Requirements for Earning Academic Credit

Students who wish to earn academic credit are required to:

  1. Complete a learning contract prior to the beginning of the internship that stipulates hours, dates of work, learning objectives, and academic outcome measures/assignments.
  2. Satisfactorily complete the contracted hours by the end of the term, to the employer’s satisfaction (the Final Evaluation includes a question about this)
  3. Satisfactorily meet the expectations of the site for work to be done, or at least effort directed towards that work.
  4. Regularly communicate with the faculty sponsor about the progress of the internship, and
  5. Submit all contracted assignments to the faculty sponsor by the end of the term.
  6. Submit all evaluations to the Internship Program office (to be passed along to the professor)

Hours requirements for earning credit The minimum number of hours worked per week at the internship site in relation to registered credits is as follows:

Fall-Spring-Summer Internships (Internships must last a minimum of a ten-week period)
4 credits = A minimum of 140 hours per semester or 10-12 hours per week
3 credits = A minimum of 105 hours per semester or 8-9 hours per week
2 credits = A minimum of 75 hours per semester or 5-7 hours per week
1 credit = A minimum of 45 hours per semester or 3-4 hours per week

January Internships (Minimum of three weeks)
2 credits = 120 hours per semester or approx. 40 hours per week
1 credit = 60 hours per semester or approx. 20 hours per week

Benefits of requiring an internship to be done for academic credit

  • In light of the Fair Labor Standards Act guidelines, making sure the internship is done as an academic class helps the host organization maintain and demonstrate its focus on the internship being a quality learning situation;
  • Students doing the work for credit are working within the structure and support of the school and a professor, and therefore tend to be more focused in what they hope to accomplish and reflective about the experience;
  • Employers report that students doing the work for credit tend to be more reliable and dedicated to the position because they are working within the structure of a class and earning credit;
  • If problems arise with the student, the employer may turn to the Internship Program Director and the professor for assistance in addressing them.