Spring 2008 Class Schedule

This is a class schedule from a previous term. View current class schedules

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Classics
Cognitive and Neuroscience Studies
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theatre and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
AMST 101-01 Explorations of Race/Racism MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 112 Jane Rhodes
*First day attendance required.*
AMST 110-01 Intro to African American St TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 214 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required.*
AMST 140-01 Black Public Intellectuals TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm HUM 215 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required.*
AMST 194-02 American Voices: Multi-Ethnic Literature and American History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Michael Cohen
*Cross-listed with ENGL 130-01; first day attendance required.*
AMST 194-03 Indian Americanness W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 214 Scott Shoemaker
Recent debates concerning American Indians as sports mascots are integrally tied to American identity. This class examines the intersections of constructions of race, gender, and nation where representations of American Indians have served to legitimate the foundations of the United States and American identity through the creation of an Indian Americanness. Beginning with constructions of American Indians in the colonial period to recent issues of representation in the realm of mascots, this course will trace the genealogy of how America has constructed and appropriated an Indian identity through cultural productions and historiography. We will study a wide array of primary documents including but not limited to: pictorial and photographic representations, novels, captivity narratives, and cinema. Investigating American Indian reactions to these constructions will further complicate the creation of Indian Americanness. No prerequisites.
AMST 194-04 American Violence II: A Cultural History TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm THEATR 204 Andrea Cremer
*Cross-listed with HIST 194-03.*
AMST 203-01 Race, Ethnicity and Politics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 250 Paru Shah
*Cross-listed with POLI 203-01.*
AMST 232-01 Immigration/Ethnicity US Hist TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MAIN 011 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with HIST 232-01.*
AMST 240-01 Race/Culture/Ethnicity in Educ M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Marceline DuBose
*Cross-listed with EDUC 240-01.*
AMST 248-01 Jim Crow TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm MAIN 002 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with HIST 248-01.*
AMST 254-01 Peoples/Cultures Native Amer TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 228 Diana Dean
*Cross-listed with ANTH 254-01.*
AMST 264-01 The Psychology of Gender TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 352 Joan Ostrove
*Cross-listed with PSYC 264-01 and WGSS 294-01.*
AMST 285-01 Asian Amer Community/Ident TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 226 Karin San Juan
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with SOCI 285-01*
AMST 294-01 Race and Ethnicity in Japan TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 110 Christopher Scott
*Cross-listed with JAPA 294-01.*
AMST 294-02 Latinos-US Imperialism MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 213 Jason Ruiz
*Cross-listed with HISP 394-01.*
AMST 294-03 Transatlantic Slave Trade MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Lynn Hudson
*Same as HIST 294-05.*
AMST 294-04 Jews in America MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 David Itzkowitz
*Cross-listed with HIST 240-01.*
AMST 300-01 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Karin San Juan
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; concurrent registration in a 2-credit internship required.*
AMST 300-01 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 215 Karin San Juan
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; concurrent registration in a 2-credit internship required.*
AMST 354-01 Blackness in the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 213 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with HMCS 354-01; first day attendance required.*
AMST 394-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 384-01 and INTL 384-01.*
AMST 394-02 Urban Social Geography W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06 Daniel Trudeau
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with GEOG 341-01.*
AMST 394-03 Race, Gender, Science TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MAIN 111 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with HIST 350-01.*
AMST 494-01 Senior Seminar: US Jews and the Media TBA TBA Clay Steinman
*Same as HMCS 488-01; first day attendance required; additional film screenings TBA.*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06 Arjun Guneratne
ANTH 111-02 Cultural Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06 Diana Dean
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 05 Arjun Guneratne
*Instructor permission required: first day attendance required.*
ANTH 254-01 Peoples/Cultures Native Amer TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 228 Diana Dean
*Cross-listed with AMST 254-01.*
ANTH 258-01 Peoples/Cultures of Africa MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Sonia Patten
ANTH 285-01 Seminar in World Ethnography M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Diana Dean
ANTH 294-01 Psychological Anthropology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez
ANTH 380-01 Adv Medical Anthropology TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 05 Sonia Patten
ANTH 394-01 Politics of Memory-Latin Amer MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm HUM 217 Olga Gonzalez
ANTH 394-02 Global Aids: History, Politics, Culture MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Scott Morgensen
*Cross listed with INTL 394-03 and WGSS 394-01.*
ANTH 490-01 Senior Seminar TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 05 Jack Weatherford
ANTH 494-01 Intro to Ethnomusicology TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MUSIC 202 Chuen-Fung Wong
*Cross-listed with MUSI 494-01.*

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ART 130-01 Drawing I TR 01:00 pm-04:15 pm ART 123 Amy Sands
*First day attendance required.*
ART 149-01 Principles of Art M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ART 113 Christopher Atkins
ART 160-01 History of Art I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ART 113 Mireille Lee
*Cross-listed with CLAS 160-01.*
ART 171-01 Japanese Art and Culture MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ART 113 Winston Kyan
*Cross-listed with ASIA 171-01; first day attendance required.*
ART 194-01 Drive-by Drawing TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm ART 136 Stanton Sears
ART 232-01 Fibers I TR 01:00 pm-04:15 pm ART 116 Ursula McCarty
ART 234-01 Painting I MW 01:10 pm-04:30 pm ART 128 Christine Willcox
*Permission of instructor required.*
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 135 Stanton Sears
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:00 pm-04:15 pm ART 119 Ruthann Godollei
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
ART 237-01 Ceramic Art I: Handbuilding TR 01:00 pm-04:15 pm ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
ART 257-01 Image in 20th Century China MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 404 Winston Kyan
*Cross-listed with ASIA 257-01; first day attendance required.*
ART 261-01 History of Art II MW 09:40 am-11:10 am ART 113 Joanna Inglot
ART 262-01 Contemporary Art MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
ART 294-01 Studies in Archaeology: Greek Vases MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Mireille Lee
*Cross-listed with CLAS 271-01.*
ART 370-01 Drawing II TR 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 123 Amy Sands
*Permission of instructor required.*
ART 371-01 Painting II MW 08:30 am-11:50 am ART 128 Christine Willcox
ART 372-01 Sculpture II TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm ART 135 Stanton Sears
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TR TBA Ruthann Godollei
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II TR 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
ART 378-01 Fibers II TR 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 116 Ursula McCarty
*First day attenance required.*
ART 394-01 The Buddhist Body MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 404 Winston Kyan
*Cross-listed with ASIA 394-02 and RELI 394-01.*

Given the importance of the 'body' as a critical term in the study of art history and religion, how does one investigate representations of the body in Buddhist art, scripture and literature? This course addresses this question by examining visual and textual representations of the human body in Buddhist sources as a site of idealization, mutilation, sacrifice and relic making, among other cultural practices. Interdisciplinary in scope, this course is neither limited to a specific tradition nor to a specific time period. Rather, it encourages students to explore individual interests in Buddhist art, practice and ritual in a seminar setting. Readings include modern theories of the body and recent scholarship on Buddhist visual and material culture. Permission of the instructor required.
ART 487-01 Art Hist Methodology Seminar TBA TBA Joanna Inglot
*First day attendance required.*
ART 488-01 Senior Seminar MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ART Ruthann Godollei
*Course will meet in the Fine Arts Lounge; first day attendance required.*

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ASIA 102-01 Elementary Chinese II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 110 Jin Stone
ASIA 102-02 Elementary Chinese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 226 Jin Stone
ASIA 102-L1 Elementary Chinese II Lab W 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 226 Pei Zhang
ASIA 102-L2 Elementary Chinese II Lab W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 Pei Zhang
ASIA 102-L3 Elementary Chinese II Lab W 02:30 pm-03:30 pm CARN 208 Pei Zhang
ASIA 124-01 Asian Religions TR 08:30 am-10:00 am MAIN 111 Erik Davis
*Cross-listed with RELI 124-01.*
ASIA 136-01 Indian Philosophies TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MAIN 002 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with PHIL 136-01.*
ASIA 171-01 Japanese Art and Culture MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ART 113 Winston Kyan
*Cross-listed with ART 171-01; first day attendance required.*
ASIA 204-01 Intermediate Chinese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 227 Patricia Anderson
ASIA 204-02 Intermediate Chinese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 Patricia Anderson
ASIA 204-L1 Intermediate Chinese II Lab R 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 Pei Zhang
ASIA 204-L2 Intermediate Chinese II Lab R 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 228 Pei Zhang
ASIA 204-L3 Intermediate Chinese II Lab R 02:30 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 170 Pei Zhang
ASIA 257-01 Image in 20th Century China MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 404 Winston Kyan
*Cross-listed with ART 257-01; first day attendance required.*
ASIA 275-01 History of Modern China TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MAIN 011 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 275-01.*
ASIA 277-01 History of Modern Japan TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MAIN 001 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 277-01.*
ASIA 278-01 War Crimes/Memory E Asia TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm MAIN 009 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 278-01.*
ASIA 294-01 20th Century Chinese Lit MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 227 Xin Yang
ASIA 394-01 Advanced Chinese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 214 Xin Yang
ASIA 394-02 The Buddhist Body MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 404 Winston Kyan
*Cross-listed with ART 394-01 and RELI 394-01..*
ASIA 394-L1 Advanced Chinese II Lab T 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 113 Pei Zhang
ASIA 394-L2 Advanced Chinese II Lab T 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 113 Pei Zhang

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
BIOL 117-01 Women, Health, Reproduction MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Elizabeth Jansen
*First day attendance required.*
BIOL 161-01 Cell/Biol I: Biotech/Society MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 350 Mary Montgomery
BIOL 161-L1 Cell/Bio I: Biotech/Socty Lab T 08:30 am-10:00 am OLRI 285 Devavani Chatterjea
BIOL 161-L2 Cell/Bio I: Biotech/Socty Lab T 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 285 Mary Montgomery
BIOL 170-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Mary Montgomery
BIOL 170-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution R 08:30 am-11:45 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
BIOL 170-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution R 08:30 am-11:45 am OLRI 273 Mary Montgomery
BIOL 170-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution R 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 273 Mary Montgomery
BIOL 170-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution R 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
BIOL 180-01 Ecology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with ENVI 180-01; first day attendance required.*
BIOL 180-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 284 Michael Anderson
*Cross-listed with ENVI 180-L1; first day attendance required.*
BIOL 180-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with ENVI 180-L1; first day attendance required.*
BIOL 180-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson
*Cross-listed with ENVI 180-L2; first day attendance required.*
BIOL 180-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with ENVI 180-L2; first day attendance required.*
BIOL 194-01 Lakes, Streams, and Rivers MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 Daniel Hornbach
*Cross-listed with ENVI 194-01; first day attendance required.*
BIOL 205-01 Cell Biology/Genetics II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Paul Overvoorde
BIOL 205-L1 Cell Biology/Genetics II Lab R 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 285 Paul Overvoorde
BIOL 205-L1 Cell Biology/Genetics II Lab R 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
BIOL 205-L1 Cell Biology/Genetics II Lab R 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 285 David Matthes
BIOL 205-L2 Cell Biology/Genetics II Lab R 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
BIOL 205-L2 Cell Biology/Genetics II Lab R 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 285 Paul Overvoorde
BIOL 205-L2 Cell Biology/Genetics II Lab R 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 285 David Matthes
BIOL 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-01.*
BIOL 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L1; first day attendance required.*
BIOL 353-01 Advanced Genetics R 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 241 Paul Overvoorde
BIOL 356-01 Cell/Molecular Neuroscience MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 David Matthes
*First day attendance required.*
BIOL 356-L1 Cell/Molecular Neurosci Lab R 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen
BIOL 358-01 Microbiology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 300 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required.*
BIOL 358-L1 Microbiology Lab T 01:00 pm-04:15 pm Steven Sundby
BIOL 361-01 Animal Diversity MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Sarah Boyer
BIOL 361-L1 Animal Diversity Lab T 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 273 Sarah Boyer
BIOL 363-01 Ornithology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
BIOL 363-L1 Ornithology Lab R 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
BIOL 394-01 Seminar in Cancer Immunology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 170 Devavani Chatterjea
The immune system plays a central role in protecting the body from danger/disintegration caused by infection and cancer though its complex role in cancer is only beginning to be understood. Recent literature has also emphasized the role of the immune system and chronic inflammation in promoting cancer. Our focus in this seminar will be on appreciating, understanding, and dissecting this 'double-edged sword' of cancer immunity. Seminar participants will read primary research reports and review articles exploring the mechanisms of immune involvement in oncogenesis, metastasis, prevention of metastasis and how such adaptive and innate mechanisms are harnessed or targeted in cancer immunotherapy. The format of our meetings will be a journal club in which every member will be expected to be prepared for and contribute to the discussion every week. Prerequisites include: BIOL205 Cell Biology & Genetics II and at least two upper division courses in molecular & cell biology, human physiology, developmental biology, biochemistry, immunology (highly recommended).
BIOL 394-03 Bioinformatics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 287 David Matthes
Bioinformatics is the exploration of molecular sequence, structure and function using online tools and databases. In this class we will learn to use some of the most powerful tools available for biologists to investigate the nature of genes and proteins. We will explore genes and proteins that no one before us has studied. We will learn to analyze and interpret the diverse forms of bioinformatic data we obtain. And we will generate and evaluate original hypotheses based on our data that can be tested in the laboratory. This is a hands-on course that will be held exclusively in the computer lab. While the class has no exams, it does require the completion of 4-6 problem sets over the course of the semester. Note, the course does *not* presume any background in computer programming, or even a particular love of computers, so details of code and algorithms will not be emphasized. Prerequisite: BIOL205 Cell Biology & Genetics II.
BIOL 473-01 Research in Immunology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 170 Devavani Chatterjea
BIOL 473-L1 Research in Immunology Lab T 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 280 Devavani Chatterjea
BIOL 486-01 Sem in Neuropharmacology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 270 Lin Aanonsen
*First day attendance required.*
BIOL 489-01 Biology Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Paul Overvoorde

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CHEM 112-01 General Chemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Paul Fischer
CHEM 112-02 General Chemistry II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 Kathryn Splan
CHEM 112-L1 General Chemistry II Lab T 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 343 Paul Fischer
*Lab fee ($6) required; first day attendance required.*
CHEM 112-L2 General Chemistry II Lab T 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 343 Stacey Stoffregen
*Lab fee ($6) required; first day attendance required.*
CHEM 112-L3 General Chemistry II Lab R 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*Lab fee ($6) required; first day attendance required.*
CHEM 112-L4 General Chemistry II Lab R 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*Lab fee ($6) required; first day attendance required.*
CHEM 212-01 Organic Chemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 150 Rebecca Hoye
CHEM 212-02 Organic Chemistry II M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 100 Ronald Brisbois
CHEM 212-L1 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 08:00 am-11:40 am OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 212-L2 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 01:00 pm-04:45 pm OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 212-L3 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:40 am OLRI 383 Stacey Stoffregen
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 212-L4 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 01:00 pm-04:45 pm OLRI 383 Stacey Stoffregen
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 222-01 Analytical Chemistry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Keith Kuwata
CHEM 222-L1 Analytical Chemistry Lab R 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 380 Robert Rossi
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Ronald Brisbois
CHEM 312-01 Physical Chemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata
CHEM 312-L1 Physical Chemistry II Lab R 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 350 Keith Kuwata
CHEM 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-01.*
CHEM 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L1; first day attendance required.*
CHEM 394-01 Organic Photochemistry MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Stacey Stoffregen
This course will cover the fundamentals of photochemical and photophysical processes and will include a survey of commonly studied functionalities. In addition, we will explore the areas of photodynamic therapy, solar energy utilization, and environmental photochemistry.

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CLAS 122-01 The Roman World TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm MAIN 010 Joseph Rife
*Cross-listed with HIST 122-01 and HMCS 122-01.*
CLAS 129-01 Greek Myths Troy to Hollywood MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 250 Andrew Overman
*Cross-listed with RELI 135-01.*
CLAS 160-01 Intro to Ancient/Medieval Art MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ART 113 Mireille Lee
*Cross-listed with ART 160-01.*
CLAS 212-01 Elementary Latin II MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 David Oosterhuis
CLAS 214-01 Elementary Arabic II TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 107 Antoine Mefleh
CLAS 214-02 Elementary Arabic II TR 08:30 am-10:00 am CARN 107 Antoine Mefleh
CLAS 230-01 Ancient/Medieval Philosophies MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Henry West
CLAS 235-01 Elementary Greek II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 235-L1 Elementary Greek II Lab T 01:00 pm-02:00 pm OLRI 300 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 271-01 Studies in Archaeology: Greek Vases MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Mireille Lee
*Cross-listed with ART 294-01.*
This course considers Greek vases as documents of ancient society. Using historiographic, stylistic, semiotic, contextual, and scientific approaches, we will discuss the production, trade, and functions of Greek vases in funerary and ritual contexts, in particular the symposium. We will discuss the development of black- and red-figure painting, and learn how to 'read' the iconography of Greek vases. Field trips include visits to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts as well as a working potters' studio.
CLAS 272-01 Studies in Classical Civilization: Age of Augustus M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 011 Beth Severy-Hoven
By analyzing specifically the period of transition between the Roman republic and empire, this course examines how new knowledge is created in the field of Classics. The first third of the course will be spent reading and discussing major sources on and contributions to the study of the Augustan period. Students will then undertake an extensive independent research project, including a series of short assignments designed to introduce the research tools available in the field and the complex stages of writing and revision. During the final weeks of class, students will serve as the editorial board for a new issue of the undergraduate journal Studies in Mediterranean Antiquity and Classics, to which they may also submit their own research for publication.
CLAS 332-01 Intermediate Latin: Poetry MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 003 Corby Kelly
CLAS 338-01 Intermediate Hebrew II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 003 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 362-01 Intermediate Greek: Poetry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Joseph Rife
CLAS 392-01 Archaeological Theory W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MAIN 001 Mireille Lee
This two-credit course will introduce students to the basic analytical approaches employed by archaeologists. We will begin with a short overview of the development of archaeology as a discipline, followed by weekly readings and discussions of different theoretical models, including processualist, Marxist, structuralist, post-structuralist, semiotic, contextual and post-processual archaeologies. Students will apply these methods to a selected site or monument in weekly writing assignments. Classical archaeology majors considering an honors thesis or capstone project are particularly encouraged to take this course.

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Cognitive and Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CNS 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with PSYC 248-01.*
CNS 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 371 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with PSYC 248-L1.*
CNS 300-01 Directed Research in CNS TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak
CNS 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
COMP 120-01 Intro to Computing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop
COMP 121-01 Intro to Scientific Program MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 245 Paul Cantrell
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Comp Sci MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Susan Fox
COMP 123-L1 Core Concepts Lab T 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 256 Susan Fox
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 258 Elizabeth Shoop
COMP 124-L1 Object-Oriented Prog Lab T 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 258 Elizabeth Shoop
COMP 240-01 Computer Systems Organization MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 247 Michael Schneider
COMP 261-01 Theory of Computation MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 247 Richard Molnar
*Cross-listed with MATH 361-01.*
COMP 365-01 Scientific Computation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Chad Topaz
*Cross-listed with MATH 365-01.*
COMP 480-01 Intro to Database Management TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar T 11:50 am-12:50 pm OLRI 241 David Bressoud
*Cross-listed with MATH 490-01.*
COMP 494-01 Bodies and Minds: AI Robotics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 247 Susan Fox

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Sarah West
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Sarah West
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 206 Paul Aslanian
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 100 Lisa Giddings
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 112 Liang Ding
ECON 225-01 Comparative Econ Systems TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 304 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with INTL 225-01.*
ECON 227-01 Adam Smith and Karl Marx MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Vasant Sukhatme
ECON 242-01 Economics of Gender TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 112 Lisa Giddings
ECON 294-01 Real Estate Finance and the US Housing Market TR 08:30 am-10:00 am CARN 304 Lee Jacobsohn
This course we will focus on all aspects of the $8 trillion U.S. mortgage finance market, the largest debt market in the world. We will explore the different roles played by market participants from the point of loan creation through to the end investor, including; investment bankers, banks, money managers, hedge funds, mortgage bankers, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, GNMA. We will investigate the various functions of the real estate finance process including; loan origination, credit underwriting, bond trading, hedging and risk management, cash flow engineering and securitization. A number of industry experts will join us as guest speakers throughout the semester. Throughout the class we will discuss the economic impact of real estate finance on the US housing market and the overall economy. At the end of the class we will discuss the current market and the events that led to the 2007 mortgage market collapse and credit market crisis.

Students will be assigned readings by the instructor related to the topics discussed in class. Students are required to find current news media articles and relate those articles to topics covered in class. There will be a number of short assignments/problem sets to reinforce concepts covered in class and the work will be reviewed in class. There will be a mid-term and final exam.
ECON 356-01 Capital Markets TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 404 Liang Ding
ECON 361-01 Intermed Microecon Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Vasant Sukhatme
ECON 371-01 Intermed Macroecon Analysis TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 309 Raymond Robertson
ECON 381-L1 Intro to Econometrics Lab R 12:00 pm-12:59 pm CARN 309 Raymond Robertson
ECON 394-01 Applied Economics TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 06 Karl Egge
This class will feature a number of guest speakers, especially Macalester alums, who will talk about their careers and current employment focusing on how their training in economics is applied to their work. Some will go through transactions or deals they were involved in, such as mergers, acquisitions, and/or diverstitures. Some will be from the nonprofit sector.
Students are required to read the Wall Street Journal, and readings that will be assigned by the professors. There will be weekly write-ups required of the students summarizing what they learned from the guest and how it is connected to economics they were taught. There will be a final paper on a research topic to be discussed - with the students working in 2-person teams. There will be one final exam. Students will be expected to participate in out-of-class lunches, dinners and/or seminars with some of the guest speakers. Course Prerequisite: Minimum of 3 courses in Economics, or permission of instuctor
ECON 394-01 Applied Economics TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 06 Paul Aslanian
This class will feature a number of guest speakers, especially Macalester alums, who will talk about their careers and current employment focusing on how their training in economics is applied to their work. Some will go through transactions or deals they were involved in, such as mergers, acquisitions, and/or diverstitures. Some will be from the nonprofit sector.
Students are required to read the Wall Street Journal, and readings that will be assigned by the professors. There will be weekly write-ups required of the students summarizing what they learned from the guest and how it is connected to economics they were taught. There will be a final paper on a research topic to be discussed - with the students working in 2-person teams. There will be one final exam. Students will be expected to participate in out-of-class lunches, dinners and/or seminars with some of the guest speakers. Course Prerequisite: Minimum of 3 courses in Economics, or permission of instuctor
ECON 424-01 Effects of Intl Competition TR 08:30 am-10:00 am CARN 305 Raymond Robertson
ECON 431-01 Public Finance MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Sarah West
ECON 490-01 Behavioral Economics TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 305 Pete Ferderer

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
EDUC 200-01 Experiences in Education M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Marceline DuBose
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01.*
EDUC 240-01 Race/Culture/Ethnicity in Educ M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Marceline DuBose
*Cross-listed with AMST 240-01.*
EDUC 280-01 Re-envisioning Educ/Democracy TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 214 Steven Jongewaard
*Cross-listed with POLI 211-01.*
EDUC 320-01 Educating Exceptional Students M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 112 Tina Kruse

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENGL 101-01 College Writing TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm CARN 204 Jennifer White
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 120-01 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Marlon James
ENGL 120-02 Intro to Creative Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Stephen Healey
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 120-03 Intro to Creative Writing TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm MAIN 011 Jeffrey Shotts
*First day attendance required.*
Poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction each have their own set of traditions and rules, but what happens when those traditions and rules are shared, blurred, and our assumptions about literary genres become upended? This course will introduce creative writing as an ongoing investigation into lyric and narrative experimentation through encounters with writing we can�t easily define at first glance.
Reading as a writer, with an eye for the details of craft, is essential to producing, evaluating, and revising your own creative writing. We will read and discuss works by contemporary authors, such as Sherman Alexie, Charles Baxter, Anne Carson, Louise Gl�ck, Robert Hass, Terrance Hayes, Denis Johnson, Jamaica Kincaid, Claudia Rankine, and many others, to examine craft decisions these authors make to create desired effects.
While reading as a writer, we will be constantly devoted to the process of writing - the first glimmer of an idea, the practical considerations of form, experimentation with structural and craft techniques, first drafts, and revision. Each writer in the class will produce weekly writing, participate in regular workshop, and turn in a revised final portfolio of poetry, creative nonfiction, fiction, and hopefully innovative pieces that resist genre definitions to challenge, move, bewilder, repulse, and intoxicate us.
ENGL 120-04 Intro to Creative Writing TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MAIN 003 Ping Wang
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 120-05 Intro to Creative Writing W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Ann Bauer
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 120-06 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Marlon James
ENGL 130-01 American Voices: Multi-Ethnic Literature and American History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Michael Cohen
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-02; first day attendance required.*


What makes a voice "American"? What are the relationships between different kinds of writing and different "American voices"? How do different literary forms enable writers to find their "voice," to tell stories about themselves and the "America" in which they live? In this course we will seek answers to these and other questions by reading a range of poems, novels, short stories, and plays that tell varying - and often contradictory - stories about the lives and experiences of people in the United States. Some of our authors will include Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Israel Zangwill, W.E.B. DuBois, James Baldwin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Lan Cao.
ENGL 136-01 Drama MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Michael Cohen
This course will provide an introduction to Western drama, from antiquity to the present. The guiding light to our course will be performance�the recognition that dramatic literature has a life beyond the script. To that end we will orient our discussions toward the theory and practice of performance, and we will seek to understand the different ways in which drama has been understood and used at different points in Western history. We will read a selection of plays from the Classical era, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will also take advantage of the rich theatrical tradition at Macalester and in the Twin Cities by attending a number of performances throughout the semester. Serves as a gateway course for the English major.
ENGL 137-01 Novel TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 170 Ayse Celikkol
*First day attendance required.*

In this course we will explore the emergence and development of the novel in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and investigate the transformations of the genre in the twentieth century. We will pay special attention to the proliferation of novelistic subgenres such as the sensation novel. Our inquiries will also focus on the ways in which literary and artistic developments such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism mark the historical trajectory of the novel. Students will read literary theory and criticism in addition to novels. They will write three formal papers and three informal response papers. The reading list includes novels by authors from the U.K., the Caribbean, the U.S., and South Africa, all writing in English in the original.
ENGL 140-01 Shakespeare TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 102 John Parker
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 260-01 Film Studies: Gangster Cinema MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 401 Casey Jarrin
*First day attendance required.*

This course will examine the genealogy of the gangster film within the United States and its adaptations in French New Wave, Japanese yakuza, and more recent British, Irish, Asian, and African contexts. We'll build a technical vocabulary for how to discuss film as an audiovisual art form (camera work, perspective, framing, editing, lighting, soundtrack), while also examining the signature visual style of particular genres that surface within the gangster film (German expressionism, film noir, detective genre, war/espionage film, Western, documentary). We'll ask: What were/are the underlying representational politics of the gangster film? Historically, how did the nationalist and/or anarchist politics of immigrant mafias become allied with the enterprise of American capitalism? How do specific films present the relationship between organized labor and organized crime? The Organization and the Family? What role has religion, particularly Roman Catholicism, played within the lived and symbolic histories of these films? How has the American gangster genre influenced -- and been influenced by -- other (inter)national cinemas? How might we understand the transnational gangster film as reflective of increasingly diasporic criminal subcultures? In addition to weekly required screenings, we'll read ~150 pages a week of film and critical theory, as well as the source texts for several films. Requirements: Journals (25%); Papers (50%); Participation/Quizzes/Presentation (25%); Weekly film screenings (day/time/location TBD). For a full description and listing of films, consult the English department website.
ENGL 268-01 Nabokov MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 216 Julia Chadaga
*Cross-listed with RUSS 268-01.*
ENGL 270-01 Literature and Sexuality TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MAIN 002 Ayse Celikkol
*First day attendance required.*

This course will examine the narration of sexuality in nineteenth- and twentieth-century British literature, with an emphasis on representations of subversion. Which literary tropes addressed the transgression of sexual codes and the undoing of gender binaries? How did literary representations of sexuality evoke gender and class identity? How did novels and poems contribute to the policing of sexuality? How did they undermine it? We will first address these questions in the historical context of the nineteenth century, examining the literary figures of the prostitute and the libertine. As we will see, despite the presumed repressiveness of Victorian society, Victorian writing created a public discourse around sexuality. We will gradually transition into the twentieth century as we discuss the legacy of aesthetes and decadents. Our discussions of twentieth-century British literature will first address the Bloomsbury group, famous for its members� rebellion against Victorian morality, and then turn to explorations of sexual otherness in the post-colonial period. This course fulfills the English major requirement of a pre-1900 British course.
ENGL 280-01 Crafts of Writing: Poetry TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MAIN 001 Ping Wang
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MAIN 010 Don Lee
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 282-01 Crafts of Writing: Nonfiction W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 011 James Dawes
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 283-01 Scriptwriting MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Peter Bognanni
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 294-01 Poetry of Environment MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Theresa Krier
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-01.*

Language does not impose order on a chaotic universe but reflects its own wildness back. Gary Snyder
In this course we'll read a wide array of poetry, along with selected creation myths, cosmologies, and essays, to consider poets� sense of what Gary Snyder famously called 'Earth Household.' What environs us? How do we find a dynamic and just principle of dwelling? How do poets evoke the vitality of sensory experience within elemental environments? How do places arouse strong emotions and attachments? How do people in today's environmental movements use poetry? Can poetry about environments teach specific guidelines for living? What are ecopoetry and ecocriticism, and how are they different from nature poetry? What do poets mean when they say that language itself is wild? How can studying poetry fuel or refine thinking about environmental justice? We'll read from a wide range of poets, including Li Po, T'ao Ch'ien, Virgil, Thomas Traherne, John Clare, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth, John Keats, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Walt Whitman, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Dylan Thomas, Lorine Niedecker, Elizabeth Bishop, A. R. Ammons, Susan Stewart, Kenneth Rexroth, Ted Hughes, Alice Oswald, Mary Oliver, Jorie Graham, Les Murray, and that familiar poet Anonymous. To focus our thinking we'll draw on prose by thinkers on dwelling like Dogen, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Dorothy Wordsworth, Gaston Bachelard, Wendell Berry, Martin Heidegger, Joanna Macy. We'll think about certain kinds of natural habitats in poetry: the woods, the river and river banks, the shore and the deep ocean. This is not a course in Creative Writing, but we'll try our hand informally at observing and evoking environments in language, a practice that can awaken and refine our own imaginations toward natural environments. This course is open to all students, with or without previous experience of poetry, with or without expertise in environmental issues. We'll learn how to read poetry, and discover what questions to ask of poetry of the natural world. We'll investigate the current state of journals and magazines that use the arts to develop a vision of environment, and we'll investigate initiatives in environmentalism and the arts in our own region. There will be a mid-term and a final; students will write essays and journal entries. This course fulfills the College's new writing requirement (the "W" requirement).
ENGL 294-02 Postcolonial Literature: Feminist Interventions TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 227 Kulvinder Arora
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-02.*
ENGL 311-01 Shakespeare: Comedy/Romance MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 304 Theresa Krier
ENGL 313-01 Renaissance Poetry TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm MAIN 111 John Parker
ENGL 341-01 20th C British Novel: Diasporic London MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Casey Jarrin
*Cross-listed with INTL 394-02.*
ENGL 342-01 Anglophone Lit: Beyond Post-Colonial MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 Marlon James
2008 is the 50th Anniversary of Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, the shot heard around the world for post-colonial literature. But in 2007, does the term still apply to the massive growth of fiction in these former colonies, most of it having very little relation to anything European, traditional, or past tense for that matter? This course will explore a few of the seminal works of post-colonial fiction but more so, recent works that depart from that era with tales of grit, urban development and decay, violence and even fantasy. This course will throw light not only on where this fiction has been but where it is now. Readings may include V.S. Naipaul's The Mimic Men, Alain Mabanckou's African Psycho, Zadie Smith's White Teeth, along with works by Chimamanda Adichie, Vikram Chandra, Oonya Kempadoo, Uzodimna Iweala, Anthony Winkler, Kiran Desai, Tony D'Souza and Chris Abani, among others.
ENGL 370-01 American Lit of Early Republic TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 301 James Dawes
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 374-01 The American Novel TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 370 James Dawes
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01 and INTL 384-01.*
ENGL 401-01 History of a Literary Genre MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Daylanne English
In this capstone course, we will investigate the rich history and the contemporary flourishing of African American detective fiction. Guided by the premise that genres emerge at certain times for identifiable reasons, we will assess the 'cultural work' being performed by murder mysteries and crime novels by authors such as Walter Mosley, Barbara Neely, and Ishmael Reed. We will develop strongly historical contexts for our investigation, reading the earliest examples of African American detective fiction by Pauline Hopkins at the turn of the 20th century, novels and short stories by authors such as Rudolph Fisher and George Schuyler during the Harlem Renaissance, and novels and short stories written in the mid-20th century by authors such as Chester Himes and Richard Wright. We will also view several film adaptations, examining the aesthetic and political shifts that can occur when a literary work is transformed via a visual/auditory medium. We will read a great deal of relevant literary and filmic criticism and theory as well. Requirements for the course include: presenting extensively on one of the books and directing class discussion of that book, writing a 1-page response to each primary reading, and writing draft and final versions of a term paper of about 20 pages. This course fulfills the capstone and U.S. writers of color requirements for English majors. Prerequisite: one 100-level English course other than English 120.
ENGL 403-01 Seminar: Whitman & Dickinson MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Michael Cohen
This seminar will study the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, the two authors most commonly represented to be the yin and yang, or the father and mother, of a distinctively 'American' poetry. Whitman is the ebullient, masculine advocate of democracy, the open road, the American landscape and the American worker. Dickinson is the reclusive, solitary lyric poet, communing with herself, a feminist visionary at odds with the religious orthodoxy and bourgeois complacency of late-nineteenth-century culture. As we shall see, however, on closer reading the apparent familiarity of these authors quickly recedes and dissolves, and they appear far stranger and more elusive when the history of their poems is laid open to view. Our work will be to understand them, to locate them in nineteenth-century culture, and to trace out their critical legacy. To that end, we will read deeply in their poems and other related writings; we will chart out the textual history of their work, from manuscript to printed book to the internet; and we will become familiar with the critical heritage that has crafted them into iconic American poets. Satisfies the majors' requirement for a course in pre-1900 U.S. literature.
ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 206 Don Lee
*First day attendance required.*

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENVI 133-01 Environmental Science MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Daniel Hornbach
*First day attendance required.*
ENVI 180-01 Ecology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 180-01; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 180-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 284 Michael Anderson
Cross-listed with BIOL 180-L1; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 180-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:30 am-11:40 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
Cross-listed with BIOL 180-L1; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 180-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson
*Cross-listed with BIOL 180-L2; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 180-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 180-L2; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 194-01 Lakes, Streams, and Rivers MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 Daniel Hornbach
*Cross-listed with BIOL 194-01; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 194-02 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 404 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 194-01.*
ENVI 194-L1 Renewable Energy Lab T 09:30 am-11:30 am OLRI 154 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 194-L1.*
ENVI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Roopali Phadke
*Cross listed with POLI 215-01; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 003 Karen Warren
*Cross-listed with PHIL 229-01.*
ENVI 235-01 Citizen Science TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with POLI 235-01; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 236-01 Consumer Nation: American Consumer Culture in the 20th Century MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 100 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with HIST 236-01 and HMCS 294-03; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 280-01 Environmental Classics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning
*Permission of department chair (Dan Hornbach) required; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 280-01 Environmental Classics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Daniel Hornbach
*Permission of department chair (Dan Hornbach) required; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 294-01 Poetry of Environment MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Theresa Krier
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-01.*
ENVI 294-02 Conservation Psychology TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 402 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with PSYC 194-01.*
ENVI 368-01 Sustain Dev/Global Future TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with INTL 368-01; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 488-01 Sr Seminar in Environmental St TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 270 Christopher Wells
*First day attendance required.*

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 213 Anne Carayon
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 102 Saloua Ben Zahra
FREN 102-L2 French II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Saloua Ben Zahra
FREN 102-L3 French II Lab R 01:00 pm-02:00 pm OLRI 150 Saloua Ben Zahra
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 102 Diane Brown
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 111-02 Accelerated French I-II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 102 Diane Brown
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Sandra Vende
FREN 111-L2 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 01:00 pm-02:00 pm HUM 212 Sandra Vende
FREN 111-L3 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 110 Sandra Vende
FREN 203-02 French III MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 Peter Vantine
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Saloua Ben Zahra
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Saloua Ben Zahra
FREN 203-L3 French III Lab T 01:00 pm-02:00 pm OLRI 170 Saloua Ben Zahra
FREN 203-L4 French III Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Saloua Ben Zahra
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 111 Jo�lle Vitiello
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-03 Text, Film and Media MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Anne Carayon
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 213 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Sandra Vende
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Saloua Ben Zahra
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Sandra Vende
FREN 204-L5 Text, Film and Media Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 Sandra Vende
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 111 Anne Carayon
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 102 Saloua Ben Zahra
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Saloua Ben Zahra
FREN 306-01 Intro to Literary Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Diane Brown
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 307-01 Contemporary French Culture MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 111 Jo�lle Vitiello
FREN 411-01 Challenges of Modernity and Literature: Violence et litt�rature MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Fran�oise Denis
*Cross-listed with HMCS 411-01.*
FREN 411-02 Challenges of Modernity/Lit MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 Fran�oise Denis
*Cross-listed with HMCS 411-02.*
FREN 494-01 Cartographic/Literary Paths MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Martine Sauret

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOG 111-01 Human Geog of Global Issues MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Ian Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 111-02 Human Geog of Global Issues MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am David Lanegran
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 107 Holly Barcus
*First day attendance required; $20 materials fee required.*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab M 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 261-01 Geog of World Urbanization MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 294-01 Geog of Environmental Hazards TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 107 Kenneth Blumenfeld
*First day attendance required.*

This course explores many dimensions of natural and human-induced hazards. We first examine the many ways in which hazards have been and can be defined, before moving into in-depth explorations of human-hazard relationships. We will discuss the simple causative mechanisms of some geological, meteorological, biological and environmental hazards, but more importantly, we will look at how population dynamics, society at large, and external factors exacerbate (or occasionally mitigate) what we know as 'risk.' We analyze several programs designed to help society cope with specific hazards, and we pay particular attention to how populations share risk unevenly. Students will have the opportunity to participate in and critique a local hazard-mitigation initiative.
GEOG 294-02 Medical Geography M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*First day attendance required.*


This course uses three theoretical approaches from geography to make sense of health-related issues. First, we consider ecological approaches to recognize ways in which human interactions with their environments can shape human health. For instance, how can deforestation or the development of irrigation schemes alter disease patterns? Second, we turn to social approaches, including political economy and recent humanist approaches, to ask how patterns of human organization affect health and health care. For instance, how do race, socioeconomic status, or political structures influence who gets sick and who stays healthy? Finally, we will investigate spatial approaches, which employ maps and spatial statistics to identify patterns across space. Two sub-themes�environmental issues and international perspectives�are emphasized throughout the course.
GEOG 294-03 Geographies of Transformation in Post-Soviet Europe MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Ian Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required.*

In the wake of Soviet collapse the geographic concept and extent of Europe is undergoing dramatic change. Merely 20 years ago the continent was split in half by ideologically opposed super powers; today it is split by an economic divide. Over the past 400 years the European map has been a mosaic of competitive nation-states; today many of these same states are attempting to forge a political union. Whereas Europe has traditionally defined itself as the epicenter of Christian faith, today Christian affiliation is on the wane and Islamic belief on the rise. And finally, after vowing "never again" to the genocidal nationalism of World War Two, the past 20-years has seen tens-of-thousands of Europeans die due to nationalist conflict. This course covers the various human geographic transitions affecting all European societies, states, and cultures since the collapse of the Iron Curtain in 1989. Topics of intense scrutiny will include: (1) the expansion and role of the European Union and NATO in post-communist Europe; (2) the geographic dimensions and tensions of contemporary migration in Europe; (3) the growth of Islam in Western Europe; (4) the geographic origins of resurgent nationalism in European states; (5) the economic and political transition of East Central European states since 1989 and 1991; and centrally, (6) the geographic roots of states' varied transformations from communism to liberal democracy. The goal of the course is to introduce students to the nuances of contemporary European geography and to illustrate the benefits of geographic perspective in understanding the myriad social issues facing modern Europe. Students will be required to read and write critically and come ready to discuss topics from a geographic perspective, as proffered during lecture.
GEOG 294-04 Cultural Politics of Sport in North American Cities M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 212 Tiffany Muller
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-03.*

Professional sports are important economic and symbolic components of many North American cities and their significance becomes visible in myriad ways: debates over stadium building and finance, resources allocated to major event proposals and planning, displays of fan identity, and the various ?and contradictory- meanings that are attached to sport in urban centers. This course will examine the relationship between sport and the city by focusing on both the practicalities of locating sport in the city [asking questions like why do city leaders care about gaining or losing professional sport teams? What are the costs and benefits of stadium building?] and the social norms and cultural politics at work within and beyond stadiums [asking questions like how do identity categories like race, class, gender, and sexuality get expressed in and through sport spaces? What is the relationship between identity, sport, and the city?] Whether you love or hate professional sports, this course will prompt you to see them in a very different light!

The course will use an interdisciplinary framework and set of materials, drawing together scholarship from urban geography and urban studies; sport sociology; and feminist, critical race, and queer theories. We will focus primarily on discussion of scholarly readings, but we will also conduct analyses of popular sources (like media representations of sport) and carry out a field study of a local sport space.
GEOG 341-01 Urban Social Geography: City Life and Landscapes W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06 Daniel Trudeau
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-02; first day attendance required.*
GEOG 364-01 GIS: Concepts/Applications MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 108 Holly Barcus
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 364-L1 GIS: Concepts/Appl Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 364-L2 GIS: Concepts/Appl Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 365-01 Adv Cartography/Urban GIS TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 108 Laura Smith
*First day attendance required; $20 materials fee required.*
GEOG 378-01 Discipline/Methods of Geog MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 Laura Smith
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 488-01 Seminar: Urban Geography Field Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 109 David Lanegran
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 488-02 Seminar: Cities of the 21st Century TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau
*First day attendance required.*

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOL 100-01 Oceanography TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 100 John Craddock
GEOL 102-01 Exploring the Solar System MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 100 Karl Wirth
GEOL 155-01 History/Evolution of Earth MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor
GEOL 155-L1 History/Evolution of Earth Lab M 07:00 pm-09:30 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 155-L2 History/Evolution of Earth Lab T 09:00 am-11:30 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 255-01 Structural Geology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock
GEOL 255-L1 Structural Geology Lab TBA TBA STAFF
GEOL 265-01 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 265-L1 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy Lab R 01:00 pm-04:00 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 294-01 Episodes in History of Life MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 187 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 302-01 Petrology and Geochemistry MWF 08:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth
GEOL 394-01 Surface and Groundwater Geol MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor
GEOL 394-L1 Surface and Groundwater Lab T 01:00 pm-04:00 pm OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor
GEOL 450-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Raymond Rogers

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GERM 102-01 Elementary German II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 212 Kiarina Kordela
GERM 102-L1 Elementary German II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 STAFF
GERM 102-L2 Elementary German II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 228 STAFF
GERM 102-L3 Elementary German II Lab T 01:00 pm-02:00 pm OLRI 150 STAFF
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Kiarina Kordela
GERM 110-L1 Accelerated Elem German Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 213 STAFF
GERM 110-L2 Accelerated Elem German Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 213 STAFF
GERM 110-L3 Accelerated Elem German Lab T 02:45 pm-03:45 pm HUM 213 STAFF
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Kiarina Kordela
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 214 STAFF
GERM 203-L2 Intermediate German I Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 212 STAFF
GERM 203-L3 Intermediate German I Lab T 02:45 pm-03:45 pm HUM 212 STAFF
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 Linda Schulte-Sasse
GERM 204-02 Intermediate German II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 214 Brigetta Abel
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 112 STAFF
GERM 204-L2 Intermediate German II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 113 STAFF
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:00 pm-02:00 pm HUM 113 STAFF
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 226 Rachael Huener
GERM 305-L1 German Through the Media Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 STAFF
GERM 305-L2 German Through the Media Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 102 STAFF
GERM 306-01 Introduction to German Studies MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 214 Rachael Huener
GERM 365-01 Modernism and Avant-Garde MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 216 Linda Schulte-Sasse
GERM 394-01 Heidegger, Gadamer, Derrida TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MAIN 009 David Martyn
*Same as PHIL 394-02; not open to first year students.*

Heidegger's philosophy of being in Being and Time presented a key challenge to modern epistemology: unlike Descartes, who saw knowledge as something a 'subject' has of an 'object,' Heidegger rejected the subject-object dichotomy, which he saw as a derivative cognitive form that masks the fundamental qualities of what it means to be in the world. Key to this new conception of being is what Heidegger calls 'understanding,' a fundamental aspect of humankind which is prior to the kind of detached, theoretical knowledge that has formed the paradigm of truth since Plato. Unlike disinterested truth, 'understanding' is pragmatic, context-bound, limited in time, and contingent. The goal of the course is first to understand what Heidegger means by 'understanding,' looking at its place in the broader context of Heidegger's philosophy of being as presented in Being and Time. We will then pursue how these ideas were applied and developed by Heidegger's student Hans-Georg Gadamer, who wrote the 20th century's most influential theory of understanding (or 'hermeneutics'), and 'here's the course's controversial thesis - by Jacques Derrida, the inventor of 'deconstruction' whose seemingly antithetical theory of language nevertheless draws explicitly on Heidegger. Discussion topics will include: How does Heidegger overcome the subject-object paradigm? What does Gadamer's hermeneutics teach us about the historical nature of language and thought? How does Derrida deconstruct the concept of the linguistic sign, and what are the consequences of his argument for our understanding of meaning?
GERM 488-01 Sr Sem: Translingual Interventions - Migration, Language, and Culture in Contemporary Germany TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 217 David Martyn
Immigrant authors and filmmakers have not just added 'diversity' to the German cultural scene, but have redefined it, earning it new international acclaim in the process. This year's senior seminar will examine the impact of such 'new Germans' on German culture, focusing on the question of 'translingualism': of what it means to write and work in a language that is not one's own, both for oneself and for the language and culture of the native 'other.' Course materials will include readings by Yoko Tawada, Wladimir Kaminer, Zafer Senocak, and Sten Nadolny, films by Fatih Akin and Werner Maria Fassbinder, newspaper articles on the 'Leitkultur-Debatte' of the 1990s, and discursive texts on the history of German linguistic identity and on the history of migration to Germany. Requirements: Participants prepare independent research projects on a topic of their choice, write a term paper, and present their work in class during the last weeks of the term. Topics may be chosen from the full range of the German Studies curriculum: literature or film, but also the political, social, or economic aspects of immigration. Prerequisites: German 306, Study Abroad, or permission of the instructor. Open to Juniors.

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 Blanca Gimeno Escudero
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 113 Elena Gandolla
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab R 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 300 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 204 Blanca Gimeno Escudero
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 216 Justin Butler
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-03 Elementary Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 214 Justin Butler
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Elena Gandolla
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-L3 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Elena Gandolla
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 404 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab F 10:00 am-11:00 am HUM 102 STAFF
HISP 110-01 Accel Beginning Spanish MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 110-L1 Accel Beginning Spanish Lab WF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 STAFF
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 110-L2 Accel Beginning Spanish Lab TBA TBA STAFF
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 111 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm THEATR 204 Blanca Gimeno Escudero
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Elena Gandolla
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 113 Elena Gandolla
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-L5 Intermediate Spanish I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 STAFF
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 215 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Cynthia Kauffeld
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-04 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 215 Laura Wasenius
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Elena Gandolla
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Elena Gandolla
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 11:00 am-12:00 pm Romina Papini
*First day attendance required. Lab meets in the Spanish House.*
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Elena Gandolla
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L7 Intermediate Spanish II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 STAFF
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 216 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 220-02 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 228 Laura Sanchez
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 220-L1 Accel Intermed Spanish II Lab TR 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 370 STAFF
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 220-L2 Accel Intermed Spanish II Lab TR 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 217 STAFF
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 220-L3 Accel Intermediate Spanish Lab TR 01:00 pm-02:00 pm STAFF
HISP 305-01 Oral and Written Expression TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 212 David Sunderland
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 305-02 Oral and Written Expression TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 111 David Sunderland
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 305-03 Oral and Written Expression MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 215 Laura Wasenius
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 228 Laura Wasenius
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required.*
HISP 307-02 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 215 Margaret Olsen
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-02; first day attendance required.*
HISP 331-01 Luso-Brazilian Voices TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 216 Leland Guyer
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 394-01 Latinos-US Imperialism MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 213 Jason Ruiz
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02.*
HISP 416-01 Building Latin Amer Identity MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 217 Margaret Olsen
HISP 423-01 Lat Amer/US Latino Theater TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 247 Gerardo Chavana
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 433-01 Translation: Theory/Practice TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 216 Leland Guyer
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 436-01 Spanish Dialectology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with LATI 436-01 and LING 436-01; first day attendance requird.*
HISP 441-01 Hispanic Film and Other Media MW 01:10 pm-03:20 pm HUM 401 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 443-01 Reality of Contemporary Spain MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Galo Gonzalez
*First day attendance required.*

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HIST 110-01 Introduction to European History: Europe Since 1789 MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Peter Weisensel
HIST 110-02 Introduction to European History: The Middle Ages MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 112 Ellen Arnold
HIST 122-01 The Roman World TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm MAIN 010 Joseph Rife
*Cross-listed with CLAS 122-01 and HMCS 122-01.*
HIST 194-01 The Dead Will Arise: African History to 1800 MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Jones Sichali
Is there such a thing as pre-colonial African history? This course explores the dynamism and complexity of African societies in the years prior to European colonial domination in the 19th century. We will examine such topics as the growth, innovation, and regional spread of material culture and ideas; the connections between trade, urbanization, and centralized state systems; the mechanisms of social hierarchy in different African communities; as well as continuity and change in the organization and expression of religious belief, including the spread of Islam and Christianity. The last part of the course will focus on the transformation of African societies as a result of the slave trades. Given the vast periodic scope and Africa being such a huge and diverse continent, the primary goal of the course is to introduce students to the major outlines of early African history whilst helping them cultivate an appreciation of Africa, its peoples, cultures, expressions, and experiences. Only with such a foundation can one fully comprehend contemporary issues on the continent. Our broad chronological narrative will be integrated with in-depth analyses of key themes that define the distinctive regional histories of Africa.
HIST 194-02 Intro to Latin America and the Caribbean MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Sharilyn Geistfeld
This course offers a general survey of Latin America and the Caribbean from the colonial period to the contemporary era. We will use a multimedia, interdisciplinary approach to focus on legacies of European colonialism, dictatorships, democratization and contemporary social movements that are critical to understanding the emergence and diversity of the people and nations of Latin America and the Caribbean. This course introduces you to interpretations in historical literature, different traditions of theory, and case studies to provide you with tools to better understand and evaluate sources about present day Latin America and the Caribbean.
HIST 194-03 American Violence 2: A Cultural History of Warfare from the Early Republic to the Civil War TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm THEATR 204 Andrea Cremer
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-04.*
What does it mean to study war? Is the history of warfare a history of generals, strategy, and developments in military technology? Or perhaps it is the story of the common solider; that of first aid workers, nurses, and doctors; or that of populations who conquer or are conquered? This course will interrogate the way scholars study large-scale violence (a broad definition of war) between human communities. Throughout class discussions we will consider the ways in which warfare has been recorded and analyzed in the early Republic, antebellum and Civil War eras. While major political conflicts including the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War, and Civil War will be discussed, the class will also engage the meanings of violence through an investigation of intra and intercultural violence diverse American populations. The chronological focus of the course, circ. 1800-1865, permits our examination of the idea of American exceptionalism. Is there a specific form or pattern of violence or warfare that can be called 'American'? If so, does this type of violence remain present in our contemporary society? What relationship does violence have with an American identity?
HIST 232-01 Immigration/Ethnicity US Hist TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MAIN 011 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with AMST 232-01.*
HIST 236-01 Consumer Nation: American Consumer Culture in the 20th Century MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 100 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 236-01 and HMCS 294-03; first day attendance required.*
HIST 240-01 Jews in America MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 David Itzkowitz
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-04.*
HIST 248-01 Jim Crow TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm MAIN 002 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with AMST 248-01.*
HIST 275-01 History of Modern China TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MAIN 011 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 275-01.*
HIST 277-01 History of Modern Japan TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MAIN 001 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 277-01.*
HIST 278-01 War Crimes and Memory in Contemporary East Asia TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm MAIN 009 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 278-01.*
HIST 294-02 "For We Are Now Monkeys..." : Environment, History, and Social Change in Africa MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Jones Sichali
Popular images portray the African environment as a picturesque landscape waiting to be explored. Indeed, images of the Serengeti on National Geographic are a powerful symbol of the 'beckoning' African landscape. These images, however, mask a deep and complex history of both conflict and accommodation on how to manage and utilize Africa's natural resources. This course explores that history and examines how the environment has shaped social relationships and power dynamics in African societies over time. Some of the topics to be covered include struggles over water, land and oil resources; European 'green' imperialism; debates about indigenous knowledge; and conservation and social justice. Although the course spans temporal boundaries, our major emphasis will be on the colonial and post-colonial periods.
HIST 294-03 Puerto Rico and Cuba M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Sharilyn Geistfeld
This course is a comparative survey of the history of Cuba and Puerto Rico in a global context. Among the topics we will address are colonialism, slavery, plantation society, independence, socialism and revolution. We begin by focusing on indigenous peoples before 1492, European contact and conquest, Spanish colonial society and economy, and independence movements of the nineteenth century. We then examine US occupation, the Cuban Republic, "Operation Bootstrap" and the 1959 Cuban Revolution before concluding with an evaluation of contemporary Puerto Rico and Cuba. Throughout the course, our goal is to make connections between political economy, political culture, and identity politics to formulate historically-sensitive interpretations of Cuban and Puerto Rican culture and society.
HIST 294-05 Transatlantic Slave Trade MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Lynn Hudson
*Same as AMST 294-03.*

This class examines the Atlantic commerce in slaves that occurred between approximately 1400 and 1800. Among the topics we will consider are the social cost to Africa of this forced migration; the role of gender in the trade; the economic and social development of slave societies; resistance to the slave trade; and the abolitionist movement on both sides of the Atlantic. In addition to reading recent historiography, students will analyze a range of primary source material including but not limited to diaries of fugitive slaves and slave traders, and documents from the abolitionist movement.
HIST 294-06 Women and the African Diaspora MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Sharilyn Geistfeld
The creation and perpetuation of sexual and racial difference and inequality in the transAtlantic world is a dynamic historical process established and reinforced from colonial times to the present, through policies and projects of colonization, slavery, modernization and neoliberalism. We will focus on the ways these processes have contributed to the construction of gender and racial difference, and the strategies of resistance to racial discrimination and sexual oppression in countries such as Brazil, Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Venezuela and the United States.This course places transnational and US Black feminist theory at the center of our analysis and asks how well do theories and notions of race, gender and class travel across the Americas for women who are part of the transAtlantic African diaspora.
HIST 305-01 Comparative Freedom Movements TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff
HIST 330-01 Historians/Crit Race Theory W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 010 Peter Rachleff
*Permission of instructor required.*
HIST 350-01 Race, Gender, and Science TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MAIN 111 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-03.*
HIST 352-01 Modern Britain MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 David Itzkowitz
HIST 364-01 Germany from 1871 to Present MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Peter Weisensel
HIST 379-01 The Study of History W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Andrea Cremer
HIST 394-01 European Environ to 1650 MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 214 Ellen Arnold
The natural world had an amazing impact on the civilizations of Europe. This class will give you the chance to explore the connections between society, economy, war, religion, and nature during the classical period, the Middle Ages, and the Early Modern period. We will discuss a range of environments, from the Mediterranean to Scandinavia, and explore how scholars reconstruct ancient environments, how pre-modern people perceived their environments, and how interactions between different environments shaped the history of Europe. This class will assume a basic understanding of historical methods and approaches, but will not require you to have extensive knowledge of either environmental history or pre-modern history. However, students with some familiarity with either the history of Europe to 1650 or of environmental history or studies are especially encouraged to take the class.

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTL 111-01 Intro to Intl St: Lit/Global MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 David Moore
INTL 114-01 Intro to Intl St: Intl Conduct TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 404 James von Geldern
*First day attendance required.*
INTL 225-01 Comparative Econ Systems TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 304 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with ECON 225-01.*
INTL 294-01 Partition Cultures: Israel/Palestine/Middle East and Beyond MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 Smadar Lavie
Sixty years ago, Palestine/Israel and India were partitioned, and the Republic of Ireland Act was passed, all with deep national-ethnic-religious results. From a transnational comparative culture framework, this course explores partitions, pluralism, and citizenship. Considerations include spatial arrangements, family and community definitions, memory, resistance, assimilation, and border-crossing, all in the context of categories such as gender, sex, race, and religion.
INTL 317-01 Writers and Power M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Nadya Nedelsky
INTL 345-01 Adv Themes in Human Rights TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky
INTL 368-01 Sustain Dev/Global Future TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 368-01; first day attendance required.*
INTL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01 and ENGL 384-01.*
INTL 394-01 Compar Borderlands/Diasporas MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Smadar Lavie
The course will compare, in context, the Middle East, the "new" Europe (with a focus on Muslim immigration), and the US-Mexico intersection by considering borders and diasporas through the optics of culture, hybridized histories, identities, institutions, zones of contact, and travel. Important focuses will include the cultural shaping of individual and group identities, and the geopolitical constitution of "homes."
INTL 394-02 20th Century British Novel: Diasporic London MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Casey Jarrin
*Cross-listed with ENGL 341-01.*
INTL 394-03 Global AIDS: History, Politics, Culture MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Scott Morgensen
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-02 and WGSS 394-01.*
INTL 480-01 Paradigms-Global Leadership M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Ahmed Samatar
INTL 485-01 Sr Sem: Global Hatred W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
JAPA 102-01 Elementary Japanese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 110 Sachiko Dorsey
JAPA 102-02 Elementary Japanese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Sachiko Dorsey
JAPA 102-L1 Elementary Japanese II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Hideko Yamazaki
JAPA 102-L2 Elementary Japanese II Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 404 Hideko Yamazaki
JAPA 102-L3 Elementary Japanese II Lab T 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 404 Hideko Yamazaki
JAPA 204-01 Intermediate Japanese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 204-02 Intermediate Japanese II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 204-L1 Intermediate Japanese II Lab R 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 404 Hideko Yamazaki
JAPA 204-L2 Intermediate Japanese II Lab R 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 Hideko Yamazaki
JAPA 204-L3 Intermediate Japanese II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Hideko Yamazaki
JAPA 294-01 Race and Ethnicity in Japan TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 110 Christopher Scott
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-01.*
JAPA 306-01 Advanced Japanese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 306-L1 Advanced Japanese II Lab T 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 113 Hideko Yamazaki
JAPA 306-L2 Advanced Japanese II Lab W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 102 Hideko Yamazaki
JAPA 488-01 Translating Japanese TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 227 Christopher Scott

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LATI 194-01 Political Change in Latin Amer TR 10:10 am-11:40 am THEATR 204 James Bowen
LATI 294-01 Soc Movts/Democracy TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm CARN 05 James Bowen
*Cross-listed with POLI 294-01.*
LATI 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 228 Laura Wasenius
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required.*
LATI 307-02 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 215 Margaret Olsen
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-02; first day attendance required.*
LATI 436-01 Spanish Dialectology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with HISP 436-01 and LING 436-01; first day attendance required.*

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm HUM 226 Christina Esposito
*First day attendance required.*
LING 103-01 Advertising and Propaganda TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 226 John Haiman
*First day attendance required.*
LING 175-01 Sociolinguistics TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 111 Christina Esposito
*Cross-listed with SOCI 175-01; first day attendance required.*
LING 200-01 English Syntax MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 John Haiman
*First day attendance required.*
LING 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 301 Brooke Lea
*Cross-listed with PSYC 378-01.*
LING 400-01 Field Methods in Linguistics TBA TBA John Haiman
*First day attendance required.*
LING 436-01 Spanish Dialectology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with HISP 436-01 and LATI 436-01; first day attendance required.*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MATH 135-01 Applied Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Andrew Beveridge
MATH 135-02 Applied Calculus MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Chad Topaz
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud
MATH 137-01 Single Variable Calculus MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 David Ehren
MATH 137-02 Single Variable Calculus MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 A. Roberts
MATH 153-01 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Sharon Lane-Getaz
MATH 153-02 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 258 Sharon Lane-Getaz
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 Vittorio Addona
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 258 Vittorio Addona
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 A. Roberts
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 Daniel Flath
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Daniel Flath
MATH 253-01 Applied Mulitivariate Stats MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 245 Sharon Lane-Getaz
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 241 A. Roberts
MATH 355-01 Mathematical Statistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Vittorio Addona
MATH 361-01 Theory of Computation MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 247 Richard Molnar
*Cross-listed with COMP 261-01.*
MATH 365-01 Scientific Computation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Chad Topaz
*Cross-listed with COMP 365-01.*
MATH 376-01 Algebraic Structures TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 243 Andrew Beveridge
MATH 379-01 Combinatorics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 247 Richard Molnar
MATH 478-01 Complex Analysis TR 08:30 am-10:00 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud
MATH 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar T 11:50 am-12:50 pm OLRI 241 David Bressoud
*Cross-listed with COMP 490-01.*

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HMCS 110-01 Texts and Power: Foundations of Cultural Studies TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 270 Vincent Doyle
*First day attendance required.*
HMCS 114-01 News Reporting/Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 110 John Ullmann
HMCS 122-01 The Roman World TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm MAIN 010 Joseph Rife
*Cross-listed with CLAS 122-01 and HIST 122-01.*
HMCS 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture TR 01:00 pm-03:30 pm HUM 401 Clay Steinman
HMCS 247-01 Documentary Video W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 401 Vincent Doyle
*Plus mandatory screenings TBA.*

This course explores the history and theory of documentary practices in film and video: the epistemological issues and critical debates surrounding documentary attempts to depict and/or comment on �reality,� the implications of cinematic technique and style for documentary representation and function, and the place of documentary representation in social and political discourse, including nationalist propaganda. The course integrates critical readings on documentary history and theory and viewings and discussions of relevant documentary films and videos.
HMCS 256-01 Mass Culture Under Communism TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 215 James von Geldern
*Cross-listed with RUSS 256-01; first day attendance required.*
HMCS 272-01 Social Theories W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Khaldoun Samman
*Cross-listed with SOCI 272-01.*
HMCS 292-01 Activist Video Practicum W 12:00 pm-02:10 pm HUM 402 Jenny Lion
*First day attendance required.
Concurrent enrollment in HMCS 294-01, Video as Activist Medium, or instructor permission is required. 2 credits.*

This practicum class focuses on video production in the context of activist video and tactical media. Through exercises, group and individual video production projects, critique, and community involvement, we will investigate strategies for politically motivated media production. Basic video shooting, lighting, sound recording, and editing will be taught, with an emphasis on sharpening criticality and utilizing technology for maximum political or social efficacy. As their final projects, students will choose a political or social issue at any scale of local to global, and employ video as an activist strategy. No production experience is necessary. If course closes, contact the professor to waitlist.
HMCS 292-02 Experimental Video Practicum W 02:20 pm-04:30 pm HUM 402 Jenny Lion
*First day attendance required. Meets in Humanities 408. Concurrent enrollment in HMCS 294-04, Experimental Artists' Video, or instructor permission required. 2 credits.*

This practicum class focuses on video production in the context of artists' and experimental video. Through individual video production projects and extensive critique each student will develop their own individual media production proces. Basic video shooting, lighting, sound recording, and editing will be taught, with the emphasis being on developing aesthetic, analytic, critical, and conceptual acuity through an integration of practice and theory. No production experience is necessary. If course closes, contact the professor to waitlist.
HMCS 294-01 Video as Activist Medium M 01:10 pm-04:10 pm HUM 402 Jenny Lion
*First day attendance required. Course will meet in Humanities 408. This course is to be taken concurrently with HMCS 292-01, Activist Video Practicum, which is a 2-credit practicum.*
This course focuses on the rich political possibilities of video as intervention, propaganda, prank, advocacy technique, educational tool, act of witness, subversive art practice, legal or physical defense strategy, etc. We will examine the politics of access, alternative and underground means of production and distribution, and strategies for collective process. The course will trace a history of radical video, from the initial use of the Porta Pak in the 1960's through the development of video collectives, the establishment of public access television, AIDS activist video, indigenous cultural preservation efforts, culture jamming and tactical media actions, and recent web & cell developments. Coursework will include screenings, readings, writing, in-class presentations, and critique. There will be various class trips to community video organizations in the Twin Cities, and individual students are expected to undertake significant research in an issue of their choice. If course closes, contact the professor to waitlist.
HMCS 294-02 Obamamania: Race, Politics, Media MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 401 Leola Johnson
HMCS 294-03 Consumer Nation: American Consumer Culture in the 20th Century MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 100 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 236-01 and HIST 236-01; first day attendance required.*
HMCS 294-04 Experimental and Artists' Video M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 402 Jenny Lion
*First day attendance required. This course is to be taken concurrently with HMCS 292-02, Experimental Video Practicum, which is a 2-credit practicum.*

This course will integrate history, theory, and practice in a critical examination of experimental and artists' video as an art form, political tool, and social process. The course will be structured around various key issues, including portraiture and autobiography, appropriation and collage, assertions or representations of identity, the presence of the maker and reflexivity, and conceptual, feminist, performative, and structuralist approaches. Art video's relationships to experimental film, gallery and museum exhibition, and television will be considered. Coursework will include readings, screenings, writing, critique, and visual analysis. Video installation & other work not available in the classroom will be viewed in gallery & museum contexts around the Twin Cities. cIf course closes, contact the professor to waitlist.
HMCS 354-01 Blackness in the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 213 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with AMST 354-01; first day attendance required.*
HMCS 357-01 Adv Journalism: Print TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 217 Douglas Stone
HMCS 376-01 Critical Social Theory/Media TBA TBA Clay Steinman
Studies of the contributions critical social theory has made to media research oriented toward democratic communication. Class discussion evaluates the social uses of theories and probes assumptions and values embedded within them. A research paper allows each student to examine one theory or theoretical issue in detail. Prerequisite: HMCS 110 or permission of instructor.
HMCS 394-01 Gender, Sexuality, Film TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm HUM 402 Vincent Doyle
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-02.*

This course will explore a variety of critical approaches to the representation of gender and sexuality in film and video, including psychoanalytic feminist film theory and criticism, narrative analysis, ideological critique, and cultural studies of gender and sexuality in relation to race, nation, and class. How have social constructs about gender and sexuality been promulgated and/or contested in film and video within both mainstream and avant-garde contexts of cultural production? How have these constructs functioned to uphold and/or challenge other forms of social stratification or privilege? In asking these questions, we will consider a wide range of issues ranging from drag to camp to spectatorship, identity and identification, assimilation, social change, body politics, realism, and pornography. Papers emphasizing close analysis of film texts will be required. Students will have the option of either attending bi-monthly Thursday evening screenings or screening films on their own outside of class. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and previous experience with at least one of the following fields: women�s, gender, and sexuality studies, film studies, cultural studies, media studies, or permission of the instructor. Mandatory film screenings TBA.
HMCS 411-01 Challenges of Modernity/Lit MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Fran�oise Denis
*Cross-listed with FREN 411-01.*
HMCS 411-02 Challenges of Modernity/Lit MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 Fran�oise Denis
*Cross-listed with FREN 411-02.*
HMCS 488-01 Senior Seminar: US Jews and the Media TBA TBA Clay Steinman
*Same as AMST 494-01; first day attendance required; additional film screenings TBA.*

This semester's senior seminar will focus on U.S. Jews and the Media, with an emphasis on five topics: Yiddish cinema, Jews and race in Hollywood, Jews and Communists in Hollywood, feminist and queer approaches to gendered film and TV representations of Jews, and controversies over news coverage of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. Students will complete a seminar paper of independent scholarship on one of these or a related topic, applying what they have learned in other courses in their major focus, as well as present their work at a concluding mini-conference. Except insofar as they affect media representations, the course will not cover religious or Palestinian-Israeli issues. An interest in twentieth century U.S. Jewish history and media representations is essential, as there will be extensive background readings and screenings in both areas. Prerequisite: HMCS 110 (Texts and Power: Foundations of Cultural Studies), or HMCS 128 (Film Analysis and Visual Culture), or permission of instructor. Non-majors are welcome if they have taken one of the prerequisites or a comparable course that covered the semiotics of race and of cultural difference, and the relations between power and cultural discourses. In exceptional cases, students with sufficient preparation may take the seminar prior to their senior year. Students may take more than one HMCS senior seminar as long as content varies.

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MUSI 111-01 World Music TR 02:45 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 202 Chuen-Fung Wong
MUSI 112-01 Basic Musicianship MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 201 Christopher Gable
MUSI 114-01 Theory II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 201 Christopher Gable
MUSI 114-L1 Theory II Lab T 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MUSIC 201 Christopher Gable
MUSI 114-L2 Theory II Lab T 02:45 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 201 Christopher Gable
MUSI 153-01 Electronic Music MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC Janet Gilbert
MUSI 314-01 Theory IV, Contemp Theory/Lit TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MUSIC 202 Carleton Macy
MUSI 343-01 Western Music-19th Century MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 123 Mark Mazullo
MUSI 394-01 Musical Performance and Interpretation MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 202 Mark Mazullo
*First day attendance required.*


This course, intended for music majors and minors, addresses the subject of musical performance from a variety of perspectives, and within a number of musical styles and traditions, with examples drawn from Western art music, popular music, and jazz. It considers questions of ontology (what is a musical work, and what does it mean to interpret? are traditional divisions between �a piece of music� and �a musical performance� valid, and if so, in what contexts?), methodology (how do we talk about, evaluate, compare musical performances, and to what ends? what is the relationship between performance and musical analysis?), and historiography (what has been the role of performance in the writing of music histories?). It also concerns itself with the intersections between musical performance and identity in various historical contexts, and it looks at the changing role of performance in the recording process. The course is meant in part as a critical introduction to some of the ways in which the examination of performance has affected musicology (which includes the study of popular music and jazz in addition to Western art music) in recent years. In that way, it is a conceptual course. It is also meant, however, as a practical and participatory seminar for students who themselves are performers, in which what they do as musicians may be put into relief from a variety of vantage points. To that end, the course will involve a significant project tailored to individual or group interests involving a performance and/or an oral presentation. Its overall aim is to provide student with some intellectual and critical tools that will allow them more thoroughly and imaginatively to evaluate what they do as musicians.
MUSI 394-02 Orchestration TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm Cary Franklin
MUSI 494-01 Introduction to Ethnomusicology TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MUSIC 202 Chuen-Fung Wong
*Cross-listed with ANTH 494-01.*

This course introduces students to the field of ethnomusicology through its historical developments, theoretical models, and disciplinary practices. It is designed for students who are interested in cross-cultural studies of music and/or in pursuing further studies in ethnomusicology-related disciplines. Through a combination of reading, writing, and class discussion, we will examine key philosophical foundations and paradigmatic shifts in ethnomusicology. Topics include but are not limited to the early Berlin school of comparative musicology, structural-functionalist approaches, practice theory, the music-in/as-culture debate, reflexive turn, and the recent interdisciplinary frameworks of identity (gender, race/ethnicity, nationalism, etc.), transnational, and post-colonial discourses. Students will develop both ethnographic and laboratory skills in fieldwork, transcription, and musical analysis through practical research projects to be carried out in the Twin Cities. Students will also be equipped with skills of preparing and presenting scholarly findings in ethnographic disciplines. This course is aimed primarily at majors or minors of music and anthropology, but it will be relevant to other students from art/performance, humanities, and social sciences. There is no pre-requisite; rudimentary knowledge or experience in world music, performance, and/or musical analysis, however, is desirable.
MUSI 73-01 African Ensemble TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 73-01 African Ensemble TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 75-01 Macalester Choir TBA TBA Robert Peterson
MUSI 75-01 Macalester Choir TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 77-01 Mac Singers TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 77-01 Mac Singers TBA TBA Robert Peterson
MUSI 81-01 Mac Jazz Band TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 81-01 Mac Jazz Band TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 85-01 Pipe Band TBA TBA Michael Breidenbach
MUSI 85-01 Pipe Band TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 89-01 Symphony Orchestra TBA TBA Cary Franklin
MUSI 89-01 Symphony Orchestra TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 91-01 Collegium Musicum TBA TBA Carleton Macy
MUSI 91-01 Collegium Musicum TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 91-02 Wind Ensemble TBA TBA Cary Franklin
MUSI 91-02 Wind Ensemble TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 91-03 Jazz Combos TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 91-03 Jazz Combos TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 93-01 Chamber Music Ensemble TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 93-01 Chamber Music Ensemble TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 93-02 Chamber Music Ensemble TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 93-02 Chamber Music Ensemble TBA TBA Kristen Hanich
MUSI 95-01 Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
Studio instruction may be taken by any Macalester student in voice, piano, harpsichord, organ, guitar, recorder, bagpipes, standard orchestral instruments and some non-western instruments.
Studio instruction fees are currently $340 for 12 half-hour lessons per semester (fee subject to change). Macalester will pay 90% of instruction fees on the major instrument or voice for students with major or minor concentrations in music. Registration instructions and other information pertaining to private studio instruction may be obtained from Gloria Ahlers-Uecker in the Music Department (Room 105).
MUSI 95-01 Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
Studio instruction may be taken by any Macalester student in voice, piano, harpsichord, organ, guitar, recorder, bagpipes, standard orchestral instruments and some non-western instruments.
Studio instruction fees are currently $340 for 12 half-hour lessons per semester (fee subject to change). Macalester will pay 90% of instruction fees on the major instrument or voice for students with major or minor concentrations in music. Registration instructions and other information pertaining to private studio instruction may be obtained from Gloria Ahlers-Uecker in the Music Department (Room 105).
MUSI 95-02 Piano TBA TBA Barbara Brooks
MUSI 95-02 Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-03 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 95-03 Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-04 Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 95-04 Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-08 Organ TBA TBA Winston Kaehler
MUSI 95-08 Organ TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-09 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 95-09 Voice TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-10 Voice TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-10 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-11 Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 95-11 Voice TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-13 African Voice TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-13 African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-15 Electric Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-15 Electric Guitar TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-16 Classical String Bass TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-16 Classical String Bass TBA TBA Jennifer Rubin
MUSI 95-17 Acoustic Guitar TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-17 Acoustic Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson
MUSI 95-18 Acoustic Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-18 Acoustic Guitar TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-1M Trombone TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-1M Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor
MUSI 95-1W Trombone TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-1W Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor
MUSI 95-20 Jazz Improvisation TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-20 Jazz Improvisation TBA TBA Kathy Jensen
MUSI 95-21 Jazz Improvisation TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-21 Jazz Improvisation TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 95-22 Violin TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-24 Viola TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 95-24 Viola TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-26 Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 95-27 String Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-27 String Bass TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-29 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 95-29 Flute TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-30 African Flute TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-30 African Flute TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-31 Oboe TBA TBA Jennifer Loupe
MUSI 95-31 Oboe TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 95-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-34 Bassoon TBA TBA Carole Smith
MUSI 95-34 Bassoon TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-37 French Horn TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-37 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen
MUSI 95-38 Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor
MUSI 95-38 Trombone TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-42 African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-42 African Percussion TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-43 Jazz Drumming TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 95-43 Jazz Drumming TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-44 Sitar TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-44 Sitar TBA TBA David Whetstone
MUSI 95-5M African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-5M African Percussion TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-6M Jazz Drumming TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-6M Jazz Drumming TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 95-9M Classical Saxophone TBA TBA Kristen Hanich
MUSI 95-9M Classical Saxophone TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-9W Classical Saxophone TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-9W Classical Saxophone TBA TBA Kristen Hanich
MUSI 95-C Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-C Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 95-C2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 95-C2 Flute TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-C7 Bassoon TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-C7 Bassoon TBA TBA Carole Smith
MUSI 95-CD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-CD Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-CI Voice TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-CI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-CZ String Bass TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-CZ String Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-H1 Harp TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-H1 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin
MUSI 95-HC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 95-HC Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-HD Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-HD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-HI Voice TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-HI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-M0 French Horn TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-M0 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen
MUSI 95-M2 Flute TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-M2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 95-M3 African Flute TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-M3 African Flute TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 95-MB Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 95-MB Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-MH Voice TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 95-MI Voice TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-MJ Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 95-MJ Voice TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-MU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 95-MU Violin TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-W Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 95-W Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-W2 Flute TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-W2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 95-WC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 95-WC Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-WD Piano TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-WD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-WI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-WI Voice TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-WR Flamenco Guitar TBA TBA Michael Hauser
MUSI 95-WR Flamenco Guitar TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 95-WY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 97-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 97-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 97-02 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 97-02 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Barbara Brooks
MUSI 97-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 97-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 97-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 97-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 97-05 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 97-05 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Gloria Ahlers-Uecker
MUSI 99-01 Piano Proficiency Exam TBA TBA STAFF

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHIL 115-01 Problems of Philosophy MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Henry West
PHIL 115-02 Problems of Philosophy TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MAIN 111 Joy Laine
PHIL 125-01 Ethics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 011 Karen Warren
PHIL 125-02 Ethics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Martin Gunderson
PHIL 125-03 Ethics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Martin Gunderson
PHIL 125-04 Ethics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 William Wilcox
PHIL 136-01 Indian Philosophies TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MAIN 002 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with ASIA 136-01.*
PHIL 160-01 Foundations-Political Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 Franklin Adler
*Cross-listed with POLI 160-01.*
PHIL 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 003 Karen Warren
*Cross-listed with ENVI 229-01.*
PHIL 230-01 Ancient/Medieval Philosophies MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Henry West
PHIL 294-01 Mills Utilitarianism M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Henry West
PHIL 360-01 Philosophy of Science TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 304 Janet Folina
PHIL 368-01 Feminist Philosophies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Karen Warren
PHIL 394-01 Ethical Theory MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 003 Martin Gunderson
PHIL 394-02 Heidegger, Gadamer, Derrida TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MAIN 009 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01; see description under GERM 394-01; not open to first year students.*

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm KAGIN BALLROOM Donna Edelstein
PE 04-01 Karate I MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm IHM GYM Anita Bendickson
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics MWF 04:45 pm-05:45 pm IHM GYM Vanessa Seljeskog
PE 09-01 Conditioning TR 02:45 pm-04:00 pm IHM GYM Glenn Caruso
PE 13-01 Intermediate Social Dance M 08:00 pm-09:00 pm KAGIN BALLROOM Donna Edelstein
PE 14-01 Karate II MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm IHM GYM Anita Bendickson
PE 16-01 Yoga II TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm IHM GYM Vanessa Seljeskog
PE 18-01 Pilates TR 04:30 pm-05:30 pm IHM GYM Kristine Spangard
PE 20-01 Weight Training MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm IHM GYM Ellen Thompson

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 112-01 Cosmos: Perspectives M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
*2 credits; S/NC grading only.*
PHYS 113-01 Modern Astronomy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 John Cannon
PHYS 194-01 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 404 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with ENVI 194-02.*
PHYS 194-L1 Renewable Energy Lab T 09:30 am-11:30 am OLRI 154 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with ENVI 194-L1.*
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 150 Luiz Vieira
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab R 01:30 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab R 09:15 am-11:15 am OLRI 152 STAFF
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 Luiz Vieira
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab M 02:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab T 09:15 am-11:15 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-L3 Principles of Physics II Lab T 01:30 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 348-01 Laboratory Instrumentation MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 170 James Doyle
PHYS 348-L1 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab T 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 154 James Doyle
PHYS 440-01 Observational Astronomy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 404 John Cannon
PHYS 444-01 Electromagnetic Theory II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 Luiz Vieira
PHYS 461-01 Mechanics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis
PHYS 489-01 Physics Seminar F 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 James Doyle
*1 credit; S/NC grading only.*
PHYS 494-01 General Relativity MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
POLI 100-01 US Politics TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 208 Michael Zis
POLI 120-01 International Politics TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 06 Binnur Ozkececi-Taner
POLI 140-01 Comparative Politics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 304 James Bowen
POLI 160-01 Foundations-Political Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 Franklin Adler
*Cross-listed with PHIL 160-01.*
POLI 170-01 Theories of Rhetoric MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Adrienne Christiansen
POLI 194-01 Political Change in Latin Amer TR 10:10 am-11:40 am THEATR 204 James Bowen
POLI 200-01 Women and American Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Julie Dolan
POLI 203-01 Race, Ethnicity and Politics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 250 Paru Shah
*Cross-listed with AMST 203-01.*
POLI 205-01 Policy Issues: Government and Medicine TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm MAIN 010 Michael Zis
The American health care system is an anomaly, fraught with contradictions. Its hospitals are considered among the best in handling surgical emergencies, and yet US rates of infant mortality rates and life expectancy lag behind most other rich countries. While the US ranks lower on these health indicators and others, it spends more money on health care than any other in the world. The US is also the only nation of its kind that does not have national health insurance. While it has historically rejected national health insurance as too intrusive, the government has nevertheless taken a comparatively more intrusive role in regulating reproduction and sexual behavior, tobacco and drug use, and the direction of medical research.

Next semester, we will try to understand these contradictions in American health policy and others within a historical and international context. The focus is politics, but we will also be touching on important moral, medical, and economic questions as well. The class should be of interest to anyone, from political science to pre-med students, wanting to wrestle with these issues.
POLI 207-01 US Civil Rights/Liberties MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 211-01 Re-envisioning Educ/Democracy TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 214 Steven Jongewaard
*Cross-listed with EDUC 280-01.*
POLI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 215-01; first day attendance required.*
POLI 216-01 Legislative Politics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Julie Dolan
POLI 235-01 Citizen Science TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 235-01; first day attenance required.*
POLI 241-01 The Holocaust W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 242-01 Development Politics TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 204 David Blaney
POLI 260-01 Contemporary Political Theory TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 294-01 Social Movements and Democracy TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm CARN 05 James Bowen
*Cross-listed with LATI 294-01.*

This course is designed to explore the complicated relationships between civil society and democracy. Students will study theories of civil society, social movements, democratization, and democratic breakdown. We will also look at specific cases that illustrate the promise and problems that social movements present for democracy. Among the important questions we will address are: Is there an ideal level of social mobilization? Do different types of social movements have different effects of the establishment and practice of democracy? What role does/can violence play in social mobilization? Are some types of social mobilization incompatible with democracy? What role do international actors play in the relationship between social movements and democracy? A majority of the case-study material for the course will be drawn from Latin America, but we will also study cases from other major world regions such as East Asia, the Middle East, and Africa.
POLI 294-02 Presidential Campaigns and Elections W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Julie Dolan
*Permission of instructor required.*

The course uses a combination of academic theory and focused field experiences to expose students to the complexities, inner workings and strategies employed by presidential campaigns in the United States. In particular, we will focus on the Byzantine system of state primaries and caucuses used to award presidential delegates in the United States, the complicated rules of campaign finance that govern presidential elections, the ways parties, candidates and interest groups mobilize voters, the role of the media and campaign communications, and the actual workings of the Electoral College. Each student in the course will be required to secure an internship with a presidential campaign of his or her choosing during the semester. By observing and helping campaigns prepare for the Minnesota caucuses, students will be exposed to the little understood caucus process as it takes place. Regular class meetings will provide tools to compare and contrast the academic literature on presidential elections and campaigns
POLI 320-01 Global Political Economy TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 204 David Blaney
POLI 321-01 International Security M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Andrew Latham
POLI 390-01 Civic Engagement Fellowship MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 394-01 Humanitarianism-World Politics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber
The past two decades appear to have been very successful ones for humanitarianism. Funding for humanitarianism has skyrocketed; humanitarian organizations have expanded their public support, as well as their activities; and, increasingly, humanitarian issues have found a place at the center of policy decisions. As David Rieff observed in 2002, "humanitarianism as an ideal has achieved an authority and reach that would have been inconceivable even twenty years ago." And yet it is also generally agreed - by those within and outside of the humanitarian community - that humanitarianism is in crisis. This crisis has been attributed to the growing awareness of the sometimes harmful effects of aid; the expansion of the concept of humanitarianism to include human rights, development, and peace-building; and the increasing involvement of states in humanitarian operations and the concern that this involvement has politicized the 'humanitarian space'. In this advanced-level course we will explore these and other issues in an attempt to come to grips with the nature and dilemmas of contemporary humanitarianism. Other specific topics will include the roots of humanitarianism in ideas of 'charity' and `philanthropy' and humanitarianism's historical relationship to imperial domination; the role of humanitarianism in the production of identities (`refugee,'victim'); and the role of the media, especially the visual media, in representing humanitarian crises.
POLI 394-02 The Politics of Africa TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm GDAY 306 Isaac Kamola
This course meets in George Draper Dayton Residence Hall, Room 306. James Ferguson writes that 'Africa' is a "category through which a 'world' is structured." Africa is, in other words, a complex set of lived practices which shape, limit, and bring into being particular ways of living�both on the continent and elsewhere. Following this line of thought, we will examine how 'Africa' is produced and reproduced both within the work of African and Western authors as well as within the economic relationships of colonialism, underdevelopment, and post-development. We will examine these problematics in greater depth by situating them within a number of concrete historical moments including the colonization of the Congo, apartheid South Africa, and the genocide in Rwanda. The class will conclude by examining possible ways of re-imagining Africa within the present postcolonial moment. Readings will include selected works by V.Y. Mudimbe, Franz Fanon, Mahmood Mamdani, Timothy Mitchell, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, James Ferguson, Achille Mbembe, and others.
POLI 394-03 UN: Past/Present/Future TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 402 Wendy Weber
This advanced-level course is not a standard `What is the United Nations?' course. Instead, it is a course that explores some of the key issues in contemporary world politics - issues such as authority, legitimacy, responsibility, and power - through a critical examination of the United Nations Organization. Texts for the course explore, among other things, the role of the UN Secretariat and Secretary-General in world politics, the history and inner-workings of the United Nations Development Programme, and the politics of the United Nations Security Council. Specific topics addressed in these texts range from the historical (the negotiation of the UN Charter) to the contemporary (the Iraq War, humanitarian relief, the Millennium Development Goals).
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium W 07:00 pm-09:00 pm CARN 208 Adrienne Christiansen

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Jennifer Wenner
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Mary Gustafson
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 213 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 241 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 213 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 182-01 Drugs and Society MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Eric Wiertelak
PSYC 194-01 Conservation Psychology TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm HUM 402 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02.*
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 352 Jennifer Wenner
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab R 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 354 Jennifer Wenner
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab R 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 354 Jennifer Wenner
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II TR 08:30 am-10:00 am OLRI 352 Kendrick Brown
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01.*
PSYC 240-01 Principles-Learning/Behavior TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 352 Lynda LaBounty
PSYC 240-L1 Principles-Learning/Behav Lab T 02:45 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 371 Lynda LaBounty
PSYC 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with CNS 248-01.*
PSYC 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:00 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 371 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with CNS 248-L1.*
PSYC 252-01 Distress/Dysfunction/Disorder MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 264-01 The Psychology of Gender TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 352 Joan Ostrove
*Cross-listed with AMST 264-01 and WGSS 294-01.*
PSYC 294-01 Sex, Evolution, and Behavior TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 352 Lynda LaBounty
This is a course for those interested in the biological constraints on the behavior of animals--including humans. We will survey the relatively new field of evolutionary psychology which has created quite a stir in academic circles as well as in the media. Special attention will be paid to some of the more visible and controversial writings in the field regarding sex and mating, parenting, altruism, conflict and war, dominance, and other topics. Prerequisite: Psychology 100.
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych TR 08:30 am-10:00 am OLRI 300 Joan Ostrove
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych TR 08:30 am-10:00 am OLRI 300 Brooke Lea
PSYC 374-01 Clinical and Counseling Psych TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 301 Brooke Lea
*Cross-listed with LING 378-01.*
PSYC 394-01 Developmental Psychopathology TR 08:30 am-10:00 am OLRI 270 Kristen Wiik
This course will survey theoretical and empirical literature regarding the emergence and experience of psychopathology during childhood and adolescence. Course material will emphasize the importance of understanding psychopathology within a developmental context, as well as in relation to resilience, risk factors, and protective factors. Contributions and interactions of biological, family, and sociocultural factors in the development of psychopathology in childhood will be explored. Disorders of childhood and adolescence described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) will be discussed. Theories and empirical literature regarding the etiology, developmental course, and treatment of these disorders will be examined. Prerequisites: Psychology 100, Psychology 201, and Psychology 250 or Psychology 252 or permission of instructor.
PSYC 488-01 Sr Sem: Political Psychology TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 300 Grace Deason
This seminar will explore the interdisciplinary field of political psychology. We will use theories and research from social, cognitive, and personality psychology and political science to explain aspects of politics. The course will focus on understanding the origin and nature of ordinary citizens� political attitudes, and will also examine theories of political intolerance, intergroup conflict, and other politically relevant topics. Prerequisite: Senior major or minor.

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RELI 100-01 Muslim Society/Identities MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 James Laine
RELI 121-01 New Testament M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Neil Elliott
RELI 124-01 Asian Religions TR 08:30 am-10:00 am MAIN 111 Erik Davis
*Cross-listed with ASIA 124-01.*
RELI 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 250 James Laine
*Cross-listed with CLAS 135-01.*
RELI 141-01 Non-Classical Mythology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Peter Harle
RELI 194-01 The Sacred, Sword, and Market MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Paula Cooey
RELI 194-02 The Jews and Their Messiahs MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 011 Barry Cytron
Few ideas have so shaped the development of Judaism and Jewish existence as the hope for a savior. From Jesus of Nazareth to to the Lubavitch Rebbe, there have been Jews in nearly every century who have proclaimed one of their own to be the herald of redemption, both personal and communal. In modern times, Socialism, Nazism, Zionism and orthodox fundamentalism derive their impetus from messianic visions. A survey of the ways this yearning for a new, better future has contributed to, and sometimes dominated, Jewish religious and secular life for 2500 years.
RELI 194-03 Female Ascetics in Buddhism and Christianity TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 247 Erik Davis
*Cross-listed with WGSS 194-01.*

The role of women in religious asceticism is often contradictory. Asceticism is often lauded as a male escape from the 'paradigmatically feminine' roles of reproduction and sensuality, but when these same traditions insist on a universality of potential for men and women, an opening is made for female participation in practices that reject precisely these roles. Comparing autobiographical accounts in both Christianity and Buddhism, from early historical and contemporary times, this class attempts to separate the issue of gender inclusivity in practice from the religious identification of felicity and immorality as inherently gendered.
RELI 294-01 Religion and Revolution: Case Studies W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Erik Davis
An examination of five revolutions and their religious engagements: The Diggers and the English Civil War, The Taiping Rebellion in China, Buddhism and the Cambodian Revolution, Cultural Rebirth and Resistance in Native America, and the Algerian Islamist Revolution. All participants will read one work about each example, and then will focus more deeply on the examples in group and individual work. The course intends to develop critical skills in comparing the radical social changes implied by the word revolution with the differing revolutionary impulses that are sometimes drawn from religion, and sometimes opposed to it.
RELI 348-01 Contemporary Christian Thought TR 10:10 am-11:40 am MAIN 003 Paula Cooey
RELI 394-01 The Buddhist Body MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 404 Winston Kyan
*Cross-listed with ASIA 394-02 and ART 394-01.*
RELI 469-01 Approaches to Study of Reli TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm MAIN 003 Paula Cooey

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RUSS 102-01 Elementary Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 212 Julia Chadaga
RUSS 102-L1 Elementary Russian II Lab T 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 301 STAFF
RUSS 102-L2 Elementary Russian II Lab T 02:45 pm-04:15 pm HUM 112 STAFF
RUSS 204-01 Intermediate Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 213 Gitta Hammarberg
RUSS 204-L1 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 301 STAFF
RUSS 204-L2 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 02:45 pm-04:15 pm HUM 212 STAFF
RUSS 251-01 19th C Russian Lit Translation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 Gitta Hammarberg
RUSS 256-01 Mass Culture Under Communism TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 215 James von Geldern
*Cross-listed with HMCS 256-01; first day attendance required.*
RUSS 268-01 Nabokov MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 216 Julia Chadaga
*Cross-listed with ENGL 268-01.*
RUSS 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Gitta Hammarberg

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology TR 10:10 am-11:40 am CARN 105 Mahnaz Kousha
SOCI 110-02 Introduction to Sociology TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 105 Mahnaz Kousha
SOCI 175-01 Sociolinguistics TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 111 Christina Esposito
*Cross-listed with LING 175-01; first day attendance required.*
SOCI 194-01 Sociology of Work M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 206 Deborah Smith
This course provides an introductory overview of sociological theories and empirical research in the study of work. Focusing on work in contemporary American society, the course examines the history, nature and organization of work, the social aspects and consequences of work for individual lives and a range of substantive issues, core concepts and current topics in the sociology of work. Major objectives of this course are to provide the student with an appreciation of the utility of a sociological approach with studying work, workers, and the experience of working, to deepen students' understanding of the significance of work studies, and to encourage application of the "sociological imagination" by asking students to reflect on their own work experiences and aspirations.
SOCI 210-01 Sociology of Sexuality TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm CARN 208 Deborah Smith
SOCI 210-02 Sociology of Sexuality TR 02:45 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Deborah Smith
SOCI 230-01 Affirmitive Action Policy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Terry Boychuk
The course provides an introduction to US affirmative action policies in education and employment. The first section surveys the historical development of affirmative action in public schools and universities, evaluates alternative approaches to fostering diversity in higher education, and examines the most recent Supreme Court rulings on affirmative action in college admissions. The second major focus of the course is the origins and evolution of affirmative action in employment. This latter section provides an overview of the dynamics of racial and gender discrimination in employment and how affirmative action policies have endeavored to institutionalize equality of opportunity in labor markets.
SOCI 269-01 Science and Social Inquiry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Terry Boychuk
SOCI 272-01 Social Theories W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Khaldoun Samman
*Cross-listed with HMCS 272-01.*
SOCI 285-01 Asian Amer Community/Ident TR 10:10 am-11:40 am HUM 226 Karin San Juan
SOCI 290-01 Islam and the West M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Khaldoun Samman

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Theatre and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory and Performance I. MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 3 Cheryl Brinkley
*First day attendance required.*
THDA 121-01 Beginning Dance Composition TR 10:10 am-11:40 am THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 194-01 Frames and Methods in Performance Studies TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 101 Lara Nielsen
*First day attendance required.*
THDA 235-01 Fundamentals of Scene Design TR 10:10 am-11:40 am THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser
*Materials fee ($40) required.*
THDA 242-01 Playwrighting/Textual Analysis TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm THEATR 205 Beth Cleary
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
THDA 261-01 Modern Global Performance TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm THEATR 205 Jeanne Willcoxon
THDA 294-01 Oral History Theatre Project TR 10:10 am-11:40 am OLRI 101 Lara Nielsen
*First day attendance required.*
THDA 340-01 Mask Improvisation MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Paul Herwig
*Permission of instructor required; materials fee ($15) required.*
THDA 341-01 Intermediate Dance Composition TR 10:10 am-11:40 am THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 350-01 Directing Theory/Production I MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm THEATR STUDIO Beth Cleary
*Permission of instructor required.*
THDA 475-01 Advanced Scene Design TR 10:10 am-11:40 am THEATR 206 Daniel Keyser
*Materials fee ($40) required.*
THDA 42-01 Modern Dance II TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 45-01 Modern Dance IV MW 03:45 pm-05:15 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 52-01 Ballet II MW 02:15 pm-03:45 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Stanchfield
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:30 pm-06:00 pm THEATR 6 Sharon Varosh
THDA 60-01 Dance Ensemble MW 05:30 pm-07:00 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
*Permission of instructor required.*

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
WGSS 105-01 Transnational Perspectives TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm HUM 214 Kulvinder Arora
*First day attendance required.*

This course will examine feminist struggles for anti-sexist and anti-racist politics. We will examine how various feminists have defined such struggles and how race and gender have been deployed as constructs in feminist organizing. We will examine the cultural constructs that feminists in various global contexts have used to define feminism, activist work and cultural politics. We will also examine art, literature and media which offer alternative feminist visions of culture. We will try to understand feminist politics as both specific to nations and nationalisms and also within transnational networks of communication and dialogue.
WGSS 194-01 Female Ascetics TR 01:00 pm-02:30 pm OLRI 247 Erik Davis
*Cross-listed with RELI 194-03.*
WGSS 200-01 Feminist/Queer Theories MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Scott Morgensen
*First day attendance required.*
WGSS 294-01 Psychology of Gender TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 352 Joan Ostrove
*Cross-listed with AMST 264-01 and PSYC 264-01.*
WGSS 294-02 Postcolonial Literature: Feminist Interventions TR 01:00 pm-02:20 pm HUM 227 Kulvinder Arora
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-02.*
We will begin with key texts that have been influential to the study of colonialism and post-colonial literature from the perspectives of formerly colonized cultures. We will see how feminists have innovated the study of postcolonial literature by offering analyses of gender and subalternity to understanding the history of the colonized. We will examine literature form various postcolonial sites including South Asia, South Africa, the Caribbean and the Philippines. Gender will be examined as a construct that emerges in historical contexts for specific ideological purposes. In reading both the literature and theory of post colonial cultures, we will come to an understanding of how "the empire writes back" to the historical project of colonialism.
WGSS 294-03 Cultural Politics of Sport in North American Cities M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06 Tiffany Muller
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-04.*
WGSS 394-01 Global AIDS: History, Politics, Culture MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Scott Morgensen
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-02 and INTL 394-03.*
This course investigates the cultural and political history of the AIDS pandemic, in order to ask how disease and health are produced by social processes. We first consider the history and theory of colonial medicine, social hygiene, and global public health as frameworks for the globalization of AIDS, and the discourses and policies that shape it. We then ask how people affected by HIV and AIDS have created culture and politics that respond to the conditions of their lives, including in movements that seek redress in national or transnational contexts. We conclude by studying current social contests over AIDS worldwide, even as students complete research papers that answer scholarly debates about the history, politics, and culture of global AIDS. Our readings address HIV/AIDS in a range of overlapping political and geographic areas, with particular detail in southern Africa, southeast Asia, the Caribbean, and north America (Mexico/U.S./Canada).
This book-driven, reading-intensive advanced seminar is designed for seniors and juniors in WGSS, International Studies, Anthropology, and other areas of study that link closely to HIV/AIDS.
WGSS 394-02 Gender, Sexuality, Film TR 02:45 pm-04:15 pm HUM 402 Vincent Doyle
*Cross-listed with HMCS 394-01; mandatory film screenings TBA.*
WGSS 400-01 Senior Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Scott Morgensen
*First day attendance required.*

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