Class Schedules

Fall 2015 »      Spring 2016 »     

Fall 2015 Class Schedule - updated February 8, 2016 at 11:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
AMST 250-01  Race, Place and Space
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with GEOG 250-01; first day attendance required* How do racial formations manifest in space and place? Through lecture and discussion, we will define what is spatial or “platial.” A prelude on visual culture will help us to engage the difficult practice of “looking” at race and space. Then we consider how race and racism operate at various levels of spatial scale: women’s reproductive health (Dorothy Roberts, Killing the Black Body), urban renewal (Detroit: An American Autopsy, by Charlie LeDuff), and the planet (“A Fierce Green Fire”). This is an interdisciplinary approach so prior exposure to American Studies, Urban Studies, or Environmental Studies will help ground you in this course.

AMST 300-01  Jr Civic Engagement Seminar
W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 213 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required*

ANTH 230-01  Ethnographic Interviewing
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Arjun Guneratne
 
GEOG 241-01  Urban Geography
MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Daniel Trudeau
*First day attendance required*

GEOG 250-01  Race, Place and Space
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with AMST 250-01; first day attendance required* How do racial formations manifest in space and place? Through lecture and discussion, we will define what is spatial or “platial.” A prelude on visual culture will help us to engage the difficult practice of “looking” at race and space. Then we consider how race and racism operate at various levels of spatial scale: women’s reproductive health (Dorothy Roberts, Killing the Black Body), urban renewal (Detroit: An American Autopsy, by Charlie LeDuff), and the planet (“A Fierce Green Fire”). This is an interdisciplinary approach so prior exposure to American Studies, Urban Studies, or Environmental Studies will help ground you in this course.

GEOG 261-01  Geography of World Urbanization
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 I-Chun Catherine Chang
*Appropriate for FY students* We now live in a world where the majority of the population already lives in cities. And yet every year, hundreds of millions of people continue to move into cities to pursue a better future. The contemporary social, economic, and political changes are intrinsically linked to divergent urban processes across the world. This paramount shift poses important theoretical and empirical questions to our age. This course uses the critical perspective of “global urbanism” to both contextualize and connect different urban experiences across places. We will introduce various urban settings and demonstrate how complex relations between urbanization, globalization, and economic development produce spatial unevenness and social inequality. We will study the dominant paradigm of world and global cities, which prioritizes development trajectories of cities in the global North, and discuss contesting views focusing on “ordinary cities” from the global South. Drawing on case studies in the developed and less-developed world, we will also learn how to apply the relational comparative urbanism approach as well as regionally-based theoretical perspectives to comprehend the diverse urban landscapes around the globe.

GEOG 262-01  Metro Analysis
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith
 
GEOG 377-01  Qualitative Research Methods
MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau
 
LATI 342-01  Urban Politics of Latin America
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 212 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with POLI 342-01*

POLI 342-01  Urban Politics of Latin America
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 212 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with LATI 342-01*

SOCI 190-01  Criminal Behavior / Social Control
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Erik Larson
*First Year Course only* The use of imprisonment as a form of criminal punishment is only about as old at the United States. Currently, 1 in 100 adults in the United States are in prison or jail. How should we understand the growth of this form of criminal punishment? How is it similar to other methods to react to and to attempt to control unwanted behavior? What are the social consequences of these formal institutions of social control? In this course, we examine these developments in the processes and organization of social control, paying particular attention to criminal behavior and formal, legal responses to crime. We study and evaluate sociological theories of criminal behavior to understand how social forces influence levels of crimes. We examine recent criminal justice policies in the United States and their connections to inequality, examining the processes that account for expanding criminalization. Finally, we compare the development of formal, bureaucratic systems of social control and informal methods of social control, paying attention to the social and political implications of these developments.

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Spring 2016 Class Schedule - updated February 8, 2016 at 11:00 pm

Number/Section  Title
Days Time Room Instructor
 
AMST 203-01  Politics and Inequality
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM 102 Lesley Lavery
*Cross-listed with POLI 203-01* “Democracies, and the citizenries that stand at their center, are not natural phenomena; they are made and sustained through politics and government policies can play a crucial role in this process - shaping the things publics believe and want, the ways citizens view themselves and others, and how they understand and act toward the political system.” Suzanne Mettler and Joe Soss, 2004.

How do the social programs that, when woven together, constitute the American Welfare State, contribute to the lived experiences of American citizens? The readings and assignments in this course are designed to examine this question from a policy perspective. We will examine various theoretical justifications for the policies that constitute the American approach to social welfare. We will then confront and dissect major strands of the American social safety net (looking at evolution across time and political jurisdiction) to better understand how political institutions and policy mechanisms contribute to diversity, and often, inequality, in Americans’ lived experiences (based in race, class, gender, dis/ability, region, political jurisdiction, etc.). Students will then explore and offer new approaches to meeting the needs of a diverse American citizenry.

AMST 292-01  Engaging the 21st Century City: Innovation/Inequality/Urban Dev in Twin Cities and Seattle
W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MARKIM 303 Paul Schadewald
*2 credits; permission of instructor required; cross-listed with GEOG 292-01* This course examines contemporary urban issues in the Twin Cities and Seattle, Washington, to understand the possibilities and challenges of cities in the 21st century. Seattle offers a compelling vantage point for urban learning. The Seattle region is a hub for creative neighborhood engagement programs, a thriving entrepreneurship culture, and communities that have been formed through migration and interaction with the Pacific Rim. The course will critically engage such themes as urban development and gentrification, racial and economic inequality, and the emerging landscape of innovation We will connect academic themes to specific examples from the Twin Cities and Seattle of what it means to live, work, and make positive social change in urban environments. The course meets weekly for 1 ½ hours to develop approaches for understanding urban issues, and includes a mandatory, fully-funded immersive learning experience in Seattle over Spring Break. The permission of instructor is required and all students must complete an application. Accepted students have an option of doing an additional parallel 2-credit independent study on course themes. Applications are due November 18th at 11 p.m. Applications can be found at

http://bit.ly/1NnceIv or contact the instructor.

AMST 341-01  City Life: Segregation, Integration, and Gentrification
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Daniel Trudeau
*Cross-listed with GEOG 341-01*

ANTH 230-01  Ethnographic Interviewing
MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Anna Jacobsen
 
ANTH 294-03  Urban Anthropology
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06B Anna Jacobsen
Today more than 50% of the world’s population resides in cities and the United Nations predicts that by the year 2050, 70% of the world’s population will live in cities. This means that cities might be considered among the most important locations for building an understanding of the human experience. This course examines the many ways that people around the world make urban life meaningful. We will focus on the intersections among anthropology, urban studies, social theory and human geography to explore the theoretical, social, and methodological approaches to understanding the culture(s) created in cities. Drawing on ethnographic case studies from cities around the world, we will explore issues pertaining to race and ethnicity, gender, youth, poverty, diversity and “super-diversity,” gentrification, urbanization, and illusions and realities of modernity. Prerequisite: ANTH 111 (or permission of instructor).

ASIA 294-02  Asian Cities
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 I-Chun Catherine Chang
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-03; first day attendance required* Since the last century, Asia has experienced rapid urbanization. It is now home to over half of the world’s most populated cities. By 2010, the urban population in the Asia-Pacific region has surpassed the population of the United States and the European Union combined. In this course, we will focus on cities in East, Southeast and South Asia. We will first contextualize the rapid urbanization in the region’s changing political economy, and identify urban issues that are unique to this region. We will further explore different theoretical approaches to understand Asian cities; several of them challenge mainstream urban theories rooted in the experiences of West European and North American cities. Upon the completion of this course, students will acquire substantive knowledge on contemporary trends of urban development in Asia, and develop familiarity with related ongoing theoretical debates.

EDUC 260-01  Critical Issues in Urban Education
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 215 Brian Lozenski
 
ENVI 194-01  Bicycling the Urban Landscape
R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 Margot Higgins
With an emphasis on winter cycling, this course will expand on the bicycle course offered in the 2015 fall semester. The overarching goal this course is to provide intellectual and active engagement with bicycling. This includes understanding local, national, and global trends in in bicycling, bicycle politics, and infrastructure. We will begin the semester by considering the history and politics of bicycling in relation to other forms of transit. Next, we will examine the cultural, economic, and social dimensions of bicycling, in addition to a variety of local perspectives on bicycling. What does a successful urban bike landscape look like and what have been the central obstacles that city planners and activists have faced? What is bicycle equity? Who promotes and benefits from bike improvements and why is there opposition to cycling? How can urban planners make city cycling more feasible and safe (even in Minnesota winters). This course will include guest lecturers and field trip leaders, reading responses, short essays, an introduction to research methods and final group projects. We will pay particular attention to the perceived barriers among different income levels and cultural groups that prevent people from realizing all the benefits year-round cycling can support in terms of health, happiness and equality. Students will be required to attend the Winter Cycling Congress which will be held in the Twin Cities February 2-4. Attendance is also required on several bicycle field trips that will extend beyond the regular class meeting time. Students must have clothing and bicycles that are appropriate for a variety of weather conditions.

ENVI 294-06  Introduction to Urban Ecology
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 I-Chun Catherine Chang
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with GEOG 294-01* Urban ecology is both a concept and a field of study. It focuses on interactions between human, urban ecosystems and the built environment. With over half of the world’s population now living in cities, cities have assumed a critical role in shaping local, regional and global ecologies. In this course, we will examine the distinctiveness of the interconnected urban biophysical, socio-economic, and political processes. In order to disentangle the complexity of human-environment relations in cities, we will take an interdisciplinary approach and learn theories and concepts in natural science ecology, environmental studies, geography, urban planning, sociology, and public policies. We will also apply these theories and concepts to laboratory exercises, field research, and case studies.

GEOG 292-01  Engaging the 21st Century City: Innovation/Inequality/Urban Dev in Twin Cities and Seattle
W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MARKIM 303 Paul Schadewald
*2 credits; permission of instructor required; cross-listed with AMST 292-01* This course examines contemporary urban issues in the Twin Cities and Seattle, Washington, to understand the possibilities and challenges of cities in the 21st century. Seattle offers a compelling vantage point for urban learning. The Seattle region is a hub for creative neighborhood engagement programs, a thriving entrepreneurship culture, and communities that have been formed through migration and interaction with the Pacific Rim. The course will critically engage such themes as urban development and gentrification, racial and economic inequality, and the emerging landscape of innovation We will connect academic themes to specific examples from the Twin Cities and Seattle of what it means to live, work, and make positive social change in urban environments. The course meets weekly for 1 ½ hours to develop approaches for understanding urban issues, and includes a mandatory, fully-funded immersive learning experience in Seattle over Spring Break. The permission of instructor is required and all students must complete an application. Accepted students have an option of doing an additional parallel 2-credit independent study on course themes. Applications are due November 18th at 11 p.m. Applications can be found at

http://bit.ly/1NnceIv or contact the instructor.

GEOG 294-01  Introduction to Urban Ecology
TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 I-Chun Catherine Chang
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ENVI 294-06* Urban ecology is both a concept and a field of study. It focuses on interactions between human, urban ecosystems and the built environment. With over half of the world’s population now living in cities, cities have assumed a critical role in shaping local, regional and global ecologies. In this course, we will examine the distinctiveness of the interconnected urban biophysical, socio-economic, and political processes. In order to disentangle the complexity of human-environment relations in cities, we will take an interdisciplinary approach and learn theories and concepts in natural science ecology, environmental studies, geography, urban planning, sociology, and public policies. We will also apply these theories and concepts to laboratory exercises, field research, and case studies.

GEOG 294-03  Asian Cities
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 I-Chun Catherine Chang
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ASIA 294-02* Since the last century, Asia has experienced rapid urbanization. It is now home to over half of the world’s most populated cities. By 2010, the urban population in the Asia-Pacific region has surpassed the population of the United States and the European Union combined. In this course, we will focus on cities in East, Southeast and South Asia. We will first contextualize the rapid urbanization in the region’s changing political economy, and identify urban issues that are unique to this region. We will further explore different theoretical approaches to understand Asian cities; several of them challenge mainstream urban theories rooted in the experiences of West European and North American cities. Upon the completion of this course, students will acquire substantive knowledge on contemporary trends of urban development in Asia, and develop familiarity with related ongoing theoretical debates.

GEOG 341-01  City Life: Segregation, Integration, and Gentrification
TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Daniel Trudeau
*Cross-listed with AMST 341-01*

GEOG 365-01  Urban GIS
TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 Laura Smith
*Instructor approval required*



GEOG 365-L1  Urban GIS Lab
TBA TBA CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
 
POLI 203-01  Politics and Inequality
MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM 102 Lesley Lavery
*Cross-listed with AMST 203-01* “Democracies, and the citizenries that stand at their center, are not natural phenomena; they are made and sustained through politics and government policies can play a crucial role in this process - shaping the things publics believe and want, the ways citizens view themselves and others, and how they understand and act toward the political system.” Suzanne Mettler and Joe Soss, 2004.

How do the social programs that, when woven together, constitute the American Welfare State, contribute to the lived experiences of American citizens? The readings and assignments in this course are designed to examine this question from a policy perspective. We will examine various theoretical justifications for the policies that constitute the American approach to social welfare. We will then confront and dissect major strands of the American social safety net (looking at evolution across time and political jurisdiction) to better understand how political institutions and policy mechanisms contribute to diversity, and often, inequality, in Americans’ lived experiences (based in race, class, gender, dis/ability, region, political jurisdiction, etc.). Students will then explore and offer new approaches to meeting the needs of a diverse American citizenry.

POLI 204-01  Urban Politics
MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Michael Zis
The history of American cities are peppered with political clashes, from the conflicts between machine party bosses and reformers at the turn of the century to intense struggles over police reform and downtown development plans today. This class begins with a historical approach, believing that the residual effects of America's urban past -- from the political reforms aimed to rid cities of political machines to the housing policies of the twentieth century -- reverberate in today's debates over economics, governance, and integration. After establishing this historical foundation, we move at the midpoint to studying the challenges city leaders face today; from raising revenues to pay for basic services like water, garbage, sewerage, and parks, to persistent racial and economic segregation and exacerbated inequalities, to the dominance of one-party rule, to courting business investment, upwardly mobile millennials, and affluent empty nesters into once-declining downtowns and urban districts without raising rents on longtime residents of nearby neighborhoods.

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Courses at ACTC Institutions

Students may use courses taken at other ACTC institutions towards an urban studies concentration at Macalester. The following is a list of courses that may qualify. Students must seek approval from the concentration director to determine how a course will satisfy the concentration’s requirements.

Augsburg College

  • Art 249/349 HIS 249/349 The Designed Environment
  • Economics 110 Economics of Urban Issues
  • History 225 History of the Twin Cities
  • History 316 U.S. Urban Environmental History
  • History 335 American Urban History
  • Political Science 122 Metropolitan Complex
  • Political Science 140 Social Justice in America
  • Sociology 111 Community and the Modern Metropolis
  • Sociology 381 The City and Metro-Urban Plannin

College of St. Catherine

  • Political Science 2020 State, local and urban government
  • Sociology 3860 Urban Social Problem

Hamline University

  • Political Science 3690: Politics of Urban and Metropolitan America
  • Political Science 3700: Public Administration and Public Policy
  • Sociology 3440: Urban Sociology

University of St. Thomas

  • Geography 430: Urban Geography
  • Economics 333: Regional and Urban Economics
  • History 377: History of the Twin Cities
  • Political Science: Urban and Metropolis Politics and Government
  • Sociology: Urban Sociology