02 Afrofuturism in Media and Popular Culture W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Leola Johnson -3 / 24
MCST 294-03 Cinema and Translation MW 01:10 pm-03:40 pm HUM 402 Jessica Ka Yee Chan 11 / 20
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-01*
MCST 294-04 Nazi Movies and Movie Nazis MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 401 Linda Schulte-Sasse 12 / 20
*Cross-listed with GERM 255-01*
MCST 315-01 Gender, Sexuality and Film MW 09:40 am-12:10 pm MARKIM 201 Genevieve Yue -1 / 16
*Cross-listed with WGSS 320-01.* This course explores a variety of critical approaches to the representation of gender and sexuality in film and video, including psychoanalytic feminist film theory and criticism, queer theory, narrative analysis, genre, visual culture, and cultural studies of gender and sexuality in relation to race, nation, and class. How have social constructs about gender and sexuality been promulgated and/or contested in film and video within mainstream and avant-garde contexts of cultural production? How have these constructs functioned to uphold and/or challenge other forms of social stratification or privilege? And, how might the woman's body in particular - both as a sight to behold and a site of looking - offer different ways of thinking representational possibility? In asking these questions, the course considers a wide range of issues, including the gaze, the body, media technologies, spectatorship, identity and identification, realism, mythology, and pornography. Written work emphasizes the close analysis of film texts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing; Media and Cultural Studies 128, Film Analysis and Visual Culture, or a course in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; or permission of the instructor.
MCST 394-01 Media Manifestos TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 111 John Kim 11 / 16
Media Manifestos is a class about the potential for radical politics in media practices; the radical art in media politics; the historical forms some radical creative practices have taken and can take in the present. We will read and reflect on manifestos and theories of the relationship between radical politics and media practices. Finally, we will engage in frequent media making prescribed by some of the following groups: Dada, Surrealism, Situationism, Hacktivism, DIY, Dogme 95, Cyborg Feminism and others. Prerequisite: MCST 110, 128, or permission of instructor.
MCST 488-01 Advanced Seminar: The Blaxploitation Era: Blackness/Media in the 1970's W 01:10 pm-04:10 pm HUM 401 Leola Johnson 7 / 12
*Plus screenings TBA*

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MUSI 111-01 World Music MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm GDAY 306 Chuen-Fung Wong 5 / 25
MUSI 114-01 Theory II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Victoria Malawey 3 / 30
MUSI 114-L1 Theory II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm GDAY 306 Victoria Malawey 12 / 25
*Lab required for Theory II*
MUSI 114-L2 Theory II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm GDAY 306 Victoria Malawey 11 / 25
MUSI 294-01 World Music Theory/Analysis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm GDAY 306 Chuen-Fung Wong -2 / 12
*Students who've already taken MUSI 111 may not take this course for credit* This course is designed primarily for music majors, music minors, or students with some musical background. It serves three main purposes. First, we survey the traditional, folk, and pop genres from major traditions around the world - in Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and the Middle East - focusing on the interaction between musical performance and other domains of human experience. Second, we approach music theory "not as a codification of Western harmonic practice, but as symbolic systems for conveying musical knowledge" (Roeder 2011). Course materials seek to understand the diverse ways in which musical sounds are organized across world cultures. Third, we examine the discourse of "world music" against the changing ideas of musical otherness in the West. Course requirements include reading, critical listening, transcription and analysis, concert attendance, participation in performance workshops, and class discussion. The ability to read staff notation is required. Students who've taken Music 111, World Music, may not take this course for credit.
MUSI 294-02 History of Jazz MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am GDAY 308 Randall Bauer -2 / 20
MUSI 314-01 Theory IV, Contemporary Theory and Literature MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am GDAY 308 Randall Bauer 11 / 20
MUSI 343-01 Western Music-19th Century MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm GDAY 308 Mark Mazullo 11 / 25
MUSI 394-01 Orchestration TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm GDAY 308 Cary Franklin 2 / 8
Orchestration refers to the process of scoring music for orchestra. The technical information required of both composer and orchestrator includes a thorough knowledge of the individual instruments. This course will examine ranges, proper notation, technical abilities and limitations of each instrument and a mental conception of the sound of each. The art of orchestration pairs the understanding of each individual instrument with principles of instrumental combination and involves the study of balance of tone, mix of tone color, clarity in texture and special effects. The final project for this class will be a reading of orchestrated works with the Macalester Orchestra. Textbook: The Technique of Orchestration, 6th Edition, Kent Kennan

MUSI 73-01 African Music Ensemble TR 05:30 pm-07:00 pm Sowah Mensah 18 / 50
*Meets in Turck Lounge*
MUSI 75-01 Macalester Choir MWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm Matthew Mehaffey 22 / 50
*Meets at Immanuel Lutheran Church*
MUSI 77-01 Highland Camerata T 04:45 pm-06:15 pm Matthew Mehaffey 3 / 50
*Location will be Immanuel Lutheran Church; this ensemble will also meet Thursday evenings 6:30-7:30pm*
MUSI 81-01 Mac Jazz Band TR 07:00 pm-08:30 pm GDAY Joan Griffith 32 / 50
*Meets in George Draper Dayton 015*
MUSI 83-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:30 pm Joan Griffith 14 / 50
*Meets in George Draper Dayton 015*
MUSI 85-01 Pipe Band W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Michael Breidenbach 28 / 50
*Meets in Turck Lounge*
MUSI 87-01 Chamber Ensemble TBA TBA Cary Franklin 35 / 50
MUSI 89-01 Orchestra TR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm Cary Franklin 9 / 50
*Meets in Ramsey Junior High band room*
MUSI 91-01 Mac Early Music Ensembles TBA TBA Clea Galhano 41 / 50
MUSI 95-01 Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 19 / 20
MUSI 95-03 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl 6 / 10
MUSI 95-04 Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen 8 / 10
MUSI 95-05 Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo 9 / 10
MUSI 95-08 Jazz Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen 8 / 10
MUSI 95-09 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 6 / 10
MUSI 95-10 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 6 / 10
MUSI 95-11 Voice TBA TBA William Reed 5 / 10
MUSI 95-12 Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson 7 / 10
MUSI 95-13 African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 8 / 10
MUSI 95-17 Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 9 / 10
MUSI 95-18 Electric Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith 49 / 50
MUSI 95-19 Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 8 / 10
MUSI 95-1M Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor 9 / 10
MUSI 95-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 8 / 10
MUSI 95-23 Violin TBA TBA Stella Anderson 7 / 10
MUSI 95-25 Classical Bass TBA TBA Jennifer Rubin 9 / 10
MUSI 95-26 Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 9 / 10
MUSI 95-27 Jazz Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith 9 / 10
MUSI 95-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson 9 / 10
MUSI 95-38 Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor 8 / 10
MUSI 95-41 Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball 8 / 10
MUSI 95-42 African Drumming TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 8 / 10
MUSI 95-4M Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball 7 / 10
MUSI 95-5M African Drumming TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 4 / 10
MUSI 95-7M Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 9 / 10
MUSI 95-C1 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin 9 / 10
MUSI 95-C2 Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder 9 / 10
MUSI 95-C3 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa 9 / 10
MUSI 95-CC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen 6 / 10
MUSI 95-CI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 7 / 10
MUSI 95-H1 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin 9 / 10
MUSI 95-HB Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl 9 / 10
MUSI 95-M Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 7 / 10
MUSI 95-M2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa 6 / 10
MUSI 95-M3 Tuba TBA TBA Charles Wazanowski 9 / 10
MUSI 95-M5 Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen 9 / 10
MUSI 95-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson 8 / 10
MUSI 95-M9 Trumpet TBA TBA Lynn Erickson 8 / 10
MUSI 95-MC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen 9 / 10
MUSI 95-MD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo 9 / 10
MUSI 95-ME Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich 9 / 10
MUSI 95-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 4 / 10
MUSI 95-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 3 / 15
MUSI 95-MJ Voice TBA TBA William Reed 7 / 10
MUSI 95-ML African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 8 / 10
MUSI 95-MO Electric Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith 9 / 10
MUSI 95-MP Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 9 / 10
MUSI 95-MQ Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith 9 / 10
MUSI 95-MU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 6 / 10
MUSI 95-MW Viola TBA TBA Stella Anderson 9 / 10
MUSI 95-MX Gamba TBA TBA Julie Elhard 9 / 10
MUSI 95-MY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 7 / 10
MUSI 95-MZ Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 8 / 10
MUSI 95-W2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa 9 / 10
MUSI 95-WE Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich 9 / 10
MUSI 95-WH Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 8 / 10
MUSI 97-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 3 / 20
MUSI 97-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl 7 / 20
MUSI 97-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Claudia Chen 7 / 10

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Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
NEUR 246-01 Exploring Sensation/Perception MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Alvina Kittur 5 / 24
*Cross-listed with PSYC 246-01*
NEUR 246-L1 Exploring Sensation/Percpt Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Alvina Kittur 5 / 24
*Cross-listed with PSYC 246-L1*
NEUR 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 Eric Wiertelak 6 / 24
*Cross-listed with PSYC 248-01*
NEUR 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 371 Eric Wiertelak 6 / 24
*Cross-listed with PSYC 1248-L1*
NEUR 300-01 Directed Research TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak 13 / 16
NEUR 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak 8 / 16

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHIL 115-01 Introduction to Philosophy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Janet Folina 6 / 20
PHIL 125-01 Ethics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 William Wilcox -4 / 20
PHIL 227-01 Bioethics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Martin Gunderson 0 / 20
PHIL 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Martin Gunderson 3 / 20
*Cross-listed with ENVI 229-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
PHIL 231-01 Modern Philosophy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Geoffrey Gorham -6 / 20
PHIL 236-01 Indian Philosophies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 Joy Laine 5 / 20
*Cross-listed with ASIA 236-01*
PHIL 294-01 Philosophy of Sport MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 Geoffrey Gorham -2 / 20
Sports and games deserve close philosophical examination since they have always played an important part in human life. We first ask what exactly sports, games and athletics are, and how they are distinct from other modes of life. Next, we consider the main arguments for and against sports. For example, does sport promote virtue and 'fair-play' or, on the contrary, aggression and egoism? It is often said that sport is an essential part of a 'well-rounded' life and a liberal arts education. But why are well-rounded lives, and liberal arts educations, good? We will explore numerous ethical and conceptual issues that arise within sports, such as cheating and 'sportsmanship', violence and injury, doping and enhancement, and gender and racial equity. And we will consider whether sports can help us gain insight into more general philosophical concepts, such as virtue, justice, health, embodiment, friendship, consciousness, absurdity, death, and beauty. Our ultimate concern will be: what is the place of sport and games in a good and meaningful human life? Is it possible that life itself is a game? Along with numerous philosophical readings, contemporary and historical, we will also discuss philosophical treatments of sports in literature and film. Grades will be based primarily on a number of short papers, a class presentation, and a final take-home examination.
PHIL 294-02 Rights of Nonhuman Animals TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Diane Michelfelder 4 / 15
In this course, we will combine readings, films, presentations by guest speakers, and field trips to aid an exploration of the central philosophical questions and debates associated with extending human rights to nonhuman animals. Just what does it mean to say that we ought to respect the rights of animals? On what grounds might such rights be granted or denied? If at least some human rights ought to be extended to at least some nonhuman animals, to which ones and what rights ought to be extended? What role do the concepts of personhood and property play in these debates? In what ways is the issue of the rights of nonhuman animals also an issue of environmentalism, particularly with respect to climate change? How would granting rights to nonhuman animals impact public policies and everyday habits of living? Might improving animal welfare bring about the same ends as granting rights to animals, while also avoiding thorny philosophical thickets? In considering these questions, it is anticipated that students taking this course will not only gain greater critical insight into what it may mean for nonhuman animals to have human rights but for what it means for us as rational animals to have them as well. This course counts as an elective within the Human Rights and Humanitarianism concentration. No prerequisites.
PHIL 369-01 Advanced Symbolic Logic TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 Janet Folina 10 / 20
*Cross-listed with MATH 369-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
PHIL 394-01 The Life of the Spirit: Hegel and Kierkegaard MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MAIN 003 Diane Michelfelder 10 / 20
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel's daring and drama-packed volume, The Phenomenology of Spirit, has long stood out as one of the masterworks of 19th century European philosophy. In this cousre, we will embrace the adventure of reading the Phenomenology, starting with the preface and continuing through the section on Unhappy Consciousness. Among the questions guiding our adventure will be: Just what does Hegel mean by "spirit"? What does it mean to "do" philosophy as a speculative science and how does this approach differ from some of Hegel's predecessors, most importantly Kant? What are the historical forms that Hegel identifies with the emergence and development of philosophical consciousness and how are the transitions between these forms accomplished? In the second part of the course, we will turn to one of Hegel's most sharp-witted and wittiest critics, the Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard, in whose writings the roots of existentialism can be found. Through reading and discussing original texts such as Fear and Trembling, The Sickness Unto Death, and parts of Either-Or and The Concluding Unscientific Postscript, we will critically examine the contrast between Hegel's stages of consciousness and those proposed by Kierkegaard: the aesthetic, the ethical, and the religious. What does Kierkegaard mean when he claims that "truth is subjectivity"? And what are we to make of it when he proposes that "a human being is spirit...spirit is the self"?
PHIL 394-02 Contemporary Social and Political TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 William Wilcox 7 / 15
This course will focus on three central topics in contemporary Anglo-American (or "analytic") social and political philosophy. We begin with John Rawls's theory of justice as it evolved, often in light of criticisms that Rawls found compelling, from its first articulation in 1958 to its final in 2001. The second topic is equality, where we'll look at a few seminal attempts, for instance by Thomas Nagel, Amartya Sen, and Elizabeth Anderson, to explain the way in which equality is an important political and social ideal, and some recent work questioning its importance. Finally, we'll examine arguments by John Rawls and Thomas Nagel that the appropriate standards of justice applying to interactions between different societies are quite different from those standards that should be applied within a single society. These views by Nagel and Rawls have been opposed by philosophers with a more cosmopolitan outlook, and some of these opposing arguments will also be read and discussed.

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PE 01-01 Swimming I TR 03:00 pm-04:15 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 15 / 20
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson -1 / 25
PE 04-01 Karate I MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson 14 / 25
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:40 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 4 / 25
PE 06-02 Yoga I TR 03:00 pm-04:10 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 1 / 25
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Vanessa Seljeskog 4 / 30
PE 10-01 Racquetball I TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Betsy Emerson 1 / 6
PE 11-01 Swimming II TR 03:00 pm-04:15 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 19 / 20
PE 13-01 Intermediate Social Dance M 08:30 pm-10:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson 7 / 25
PE 14-01 Karate II MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson 22 / 25
PE 16-01 Yoga II TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin 8 / 25
PE 18-01 Pilates MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard -2 / 25
PE 19-01 Conditioning II MW 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 25 / 25
PE 20-01 Weight Training MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 10 / 25
PE 21-01 Swim for Fitness TR 03:00 pm-04:15 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 16 / 20
PE 26-01 Tai Chi Chuan MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Phyllis Calph 7 / 25
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard 12 / 25
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance T 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson 5 / 25
PE 51-01 Aqua Aerobics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth 17 / 25

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 36 / 65
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 46 / 65
PHYS 112-01 Cosmos: Perspectives and Reflections M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 5 / 65
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 150 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 33 / 54
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab R 09:00 am-11:00 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 9 / 18
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab R 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 6 / 18
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 250 John Cannon 22 / 63
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab M 02:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 1 / 18
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab T 09:00 am-11:00 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 1 / 18
PHYS 227-L3 Principles of Physics II Lab T 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 11 / 18
PHYS 340-01 Digital Electronics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 101 James Doyle 4 / 24
*Cross-listed with COMP 340-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
PHYS 340-L1 Digital Electronics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 147 James Doyle 3 / 12
*Cross-listed with COMP 340-L1; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
PHYS 340-L2 Digital Electronics Lab M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 147 James Doyle 1 / 12
*Cross-listed with COMP 340-L2; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 2nd with signature of instructor*
PHYS 348-01 Laboratory Instrumentation MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 101 James Heyman 9 / 24
PHYS 348-L1 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Heyman 2 / 12
PHYS 348-L2 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Heyman 7 / 12
PHYS 440-01 Observational Astronomy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 404 John Cannon 8 / 16
PHYS 440-L1 Observational Astronomy Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 404 John Cannon 4 / 8
*Permission of instructor required*
PHYS 440-L2 Observational Astronomy Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 404 John Cannon 4 / 8
*Permission of instructor required*
PHYS 461-01 Mechanics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 2 / 24
PHYS 468-01 Statistical Mechanics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 James Heyman 9 / 24
PHYS 489-01 Physics Seminar F 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 150 James Doyle 12 / 24

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
POLI 120-01 International Politics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Andrew Latham -2 / 25
POLI 160-01 Foundations of Political Theory TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Jessica Chastek 13 / 25
POLI 170-01 Theories of Rhetoric MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 12 / 25
POLI 200-01 Women and American Politics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Julie Dolan 14 / 25
POLI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Kathryn Pratt 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENVI 215-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
POLI 216-01 Legislative Politics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Julie Dolan 7 / 25
*Permission of instructor required*
POLI 222-01 Regional Conflict/Security TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Andrew Latham -1 / 25
This is a seminar on the challenges posed to US interests in the Middle East (the region bounded by Egypt, Iran, Yemen and Syria). It is organized around the following questions:

What are the interests motivating US involvement in the Middle East? What are the challenges to US global and regional interests in the region? How well is the current US policy/strategy working to advance those interests? What realistic military, political, economic and diplomatic options are available to the US in the region? What strategic choices would you advise the Obama administration to make if it is to advance/defend key American interests in the region? Throughout, seminar participants will approach these questions from the perspective of American policy practitioners seeking to craft a comprehensive strategy that advances US interests in the region and the world. The goal is not only to deepen participants' understanding of the complexities of the security challenges in the region, but also to enhance their appreciation of challenges faced by the public officials charged with dealing with those complexities. As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no prerequisites, however, and is therefore suitable to all students seeking to satisfy an interest in US foreign policy and/or the security situation in the Middle East.

POLI 242-01 Development Politics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 402 David Blaney 5 / 25
POLI 260-01 Contemporary Political Theory TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Katherine Gott 17 / 25
POLI 262-01 American Political Thought TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt 5 / 25
POLI 272-01 Researching Political Communication TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 4 / 16
POLI 294-01 Immigration Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 9 / 25
The United States are often described as a nation of immigrants, yet various anxieties over the status and role of immigrants have been expressed throughout the history of the country. This class offers a symptomatic reading of key historical debates over immigration in the United States. A symptomatic analysis explores the contextual forces that shape the definitions, terms, and goals of such debates, the variety of interests vested in the issue, and the political and social consequences of these controversies not only for the dominant political order but especially for the lives and identities of the immigrants, their families, and communities. In particular we will explore: key historical events and trends that have defined the flow and status of immigrants in the United States; how various anxieties about immigration have served to disenfranchise some groups while solidifying the power of others; the rhetorical, economic, political, and ideological challenges faced by those interested in promoting immigrants' rights; how the status of immigrants has consequences for the political rights of citizens and vice versa, thus challenging the notion that immigrants' problems are theirs alone.

POLI 294-02 Political Violence TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Andrew Latham -7 / 25
This course is an introduction to political violence. Throughout the semester, we will examine various manifestations of political violence, including terrorism, major interstate war, jihad/religious war, insurgencies, New Wars, ethnic conflict, and civil war. We will also explore the debates in the field of political science regarding the nature and causal factors behind these types of violence. The course will be organized around both historical and contemporary cases of political violence. As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable to all students seeking to satisfy an interest in political violence.

POLI 294-03 Gender Issues in Human Rights and Humanitarianism MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber 2 / 25
This intermediate-level course explores the complex roles of women and gender in the fields of human rights and humanitarianism. We will begin with the efforts of women's rights activists to expose the gendered nature of the international human rights regime and to address women's rights as human rights. Taking a global perspective, we will then explore the key debates within women's human rights activism, as well as some current threats to women's human rights. Shifting our focus to humanitarianism, we will look at various issues surrounding women and gender in armed conflict, including the use of sexual violence in war, efforts to protect women in situations of armed conflict, and the prosecution of wartime sexual violence. We will also look at the roles of women and gender in post-conflict peacebuilding.
POLI 294-04 Information Policy, Politics and Law TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt 11 / 25
This course explores the central problems created for public policy makers by changes in information technologies of the past half century. Through both legal cases and legislative questions, we consider the tensions between privacy, security, transparency, secrecy, and other values. Using a mix of tutorials, class discussion, and individual projects, topics will include copyrights, patents, file-sharing, surveillance, and information disclosure. Historic comparisons will allow us to question how these contemporary problems may or may not present fundamentally new challenges.
POLI 294-05 Food Politics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 Michael Zis -3 / 25
Most people tend to think of eating as a very personal decision, but the availability, price, and nutritional value of our food is strongly influenced by governmental policy. In this class, we will explore, discuss, and debate the government's historic and proper role in three interrelated areas of public policy, with attention to the political and moral justification, politics at play, and public policymaking of each. They are: 1) agriculture as that relates to farm subsidies, food safety, organic food standards, and factory farms; 2) hunger relief and poverty, from food stamps to school lunch programs to new local initiatives targeting food deserts 3) and public health, from Prohibition to the campaign against obesity today.
POLI 300-01 American Government Institutions MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 205 Michael Zis 10 / 20
POLI 322-01 Advanced International Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 208 David Blaney 12 / 25
POLI 323-01 Humanitarianism in World Politics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber 2 / 20
POLI 341-01 Comparative Social Movements TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Paul Dosh 4 / 20
*Cross-listed with LATI 341-01; first day attendance required*
POLI 390-01 Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship TR 08:00 am-11:10 am GDAY 306 Paul Dosh 0 / 12
*Permission of instructor required*
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium W 07:00 pm-09:00 pm CARN 208 Julie Dolan 12 / 16

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Jillian Peterson 2 / 35
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Jason Weaver 2 / 35
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 3 / 20
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 3 / 20
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 7 / 20
PSYC 100-L4 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 1 / 20
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Brooke Lea -5 / 24
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Brooke Lea -2 / 12
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Brooke Lea -3 / 12
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 352 Christina Manning -2 / 24
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Tina Kruse -1 / 25
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01*
PSYC 246-01 Exploring Sensation/Perception MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Alvina Kittur 5 / 24
*Cross-listed with NEUR 246-01*
PSYC 246-L1 Exploring Sensation/Percep Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Alvina Kittur 5 / 24
*Cross-listed with NEUR 346-L1*
PSYC 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 Eric Wiertelak 6 / 24
*Cross-listed with NEUR 248-01*
PSYC 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 371 Eric Wiertelak 6 / 24
*Cross-listed with NEUR 248-L1*
PSYC 252-01 Distress, Dysfunction, and Disorder: Perspectives on the DSM MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Jaine Strauss 1 / 75
PSYC 254-01 Social Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Jason Weaver 7 / 30
PSYC 262-01 Asian American Psychology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Sun No 14 / 24
*Cross-listed with AMST 262-01*
PSYC 294-01 Psychology of Health MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Daniel Graham 0 / 30
In this course, we will examine human health and its many determinants. We will investigate ways in which our behaviors, thoughts, emotions, friends, environments, and other factors influence our health and the bi-directional linkages between psychological factors and health (for example, on the one hand psychological stress can produce physiological disease; and on the other hand, being physically sick can cause us to feel stressed, depressed, and can impair our psychological functioning.) We will discuss major research findings in the Health Psychology literature. A focus of the course will be on understanding research findings as presented in primary source documents (i.e., peer-reviewed journal articles). These journal articles will be supplemented by chapters from books written by and/or about leading scientific researchers and their work, including: Martin Seligman, Ellen Langer, Daniel Gilbert, and many others! An objective of this course is to introduce you to the fundamental principles and theories of Health Psychology, as well as the factual knowledge that is the basis of our scientific understanding of Health Psychology. An additional objective of this course is to introduce you to many ways in which theoretical and empirical findings are applied to improve the lives and development of individuals and groups (you will have the opportunity to try this yourselves with a personal health behavior-change project!). Finally, an object of this course is to gain experience analyzing and critically evaluating fundamental issues, arguments, and points of view in Health Psychology.
PSYC 294-02 Psychology in a Material World TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning 10 / 20
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 294-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am Sun No 1 / 20
*Meets in the Psychology reading room*
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am Rachel Lucas-Thompson 1 / 20
*Meets in the Psychology reading room*
PSYC 374-01 Clinical and Counseling Psych TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss -1 / 18
PSYC 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 300 Mark Lewis 2 / 18
*Cross-listed with LING 378-01; please see Brooke Lea, Dept Chair, for prerequisite waiver/signature*
PSYC 379-01 Cultural Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Sun No -1 / 20
PSYC 488-01 Development in Context TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Rachel Lucas-Thompson 4 / 16

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RELI 102-01 Modern Islam TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Brett Wilson 10 / 25
RELI 121-01 New Testament TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Susanna Drake 11 / 25
RELI 194-01 Asian Religions in American MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Erik Davis -4 / 15
This class is part of the Religious Studies American Religions Cluster, and will meet once a week (most likely Sunday evening) with the other classes in this cluster to partake in the broader curriculum. The Asian Religions in America course serves as an introduction to a few of the religions in the United States which originated in Asia, with special focus on those traditions highly represented in the Twin Cities: Tibetan, Lao, Cambodian, and Vietnamese Buddhism, Chinese Religions, and Hmong Religion. Students will be expected to master social and historical material in addition to the 'religious' material, as a function of understanding how these traditions came to North America, and what this move has entailed for practicing communities.

RELI 194-02 American Heretics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Paula Cooey 1 / 18
*Cross-listed with WGSS 194-01; This class is part of a Spring 2012 cluster in the department focusing on religion and the American experience. Class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays at the assigned time, and on a weekend day (mostly Sundays, early evenings) for speakers, films, field trips and joint dinners with the other classes. * Just what is "the Bible" and what role has it played in shaping American life? How might it center a pattern of repeated political and cultural subversion that later becomes part of the dominant political voice in the United States? Many if not most of the earliest Europeans who colonized what is now the U.S. were considered religious heretics by the Christian churches of their original homelands at the time of their immigration. Over the course of U.S. history, "new" traditions have also emerged, often considered heretical or "not really Christian" by the subsequently established Christian traditions. While some of these traditions die out, a number of them flourish and later become part of the dominant cultural and political landscape. Much of the debate over who is and isn't heretical or "really Christian" has focused on what counts as authoritative Christian sacred text and how to interpret it. So, for example, even today some Christian denominations and sects find the Church of Latter Day Saints (Mormons) politically, as well as religiously, unacceptable because this tradition grants the Book of Mormon divinely revealed status. Controversy over what does and does not count as sacred scripture, how it is to be interpreted, and who gets to determine right teaching of these texts for human life has gone on to shape American culture and politics in distinctive ways. The debates and the texts on which they focus have provided the primary scripts, the central narratives, and the cultural discourse, from worship to moral practice, politics to the courts, and secular ceremony to economic life. Christians have turned to scripture to justify opposing views and political action on issues from slavery to the Civil Rights, Women's suffrage to the second wave of Feminism, capitalism to socialism, and heterosexually exclusive civil marriage laws to Gay Rights. This course will examine this pattern or movement from "heretic" to dominance, characterized by dispute, adaptation, and power, even violence, by looking at a number of these groups, their sacred texts, and their impact through the use of film, guest lecture, visual arts, field work in various different Christian communities, on-line virtual churches, and, most importantly, the texts themselves.

This course is scheduled as an MWF course; however, class will not meet on Fridays due to required fieldwork and attendance at other events.

RELI 194-03 America's Jews, American Judaism MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Barry Cytron -2 / 20
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-02; this class is part of a Spring 2012 cluster in the department focusing on religion and the American experience. Class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays at the assigned time, and on a weekend day (mostly Sundays, early evenings) for speakers, films, field trips and joint dinners with the other classes.* In 1654 twenty-three Jewish refugees fled Brazil and landed by mistake in what is today New York. 350 years later American Jewry constitutes the largest, most prosperous, and one of the two most important Jewish communities in the world. The five to six million men, women, and children of the contemporary American Jewish community constitute a "mixed multitude": Sephardic and Ashkenazic, "yordim" and Zionists, religious Jews and secularists, feminists, converts and "bagel-and-lox" Jews, and those who are "just Jewish"! Although comprising less than three percent of the U.S. population, their educational, social, and economic success gives them heightened visibility in the media, politics and literature. We will explore the creation and evolution of the American Jewish community, focusing on the successive waves of immigration, the ways in which these settlers and their descendants constructed a distinctive cultural and religious character, and the reactions of others to their entrance into national life. Of particular focus are the relationships of: Christians and Jews, American Jews and African-Americans, and Jewish women and men, to each other and to the changing landscapes of religious and cultural identity.

RELI 194-04 American Catholics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 James Laine -1 / 20
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-03; this class is part of a Spring 2012 cluster in the department focusing on religion and the American experience. Class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays at the assigned time, and on a weekend day (mostly Sundays, early evenings) for speakers, films, field trips and joint dinners with the other classes. * For much of American history, Catholics were suspected of harboring values at odds with the democratic values thought to be central to the nation. And yet very large numbers of immigrants coming to American since the 1830s were Catholics: Irish, Germans, Poles, Italians. This course will concentrate on the European background to American Catholicism, the sub-cultures of popular Catholic piety, and the values that American Catholics have held, values that sometimes put them at odds with their Protestant neighbors, and other values that put them at odds with the Catholic hierarchy. With that historical background, we will go on to consider a variety of Catholic sub-cultures present in the Twin Cities: Latinos, African Americans, recent African Immigrants (Eritreans, Cameroonians), Native Americans (Ojibwe), Asian Americans (Koreans, Vietnamese). We will visit these communities and compare their experience to more mainstream Euro-American Catholic communities, both those characterized by a progressive 1960s Vatican II ethos, and those favoring a conservative approach to religion, politics and culture.
RELI 200-01 The Qur'an (Koran) TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Brett Wilson 7 / 15
RELI 223-01 Orthodoxy and Heresy in Early Christianity M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Susanna Drake 4 / 15
RELI 294-03 World Religions and World Religion Discourse MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 003 James Laine 6 / 15
Our goal will be to make an effort to comprehend just what cultural literacy would mean when studying the major religious traditions of the world, while at the same time developing an appreciation of some of the blind spots and problems in this enterprise. To a large extent, we will do some serious construction before we feel ready for de-construction. Every couple of weeks, we will cover one of five major areas (South Asia, East Asia, Judaism, Christianity, Islam) and each student will read a different author's treatment of this material.
RELI 294-04 Defense Against the Dark Arts W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Erik Davis 0 / 20
*Please note that as of Nov. 16 the waitlist for this course is long and there's no magical way for everyone to get in; cross-listed with ANTH 294-01* This class is a comparative survey of magic and witchcraft across cultures. As such, students in this class will be expected to simultaneously learn details from particular magical traditions studied in class, as well as to relate these details to theories about magic and witchcraft within the discipline of Anthropology and the field of Religious Studies. Special themes addressed in the class are the reasonableness of belief in magic, social panics, magical efficacy, and magic as a form of prefigurative politics.
RELI 294-04 Defense Against the Dark Arts W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Ron Barrett 0 / 20
*Please note that as of Nov. 16 the waitlist for this course is long and there's no magical way for everyone to get in; cross-listed with ANTH 294-01* This class is a comparative survey of magic and witchcraft across cultures. As such, students in this class will be expected to simultaneously learn details from particular magical traditions studied in class, as well as to relate these details to theories about magic and witchcraft within the discipline of Anthropology and the field of Religious Studies. Special themes addressed in the class are the reasonableness of belief in magic, social panics, magical efficacy, and magic as a form of prefigurative politics.
RELI 294-05 Martyrdom Then/Now TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Paula Cooey 6 / 20
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01* From Socrates to suicide bombers, martyrs have been forced to give up their lives, or chosen to risk them and even to die, rather than renounce their beliefs or practices. This course explores how stories about martyrs ("martyrologies") relate to the formation of religious identities and communities. Over the course of the semester, we will analyze martryrologies from the early Christian and Jewish periods, the beginnings of Islam, the sixteenth century, and modernity. We will pay special attention to the social and political contexts with which martyrs often found themselves at odds (including the Roman Empire, and U.S./Middle East in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries). In class discussions, readings, and written work, you will have the opportunity to reflect on the following questions (among others): How do the stories we tell about martyrs shape the way we understand religious practices and beliefs? How do narratives of bearing witness, suffering, and death help to illumine relationships between religious and political domains? How might our current understanding of martyrdom be informed for better and for worse by a study of history?
RELI 294-05 Martyrdom Then/Now TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Susanna Drake 6 / 20
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01* From Socrates to suicide bombers, martyrs have been forced to give up their lives, or chosen to risk them and even to die, rather than renounce their beliefs or practices. This course explores how stories about martyrs ("martyrologies") relate to the formation of religious identities and communities. Over the course of the semester, we will analyze martryrologies from the early Christian and Jewish periods, the beginnings of Islam, the sixteenth century, and modernity. We will pay special attention to the social and political contexts with which martyrs often found themselves at odds (including the Roman Empire, and U.S./Middle East in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries). In class discussions, readings, and written work, you will have the opportunity to reflect on the following questions (among others): How do the stories we tell about martyrs shape the way we understand religious practices and beliefs? How do narratives of bearing witness, suffering, and death help to illumine relationships between religious and political domains? How might our current understanding of martyrdom be informed for better and for worse by a study of history?
RELI 294-06 Conversion and Inquisition: Religious Change 1550-1750 TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Karin Velez 14 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-03*
RELI 469-01 Approaches to the Study of Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Paula Cooey 7 / 15
*For Religious Studies majors/minors only; others need permission of instructor*

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RUSS 102-01 Elementary Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 213 Julia Chadaga 14 / 25
RUSS 102-L1 Elementary Russian II Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 Elizaveta Kundas 8 / 13
RUSS 102-L2 Elementary Russian II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Elizaveta Kundas 7 / 13
RUSS 204-01 Intermediate Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 212 Gunvor Hammarberg 14 / 25
RUSS 204-L1 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 Elizaveta Kundas 8 / 13
RUSS 204-L2 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Elizaveta Kundas 7 / 13
RUSS 261-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Julia Chadaga 15 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 261-01*
RUSS 261-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Peter Weisensel 15 / 25
*Cross-listed with HIST 261-01*
RUSS 272-01 The Post-Soviet Sphere MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine 3 / 20
*Cross-listed with INTL 272-01*
RUSS 366-01 Nabokov TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Julia Chadaga 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENGL 366-01; no prerequisites*
RUSS 367-01 Dostoevsky and Gogol MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 216 Gunvor Hammarberg 19 / 25
RUSS 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 James von Geldern 9 / 15

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm CARN 06A Khaldoun Samman 5 / 16
SOCI 175-01 Sociolinguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Marianne Milligan -1 / 20
*Cross-listed with LING 175-01*
SOCI 175-02 Sociolinguistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Marianne Milligan 2 / 20
*Cross-listed with LING 175-02*
SOCI 194-01 Consumer Culture and Sustainability M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Deborah Smith -5 / 16
SOCI 194-02 Medical Sociology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Terry Boychuk 4 / 15
This course provides an overview of the political, economic, cultural, and scientific foundations of the US health care industry. Select topics include: What is the secret to a long life? What is the basis of medical knowledge about health and illness? How do we know if medical care hurts or helps us? Why did the US health care industry develop under the auspices of markets rather than government-provided public goods? Why is it so difficult to achieve universal access to health care?
SOCI 210-01 Sociology of Sexuality TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Deborah Smith -8 / 16
SOCI 210-02 Sociology of Sexuality TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Deborah Smith -7 / 16
SOCI 250-01 Nonprofit Organizations MW 09:10 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Terry Boychuk 4 / 15
SOCI 269-01 Science and Social Inquiry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Erik Larson -2 / 20
SOCI 272-01 Social Theories MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Khaldoun Samman -4 / 16
SOCI 294-01 Higher Education in America MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Terry Boychuk 9 / 15
Why does Macalester College exist? How has the college changed over time? This course surveys the ongoing reconstruction of American higher education from colonial times to present day, with particular emphasis on situating our own institutional history within the context of larger social transformations that have reshaped the contours of colleges and universities over time. Select topics include: Who owns and governs colleges? What are economic foundations of higher education? Who gets to go to college? What will students learn when they get there? How did college teaching become a profession, and what does it matter?
SOCI 310-01 Law and Society TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Erik Larson 4 / 20

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Theater and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory & Performance I MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm THEATR STUDIO Cheryl Brinkley 4 / 16
*First day attendance required*
THDA 121-01 Beginning Dance Composition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke 0 / 10
THDA 125-01 Technical Theater MW 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser 9 / 16
*First day attendance required*
THDA 125-L1 Technical Theater Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Daniel Keyser 4 / 8
THDA 125-L2 Technical Theater Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Daniel Keyser 5 / 8
THDA 145-01 Make-Up Design and Application TR 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett 12 / 16
*$45 materials fee required*
THDA 220-01 Voice and Speech MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Cheryl Brinkley 6 / 16
*First day attendance required; additional meeting room is Rehearsal Room 3*
THDA 242-01 Playwrighting and Textual Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Beth Cleary 5 / 16
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-02*
THDA 250-01 Experiential Anatomy and the Mind Body Connection MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke -3 / 15
THDA 260-01 Performance Studies Praxis: Avant Garde and the Social TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Lara Nielsen -2 / 15
*Cross-listed with ART 294-01; first day attendance required*
THDA 260-01 Performance Studies Praxis: Avant Garde and the Social TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot -2 / 15
*Cross-listed with ART 294-01; first day attendance required*
THDA 265-01 The Oral History Project TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen 7 / 15
*First day attendance required*
THDA 294-02 Dance for the Camera MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR STUDIO Rebecca Heist 11 / 15
Explore the world of movement on screen. This course will look at the development of this burgeoning art form. Studies of a wide range of work will be supplemented with devised projects. In creating individual dance films students will learn editing and camera techniques. Analysis of the infinite ways in which movement forms perception in the two dimensional format will be investigated.
THDA 294-03 Japanese Theater: From Noh to Now TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 204 Kendall Heitzman 10 / 20
*Cross-listed with JAPA 294-02 and ASIA 294-02*
THDA 341-01 Intermediate Dance Composition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke 10 / 10
THDA 350-01 Directing Theory/Production I MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Beth Cleary 4 / 12
*First day attendance required*
THDA 360-01 Acting Theory/Performance II MWF 09:40 am-11:40 am THEATR STUDIO Harry Waters 0 / 12
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
THDA 31-01 Dance Improvisation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 6 Krista Langberg 7 / 15
THDA 42-01 Modern Dance II TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 8 / 15
THDA 45-01 Modern Dance IV MW 03:50 pm-05:20 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 10 / 15
THDA 52-01 Ballet II MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Stanchfield 11 / 20
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Sharon Varosh 5 / 15

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
WGSS 110-01 Intro to LGBTQ Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Corie Hammers 5 / 25
*Cross-listed with AMST 112-01; first day attendance required*
WGSS 117-01 Women, Health, Reproduction MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 Elizabeth Jansen -7 / 24
*Cross-listed with BIOL 117-01; first day attendance required*
WGSS 127-01 Wom/Gend/Sex Greece/Rome TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Beth Severy-Hoven 2 / 25
*Cross-listed with CLAS 127-01*
WGSS 194-01 American Heretics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Paula Cooey 1 / 18
*Cross-listed with RELI 194-02; This class is part of a Spring 2012 cluster in the department focusing on religion and the American experience. Class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays at the assigned time, and on a weekend day (mostly Sundays, early evenings) for speakers, films, field trips and joint dinners with the other classes. *
WGSS 220-01 Icons, Ideas, Instruments: Feminist Re-constructions MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker 21 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-03* "Subaltern" is, technically speaking, the foot-soldier who obeys orders. This course will study how this concept of the marginalized and powerless has become instrumental in resistances to feminist and other hegemonic structures in the 20th century. It is explicitly or implicitly a key concept in literary/cultural studies, historiography as well as micro-finance and development policies. We will debate whether and how "subaltern" can be a viable perspective in (post)modern and (neo) liberal times by analyzing what is going on today, at the intersection of literature, culture, economics, and politics. Latin America, South Asia, Western Europe, and Africa will be some of the areas addressed; Gramsci, Foucault, Subaltern Studies groups, Rabasa, Spivak, and Hardt/Negri are some of the authors included; literary and cultural texts by Suu Kyi, Menchu, Fusco, Morrison, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, and extracts from Dalit and Palestinian literature will be read. No prerequisites. Approved for the International Development concentration. It fulfills the English Major requirement for U.S. writers of color, postcolonial, or diasporic literature.
WGSS 294-01 Whiteness and Postcolonialism MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker 17 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-04* This course will bring together discourses that have remained somewhat parallel and unrelated--Whiteness Studies and Postcolonial Studies. It is based on the premise that the focus on 'whiteness' as an academic/social framework stems from and is intertwined with social and political identity-based movements (feminist, critical race, etc.). In other words, studies of the intersection of gender, race, class, and nation initiated in the post-colonizing imagination seeks to shake up paradigms of power, and this course explores where and how the notion of 'whiteness' converges and diverges from it. We will study literary and cultural texts, including Frantz Fanon, Nadine Gordimer, Zadie Smith, Ntozake Shange, Michelle Cliff, and movies such as At Play in the Fields of the Lord and Avatar. No prerequisites. It fulfills the English Major requirement for U.S. writers of color, postcolonial, or diasporic literature.
WGSS 294-02 Feminism and the Law MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 212 Duchess Harris 7 / 25
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with AMST 294-01*
WGSS 300-01 Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Sonita Sarker 11 / 25
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-02* This course will focus on feminist and queer postmodernist literature and film. We will study how the terms 'feminist' and 'queer' meet and separate in 20th century culture and politics. We will seek to understand and work with definitions of the 'postmodern.' Some themes that bring them into the same conversation are: negotiating prescribed and constructed identities, playing with the notion of 'post,' critiquing existing frameworks and fashioning unprecedented ones, and addressing the material conditions of modernity and postmodernity. Some authors addressed are Reinaldo Arenas, Theresa Cha, Trinh Minh-Ha, Jeannette Winterson, and Monica Ali, and films by Ursula Biemann (Switzerland) and Alka Sadat (Afghanistan) are included. No prerequisites. Approved for the Critical Theory concentration. It fulfills the English Major requirement for U.S. writers of color, postcolonial, or diasporic literature.

WGSS 320-01 Gender, Sexuality and Film MW 09:40 am-12:10 pm MARKIM 201 Genevieve Yue -1 / 16
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with MCST 315-01.*
WGSS 400-01 Senior Seminar: Linking Theory and Practice W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Corie Hammers 10 / 12
*First day attendance required*

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