Class Schedules

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Fall 2014 Class Schedule - updated December 18, 2014 at 10:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
THDA 105-01  Theatre in the Twin Cities: Making the Musical
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 010 Colleary, Waters Jr.
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required; meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010* For nearly 150 years, the American musical has been one of this country’s most popular performance genres both at home and abroad. From minstrelsy and vaudeville revues to Rent and Avenue Q, from Bert Williams and Fanny Brice to Nathan Lane and Audra McDonald, the musical has both imagined and reflected American national identities. The musical has also been a forum where the social issues of the day are given voice, sometimes using the guise of popular entertainment as a strategy of subversion.

In this course, we will explore the musical’s rich historical tradition, digging deeply and critically into several performance texts. Students will participate in acting, dance, and design workshops, and have the opportunity to attend theatre performances in the Twin Cities. All students will also participate in the creation of Macalester’s fall semester production of The Cradle Will Rock, either as performers or stage technicians.

Throughout the semester, students will be taught to engage in critical thinking and writing about performance – skills which apply directly to future studies in the arts, humanities, and sciences.

Previous theatre or performance experience is not required. Prospective majors are allowed to take this course. Due to the production schedule of The Cradle Will Rock, students enrolled in this course will not be able to take night courses during the Fall semester.



THDA 105-01  Theatre in the Twin Cities: Making the Musical
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 205 Colleary, Waters Jr.
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required; meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010* For nearly 150 years, the American musical has been one of this country’s most popular performance genres both at home and abroad. From minstrelsy and vaudeville revues to Rent and Avenue Q, from Bert Williams and Fanny Brice to Nathan Lane and Audra McDonald, the musical has both imagined and reflected American national identities. The musical has also been a forum where the social issues of the day are given voice, sometimes using the guise of popular entertainment as a strategy of subversion.

In this course, we will explore the musical’s rich historical tradition, digging deeply and critically into several performance texts. Students will participate in acting, dance, and design workshops, and have the opportunity to attend theatre performances in the Twin Cities. All students will also participate in the creation of Macalester’s fall semester production of The Cradle Will Rock, either as performers or stage technicians.

Throughout the semester, students will be taught to engage in critical thinking and writing about performance – skills which apply directly to future studies in the arts, humanities, and sciences.

Previous theatre or performance experience is not required. Prospective majors are allowed to take this course. Due to the production schedule of The Cradle Will Rock, students enrolled in this course will not be able to take night courses during the Fall semester.



THDA 110-01  Introduction to Theatre Studies
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Eric Colleary
 
THDA 115-01  Cultures of Dance
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke
 
THDA 115-01  Cultures of Dance
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 205 Wynn Fricke
 
THDA 120-01  Acting Theory and Performance I
MWF 12:00 pm-01:30 pm THEATR 010 Cheryl Brinkley
*First day attendance required; meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010*

THDA 121-01  Beginning Dance Composition
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke
This course is the study of dance-making. Students learn basic elements of movement – time, space, texture – and how they can be shaped to give the body expressive power. The relationships between form, content, and technique are explored. Students choreograph short studies, improvise, discuss, and view dance on film and in live performance. The course values risk-taking and collaboration. It culminates with the creation of a complete dance. No experience or dance training necessary. All are welcome!

THDA 141-01  Film and the Moving Body
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
Explore the world of movement on screen. This course looks at the development of this burgeoning art form. The infinite ways in which movement forms perception in the two dimensional format will be investigated. The semester begins with an historical perspective on the merging of film and dance followed by extensive studies of work ranging from insights into the human condition through pedestrian gesture to abstract choreography uniquely portrayed via the camera lens. The analytical examinations are supplemented with devised projects. In creating individual screendances students learn editing and camera techniques. Kinesthesia, rhythm, and spatial awareness are a few of the movement for the camera aspects that are applied to the film work. Previous experience in either dance or film is not required.

THDA 194-01  Technologies of Performance: Crafting the Tangible
MW 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett
*This course counts in place of THDA 125* As our society shifts away from a human connection to the tangible, this course seeks to reconnect the student to the tangible object. Our focus will be on the process of “thinking through making.” Through a series of project based learning opportunities, students will develop an understanding of themselves, the process of “critical making,” and current performance production technologies. This course will meet in a seminar format 1-2 times a week and a studio format 1 time a week. This topics course fulfills the Technical Theater requirement of the Theater and Dance major.

THDA 194-L1  Technologies of Performance Lab
T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 010 Thomas Barrett
*Meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010*

THDA 230-01  Physical Approaches
MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 010 Robert Rosen
*Meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010*

THDA 235-01  Fundamentals of Scene Design
T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR Daniel Keyser
*$40 materials fee charged; course to meet in Theater 207*

THDA 310-01  Theatre Methods: Shakespeare to Viewpoints
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 Beth Cleary
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

THDA 310-L1  Theatre Methods: Shakespeare to Viewpoints
R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 010 Beth Cleary
*Meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010*

THDA 341-01  Intermediate Dance Composition
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke
 
THDA 475-01  Advanced Scene Design
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser
*$40 materials fee charged*

THDA 489-01  Seminar in Performance Theory and Practice
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Eric Colleary
*First day attendance required*

THDA 21-01  West African-Based Movement I
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 6 Patricia Brown
 
THDA 41-01  Modern Dance I
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
 
THDA 43-01  Modern Dance III
MW 03:50 pm-05:20 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
 
THDA 51-01  Ballet I
MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile
 
THDA 52-01  Ballet II
MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile
 
THDA 53-01  Ballet III
TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile
 

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Spring 2015 Class Schedule - updated December 18, 2014 at 10:56 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
THDA 210-01  Community-Based Theatres
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 113 Harry Waters Jr.
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-04*

THDA 220-01  Voice and Speech
MWF 02:20 pm-04:00 pm THEATR 205 Cheryl Brinkley
*First day attendance required; course also utilizes Theatre 03*

THDA 250-01  Experiential Anatomy and the Mind Body Connection
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke
 
THDA 255-01  Lighting Design
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett
*$20 lighting design fee*

THDA 294-01  Performing History: Interpreting the James J. Hill House
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 100 Eric Colleary
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-06* In recent years, more and more museums have turned to performance as a way of telling their particular story – nationally at places like Colonial Williamsburg and Plimouth Plantation, or locally at places like Historic Fort Snelling and the James J. Hill House.

In this course, we will be working directly with the James J. Hill House and Minnesota Historical Society to develop an interpretative program that will be presented by the class participants at the end of the term. Just down the street from the Macalester campus, the Hill mansion housed the great railroad barron and his family at the turn of the last century. As the “Downton Abbey” of Saint Paul, the large family lived comfortably upstairs entertaining the highest members of society including the President of the United States, while their team of servants downstairs – cooks, gardeners, maids, housekeepers, etc. – worked to keep the estate running.

Students will immerse themselves in the history, culture, and politics of turn-of-the-century Saint Paul, grappling with contemporary issues of gender, class, race and sexuality. Through class discussions, guest historians, site visits and archival research, students will construct ‘characters’ they will then perform to interpret an aspect of the life and times of this historic house. While the work of this class is located within a particular historic time period and physical site, the skills developed will be useful to any student interested in history, performance, museum studies, American studies, and civic engagement.

Please note: A few of the classes and the final presentation will be held off-campus. Contact the instructor with questions.

THDA 294-02  Staging the Nation in the American Musical
MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Colleary
*Cross-listed with MUSi 294-03* For nearly 150 years, the American musical has been one of this country's most popular performance genre's both at home and abroad. From minstrelsy and vaudeville revues to Rent and Avenue Q, from Bert Williams and Fanny Brice to Nathan Lane and Audra McDonald, the musical has both imagined and reflected American national identities. These representations – sometimes highly problematic – have enormous consequences as they continue to circulate through revivals, local theatre productions, and film adaptations.

The musical has also been a forum where the social issues of the day are given voice, sometimes using the guise of popular entertainment as a strategy of subversion. This course surveys the rich history of musical theatre in America in all its complexities using scripts, archival materials, critical essays, audio recordings and film.

THDA 294-04  New Performance Lab
MWF 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Kanta Kochhar
This course focuses on a practice-based approach to the generation of new performance work. Three consecutive sections will frame our work together in order to develop processes and skills in 1) tracking/documenting/analyzing performance events in unexpected places, 2) investigating a range of compositional, research, and devising methods for new performance work, including texts, movement systems, materials and objects, architectures, and digital media, and 3) performing work—in a range of online and live venues.

The format of the class will include lecture-demos, workshops and on-site activities across the campus. This course will be of particular interest for students interested in learning more about performance as it intersects with global and local cultures; research and problem-solving; media technology, engineering, and urban design; and community engagement.

THDA 294-05  Acting Shakespeare
MWF 12:00 pm-01:30 pm THEATR 010 Barbra Berlovitz
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-05; meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010* In this class each student will work to discover her/his own voice. Habits that have formed in the body will be worked on to free the voice and allow its true potential to exist. Breathing and tension releasing exercises, developing a sense of body awareness and presence will all be a part of the journey of the class. Improvisation and games will be used as tools to help define the ideas of openness, balance and creativity. The student will learn to speak the text on the breath of the character and discover what it feels like to walk into a text “clean”, to be free from judgment and open for discovery. For this class there will be various books to consult and texts from Shakespeare's plays to memorize. Students will be asked to review one play during the semester and write journals about their work. A minimal amount of time will be spent reviewing the fundamentals of speaking a heightened text and developing this part of the craft.

THDA 294-06  Writing Performance
M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 205 James, Waters Jr.
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENGL 294-06: There are many way that a writer/actor can find their voices either on the page or on the stage. Thisis an opportunity to explore both. This course will be revealing and writing the stories you wish, know, heard, learned as you hone your craft through intentional guidance by Marlon James. You will find the deeper meaning of the presentation, sharing and performance of those ideas.

THDA 394-01  Disability/Deaf Performance
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Kanta Kochhar
Disability/deaf performance investigates the history of disability, the distinctions between disability and deaf cultures/histories, the emergence of a range of disability and deaf theatres and dance companies, and the relation of these expressive forms to disability and deaf rights, law, and activism. Performance cases studies will range from a close reading of specific plays on disability as well as a look at the work of production companies and solo artists working in this arena. Examples will include Axis Dance, Lynn Manning, Olimpias, National Theatre of the Deaf, Deaf West, Theatre Breaking through the Barriers, and more locally, Interact Theatre and Mixed Blood’s collaborations with Nicole Zapko in the US; Aaron Williamson, Candoco, and Graeae Theatre in the UK; and Ability Unlimited in India.

In addition to including an overview of the theoretical frame for how disability/deaf studies and performance studies intersect, we will also consider the aesthetics of disability, the implications of this work for developing more inclusive performance practices based on emerging trends in universal design and the links between performance practices and accessible staging practices, including, for example, the use of audio description, captioning, and/or sign language interpreters in the performances.

THDA 22-01  West African-Based Movement II
MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Patricia Brown
 
THDA 31-01  Dance Improvisation
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 6 Krista Langberg
 
THDA 42-01  Modern Dance II
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
 
THDA 44-01  Modern Dance IV
MW 04:00 pm-05:20 pm THEATR STUDIO Rebecca Heist
 
THDA 53-01  Ballet III
TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile
 

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