Spring 2017   Fall 2016  

Spring 2017

AMST 341-01

City Life: Segregation, Integration, and Gentrification

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 341-01*

Urban social geography is the study of social and spatial dimensions of city life. In this course, we will explore some of the ways in which urban society is organized geographically. We will also consider how the spatial patterns of urban life influence public policy issues in the American context. Topics covered in this course include causes of racial segregation, debates about gentrification, sustainable suburban development, the transition from government to governance in cities, and the delivery of urban services that affect the education, health and economic welfare of urban populations. Students will learn current research, engage debates about critical urban issues, and learn techniques useful for analyzing spatial patterns in the urban landscape. Cross-listed with Geography 341. (4 credits)

ANTH 230-01

Ethnographic Interviewing

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes:

An introduction to ethnographic field interviewing learned in the context of individually run student field projects. Focuses on the anthropologist-informant field relationship and the discovery of cultural knowledge through participant observation and ethnosemantic interviewing techniques. (4 credits)


GEOG 341-01

City Life: Segregation, Integration, and Gentrification

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 341-01*

Urban social geography is the study of social and spatial dimensions of city life. In this course, we will explore some of the ways in which urban society is organized geographically. We will also consider how the spatial patterns of urban life influence public policy issues in the American context. Topics covered in this course include causes of racial segregation, debates about gentrification, sustainable suburban development, the transition from government to governance in cities, and the delivery of urban services that affect the education, health and economic welfare of urban populations. Students will learn current research, engage debates about critical urban issues, and learn techniques useful for analyzing spatial patterns in the urban landscape. (4 credits)


GEOG 365-01

Urban GIS

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Laura Smith

Notes: *Permission of instructor required*

This course allows students to participate in a “real world” application of their GIS knowledge and skills in a collaborative research project setting. Project focus is on urban GIS and questions developed by and for neighborhoods and other community research organizations. Content of the course includes development of the research project, acquisition and utilization of data used in urban analysis, data manipulation and analytical techniques unique to urban GIS, and geographical data visualization. Laboratory work is required. (4 credits)

GEOG 365-L1

Urban GIS Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: This course allows students to participate in a “real world” application of their GIS knowledge and skills in a collaborative research project setting. Project focus is on urban GIS and questions developed by and for neighborhoods and other community research organizations. Content of the course includes development of the research project, acquisition and utilization of data used in urban analysis, data manipulation and analytical techniques unique to urban GIS, and geographical data visualization. Laboratory work is required. (4 credits)

POLI 204-01

Urban Politics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Lesley Lavery

Notes: American urban politics, emphasizing urban policy problems, planning and decision-making . Politcal Science 100 recommened.

Fall 2016

AMST 250-01

Race, Place and Space

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 213
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 250-01*

In this discussion-based course we focus on the racialized places of U.S. cities, rural towns and suburbs in an effort to understand how social, historic, and spatial forces have colluded to bring about complex and enduring racial formations. We will look for race and related social categories in places around St. Paul and Minneapolis. By engaging theories about visuality and representation, urban development and suburban sprawl, and social movements for racial justice, we will develop a specialized vocabulary for explaining how race, place, and space are connected. This course requires prior exposure to at least one of the following areas: American Studies, human geography, sociology of race/ethnicity, or urban studies. (4 credits)


CLAS 294-01

Towns and City Life from Late Antiquity to the Later Middle Ages

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Cameron Bradley

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 294-07* The city is a key component of modern life, but much of what we associate with urban life took shape during the Middle Ages. This course explores European cities and city life from the Roman period to the end of the Middle Ages. We will investigate how and why cities developed, how they were governed, their relationships with the hinterland and the environment, what urban living was like, and people’s perceptions of cities and urban life. Along the way, we will cover such topics as the transformations of late Roman cities during the Middle Ages, commerce and work, urban rebellions, family life, forms of entertainment, and more.

ENVI 340-01

US Urban Environmental History

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *Cross-listed with Hist 340-01; first day of attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

In the minds of many Americans, cities are places where nature is absent¿places where nature exists only in the crevices and on the margins of spaces dominated by technology, concrete, and human artifice. This course confronts this assumption directly, drawing on the scholarship from the relatively young field of urban environmental history to uncover the deep interconnections between urban America and the natural world. Among the other things, we will examine how society has drawn upon nature to build and sustain urban growth, the implications that urban growth has for transforming ecosystems both local and distant, and how social values have guided urbanites as they have built and rearranged the world around them. Using the Twin Cities has a backdrop and constant reference point, we will attempt to understand the constantly changing ways that people, cities, and nature have shaped and reshaped one another throughout American history. Cross-listed with History 340. (4 credits)

GEOG 241-01

Urban Geography

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: This course seeks to explain the evolving pattern of cities across the earth in terms of the distribution and movement of resources and people. In addition, a careful analysis of the development and internal spatial structure of North American cities will be carried out. Much class time will be spent on discussion of contemporary urban problems such as segregation, unequal investment, and control of public space as well as attempts at their solution. We make extensive use of the Twin Cities as a case study. Field work required. (4 credits)

GEOG 241-02

Urban Geography

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *First Year Course only; first day attendance required* This course introduces you to urban geography, a discipline focused on understanding urbanization and its influence on society. We will also draw on perspectives from history, political science, and sociology to examine how the built environment of cities are shaped by human activity and how, in turn, urban life is shaped by the built environment. This course will have a special emphasis on exploring the history, geography, economics and politics of St. Paul & Minneapolis. We will take advantage of our urban location by engaging the urban environment of the Twin Cities through local case studies, field study exercises, and visits to cultural institutions in the community. We will draw on our engagement with the local urban environment to demonstrate broad themes in the academic study of urban geography (e.g., the effect of transportation systems on urban development; city government, metropolitan fragmentation and regionalism; the search for community in urban settings; urban growth and neighborhood change; and, the effect of the global market economy on individual cities) at a more personal level. Directed field study exercises will help you learn analytical skills. Writing assignments will help you synthesize knowledge from exercises, lectures, and assigned readings. An independent project will help you hone your argumentative writing and ability to conduct college-level research. This course satisfies the college’s W (WA) – writing as argument – general education requirement.

Other details: This course provides you with a great opportunity to leave campus and engage people and places in Minneapolis-St. Paul. This will require from you a willingness to explore the city by bus, bike, foot, and train. It will also require a solid work ethic to complete the field study exercises in a timely fashion. You will be rewarded with foundational knowledge of St. Paul and the greater Twin Cities region that you will draw upon throughout your career at Macalester. I am excited to have a residential first year course, and I look forward to working with a curious and dynamic group this fall.


GEOG 250-01

Race, Place and Space

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 213
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 250-01*

In this discussion-based course we focus on the racialized places of U.S. cities, rural towns and suburbs in an effort to understand how social, historic, and spatial forces have colluded to bring about complex and enduring racial formations. We will look for race and related social categories in places around St. Paul and Minneapolis. By engaging theories about visuality and representation, urban development and suburban sprawl, and social movements for racial justice, we will develop a specialized vocabulary for explaining how race, place, and space are connected. This course requires prior exposure to at least one of the following areas: American Studies, human geography, sociology of race/ethnicity, or urban studies. (4 credits)


GEOG 261-01

Geography of World Urbanization

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: We now live in a world where the majority of the population already lives in cities. And yet every year, hundreds of millions of people continue to move into cities to pursue a better future. The contemporary social, economic, and political changes are intrinsically linked to divergent urban processes across the world. This paramount shift poses important theoretical and empirical questions to our age. This course uses the critical perspective of “global urbanism” to both contextualize and connect different urban experiences across places. We will introduce various urban settings and demonstrate how complex relations between urbanization, globalization, and economic development produce spatial unevenness and social inequality. We will study the dominant paradigm of world and global cities, which prioritizes development trajectories of cities in the global North, and discuss contesting views focusing on “ordinary cities” from the global South. Drawing on case studies in the developed and less-developed world, we will also learn how to apply the relational comparative urbanism approach as well as regionally-based theoretical perspectives to comprehend the diverse urban landscapes around the globe.

GEOG 262-01

Metro Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Laura Smith

Notes: This course discusses the foundations of American urban life and metropolitan development today, and examines how and why urban housing markets operate as they do within American metropolitan regions. Topics covered in the course include: the metropolitan economy, land use patterns, urban housing supply and demand, the geography of urban housing markets, suburbanization, transportation, and public policy debates. By the end of the course, students will have mastered some of the methods used to describe metropolitan organization and change, and be able to analyze how changes in the economy and society relate to metropolitan land use. Fall semester. (4 credits)

GEOG 377-01

Qualitative Research Methods: Cultural Asset Mapping in St. Paul's Midway Neighborhood

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *First day attendance required* Social scientists use qualitative methods to understand the ways in which societal associations operate and how people experience, contribute to, or try to change these associations. Qualitative research methods are thus concerned with analyzing processes and experiences. This course trains students to use qualitative research methods to collect data, analyze it, draw authoritative conclusions, and observe professional research ethics. The course emphasizes how qualitative methods contribute to scientific research and how ethical treatment of research participants affects the practice of qualitative research. Above all, the course focuses on training students to conduct qualitative research that contributes to our understanding of human geographies. Students will develop these skills by engaging in a semester-long student-driven research project. Participation in this project will help you learn how to plan, prepare, and carry out a qualitative research project on a deadline.

In 2016, we will be working with the Union Park District Council in St. Paul, helping to launch and support a “cultural asset mapping” project. The Union Park district contains a number of the neighborhoods around Macalester and we will focus on a small isolate segment of the Midway neighborhood. The area is north of Interstate 94 and bounded by Prior, University, and Snelling avenues. The Union Park district council would like to know more about neighbor perceptions of the built environment especially as it relates to walkability and the potential for place-making. The District Council would like to support some improvements but wants resident input and ideas in order to work with community leaders and stakeholders. We will work in teams and as individuals to support this work through a combination of interviews, focus groups, and participant observation. We will also employ digital mapping technologies. Together, students will author a report for the Union Park District Council that documents the ways residents see their neighborhood, the cultural assets that are located therein, and the ways in which the built environment might be changed in order to support place-making efforts and improve the pedestrian experience.

HIST 294-07

We Built This City: Towns and City Life from Late Antiquity to the Later Middle Ages

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Cameron Bradley

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01* The city is a key component of modern life, but much of what we associate with urban life took shape during the Middle Ages. This course explores European cities and city life from the Roman period to the end of the Middle Ages. We will investigate how and why cities developed, how they were governed, their relationships with the hinterland and the environment, what urban living was like, and people’s perceptions of cities and urban life. Along the way, we will cover such topics as the transformations of late Roman cities during the Middle Ages, commerce and work, urban rebellions, family life, forms of entertainment, and more.

HIST 340-01

US Urban Environmental History

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 340-01; first day of attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

In the minds of many Americans, cities are places where nature is absent¿places where nature exists only in the crevices and on the margins of spaces dominated by technology, concrete, and human artifice. This course confronts this assumption directly, drawing on the scholarship from the relatively young field of urban environmental history to uncover the deep interconnections between urban America and the natural world. Among the other things, we will examine how society has drawn upon nature to build and sustain urban growth, the implications that urban growth has for transforming ecosystems both local and distant, and how social values have guided urbanites as they have built and rearranged the world around them. Using the Twin Cities has a backdrop and constant reference point, we will attempt to understand the constantly changing ways that people, cities, and nature have shaped and reshaped one another throughout American history. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 340. (4 credits)

Courses at ACTC Institutions

Students may use courses taken at other ACTC institutions towards an urban studies concentration at Macalester. The following is a list of courses that may qualify. Students must seek approval from the concentration director to determine how a course will satisfy the concentration’s requirements.

Augsburg College

  • Art 249/349 HIS 249/349 The Designed Environment
  • Economics 110 Economics of Urban Issues
  • History 225 History of the Twin Cities
  • History 316 U.S. Urban Environmental History
  • History 335 American Urban History
  • Political Science 122 Metropolitan Complex
  • Political Science 140 Social Justice in America
  • Sociology 111 Community and the Modern Metropolis
  • Sociology 381 The City and Metro-Urban Plannin

College of St. Catherine

  • Political Science 2020 State, local and urban government
  • Sociology 3860 Urban Social Problem

Hamline University

  • Political Science 3690: Politics of Urban and Metropolitan America
  • Political Science 3700: Public Administration and Public Policy
  • Sociology 3440: Urban Sociology

University of St. Thomas

  • Geography 430: Urban Geography
  • Economics 333: Regional and Urban Economics
  • History 377: History of the Twin Cities
  • Political Science: Urban and Metropolis Politics and Government
  • Sociology: Urban Sociology