Fall 2009 Class Schedule

This is a class schedule from a previous term. View current class schedules

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Classics
Cognitive and Neuroscience Studies
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theatre and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
AMST 103-01 The Problem of Race in US Social Thought and Policy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*First day attendance required; First Year Course only*
In this discussion-based and residential course, we will explore the hypothesis that 21st century racism has morphed from simple and evil formulations of bigotry and exploitation into more nefarious and decentralized systems of cultural camouflage, spatial demarcation, physical surveillance, and ideological control. Our interdisciplinary and integrative approach will employ multiple methods of inquiry and expression, including: self-reflective essays and maps; a scavenger hunt in the Twin Cities; library research; and deep, critical analysis of arguments about race/ethnicity/assimilation/multiculturalism. We will hone writing and speaking skills through highly structured assignments paired with open-ended conversations in order to discover the questions that truly matter to us. The semester will culminate with a short college-level paper directed toward the Clint Eastwood film, �Gran Torino.�
AMST 112-01 Sexuality, Race, and Nation: Intro to LGBTQ Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Corie Hammers
*Cross-listed with WGSS 110-01; First day attendance required*
AMST 194-01 American Voices MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 208 Kristin Naca
*Cross-listed with ENGL 105-01; First day attendance required*
AMST 194-02 Introduction to American Indian Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 111 Scott Shoemaker
*First day attendance required* American Indian Studies/Native American Studies as a discipline has its beginnings in American Indian activism of the 1960s and 1970s. Since then, the discipline has emerged from various other disciplines such as history, anthropology, literary studies, and art and matured into a new interdisciplinary approach and epistemological framework. In this course we will examine what American Indian Studies scholar, Clara Sue Kidwell (Choctaw), describes as the �five premises� of the discipline of American Indian Studies: 1) The relationship between people and land, 2) the inclusion and privileging of American Indian historical perspectives, 3) the inherent rights of American Indians as sovereign nations, 4) the importance of language, and 5) the link between cultural values and contemporary forms of American Indian art and expression.
AMST 200-01 Critical Methods for American Studies Research M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 112 Daniel Gilbert
*First day attendance required*
AMST 250-01 Race, Place and Space TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Daniel Gilbert
*Cross-listed with GEOG 250-01*
AMST 280-01 Re-Envisioning Education and Democracy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
Cross-listed with EDUC 280-01 and POLI 211-01; First day attendance required*
AMST 294-01 Hawai'i: American Colony MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Christine Manganaro
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-04; First day attendance required* 2009 marks the 50th anniversary of statehood for Hawai`i. This anniversary, like the history of Hawai`i itself since the turn of the twentieth century, is highly contested. This course will introduce students to the history of Kanaka Maoli, indigenous Hawaiians, and the history of encounters between Americans, Hawaiians, and Asian migrants during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will consider labor migration to the islands that profoundly altered their ethnic make-up and how, after American takeover, politics, race relations, and the status of Native Hawaiians, including laws about who counts as Native Hawaiian, have been shaped in a settler colony. We will also examine how and why Hawai`i became a state, the transformation of the islands from a plantation to a tourist economy, and how these changes affected residents based on their class, gender, ethnic group, and status as settlers or indigenous people.
AMST 294-02 Afro-Futurism in Old and New Media MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 401 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with HMCS 294-02; First day attendance required*
AMST 294-03 Hip Hop Performance: REMIX2009 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Harry Waters
*First day attendance required; Cross-listed with THDA 294-02 and HMCS 294-03.*
AMST 300-01 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MARKIM 201 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Permission of instructor required; First Day attendance required*
AMST 300-L1 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar Lb TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*First day attendance required*
AMST 310-01 Comparative Freedom Movements: The US and South Africa W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with HIST 235-01*
AMST 345-01 Race, Culture, and Ethnicity in Education M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 214 Marceline DuBose
*Cross-listed with EDUC 340-01; First day attendance required*
AMST 350-01 American Pop, Rockabilly, and Soul, 1954-64 TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 202 Mark Mazullo
*Permission of instructor required; Cross-listed with MUSI 350-01; First day attendance required*
AMST 370-01 Understanding and Confronting Racism R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 300 Kendrick Brown
*Cross-listed with PSYC 370-01*
AMST 380-01 Topics in African American Literature: The Harlem Renaissance TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with ENGL 380-01*
AMST 392-01 Critical Race Theory M 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Leola Johnson
*Course for Mellon Program students only; instructor approval required; cross-listed with HMCS 392-01; 2 credits*
AMST 394-01 Locating US Latino Studies M 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 401 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01; First day attendance required; Proficiency in Conversational Spanish required*
AMST 394-01 Locating US Latino Studies WF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 402 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01; First day attendance required; Proficiency in Conversational Spanish required*
AMST 494-01 Blackness/Politics/Media W 01:10 pm-04:00 pm HUM 401 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with HMCS 488-01; This is a capstone seminar for HMCS majors only*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Olga Gonzalez
ANTH 111-02 Cultural Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Ron Barrett
ANTH 115-01 Biological Anthropology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06B Scott Legge
ANTH 194-01 Evolutionary Anthropology: Facts, Fantasies and Frauds TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge
*First Year Course only*
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06B Dianna Shandy
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required*
ANTH 239-01 Medical Anthropology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A Ron Barrett
ANTH 253-01 Comparative Muslim Cultures MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Erin Glade
*Cross-listed with INTL 253-01*
ANTH 255-01 Peoples/Cultures Latin America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez
*Cross-listed with LATI 255-01*
ANTH 258-01 Peoples/Cultures of Africa MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Sonia Patten
ANTH 285-01 Seminar in World Ethnography MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Sonia Patten
*First Year Course only*
ANTH 362-01 Culture and Globalization W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
*Cross-listed with INTL 362-01*
ANTH 394-01 Darwin and Evolutionary Thought MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge
This course examines the influence of Charles Darwin on both the discipline of Anthropology and general scientific thought in the 20th century. It will begin with an exploration of the emergence of modern evolutionary biology, its role in society, and how it is essential to the understanding of biological anthropology. We will consider some of the work of Darwin�s predecessors, who laid the intellectual and scientific foundations that Darwin built upon. Students will also read and discuss some of the biggest debates surrounding the theory of Natural Selection, both past and present. Finally, we will look at the future of evolutionary theory in light of recent developments in molecular biology and the fossil record.
ANTH 487-01 Theory in Anthropology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ART 130-01 Drawing I TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 123 Megan Vossler
*First day attendance required*
ART 130-02 Drawing I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 123 Megan Vossler
*First day attendance required*
ART 130-03 Drawing I MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 123 Richard Barlow
ART 149-01 Intro to Visual Culture TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ART 113 Tiffany Bidler
*First day attendance required*
ART 160-01 Art of the West I: Ancient Through Medieval MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am ART 113 Lois Eliason
*Cross-listed with CLAS 160-01; First day attendance required*
ART 160-02 Art of the West I: Ancient Through Medieval MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ART 113 Lois Eliason
*Cross-listed with CLAS 160-02.*
ART 170-01 Art of the East I: China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Winston Kyan
*Cross-listed with ASIA 170-01; First day attendance required*
ART 232-01 Fiber and Material Studies I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 116 Pritika Chowdhry
*First day attendance required; $100 material fee will be charged.*
ART 234-01 Painting I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 128 Christine Willcox
*First day attendance required*
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 135 Stanton Sears
*First day attendance required*
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 119 Ruthann Godollei
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required*
ART 237-01 Ceramic Art I: Handbuilding TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required; $100 materials fee will be charged.*
ART 238-01 Ceramic Art I: Wheel Throwing TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; $100 materials fee will be charged.*
ART 252-01 Gender, Sexualities and Feminist Visual Culture MW 01:10 pm-02:40 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with WGSS 252-01*
ART 263-01 Modern Art MW 09:40 am-11:10 am ART 113 Joanna Inglot
ART 265-01 Renaissance Art MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm ART 113 Kristin Lanzoni
ART 367-01 3-D Design TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 135 Stanton Sears
*First Year Course only; First day attendance required*
ART 371-01 Painting II TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 208 Christine Willcox
*Permissions of instructor required; First day attendance required*
ART 372-01 Sculpture II TBA TBA ART 135 Stanton Sears
*First day attendance required*
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TBA TBA ART 119 Ruthann Godollei
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; $100 material fee will be charged.*
ART 378-01 Fiber and Material Studies II MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm ART 116 Pritika Chowdhry
Topic: Bodily Metaphors. Take your exploration of Fibers and material studies into new directions in this thematic studio seminar. Create fresh interpretations of the body in your work by investigating the corporeal through the material. This class offers you the opportunity to continue to further develop technical skills and push conceptual thinking. Propose projects of your own choice and take your work to the next level. In addition to intensive studio work, the class will include technical demonstrations, critiques, readings, and discussions.
ART 487-01 Art Hist Methodology Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 404 Winston Kyan
ART 490-08 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Ruthann Godollei
ART 490-09 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Pritika Chowdhry
ART 490-16 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Stanton Sears
ART 490-17 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Gary Erickson

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ASIA 101-01 Elementary Chinese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 111 Frederik Green
ASIA 101-02 Elementary Chinese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 111 Frederik Green
ASIA 101-L1 Elementary Chinese I Lab T 01:50 pm-02:50 pm HUM 227 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 101-L2 Elementary Chinese I Lab W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 227 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 101-L3 Elementary Chinese I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 111-01 Introduction to Asian Studies TR 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 010 James Laine
ASIA 124-01 Asian Religions TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 Erik Davis
*Cross-listed with RELI 124-01*
ASIA 136-01 Indian Philosophies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with PHIL 136-01*
ASIA 140-01 Intro to East Asian Civ TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 140-01; First Year Course only*
ASIA 170-01 Art of the East I: China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Winston Kyan
*Cross-listed with ART 170-01; First day attendance required*
ASIA 194-01 Goddesses and Ghosts: Images of Women in Chinese Culture and Literature MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with WGSS 194-01; First Year Course only*
ASIA 203-01 Intermediate Chinese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Xin Yang
ASIA 203-02 Intermediate Chinese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 228 Xin Yang
ASIA 203-L1 Intermediate Chinese I Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 203-L2 Intermediate Chinese I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 203-L3 Intermediate Chinese I Lab R 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 226 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 274-01 History of Traditional China TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 274-01*
ASIA 303-01 Advanced Chinese I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 111 Patricia Anderson
ASIA 303-L1 Advanced Chinese I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 303-L2 Advanced Chinese I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 407-01 Fourth Year Chinese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 227 Jin Stone

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
BIOL 116-01 Community and Global Health: Biological Paradigms MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Devavani Chatterjea
*First Year Course only; First day attendance required*
BIOL 116-L1 Community and Global Health: Biological Paradigms Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Devavani Chatterjea
*First Year Course only; First day attendance required*
BIOL 117-01 Women, Health, Reproduction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Elizabeth Jansen
*Cross-listed with WGSS 117-01; First day attendance required*
BIOL 194-01 Restoration Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with ENVI 194-02; first day attendance required* Ecological restoration is the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged, or destroyed (SER 2004). This new course will provide a broad overview of the interdisciplinary field of restoration ecology, include specific case studies of restoration efforts, and involve extensive hands-on field experiences. We will focus on using knowledge of basic ecology and ecosystem functioning to facilitate the recovery of degraded ecosystems. Topics related to the implementation of restoration projects such as assessment of reference conditions, planning and setting objectives, manipulating successional trajectories, evaluating success, legislation, and funding will be included. Additional topics will include management of introduced/exotic/invasive species, environmental design principles, and complications due to climate change. Labs will include field trips to restoration efforts in the Twin Cities area and a semester long project at Macalester�s field station, the Katherine Ordway Natural History Study Area.
BIOL 194-02 Lake, Streams, and Rivers MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Daniel Hornbach
*Cross-listed with ENVI 194-05.*
BIOL 194-L1 Restoration Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with ENVI 194-L2; First day attendance required*
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course.*
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course.*
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course.*
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Christopher Calderone
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Lin Aanonsen
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Kristina Curry Rogers
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Kristina Curry Rogers
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Kristina Curry Rogers
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; First day attendance required*
BIOL 285-02 Ecology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-02; First day attendance required; First Year Course only*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1; First day attendance required*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2; First day attendance required; First Year Course only*
BIOL 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-01*
BIOL 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L1; First day attendance required*
BIOL 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L2; First day attendance required*
BIOL 351-L3 Biochemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L3; First day attendance required*
BIOL 357-01 Immunology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Devavani Chatterjea
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 357-L1 Immunology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 277 Devavani Chatterjea
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 361-01 Animal Diversity MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Sarah Boyer
BIOL 361-L1 Animal Diversity Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Sarah Boyer
BIOL 369-01 Developmental Biology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 300 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 369-L1 Developmental Biology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 474-01 Research in Biochemistry MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 Christopher Calderone
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required*
BIOL 474-L1 Research in Biochemistry Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Christopher Calderone
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required*
BIOL 476-01 Research in Biodiversity/Evol MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 270 Sarah Boyer
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required*
BIOL 476-L1 Research Biodiversity/Evol Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 280 Sarah Boyer
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required*
BIOL 486-01 Seminar in Neuropharmacology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Lin Aanonsen
*Cross-listed with PSYC 386-01*
BIOL 489-01 Biology Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Mary Montgomery
*S/NC grading only; 1 Credit course*
BIOL 494-01 Seminar in Stem Cell Biology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 270 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required* Stem cells are cells that are capable of dividing without differentiating into a specific cell type. Sources of stem cells include embryos, adult tissues, and most recently, adult cells that have been genetically engineered back into an embryonic state. Because of the developmental plasticity or pluripotency of these cells, the biomedical field has been interested in developing methods to direct the development of stem cells into specific cell and tissue types with the longterm goal of treating or replacing diseased tissue. This course will entail extensive reading and discussion of the primary literature of stem cell research to gain some historical perspective as well as an up-to-date view of the current state of the field. Several methodologies used to generate and/or study stem cells, such as cell culturing techniques, transgenic approaches, and microarrays will be covered in some depth, as will related concepts such as cell signaling and differential gene expression. We will also read and discuss a variety of perspectives on the socio-ethical issues associated with stem cell research and its potential therapeutic applications. Three discussion/lecture hours per week. Pre-requisites: Cell Biology & Genetics II (old BIOL 205), or both Genetics (BIOL 260) and Cell Biology (BIOL 265); junior or senior standing.

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CHEM 111-01 General Chemistry I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Paul Fischer
*$12 lab fee will be charged.*
CHEM 111-02 General Chemistry I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Susan Green
*$12 lab fee will be charged; Available to new incoming freshman only*
CHEM 111-03 General Chemistry I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Thomas Varberg
*$12 lab fee will be charged.*
CHEM 111-L1 General Chemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 111-L2 General Chemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 111-L3 General Chemistry I Lab W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 111-L4 General Chemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Thomas Varberg
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 111-L5 General Chemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Robert Rossi
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 111-L6 General Chemistry I Lab W 01:10 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
CHEM 115-01 Accelerated General Chemistry MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required; Available to new incoming first year students only; $12 Lab fee will be charged.*
CHEM 115-L1 Accel General Chemistry Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 380 Keith Kuwata
*First day attendance required; available to new incoming first year students only.*
CHEM 120-01 CSI Macalester MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Ronald Brisbois
*First Year Course only*
CHEM 211-01 Organic Chemistry I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Ronald Brisbois
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L1 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Susan Green
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L2 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L3 Organic Chemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Susan Green
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L4 Organic Chemistry I Lab M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 383 Susan Green
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Thomas Varberg
* 1 Credit course*
CHEM 311-01 Thermodynamics and Kinetics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 100 Thomas Varberg
CHEM 311-L1 Thermodynamics & Kinetics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 378 Robert Rossi
CHEM 311-L2 Thermodynamics & Kinetics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 378 Thomas Varberg
CHEM 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-01*
CHEM 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L1; First day attendance required*
CHEM 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L2; First day attendance required*
CHEM 351-L3 Biochemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L3; First day attendance required*
CHEM 394-01 Environmental Chemistry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Keith Kuwata
The chemistry of the environment involves highly complicated processes in the atmosphere, in soil, and in natural waters. To allow for appropriate depth, we will focus in this course on the chemistry of the lower atmosphere. We will use the concepts and techniques of thermodynamics, kinetics, and molecular structure and bonding to explore topics such as ozone depletion, acid rain, smog, and global climate change. Class activities will include critical reading of two environmental chemistry textbooks and articles from the primary literature, lecture and discussion, problem sets, and a final paper. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211 (Organic Chemistry I) with a minimum grade of C or permission of the instructor.
CHEM 411-01 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 247 Paul Fischer
CHEM 411-L1 Adv Inorganic Chemistry Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 347 Paul Fischer
*First day attendance required*

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CLAS 111-01 Elementary Latin I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 009 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 111-L1 Elementary Latin I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 009 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 113-01 Elementary Arabic I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Antoine Mefleh
CLAS 113-02 Elementary Arabic I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Antoine Mefleh
CLAS 115-01 Elementary Greek I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Corby Kelly
CLAS 115-L1 Elementary Greek I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 101 Corby Kelly
CLAS 121-01 The Greek World TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Corby Kelly
*Cross-listed with HIST 121-01 and HMCS 121-01*
CLAS 127-01 Women, Gender & Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Beth Severy-Hoven
*Cross-listed with WGSS 127-01*
CLAS 160-01 Intro to Ancient and Medieval Art MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am ART 113 Lois Eliason
*Cross-listed with ART 160-01; First day attendance required*
CLAS 160-02 Intro to Ancient/Medieval Art MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ART 113 Lois Eliason
*Cross-listed with ART 160-02.*
CLAS 231-01 Intermediate Latin: Prose MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 237-01 Intermediate Hebrew I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 009 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 241-01 Intermediate Arabic I TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Antoine Mefleh
CLAS 261-01 Intermediate Greek: Prose TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 Andrew Overman
CLAS 272-01 Studies in Classical Civ: Ancient Literacy T 08:10 am-11:10 am LEOCTR 36 Corby Kelly
This course will investigate reading and writing in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds from a number of angles. We�ll consider (among many other topics): the 'invention' and diffusion of the alphabet in Greece and its adaptation in Italy (including the question: was the Greek alphabet created by a single man at a particular point in time for the purpose of writing down the Iliad and Odyssey?); the physical media of ancient writing and how texts were produced and circulated; how the physical media of ancient writing affected the content of the work; who was able to read and how these readers consumed their texts; how people were educated to read and write (if they were); ancient scholarship and the development of (personal and public) libraries; how ancient as well as modern thinkers treat the relationship between orality and literacy; how literacy is related to the development of Greek and Roman social institutions (e.g. banking, law); how literacy is related to the development of the human brain and cognition. We'll also consider trends in the development of literacy studies in Classics over the last twenty-five years, and how current research on literacy in other fields can be profitably applied to the ancient world (or not).
CLAS 488-01 Jr/Sr Seminar in Archaeology: Roman Ruler Cult W 10:30 am-01:00 pm Andrew Overman

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Cognitive and Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CNS 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with PSYC 180-01*
CNS 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-01*
CNS 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-L1*
CNS 300-01 Directed Research in CNS TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak
CNS 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
COMP 121-01 Introduction to Scientific Programming MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 258 Eric Theriault
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 256 Susan Fox
*First Year Course only*
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
COMP 124-L1 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
COMP 225-01 Software Design/Devpt TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop
COMP 261-01 Theory of Computation MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 247 Susan Fox
*Cross-listed with MATH 361-01*
COMP 343-01 Design of Computer Networks MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
COMP 445-01 Parallel/Dist Processing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 256 Elizabeth Shoop
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 245 Susan Fox
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 245 Shilad Sen
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ECON 108-01 Quantitative Thinking for Policy Analysis: Epidemiology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Daniel Kaplan
*Cross-listed with MATH 108-01*
ECON 110-01 Investments TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans
ECON 113-02 Financial Accounting TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 150 Jeff Evans
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Steven Dehmer
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Steven Dehmer
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Liang Ding
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Liang Ding
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 Amy Damon
*First Year Course only*
ECON 221-01 Intro to Intl Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Raymond Robertson
*First day attendance required*
ECON 221-02 Intro to Intl Economics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 304 Raymond Robertson
*First day attendance required*
ECON 231-01 Environmental Econ/Policy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Sarah West
*Cross-listed with ENVI 231-01*
ECON 256-01 Intro to Investment Banking TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Joyce Minor
ECON 294-01 Business Communications TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 101 Joyce Minor
This course is intended to help students improve their own critical communication skills and explore how those skills can be best applied in business situations. Students will polish writing skills, with sessions that focus on resumes, cover letters and everyday business communications like email. Students will learn the best practices of effective presentations and will deliver several powerpoint presentations in class. The course will use the case method to review real corporate communications issues, such as crisis management, interpersonal communications challenges, negotiation simulations and the like. This course cannot count as the 200-level elective for the major or as fulfilling the 200-level prerequisite for 300-level courses. Prerequisite: Economics 119 or Economics 113.
ECON 325-01 China, Russia and Central Europe in Transition MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with INTL 325-01*
ECON 342-01 Economics of Poverty in US TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 228 Karine Moe
ECON 361-01 Intermed Microecon Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 226 Sarah West
ECON 371-01 Intermed Macroecon Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer
ECON 371-02 Intermed Macroecon Analysis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 381-02 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 381-L1 Introduction Econometrics Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 381-L2 Introduction Econometrics Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 422-01 International Finance in Historical Perspective MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Pete Ferderer
ECON 426-01 Intl Economic Development TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 Amy Damon
ECON 442-01 Labor Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Karine Moe
ECON 444-01 Honors Seminar MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 304 Raymond Robertson
*Permission of instructor required*

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
EDUC 194-01 Motivating Learners: Theory into Practice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*First Year Course only*
EDUC 210-01 Urban Education R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Bonner Scholars only; S/NC grading only; 2 credits*
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01; First day attendance required*
EDUC 280-01 Re-Envisioning Education and Democracy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Cross-listed with AMST 280-01 and Poli 211-01; First day attendance required*
EDUC 340-01 Race, Culture and Ethnicity in Education M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 214 Marceline DuBose
*Cross-listed with AMST 345-01; First day attendance required*
EDUC 494-01 Educational Studies Seminar TR 08:00 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENGL 101-01 College Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 003 Rebecca Graham
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 101-02 College Writing MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 003 Rebecca Graham
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 105-01 American Voices MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 208 Kristin Naca
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-01; First day attendance required*
ENGL 110-01 Introduction to African American Literature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Daylanne English
*First day attendance required; First Year Course only*
ENGL 135-01 Poetry MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm THEATR 205 Neil Chudgar
ENGL 135-02 Poetry MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm LEOCTR 36 Andrew Opitz
This course will provide students with a introduction to the study of poetry in the English language, including poems in translation. We will examine the historical evolution of the poem as a flexible literary form and read a generous selection of influential poets. We will also explore the cultural politics of poetry in our world today. Where do we find and consume poems in our day-to-day lives? What is the place of poetry in the books we read, the music we listen to and the ceremonies we attend? For example, why does the government commission poets (rather than other types of writers) to solemnify national occasions such as presidential inaugurations? By working together to address these types of questions, we will gain a better understanding of poetry as both a literary development and a living cultural artifact.

Classroom time will include a mix a lecture, discussions and possible film or poetry reading screenings. Grades will be determined by course participation, short writing assignments and quizzes on key terms and literary/historical developments. There are no prerequisites for ENGL 135. Non-majors are welcome. This course fulfills the gateway requirement for English majors and the College's Writing requirement.
ENGL 137-01 Novel MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 001 Ayse Celikkol
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 137-02 Novel MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Ayse Celikkol
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-01 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 003 Peter Bognanni
*Course available only to those who will be freshmen and sophomores fall 2009; First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-02 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 003 Peter Bognanni
*Course available only to those who will be freshmen and sophomores fall 2009; First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-03 Intro to Creative Writing TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Marlon James
*First day attendance required; First Year Course only*
ENGL 150-05 Intro to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 James Dawes
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-06 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 Bradley Liening
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-07 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 002 Eric Vrooman
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 150-08 Intro to Creative Writing TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Jon Lurie
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 150-09 Intro to Creative Writing TR 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 001 Ethan Rutherford
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 194-01 Rivers, Humans and Environmental Justice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Ping Wang
*Cross-listed with PHIL 194-01 and ENVI 194-04; First day attendance required* The Minnesota, Mississippi and St. Croix Rivers converge nearby and provide the context for our class. We begin with a consideration of Native American perspectives on the three rivers. In September we plan to take a weekend canoe trip on the Minnesota River under the direction of the Healthy Nations Program of the American Indian Center. Our consideration of Native American perspectives will raise questions of ownership and property rights and lead to consideration of environmental justice as well as the environment as a human rights issue. The written work for the course will include creative writing such as poems, short stories and reflections as well as philosophical writing such as conceptual analysis and arguments for ethical and political positions related to environmental justice and human rights. There are no prerequisites.
ENGL 194-01 Rivers, Humans and Environmental Justice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Martin Gunderson
*Cross-listed with PHIL 194-01 and ENVI 194-04; First day attendance required* The Minnesota, Mississippi and St. Croix Rivers converge nearby and provide the context for our class. We begin with a consideration of Native American perspectives on the three rivers. In September we plan to take a weekend canoe trip on the Minnesota River under the direction of the Healthy Nations Program of the American Indian Center. Our consideration of Native American perspectives will raise questions of ownership and property rights and lead to consideration of environmental justice as well as the environment as a human rights issue. The written work for the course will include creative writing such as poems, short stories and reflections as well as philosophical writing such as conceptual analysis and arguments for ethical and political positions related to environmental justice and human rights. There are no prerequisites.
ENGL 200-01 Major British Writers TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 370 Theresa Krier
ENGL 205-01 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Andrew Opitz
ENGL 208-01 Literary Publishing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Jeffrey Shotts
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 220-01 18th Century British Lit MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 105 Neil Chudgar
ENGL 240-01 20th Century British Literature: Modern Apocalypse, Conrad to Rushdie TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Casey Jarrin
ENGL 269-01 Environmental Classics TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Theresa Krier
*Cross-listed with ENVI 280-01; First day attendance required*
ENGL 272-01 19th Century American Lit M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 James Dawes
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 273-01 American Literature 1900-1945 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 301 James Dawes
ENGL 280-01 Crafts of Writing: Poetry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Ping Wang
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 011 Peter Bognanni
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 282-01 Crafts of Writing: Creative Nonfiction TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Marlon James
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 282-02 Crafts of Writing: Two Models for Creative Nonfiction - Postmodernism and the Short Story TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm LEOCTR 36 David Mura
*Permission of English Professor Ping Wang required for entry into this course.*
This class will use discussions of the readings and class exercises to generate and shape student writing. In the first half we will explore texts which break down traditional narrative and use techniques such as collage and crossing genres (writers such as Susan Sontag, Kimiko Hahn, Kathy Acker, Michelle Cliff, Leslie Marmon Silko, John Cage, Sei Shonagon). We will examine the mixing of various forms which can take place in a nonfiction text�memoir, cultural analysis, history, quotations, myth, stage dialogue, film script, e-mail, news stories, lists, poetry, etc. In the second half, we will read short stories (writers such as Junot Diaz, ZZ Packer, Denis Johnson, Jumpha Lahiri, Sherman Alexie). We will take aspects of the writing from the first half of the semester and then attempt to discover and shape a nonfiction narrative. We will address how a protagonist--in either memoir or fiction�is revealed, shaped and changed through narrative. We will work on the creation of scenes as a way of defining and depicting a self or character. We will study various structures of narrative, from myth to drama to fiction to film, and the literary and psychological need for stories.
ENGL 294-01 20th Century Anglophone Women Writers TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Paige Sweet
*Cross-listed with WGSS 210-01.*
ENGL 294-02 Topics in Feminist Postcolonial or Postmodern Literature TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Paige Sweet
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-02.*
ENGL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with HMCS 367-01 and INTL 367-01*
ENGL 380-01 Topics in African American Literature: The Harlem Renaissance TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with AMST 380-01*
ENGL 386-01 From Literature to Film/Studies in Adaptation: Vietnam TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 401 Casey Jarrin
*Cross-listed with HMCS 394-02; First day attendance required*
ENGL 402-01 Seminar in British Authors: Charles Dickens M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Ayse Celikkol
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Marlon James
*First day attendance required*

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENVI 133-01 Environmental Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Louisa Bradtmiller
*First day attendance required*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Louisa Bradtmiller
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Jerald Dosch
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required*
ENVI 194-02 Restoration Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 194-01; First day attendance required*
ENVI 194-03 Water Science and Policy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with GEOL 194-02; First day attendance required; First Year Course only*
ENVI 194-03 Water Science and Policy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Kelly MacGregor
*Cross-listed with GEOL 194-02; First day attendance required; First Year Course only*
ENVI 194-04 Rivers, Human and Environmental Justice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Martin Gunderson
*Cross-listed with ENGL 194-01 and PHIL 194-01; First day attendance required*
ENVI 194-04 Rivers, Human and Environmental Justice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Ping Wang
*Cross-listed with ENGL 194-01 and PHIL 194-01; First day attendance required*
ENVI 194-05 Lakes, Streams, and Rivers MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Daniel Hornbach
*Cross-listed with BIOL 194-02.* Minnesota, the land of 10,000 lakes, is also home to numerous streams and rivers. In this course we will examine the nature of these aquatic ecosystems; exploring their ecology, geology and chemistry. We will also investigate human impacts through such practices as agriculture, urbanization and industrialization, on these important ecosystems. Students will complete projects exploring various aspects of local waterbodies, especially the Mississippi, Minnesota and St. Croix Rivers.
ENVI 194-L2 Restoration Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 194-L1; First day attendance required*
ENVI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with POLI 215-01; First day attendance required*
ENVI 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Diane Michelfelder
*Cross-listed with PHIL 229-01*
ENVI 231-01 Environmental Econ/Policy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Sarah West
*Cross-listed with ECON 231-01*
ENVI 232-01 People, Agriculture and the Environment TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with GEOG 232-01*
ENVI 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with HIST 234-01; First day attendance required*
ENVI 237-01 Environmental Justice W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with HIST 237-01; First day attendance required*
ENVI 280-01 Environmental Classics TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Theresa Krier
*Cross-listed with ENGL 269-01; First day attendance required*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; First day attendance required*
ENVI 285-02 Ecology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-02; First day attendance required; First Year Course only*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; First day attendance required*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; First day attendance required; First year Course only*
ENVI 294-01 Psychology of Sustainable Behavior TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 100 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with PSYC 294-02; First day attendance required*
ENVI 294-02 Black Death MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Ellen Arnold
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-01*
ENVI 477-01 Seminar: Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with GEOG 488-01 and INTL 477-01*
ENVI 489-01 Environmental Leadership Pract M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*4 credits; permission of instructor required; S/D/NC grading option only; concurrent registration in ENVI 490-01 required; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 490-01 Environmental Leadership Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*2 credits; permission of instructor required; concurrent registration in ENVI 489-01 required; first day attendance required.*

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
FREN 101-01 French I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 215 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-02 French I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 228 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L1 French I Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L2 French I Lab T 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 226 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L3 French I Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L4 French I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 102 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 112 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L2 French II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 226 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 112 Anne Carayon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 02:30 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 350 Sandra Vende
FREN 111-L2 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 402 Sandra Vende
FREN 194-01 Culture and Identity: Children and Youth in Francophone Cinema MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 402 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required; First Year Course only*
FREN 203-01 French III MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-02 French III MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 216 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 247 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L3 French III Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 112 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L4 French III Lab R 02:30 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 247 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 112 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am HUM 402 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 404 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 404 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L3 Advanced Expression Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Mariane Yade
FREN 306-01 Intro to Literary Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 227 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*
FREN 415-01 Literary Periods and Movements: Splendeurs et Mis�res du Si�cle de Louis XIV TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Francoise Denis
This course focuses on the study and context of French literary masterpieces in the 17th century. The reading list includes major playwrights such as Corneille, Moli�re, Racine, philosophers such as Descartes and Pascal, and other well-known writers. The course also explores the general climate of the time with authors, memoirists, letter and storywriters, artists, who contributed to the glory of the century, but have also revealed its darker sides (La Bruy�re, La Fontaine, F�nelon, the painters Le Nain etc). In a traditionally all-male French literary culture, the course also acknowledges the unique and asserting movement of the "Pr�cieuses", as well as the birth of French novel through the artistic creativity of women. Several films will complete the exposure of students to the life of the time.
Prerequisite, French 306 or permission of instructor.
FREN 494-01 Repr�sentations de l'Afrique dans les litt�ratures fran�aise et francophones MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*First day attendance required.* In this course, we will use a variety of modes and genres (ethnological travel accounts, poetry, novels, essays, films, etc.) to explore various representations of Africa and Africans through the notion of race. We will first examine how the notion of race in French literature, particularly in hamitic myth, served to juxtapose and contrast African cultures and Africans with the superior and civilized western world. Then, we will analyze African francophone texts that rejected the colonial discourse by anthropologists and travelers as a way of reinterpreting (rewriting) African history. Finally, we will discuss writings suggesting the �prise en charge� or the appropriation of �racial theories� by Africans through debates on citizenship, ethnic identity and democracy and the role they played in the rise of mass violence. Readings and films will include selections of texts by Voltaire, L�Abb�e Gr�goire, Montesquieu, Gobineau, Maran, Gide, Fanon, C�saire, Mongo Beti, Paul Del Perugia, Mudimbe, and Boubacar Boris Diop as well the book of Genesis and La Chanson de Roland.
FREN 494-02 Litt�rature et Identit� dans les journaux de voyage et les carte MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 102 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required* Maps tell us much more than merely how to get from here to there. One of the oldest forms of human communications, they ultimately express the many ways we attempt to understand the world and be part of it. The explorers, their itineraries and their diaries offer a complex view of this world too. The class will expose the different interactions between the maps, explorers and writers from Antiquity to present. During the Renaissance and later on explorations, colonization also ushered a significant challenge to Christian and Muslim accounts of their travels. The indigenous peoples of Africas and the Americas offered for the explorers and cartographers ways to express their consternation or their enthusiasm. Our class will explore the ways Egyptians and the Greeks influenced the thought of travelers of the Middle Ages (Marco Polo, . We will discuss the French Renaissance exploration and travel writing (Verrazano, Cartier, Thevet, L�ry, Lescarbot) read about the influences of 17th and 18th century mapmakers through diaries of Lap�rouse, Nicollet, Bougainville, Rousseau. The 19th century will bring a lot of diaries and maps from utopian discourse to romantic travels (Flaubert, M�rim�e, Dumont D'urville ). The study of contemporary diaries (Ruffin, Le Clezio) and their maps of the world will be studied through discussion and show the changing dynamics of identity and the other in the Modern world.
The study of maps, diaries and films through authentic material answers the needs of the French and Liberal Arts college. This class will prepare majors and minors in French language, French and francophone cultures and literature. It will help non-French majors achieve language competencies appropriate for study in their own fields, for future professional needs or for personal enrichment. It will provide all students with the opportunity to acquire, as part as of a liberal arts education, knowledge of the French language.
As the topic relates to France and the Francophone world, it addresses the diverse disciplinary areas well established in the French Department and the long term affiliation with the humanities, media and cultural studies, and women�s and gender studies programs.
In French: Prerequisite, French 306 or permission of instructor.

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOG 111-01 Human Geog of Global Issues TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 111-02 Human Geog of Global Issues MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
*First Year Course only*
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Holly Barcus
*First day attendance required; $20 lab fee will be charged.*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab M 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
GEOG 232-01 People, Agriculture and the Environment TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01*
GEOG 241-01 Urban Geography MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
GEOG 248-01 Political Geography MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Kathryn Pratt
GEOG 249-01 Regional Geography of Latin America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*Cross-listed with LATI 249-01; First day attendance required*
GEOG 250-01 Race, Place, and Space TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Daniel Gilbert
*Cross-listed with AMST 250-01*
GEOG 254-01 Geog World Population Issues MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 107 Holly Barcus
GEOG 256-01 Medical Geography M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-02; First day attendance required*
GEOG 294-01 Regional Geography of Eastern and Central Europe W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Jennifer Blecha
In just one hundred years, Eastern and Central Europe has gone from a land of emperors and princes, to dictators both fascist and communist, to increasingly stable democracies. Rebellions and revolutions, both peaceful and violent, have marked the century, as well as the lives of the diverse peoples who resisted and succumbed to various regimes. For years, Americans knew little about the countries "behind the iron curtain" of Soviet control, but now an increasing tourist trade takes us easily to Prague, Budapest and Krakow, and new countries seem to join the European Union every year. Does it make sense to think of these countries as a distinct region, or are they seamlessly reuniting with the rest of Europe? In order to understand current issues facing Eastern and Central Europe, we must know more about the geography of this region. This course will examine layers of physical, historical, political, cultural, economic and environmental geographies of Eastern and Central Europe in order to better grasp and evaluate contemporary life and concerns there.
GEOG 364-01 GIS: Concepts/Applications TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 108 Holly Barcus
*First day attendance required; $20 lab fee will be charged.*
GEOG 364-L1 GIS: Concepts/Applications Lab TBA TBA Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required; lab required.*
GEOG 488-01 Seminar: Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and INTL 477-01*
GEOG 488-02 Seminar: Urban Geography Field Seminar, Cities and Rivers TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 109 David Lanegran

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOL 101-01 Dinosaurs TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 100 Kristina Curry Rogers
*First day attendance required*
GEOL 150-01 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Karl Wirth
GEOL 150-02 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 187 Karl Wirth
*First Year Course only*
GEOL 150-L1 Dynamic Earth/Global Chg Lab M 07:00 pm-09:30 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 150-L2 Dynamic Earth/Global Chg Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 150-L3 Dynamic Earth/Global Chg Lab R 08:30 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Karl Wirth
*First Year Course only*
GEOL 194-02 Water Science and Policy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Kelly MacGregor
Cross-listed with ENVI 194-03; First Year Course only*
GEOL 194-02 Water Science and Policy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
Cross-listed with ENVI 194-03; First Year Course only*
GEOL 260-01 Geomorphology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor
GEOL 260-L1 Geomorphology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor
GEOL 265-01 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 265-L1 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 294-01 Adv Topics Sedimentary Geol MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
*Permission of instructor required*
GEOL 294-L1 Adv Topics Sedimentary Geol Lb TBA TBA OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
*Permission of instructor required*

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GERM 101-01 Elementary German I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 214 Brigetta Abel
GERM 101-L1 Elementary German I Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 111 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 101-L2 Elementary German I Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 101-L3 Elementary German I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 226 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela
GERM 110-02 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela
GERM 110-L1 Accelerated Elem German Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 110-L2 Accelerated Elem German Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 402 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 110-L3 Accelerated Elem Germay Lab T 02:45 pm-03:45 pm HUM 113 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 203-02 Intermediate German I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 213 Gisela Peters
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Constanze Gundlach
GERM 203-L2 Intermediate German I Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 112 Constanze Gundlach
GERM 203-L3 Intermediate German I Lab W 08:10 pm-09:10 pm HUM 112 Constanze Gundlach
GERM 203-L5 Intermediate German I Lab R 02:45 pm-03:45 pm OLRI 101 Constanze Gundlach
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 215 Linda Schulte-Sasse
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab R 09:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 150 Constanze Gundlach
GERM 204-L2 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 350 Constanze Gundlach
GERM 223-01 Culture Comp for Study Abroad M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm HUM 215 Rachael Huener
*In German; 2 credit course*
GERM 255-01 German Cinema Studies: Media Art/Horror MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 401 Linda Schulte-Sasse
*First Year Course only*
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 215 Gisela Peters
GERM 305-L1 German Through the Media Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 102 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 305-L2 German Through the Media Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 102 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 306-01 Introduction to German Studies MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 217 Rachael Huener
*In German*
GERM 360-01 Proseminar: Sex and the (German) City MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 215 Brigetta Abel
*Taught in German.* In this course we will discuss the connections between sex and the city within German modernism: how is the city itself represented as sexualized? How does the city become the site of (sometimes hyper-)sexuality? How does gender play a role in this trope? And how does this connection between sex and the city intersect with other socio-political, historical, and/or literary trends? We will begin with the obvious setting for this topic, the Weimar Republic, and then delve into some other contexts chronologically. The course will be taught in German, with primary texts in German (literary works, films, music), but secondary texts will be primarily in English. Requirements include: daily reading and journal entries, several short reaction papers, final exam.
GERM 364-01 The Birth of Modern Germany TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 217 David Martyn
*The 19th century in Germany and Austria was marked by the fault lines of modernity: revolutionary radicalism and stodgy conservatism, Victorian prudishness and deviant sexuality, religious piousness and an avowedly atheist scientific revolution. All of these tensions are discernable in the literary works of the period, which include some of the greatest the language has to offer. The course will introduce students to the four major movements of the century: the politically radical Junges Deutschland and its reactionary twin, Biedermeier; bourgeois Realism, which reflected the political and social fragility that followed the failed 1848 revolution; and Naturalism, which made literature into a scientific experiment and inaugurated modernism. The emphasis will be on literature in its intellectual and social context. Readings by Morike, Droste-Hulshoff, Heine, Buchner, Marx, Gotthelf, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Keller, Fontane, and Hauptmann. Requirements: 3 short papers; oral presentation; daily reading responses. Prerequisite: German 306 (may be taken simultaneously) or study abroad. Taught in German.*
GERM 394-01 Metaphysics in Secular Thought MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with HMCS 394-01 and RELI 394-01; A widespread tendency in contemporary Western societies is to associate metaphysics with religion, if not with what is often dismissively called "irrationality." This course will dismantle this myth by turning to the European (continental) philosophical tradition since the seventeenth century and its reception by twentieth-century critical theory, in order to examine the ways in which secular thought emerges not as an alternative to metaphysics, something which thought cannot supercede anyway, but simply as an alternative way - and one that by no means is more "rationally grounded" than religion - of dealing with the very same metaphysical questions and issues than concern religion: What can infinity be and what is its relation to the finite? I know I am mortal, but is there something immortal about me? What is the relation between matter and thought (spirit, soul, etc.)? Is there a gaze that always looks at me and judges me? Am I responsible for my wrongdoings or was I predetermined by a higher power to commit them? Is there a meaning or goal in human (and other) life and history? Is there a reason (and a purpose) for everything that happens or is it all just random? Is the universe chaotic or is there order ("entropy" being an attempt to deal with this question in physics), and so on. All readings in English. No pre-knowledge is required. Assigned readings will include: St. Augustine, Spinoza, Leibniz, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, and twentieth-century critical theory.

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-02 Elementary Spanish I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 212 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 101-L4 Elementary Spanish I Lab M 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 102 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 101-L5 Elementary Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 101-L6 Elementary Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 213 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 213 Laura Wasenius
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 110-01 Accel Beginning Spanish MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 213 David Sunderland
*First day attendance required*
HISP 110-02 Accel Beginning Spanish MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 David Sunderland
*First day attendance required*
HISP 110-L1 Accel Beginning Spanish Lab TBA TBA David Sunderland
HISP 110-L2 Accel Beginning Spanish Lab TR 03:15 pm-04:15 pm HUM 227 David Sunderland
HISP 110-L3 Accel Beginning Spanish Lab TBA TBA David Sunderland
HISP 110-L4 Accel Beginning Spanish Lab TBA TBA David Sunderland
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 David Sunderland
*First day attendance required*
HISP 111-L1 Accel Elem Portuguese Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 194-01 Susurros del Pasado: Whispers towards the 21 Century MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 214 Galo Gonzalez
*First day attendance required; First Year Course only*
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-03 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Alexandra Bergmann
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 111 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:20 pm HUM 102 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab M 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 203-L5 Intermediate Spanish I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 203-L6 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 203-L7 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 102 STAFF
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 214 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 214 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 214 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 228 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 228 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required*
HISP 220-L1 Accel Intermediate Spanish Lab TBA TBA Susana Blanco-Iglesias
HISP 305-01 Visions of the Hispanic World: Oral and Written Expression TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 Antonio Dorca
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-02 Visions of the Hispanic World: Oral and Written Expression TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Antonio Dorca
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-03 Visions of the Hispanic World: Oral and Written Expression MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 216 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Teresa Kupin-Escobar
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; First day attendance required*
HISP 307-02 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Teresa Kupin-Escobar
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-02; First day attendance required*
HISP 308-01 Locating US Latino Studies WF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 402 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01; First day attendance required; Proficiency in Conversational Spanish required*
HISP 308-01 Locating US Latino Studies M 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 401 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01; First day attendance required; Proficiency in Conversational Spanish required*
HISP 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with LING 309-01; First day attendance required*
HISP 425-01 Dictators, Revolutions and Insurrections MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 Galo Gonzalez
*First day attendance required*
HISP 430-01 Advanced Spanish Grammar: Meaning and Communication TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Cynthia Kauffeld
*First day attendance required*
HISP 494-01 Constructions of a Female Killer MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Alicia Munoz
*First day attendance required; course taught in Spanish.* The rise in femicide across Latin America, most shockingly exhibited in the city of Ju�rez, Mexico, has resulted in broad discussions of women's relationship with violence. However what happens when the traditional paradigm is inverted and we explore women as perpetrators, rather than victims, of violence? This class will dialogue with selected Latin American and Latino narratives (including novels, short stories, films, and newspapers) constituting different representations of women who kill. Why are violent acts perceived to be more disturbing when a woman commits them? What type of language is used to describe a woman's violence? How do archetypes such as the femme fatale or scorned woman filter our perception? These questions will motivate our reading, discussion, and writing for the semester. Prerequisite: Hispanic Studies/Latin American Studies 307 or 308.

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HIST 100-01 Discovering World History MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 111 Ellen Arnold
*First Year Course only.*
HIST 110-01 Intro to European History: The Breaking Up and Making Up of Modern Europe, 1789- Present MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 226 Aeleah Soine
This course will examine the modern history of Europe in the context of tensions between Euro-optimism and Euro-pessimism, which alternately see a unified Europe as the inevitable future or an impossible dream. While this debate larger focuses on the rise of the European Union after World War II, this course will examine its broader historical implications for our understanding of European history and identity since the French Revolution and Industrial Revolutions. We will use primary documents, leading historical scholarship, and pieces of literature, multimedia, and popular culture to aid in our consideration of shifting internal and external borders, stratifying and collapsing systems of social hierarchy, and the political and cultural values that variably pushed the peoples of Europe closer together to and pulled them farther apart from each other and the rest of the world.
HIST 112-01 The Global in the Local TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Ernesto Capello
*First Year Course only*
HIST 121-01 The Greek World TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Corby Kelly
*Cross-listed with CLAS 121-01 and HMCS 121-01*
HIST 135-01 American Violence to 1800 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Andrea Cremer
HIST 140-01 Intro to East Asian Civ TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 140-01; First Year Course only*
HIST 181-01 Introduction to Latin America and the Carribean TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with LATI 181-01*
HIST 194-01 Race, Sex, and Biology: A History of Differences MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 216 Christine Manganaro
*Cross-listed with WGSS 194-03* Is biology destiny? This introductory course in the history of science and American culture will examine scientific ideas about race, sex, sexuality, and heredity from the early nineteenth century through the present. We will explore the historical intersections of scientific, medical, and popular ideas about differences in bodies and behavior, the emergence of eugenics, the relationship between ideas about heredity and the evolution of sexual mores, gender norms, and the definition of deviance, and the development of genetic science and its applications. Ideas about differences in anatomy, physiology, and psychology have shaped social norms, public policy, and the development of identity. Readings in the history of biology, medicine, and sexuality, as well as a selection of films, will assist us as we examine the ways in which ideas about difference have evolved and persisted in American culture.
HIST 194-05 African Life Histories MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Jamie Monson
This course is an introduction to personal narrative as a form of African historical expression. We will read several published life histories, from anthropological recordings to slave narratives to autobiography and memoir. We will consult scholarly essays about life history as a genre, to help us discuss the methodology behind the production of these important texts. Our task is therefore twofold: as we learn about the lives of African men and women through their own stories, we will also examine the processes through which these stories are made available to us. The format of the course will be a discussion seminar, with intermittent background lectures where necessary.
HIST 211-01 History of Africa to 1800 MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Jamie Monson
HIST 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; First day attendance required*
HIST 235-01 Comparative Freedom Movements: The US and South Africa W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with AMST 310-01*
HIST 237-01 Environmental Justice W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with ENVI 237-01; First day attendance required*
HIST 258-01 Europe Since 1945 MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 010 Peter Weisensel
HIST 274-01 History of Traditional China TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 274-01
HIST 281-01 The Andes TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with LATI 281-01*
HIST 294-01 Black Death MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Ellen Arnold
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02; From 1347-1350, a great plague swept across Europe, killing an estimated 1/3 of the entire human population. As if that wasn�t bad enough, the fourteenth century also witnessed animal diseases, famines, large-scale climate change, and the human crisis of war. This had both immediate and long-term effects on medieval Europe, changing daily life, social networks, and economic decision making. Understanding the degree to which the medieval world was altered by (and survived) this natural disaster also offers glimpses of medieval psychology, scientific knowledge, spirituality, and aesthetics. We will also set the medieval epidemic in its broader context, by discussing problems in studying historical plagues and by looking at the earlier outbreak of plague in Europe at the end of the Roman Empire.
HIST 294-02 Saints and Society in the Middle Ages MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Ellen Arnold
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-02.* In the Middle Ages, religious practices and beliefs were deeply integrated into the social, political, and economic fabric of society. In this class, we will look at medieval saints in order to discuss the character and nature of medieval society. Medieval people interacted with saints (both living and dead) in fascinating and unique ways. We will discuss the earliest desert saints who shaped ideas of Christian holiness, crusading-era ideas about the power of saintly intervention in worldly conflict, and medieval ideas about miracles, death, and redemption. We will survey the full span of the Middle Ages, from the waning of the Roman Empire to the beginnings of the Protestant Reformation.
HIST 294-03 Socialism in History and Philosophy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Peter Weisensel
This class will study the idea of socialism from its earliest forms in ancient times to its present through a series of original socialist texts. Two professors, one in history and the other in philosophy will teach it. We will engage thinkers like Plato, Thomas More, the early French communists, the Utopians, Marx and Engels (the heart of the course) and their Revisionists, the Fabians (an Anglo-Saxon alternative), Lenin and Stalin, the Frankfurt School, the socialist feminists, and contemporary socialist thinkers. We will study socialism critically: we will recognize its strengths but also identify its flaws when we see them. We will contextualize these socialist texts, that is, study how changes in real-world circumstances change the way socialism is written or used. Lastly, we will try to understand the gap between socialist theory as written by intellectuals and the way socialism is understood by ordinary working people. The class is discussion-based. Exams will be in class. Often students will be expected to lead class discussions. Students who have already taken Hist. 255 and Phil. 255 may not take this course. Otherwise, the course is open to all students, first year students with the permission of the instructors.
HIST 294-04 Hawai'i: American Colony MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Christine Manganaro
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-01; First day attendance required*
HIST 294-05 Captivity and Slavery in the Making of Early American Society TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 227 Andrea Cremer
This course explores the complex histories of captivity and slavery in early America. Rather than focusing solely on chattel-based African-American slave institution, the history of slavery is taken back to the point of contact between European explorers and indigenous Americans. European colonists from the fifteenth century onward encountered Native American systems of captivity and slavery; the Euro-American settlers both incorporated and changed Indian captivity within their new colonial communities. Captivity and enslavement became a dynamic site of cultural conflict and exchange in colonial America. With the arrival of African slaves in North America in the seventeenth century, the history of slavery in American society transformed into a complex web of relations between Native Americans, Africans, and European colonists. Systems of slavery and captivity effectively acted as borderlands for European, Native American and African societies. This course requires students to engage in a critical analysis of slavery and captivity and the ways in which they shaped diverse cultures in North America. Specific attention will be given to the intersection of gender and sexuality in captivity and slave systems, and to the emergence of racial ideologies and political power in early America.
HIST 294-07 German History from Reformation to Unification, 1500-1871 MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Aeleah Soine
How do we understand German history before there was a Germany? This course seeks to answer this question by examining key moments in German history beginning with the Lutheran Reformation in the sixteenth century and concluding with the creation of the German nation-state at the end of its nineteenth-century Wars of Unification. Our course materials will include a diverse assortment of scholarly perspectives, political and personal documents, and elements of high and popular cultures from Bach and Goethe to beer drinking and Grimm's fairy tales. More broadly, we will look at how identities (German or otherwise) are constantly shaped by dimensions of gender, class, race, ethnicity, religion as well as tensions between nationalism, regionalism, and internationalism.
HIST 490-01 Special Advanced Topics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Peter Rachleff
*Permission of instructor required*
HIST 490-02 Special Advanced Topics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Andrea Cremer
*Permission of instructor required*

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTL 110-01 Intro to Intl St:Globalization TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Ahmed Samatar
INTL 111-01 Intro to Intl St: Lit/Global MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 David Moore
*First day attendance required*
INTL 111-02 Intro to Intl St: Lit/Global MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 David Moore
INTL 202-01 Global Media Industries TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Cross-listed with HMCS 202-01*
INTL 253-01 Comparative Muslim Cultures MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Erin Glade
*Cross-listed with ANTH 253-01*
INTL 272-01 The Post-Soviet Sphere MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Robert Nalbandov
*Cross-listed with RUSS 272-01*
INTL 280-01 Indigenous Peoples' Movements MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Erik Larson
*Cross-listed with SOCI 280-01; First day attendance required*
INTL 286-01 Media and Cultural Studies of Latin America TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Cross-listed with LATI 286-01*
INTL 294-02 Medical Geography M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*Cross-listed with GEOG 256-01; First day attendance required*
INTL 325-01 China, Russia and Central Europe in Transition MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with ECON 325-01*
INTL 345-01 Adv Themes in Human Rights MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Robert Nalbandov
INTL 362-01 Culture and Globalization W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
*Cross-listed with ANTH 362-01*
INTL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01 and HMCS 367-01*
INTL 477-01 Seminar: Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and GEOG 488-01*
INTL 485-01 Sr Sem: Global Hatred W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
JAPA 101-01 Elementary Japanese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 110 Christopher Scott
JAPA 101-02 Elementary Japanese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 110 Christopher Scott
JAPA 101-L1 Elementary Japanese I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Eriko Ike
JAPA 101-L2 Elementary Japanese I Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 Eriko Ike
JAPA 101-L3 Elementary Japanese I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am THEATR 204 Eriko Ike
JAPA 194-01 Language and Gender in Japanese Society TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 402 Satoko Suzuki
*Cross-listed with LING 194-01 and WGSS 194-02; First Year Course only*
JAPA 203-01 Intermediate Japanese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 111 Sachiko Dorsey
JAPA 203-02 Intermediate Japanese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 111 Sachiko Dorsey
JAPA 203-L1 Intermediate Japanese I Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 110 Eriko Ike
JAPA 203-L2 Intermediate Japanese I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 250 Eriko Ike
JAPA 203-L3 Intermediate Japanese I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Eriko Ike
JAPA 305-01 Advanced Japanese I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 305-L1 Advanced Japanese I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 350 Eriko Ike
JAPA 305-L2 Advanced Japanese I Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 102 Eriko Ike
JAPA 335-01 Analyzing Japanese Language TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
*Cross-listed with LING 335-01*
JAPA 407-01 Fourth Year Japanese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LATI 181-01 Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with HIST 181-01*
LATI 249-01 Regional Geography of Latin America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*Cross-listed with GEOG 249-01; First day attendance required*
LATI 255-01 Peoples/Cultures Latin America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez
*Cross-listed with ANTH 255-01*
LATI 281-01 The Andes TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with HIST 281-01*
LATI 286-01 Media and Cultural Studies of Latin America TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Cross-listed with INTL 286-01*
LATI 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Teresa Kupin-Escobar
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; First day attendance required*
LATI 307-02 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Teresa Kupin-Escobar
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-02; First day attendance required*
LATI 488-01 Senior Seminar M 08:30 am-10:40 am LEOCTR 36 Paul Dosh

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 112 John Haiman
LING 104-01 The Sounds of Language MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 228 Christina Esposito
LING 104-02 The Sounds of Language MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 216 Christina Esposito
LING 194-01 Language and Gender in Japanese Society TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 402 Satoko Suzuki
*Cross-listed with JAPA 194-01 and WGSS 194-02; First Year Course only*
LING 201-01 Historical Linguistics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 214 John Haiman
LING 204-01 Experimental Linguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 404 Christina Esposito
LING 206-01 Endangered/Minority Languages MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Marianne Milligan
LING 300-01 Linguistic Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 217 John Haiman
LING 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with HISP 309-01; First day attendance required*
LING 335-01 Analyzing Japanese Language TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
*Cross-listed with JAPA 335-01*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MATH 108-01 Quantitative Thinking for Policy Analysis: Epidemiology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Daniel Kaplan
*Cross-listed with ECON 108-01*
MATH 135-01 Applied Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Thomas Halverson
MATH 135-02 Applied Calculus MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Thomas Halverson
MATH 135-03 Applied Calculus MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 Karen Saxe
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Daniel Flath
*First Year Course only*
MATH 136-02 Discrete Mathematics TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 David Bressoud
MATH 137-01 Single Variable Calculus MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 Jessica Striker
MATH 137-02 Single Variable Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 Jessica Striker
MATH 153-01 Data Analysis and Statistics: Statistical Analysis of Sports and Games MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 Vittorio Addona
*First Year Course only*
MATH 153-02 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 245 Vittorio Addona
MATH 153-03 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 243 David Ehren
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 258 Alicia Johnson
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 258 Daniel Kaplan
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Andrew Beveridge
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 247 Stan Wagon
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 247 Stan Wagon
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Daniel Flath
MATH 354-01 Probability MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Alicia Johnson
MATH 361-01 Theory of Computation MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 247 Susan Fox
*Cross-listed with COMP 261-01*
MATH 377-01 Real Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Karen Saxe
MATH 379-01 Combinatorics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Andrew Beveridge
MATH 432-01 Mathematical Modeling MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Stan Wagon
MATH 476-01 Topics in Modern Algebra TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Thomas Halverson

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HMCS 110-01 Texts and Power: Foundations of Cultural Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 John Kim
HMCS 114-01 News Reporting/Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 217 Howard Sinker
HMCS 114-02 News Reporting/Writing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MARKIM 201 Michael Griffin
HMCS 121-01 The Greek World TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Corby Kelly
*Cross-listed with CLAS 121-01 and HIST 121-01*
HMCS 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 401 Clay Steinman
*Additional screening times TBA; course suitable for new first year students.*
HMCS 194-01 Race/Silent Film: Griffith & Micheaux MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 401 Clay Steinman
*First Year Course Only* An introductory, first-year course on raced representation in US silent film, concentrating on a comparison of the productions of D. W. Griffith and Oscar Micheaux, perhaps the leading white and black filmmakers of their time. These films were made and exhibited within separate cinemas shaped by white supremacist institutions, and, most important, with segregated audiences in mind. Comparisons illuminate the way the works reproduce strikingly different discourses of race, gender, and class. Attention will be paid to the distinctive editing styles of the two sets of films, and the way in which such styles, like their cinematography, can be seen as raced. Extensive discussions, readings, and screenings (for which extra time has been included in the schedule). Several essay exams and one short paper required.
HMCS 202-01 Global Media Industries TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Cross-listed with INTL 202-01*
HMCS 256-01 Mass Culture Under Communism TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Karen Rosenflanz
*Cross-listed with RUSS 256-01*
HMCS 294-01 Introduction to New Media TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 402 John Kim
*Suitable for new first years.* In the last couple of decades we have seen the invention and popularization of a wide assortment of digital technologies and with them, a bewildering variety of new media forms. The internet (which includes a collection of media forms, from web pages and peer-to-peer software to social networking and video sharing sites), massively multiplayer online video games, mobile computing, software, cell phones � together, many argue, these and other forms of new media are reshaping how we live, create, work and, even, what it means to be human. In this class we�ll examine a cross-section of contemporary humanistic research that has sought to understand the impact(s) of new media through a comparison to earlier, pre-digital media. In addition, we will engage in hands-on workshops, where we will use and learn some of the tools, software and websites that our texts consider. By the end of the course, you should be able to critique and synthesize the ways in which others have characterized the impact of new media. You should have a sense of just what is and isn't "new" about new media. And most important of all, you should have begun to build your own theories of how new media and the humanities interact.
HMCS 294-02 Afro-Futurism in Old and New Media MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 401 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02; first day attendance required* Afrofuturism is an artistic movement that uses science fiction and technoculture to address African-American concerns. In 2005, the Soap Factory, a local art space near the University of Minnesota, sponsored one of the first exhibits in then nation of Afro-futurist work, and HMCS was one of several co-sponsors of that event. The exhibit introduced our students to the critical and scholarly work of Yale sociologist Alondra Nelson, as well as the curatorial and artistic work of Black local and national artists whose work is displayed on the web and in art galleries, as well as in popular film, television and literature. That exhibit has since traveled to other locations, and Afrofuturism has taken off as a movement that engages scholars, critics and artists. In this course, we will explore some of the key works in the emerging Afro-futurist cannon, including Black science fiction in literature and on film and television, futuristic Black representations from the music world (e.g., Space is the Place by Sun Ra, and George Clinton�s mothership connection), and the web design and video installation work of Cinque Hicks and others.
HMCS 294-03 Hip Hop Performance: REMIX2009 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Harry Waters
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with THDA 294-02 and AMST 294-03.*
HMCS 294-04 Theory and Method in the Study of Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 204 Paula Cooey
*Cross-listed with RELI 235-01*
HMCS 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01 and INTL 367-01*
HMCS 392-01 Critical Race Theory M 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Leola Johnson
*Course for Mellon Program students only; instructor approval required; cross-listed with AMST 392-01; 2 credits*
HMCS 394-01 Metaphysics in Secular Thought MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01 and RELI 394-01; Taught in English*
HMCS 394-02 From Literature to Film/Studies in Adaptation: Vietnam TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 401 Casey Jarrin
*Cross-listed with ENGL 386-01; First day attendance required*
HMCS 488-01 Capstone Seminar: Blackness/Politics/Media W 01:10 pm-04:00 pm HUM 401 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with AMST 494-01*

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MUSI 110-01 Music Appreciation TR 08:00 am-09:30 am MUSIC 123 Eugene Rogers
MUSI 113-01 Theory I TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 201 Carleton Macy
*Students of MUSI 113-01 are required to register for one of the two labs*
MUSI 113-02 Theory I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 202 Randall Bauer
*Students of MUSI 113-02 are required to register for one of the two labs*
MUSI 113-03 Theory I TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 201 Carleton Macy
*Students of MUSI 113-03 are required to register for one of the two labs*
MUSI 113-L1 Theory I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 123 Randall Bauer
MUSI 113-L2 Theory I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 123 Randall Bauer
MUSI 131-01 African Music TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 123 Sowah Mensah
MUSI 194-01 Music and Freedom MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 202 Mark Mazullo
*First Year Course only; First day attendance required*
MUSI 213-01 Theory III, Form and Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 202 Carleton Macy
MUSI 342-01 Medieval to Mozart MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 202 Cary Franklin
MUSI 350-01 American Pop, Rockabilly, and Soul, 1954-64 TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 202 Mark Mazullo
*Permission of instructor required; Cross-listed with AMST 350-01; First day attendance required*
MUSI 72-01 African Music Ensemble TR 05:30 pm-07:00 pm MUSIC CONC HALL Sowah Mensah
MUSI 74-01 Macalester Concert Choir MTWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 123 Eugene Rogers
*Also meets Fridays (bi-weekly) from 4:30pm-6:00pm.*
MUSI 76-01 Hildegard Singers R 06:15 pm-07:15 pm MUSIC 123 Eugene Rogers
*Course meets both Tues + Thurs, as listed in this schedule.*
MUSI 76-01 Hildegard Singers T 05:45 pm-06:45 pm MUSIC 123 Eugene Rogers
*Course meets both Tues + Thurs, as listed in this schedule.*
MUSI 76-02 Singing Scotsmen R 07:15 pm-08:15 pm MUSIC 123 Eugene Rogers
*Course meets both Tues + Thurs as listed in this schedule.*
MUSI 76-02 Singing Scotsmen T 04:45 pm-05:45 pm MUSIC 123 Eugene Rogers
*Course meets both Tues + Thurs as listed in this schedule.*
MUSI 80-01 Mac Jazz Band TR 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MUSIC CONC HALL Joan Griffith
MUSI 84-01 Pipe Band W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC CONC HALL Michael Breidenbach
MUSI 86-01 Wind Ensemble MW 04:45 pm-06:00 pm MUSIC CONC HALL Cary Franklin
MUSI 88-01 Symphony Orchestra TR 04:45 pm-06:00 pm MUSIC CONC HALL Cary Franklin
MUSI 90-01 Mac Jazz Combo M 07:00 pm-09:30 pm MUSIC CONC HALL Joan Griffith
Other Ensembles may include Mac Jazz Combo or Collegium Musicum.
MUSI 90-02 Collegium Musicum TBA TBA Carleton Macy
MUSI 92-01 Chamber Music Ensemble TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 94-01 Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
Studio instruction may be taken by any Macalester student in voice, piano, harpsichord, organ, guitar, recorder, bagpipes, standard orchestral instruments and some non-western instruments. Studio instruction fees are currently $340 for 12 half-hour lessons per semester (fee subject to change). Macalester will pay 90% of instruction fees on the major instrument or voice for students with major or minor concentrations in music. Registration instructions and other information pertaining to private studio instruction may be obtained from Rachel Hest in the Music Department (Room 105). Registration for all studio instruction and ensemble groups takes place at the beginning of the semester.
MUSI 94-02 Piano TBA TBA Barbara Brooks
MUSI 94-03 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 94-04 Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 94-05 Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 94-06 Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich
MUSI 94-09 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 94-10 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 94-11 Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 94-13 African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-14 Classical Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson
MUSI 94-15 Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-16 Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-17 Acoustic Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson
MUSI 94-18 Acoustic Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-19 Flamenco Guitar TBA TBA Michael Hauser
MUSI 94-1M Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor
MUSI 94-21 Jazz Improvisation TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 94-23 Violin TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 94-24 Viola TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 94-26 Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 94-29 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 94-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 94-36 Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen
MUSI 94-37 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen
MUSI 94-41 Drums TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 94-42 African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-4M Drums TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 94-5M African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-7M Sitar TBA TBA David Whetstone
MUSI 94-CI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 94-H1 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin
MUSI 94-HC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 94-HH Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 94-M Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 94-M2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 94-M3 African Flute TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-M4 Trumpet TBA TBA Lynn Erickson
MUSI 94-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 94-M8 Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen
MUSI 94-MB Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 94-MC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 94-MD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 94-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 94-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 94-ML African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-MQ Acoustic Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-MT Jazz Improvisation TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-MU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 94-MV Violin TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 94-MW Viola TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 94-MY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 94-MZ Bass TBA TBA Jennifer Rubin
MUSI 94-W0 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen
MUSI 94-W2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 94-WC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 94-WU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 96-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Barbara Brooks
MUSI 96-02 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 96-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 96-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 96-Z1 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHIL 115-01 Problems of Philosophy MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Geoffrey Gorham
*First Year Course only*
PHIL 115-02 Problems of Philosophy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Geoffrey Gorham
PHIL 120-01 Introduction to Symbolic Logic MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 100 Janet Folina
PHIL 120-02 Introduction to Symbolic Logic MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 100 Janet Folina
PHIL 125-01 Ethics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 William Wilcox
PHIL 125-02 Ethics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Martin Gunderson
PHIL 136-01 Indian Philosophies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with ASIA 136-01*
PHIL 160-01 Foundations-Political Theory MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
*Cross-listed with POLI 160-01*
PHIL 194-01 Rivers, Humans and Environmental Justice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Martin Gunderson
*Cross-listed with ENGL 194-01 and ENVI 194-04; First day attendance required.* The Minnesota, Mississippi and St. Croix Rivers converge nearby and provide the context for our class. We begin with a consideration of Native American perspectives on the three rivers. In September we plan to take a weekend canoe trip on the Minnesota River under the
direction of the Healthy Nations Program of the American Indian Center. Our consideration of Native American perspectives will raise questions of ownership and property rights and lead to consideration of environmental justice as well as the environment as a human rights
issue. The written work for the course will include creative writing such as poems, short stories and reflections as well as philosophical writing such as conceptual analysis and arguments for ethical and political positions related to environmental justice and human rights.
There are no prerequisites.
PHIL 194-01 Rivers, Humans and Environmental Justice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Ping Wang
*Cross-listed with ENGL 194-01 and ENVI 194-04; First day attendance required.* The Minnesota, Mississippi and St. Croix Rivers converge nearby and provide the context for our class. We begin with a consideration of Native American perspectives on the three rivers. In September we plan to take a weekend canoe trip on the Minnesota River under the
direction of the Healthy Nations Program of the American Indian Center. Our consideration of Native American perspectives will raise questions of ownership and property rights and lead to consideration of environmental justice as well as the environment as a human rights
issue. The written work for the course will include creative writing such as poems, short stories and reflections as well as philosophical writing such as conceptual analysis and arguments for ethical and political positions related to environmental justice and human rights.
There are no prerequisites.
PHIL 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Diane Michelfelder
*Cross-listed with ENVI 229-01*
PHIL 230-01 Ancient/Medieval Philosophies MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Geoffrey Gorham
PHIL 235-01 Existentialist Metaphysics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Diane Michelfelder
PHIL 360-01 Philosophy of Science MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 105 Janet Folina
PHIL 394-01 Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 102 William Wilcox
This course will focus on some central topics in contemporary Anglo-American (or "analytic") social and political philosophy. We begin with John Rawls�s theory of justice as it evolved from its first articulation in 1958 to its final in 2001. We�ll then likely move on to questions about what sort of equality, if any, is an attractive social goal and then to issues about global justice. What duties do members of one society have to members of others?
PHIL 489-01 Senior Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Joy Laine

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PE 01-01 Swimming I TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 02-01 Tennis I TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Martin Peper
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson
PE 04-01 Karate I TR 03:30 pm-04:40 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:40 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-02 Yoga I TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin
PE 06-03 Yoga I TR 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Vanessa Seljeskog
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Vanessa Seljeskog
PE 09-01 Conditioning MW 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 09-02 Conditioning TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 10-01 Racquetball I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Matthew Parrington
PE 11-01 Swimming II TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 12-01 Tennis II TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Martin Peper
PE 14-01 Karate II TR 03:30 pm-04:40 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 18-01 Pilates MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard
PE 20-01 Weight Training MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 21-01 Swim for Fitness TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 26-01 Tai Chi Chuan MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Phyllis Calph
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Kristine Spangard
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance T 07:00 pm-08:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson
PE 40-01 Self Defense MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 51-01 Aqua Aerobics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHYS 113-01 Modern Astronomy MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 150 John Cannon
PHYS 120-01 Astronomical Techniques M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 404 John Cannon
*2 credit course.*
PHYS 194-01 Cosmology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 404 John Cannon
*First Year Course only*
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 James Doyle
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab M 02:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab T 09:15 am-11:15 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 226-L3 Principles of Physics I Lab T 01:30 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 150 Joshua Nollenberg
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab R 09:15 am-11:15 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab R 01:30 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 331-01 Modern Physics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 James Doyle
PHYS 331-L1 Modern Physics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Doyle
PHYS 331-L2 Modern Physics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Doyle
PHYS 443-01 Electromagnetic Theory I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 Joshua Nollenberg
PHYS 468-01 Statistical Mechanics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 170 James Heyman
PHYS 481-01 Quantum Mechanics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Joshua Nollenberg

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
POLI 100-01 US Politics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 101-01 Argument and Advocacy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
POLI 120-01 International Politics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Edward Gimbel
POLI 120-02 International Politics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Jennifer Lobasz
POLI 120-03 International Politics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06A Kurt Burch
POLI 140-01 Comparative Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 160-01 Foundations-Political Theory MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
*Cross-listed with PHIL 160-01*
POLI 200-01 Women and American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Julie Dolan
POLI 205-01 Politics and Policymaking: Government and Medicine TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 304 Michael Zis
Most everyone agrees that the US health care system is in need of reform, but policymakers are divided over what kind of reforms to prioritize and pursue. In this course, we situate the health care reform debate in a historical and comparative context, comparing the US system to other countries, and consider both the merits and feasibility of health reform through classroom discussion, a legislative simulation, and end-of-the-semester symposium. The course�s aim is to enable you to participate in the today's health reform debate through a primer on health care politics and policy and also, in a more general way, shed light on the politics of public policy.
POLI 206-01 US Constitutional Law and Thought MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 211-01 Re-Envisioning Education and Democracy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Cross-listed with AMST 280-01 and EDUC 280-01; First day attendance required*
POLI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with ENVI 215-01*
POLI 221-01 Global Governance TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Wendy Weber
POLI 265-01 Work, Wealth, Well-Being MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 David Blaney
*First Year Course only*
POLI 269-01 Empirical Research Methods TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Paru Shah
POLI 272-01 Researching Political Communication TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 228 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
POLI 294-01 Gender and Global Politics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Wendy Weber
This is an intermediate-level course designed to introduce students to the various ways in which feminist scholars have contributed to the study and practice of international relations/world politics. It challenges students to assess these contributions and to consider the implications � for both scholars and practitioners � of `taking gender seriously�. The course begins with an exploration of feminist theories and their relationship to theorizing both within and beyond International Relations. Building on this exploration, the course then turns to feminist scholarship on war, peace, and security; human rights and humanitarianism; and the global political economy.
POLI 294-02 Politics of Urban Education W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Paru Shah
This course focuses on a central question in political science and urban public policy�how can public institutions be redesigned to improve accountability? We will examine this question with particular attention to governance and politics in urban public school systems. The course will include a significant experiential/engagement component, which will allow students to interact with some of the key players in urban education politics within the Twin Cities.
POLI 301-01 Law, Economy, and Identity TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 321-01 International Security MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 Lauren Wilcox
POLI 363-01 Paradigms of Global Citizenship MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 David Blaney
POLI 400-01 Senior Research Seminar W 08:30 am-10:40 am LEOCTR 36 Paul Dosh
POLI 400-02 Senior Research Seminar MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 David Blaney
POLI 400-03 Senior Research Seminar TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 Paru Shah
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium W 07:00 pm-09:00 pm CARN 206 Julie Dolan
*Grading S/NC only; 2 Credit course*

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Bruce Hinrichs
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Daniel Graham
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L4 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with CNS 180-01*
PSYC 194-01 Psychology in the Cinema MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Eric Wiertelak
*First Year Course only*
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Brooke Lea
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Brooke Lea
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Brooke Lea
PSYC 201-L3 Research in Psychology I Lab T 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 354 Christina Manning
PSYC 201-L4 Research in Psychology I Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Christina Manning
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Rachel Lucas-Thompson
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; First day attendance required*
PSYC 242-01 Cognitive Psychology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Brooke Lea
PSYC 242-L1 Cognitive Psychology Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 354 Brooke Lea
PSYC 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with CNS 244-01*
PSYC 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with CNS 244-L1*
PSYC 256-01 Personality Psychology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Paul Fuglestad
PSYC 294-01 Asian American Psychology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Sun No
PSYC 294-02 Psychology of Sustainable Behavior TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 100 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-01; First day attendance required*
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Christina Manning
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Darcy Burgund
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Sun No
PSYC 370-01 Understanding and Confronting Racism R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 300 Kendrick Brown
*Cross-listed with AMST 370-01*
PSYC 374-01 Clinical and Counseling Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 386-01 Seminar in Neuropharmacology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Lin Aanonsen
*Cross-listed with BIOL 486-01*
PSYC 488-01 Senior Seminar: Culture and Psychology T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 300 Sun No
This seminar will examine the interplay of culture and the mind. In the first part of the course, we will briefly examine theoretical developments and methodological limitations in the field of cultural psychology, which has highlighted fundamental differences in models of the self, attention, perception, memory, morality, and emotion across East/Southeast Asians and Western Europeans/North Americans. The remaining time will be spent examining a series of topics on how culture and psychology interrelate in our increasingly globalized world. These topics include, but are not limited to, acculturation, multicultural identity negotiation, cultural evolution and reproduction, multicultural competence, emotion and memory across cultures, culture of gender, and culture of socioeconomic status. Culture and Context course. Prerequisite: Senior major or minor.
PSYC 488-02 Senior Seminar: Development in Context MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 300 Rachel Lucas-Thompson
This seminar will examine individual functioning and development using a social-ecological framework (i.e., we will discuss the ways in which the multiple contexts in which we live and interact with others impact our development and functioning across the lifespan). We will specifically focus on the roles of the family system, work and school, poverty/welfare, social support, health care, media, cultural values, national customs, and historical time in shaping development and functioning. Also discussed will be the ways by which individuals affect the ecologies in which they develop and live. Culture and Context course. Prerequisite: Senior major or minor.

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RELI 100-01 Introduction to Islam TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Brett Wilson
RELI 121-01 New Testament MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Susanna Drake
RELI 121-02 New Testament M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Neil Elliott
RELI 124-01 Asian Religions TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 Erik Davis
*Cross-listed with ASIA 124-01*
RELI 194-01 Buddhism and the Supernatural W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 011 Erik Davis
Since the beginnings of the European colonial encounter with Buddhism, Buddhism has often been presented (by Europeans and Asians alike) as an atheistic, practical, philosophy, opposed to ritual and superstition. Yet, wherever Buddhism has taken root, the practices of
Buddhism are often deeply involved with, and perhaps even rooted in, strong beliefs in spirits, gods, ghosts, and magic. This class examines "the supernatural" in Buddhist lands and Buddhism's interaction with the same, along with an examination of three different theories of how this connection should be conceived. Sections on Tibet and East Asia will be included, but the general geographic focus will remain on Southeast Asia.
RELI 200-01 The Qur'an (Koran) TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Brett Wilson
RELI 223-01 Orthodoxy and Heresy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Susanna Drake
RELI 235-01 Theory and Method in the Study of Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 204 Paula Cooey
*Cross-listed with HMCS 294-04* This course introduces students to classic and contemporary approaches to the academic study of religion. It assumes no background in theory and method and minimal background in particular religious traditions. This semester our work together will be driven by the questions "Who cares? and Why bother?" We will explore, in what I hope to be exciting and engaging ways, significant theoretical and methodological work by scholars across the social sciences and the humanities who seek to define and to understand the concept religion, the religions, and religious phenomena. Course materials include classical texts, critiques of these texts, and contemporary applications of both the classics and the critiques. These assignments exemplify and stress the necessarily interdisciplinary character of the academic study of religion and the political, economic, social, and ethical implications of how both scholars and people outside the academic world think about religion, the religions, and the religious.
RELI 238-01 Catholicism MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 James Laine
RELI 294-01 American Jews/American Judaisms MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 011 Barry Cytron
In 1654 twenty-three Jewish refugees fled Brazil and landed, by mistake, in what is today New York. 300 years later American Jewry constitutes the largest, richest, and one of the two most important Jewish communities in the world. The five to six million men, women, and children of the contemporary American Jewish community constitute a "mixed multitude": Sephardic and Ashkenazic, "yordim" and Zionists, religious Jews and secularists, feminists and "Black Jews", converts and "bagel-and-lox" Jews, and those who are "just Jewish"! Although comprising less than three percent of the U.S. population, their educational, social, and economic success gives them heightened visibility in the media, politics and literature. We will explore the creation and evolution of the American Jewish community, focusing on the successive waves of immigration, the ways in which they constructed their American Jewish identities, and the reactions of others to their entrance into American life. Of particular focus is the relationship of American Jews to 1.) the African-American experience, 2.) the creation of, and conundrums in Israel, and 3.) the interfaith reality of American, both personally and collectively.
RELI 294-02 Saints and Society in the Middle Ages MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm Ellen Arnold
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-02*
RELI 294-03 Martyrdom Then and Now TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Susanna Drake
From Socrates to Joan of Arc to suicide bombers, martyrs have chosen to risk theirs lives and even to die, rather than renounce their beliefs or practices. This course explores how stories about martyrs ("martyrologies") relate to the formation of religious identities and
communities. Over the course of the semester, we will analyze martryrologies from the early Christian and Jewish periods, the beginnings of Islam, the medieval age, the sixteenth century, and modernity. Guest faculty will also address comparatively examples of martyrdom from the non-monotheistic traditions. We will pay special attention to the social and political contexts with which martyrs often found themselves at odds (including the Roman Empire, medieval and Renaissance Europe, and U.S./Middle East in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries). In class discussions, readings, and written work, you will have the opportunity to reflect on the following questions (among others): How do the stories we tell about martyrs shape the way we understand religious practices and beliefs? How do narratives of bearing witness, suffering, and death help to illumine relationships between religious and political domains? Finally, how might our current understanding of martyrdom be informed by a study of history?
RELI 294-03 Martyrdom Then and Now TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Paula Cooey
From Socrates to Joan of Arc to suicide bombers, martyrs have chosen to risk theirs lives and even to die, rather than renounce their beliefs or practices. This course explores how stories about martyrs ("martyrologies") relate to the formation of religious identities and
communities. Over the course of the semester, we will analyze martryrologies from the early Christian and Jewish periods, the beginnings of Islam, the medieval age, the sixteenth century, and modernity. Guest faculty will also address comparatively examples of martyrdom from the non-monotheistic traditions. We will pay special attention to the social and political contexts with which martyrs often found themselves at odds (including the Roman Empire, medieval and Renaissance Europe, and U.S./Middle East in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries). In class discussions, readings, and written work, you will have the opportunity to reflect on the following questions (among others): How do the stories we tell about martyrs shape the way we understand religious practices and beliefs? How do narratives of bearing witness, suffering, and death help to illumine relationships between religious and political domains? Finally, how might our current understanding of martyrdom be informed by a study of history?
RELI 394-01 Metaphysics in Secular Thought MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01 and HMCS 394-01; Taught in English*

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RUSS 101-01 Elementary Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 213 Julia Chadaga
RUSS 101-L1 Elementary Russian I Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 101-L2 Elementary Russian I Lab T 02:45 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 101 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 194-01 Things Don't Like Me: The Material World and Wh TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 212 Julia Chadaga
*First Year Course only*
RUSS 203-01 Intermediate Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 212 Gitta Hammarberg
RUSS 203-L1 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 203-L2 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 02:45 pm-04:15 pm OLRI 250 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 251-01 Hussars, Hookers, Holy Fools: 19th Century Russian Literature in Translation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 Gitta Hammarberg
RUSS 256-01 Mass Culture Under Communism TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Karen Rosenflanz
*Cross-listed with HMCS 256-01*
RUSS 272-01 The Post-Soviet Sphere MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Robert Nalbandov
*Cross-listed with INTL 272-01*
RUSS 394-01 Advanced Russian Conversation MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 217 Karen Rosenflanz

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Khaldoun Samman
SOCI 110-02 Introduction to Sociology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Khaldoun Samman
*First Year Course only*
SOCI 170-01 Sociology of Work TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Deborah Smith
SOCI 190-01 Criminal Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 305 Erik Larson
*Permission of instructor required; First day attendance required*
SOCI 194-01 Sociology of Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Deborah Smith
SOCI 240-01 Images of Women in the Middle East M 01:10 pm-04:10 pm HUM 402 Mahnaz Kousha
SOCI 270-01 Interpretive Social Research TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Mahnaz Kousha
SOCI 280-01 Indigenous Peoples' Movements MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Erik Larson
*Cross-listed with INTL 280-01; First day attendance required*
SOCI 480-01 Senior Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Mahnaz Kousha
SOCI 480-01 Senior Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Erik Larson

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Theatre and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
THDA 110-01 Intro to Theatre Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
*First day attendance required* This course provides an introduction to studies in theatre and performance by way of critical dramatic and performance frameworks, from antiquity to present. This is an initiation, in other words, for the student of Theatre and Performance into a selection of global sources of performance forms, histories, and research methods. Around the world, artists have deployed written and embodied crafts for performance, and we will examine interpretational practices for engaging with written as well as performance texts. Key important terms include: representation, mediation, historiography, politics, philosophy, theory, performance -- as well as Theatre, Drama, and Audience. Students engage with the critical tools necessary to begin exploring histories of the critical arts, addressing methodologies of thinking, writing, reading, and researching works in the theater and the performing arts. The organizing project is to carefully consider the question of Mimesis (imitation): how it continues to inform conceptualizations of the field of Theatre and Performance Studies, and what it is that disciplines our research activities in it. In asking 'what is theatre, what is performance? How have they worked?' we also consider Methexis (participation). How are performance practices located? What are the imperatives of difference and repetition for thinking sources of global performance? Sources include Euripides, Plato, Aristotle, Ngugi wa Thiongo, Everyman, Shakespeare, Islamic and Golden Age Spain, Aztec ritual, Mayan theatres, and other indigenous performance practices.
THDA 115-01 Cultures of Dance MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 205 Wynn Fricke
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory/Performance I MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm THEATR STUDIO Cheryl Brinkley
*First day attendance required*
THDA 120-02 Acting Theory/Performance I MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 3 Harry Waters
*First Year Course only*
THDA 125-01 Technical Theater MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser
*$30 materials fee will be charged.*
THDA 125-L1 Technical Theater lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Daniel Keyser
THDA 125-L2 Technical Theater Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Daniel Keyser
THDA 145-01 Make-Up Design and Application TR 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett
*$45 materials fee will be charged.*
THDA 194-01 Theatre and Performance in the Twin Cities W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required.* The Twin cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul are second only to New York City for the number of theatre and performance tickets sold annually, supporting an active creative community, and artistic institutions. In this class we attend to many aspects of performance in the vibrant Theatre and Performance communities -- including Dance -- of the Twin Cities. We will attend theatre and dance performances throughout the city as a group, and study the genres of their crafts through the examination of texts and performance in the classroom. The course meets once a week (Wednesday night), in order to facilitate a schedule of evening excursions, and on-campus seminars. The viewing of performances alternates with campus classroom seminars (sometimes every other week, or every second or third week), in which we discuss play and other kinds of performance practices, reflect on their enactments in performance, learn about the key terminologies for the poetics of work in performance, and develop our capacities for interpretational strategies in the performing arts. We will also study the distinctive missions (and audiences) of such acclaimed institutions as the Walker Art Center, the Southern Theatre, the Penumbra Theatre, the Ten Thousand Things Theatre Company, the Guthrie Theatre, The Theatre at the University of Minnesota, and Macalester�s own mainstage theatre productions. In sum, we make Macalester's Fine Arts Division, and the Theatre and Dance Department, our critical home: they are our laboratory spaces for studies in artistic form in Theatre and Performance.
THDA 294-01 Topics in Acting: "Brain to Bone" Aliveness, From Rehearsal to Performance MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Beth Cleary
*Permission of instructor required.* The performance experience, for both actor and spectator, is a collaboration in "aliveness:" switched-on cognition, participatory embodiment systems (muscles, nerves, organs, etc.), moment-to-moment discovery. This course will establish effective practices for character embodiment for curious and serious students, while bypassing the "head trips" that underlie much of naturalistic acting. Students will learn how to apply accurate and experiential knowledge of their own body -- from brain to bone, ligament to heart -- to the building of character: using playwrights' language as cues for physical responses; finding and sustaining characters' voices and physicalities; being able to inhabit characters' whole system(s), physical, emotional, social. The work of the class will involve anatomy study and research, exercises and explorations, original application of work to character, and ultimately scene and monologue work. The class will be highly physical, and meet six hours per week. Preference will be given to students who have taken a Theatre acting course, though well-described curiosity and commitment will be considered favorably.
THDA 294-02 Hip Hop Performance: REMIX2009 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Harry Waters
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with HMCS 294-03 and AMST 294-03.* What is Hip Hop culture, what is Hip Hop performance, and can we stage such a performance here at Macalester? In line with these questions, the course is divided into sections. From the beginning we will read and discuss critical examinations of hip hop culture. We will learn about leading figures and events in the development of hip hop and talk about its� sexism, homophobia and consumerism. We will investigate the theory and practice of hip hop performance, including one person shows, theatrical performances, and various hybrid forms (such as the hip-opera).This will include a series of workshops with local and national hip hop artists on graffiti writing, spoken word, hip hop dance, and dj�ing/producing, during which we will construct and present a class produced Hip Hop Performance. Limited Class enrollment.
THDA 294-03 Staging Hard Times: Global/Local Practices MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR STUDIO Beth Cleary
n the 1930s in New York City, theater artists made galvanzing and legendary performances based on newspaper reports of repossessions and evictions. In Soweto and Johannesburg, South Africa, under the apartheid State of Emergency in the 1980s, theater activists rehearsed plays about police round-ups and passbook burnings. And in the streets of Indian cities, theater activists draw crowds to their short plays about food prices, government corruption, and housing shortages. We will look at the texts and practices of theater artists who made (and make) performance work about "hard times," through a comparative study of selected practices, contexts and time periods. How does a text read as not only reflective of its times but "resistant" or revolutionary? How do the persuasions of performance -- the action of text, body, collectivity, image -- constitute a discourse worthy of censorship or repression? Are these endeavors "merely" utopic? How does historical/political context affect such endeavors? And is it important for these endeavors to be "effective"? Who or what decides? Students will study texts (playscripts, accounts, designs, etc.) and reconstruct practices: performance research exercises, dramaturgical collectives, performer-audience relationships. Projects in the class will include several original works created in small groups, based in the practices studied, and performing contemporary "hard times." No prerequisites, though the Theatre/Dance course "Issues and Methods in Performance Studies," is recommended.
THDA 489-01 Performance Theory Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
*First day attendance required.* This seminar examines the vibrant and highly productive field of Performance Studies, and its attentions to theatrical, artistic, and cultural practices, focusing on the key theoretcial innovations which mobilize interest in Performance across many disciplines. In particular, we will pursue the question of performance, and performance theory, in the current era of globalization, ie: how do studies in theatre, performance, and dance engage with the many registers of thinking what Spivak calls `a planetary� arts and criticism? How do performance artists and theorists conceptualize and address formal artistic methodologies, culture, and globalization? Our premise is that all researchers are cultural producers, at once located within processes of globalization and mapping their terrains. Understanding theory as a method of doing (nothing more, nothing less) we examine some of the essential critical vocabularies for thinking the site-specific theories and practices of performance and globality together. Readings in Theatre and Performance research, in addition to Literary, Media, Anthropology, and Cultural Studies, contribute to our study of contemporary Performance Studies.
THDA 21-01 African Dance WF 10:10 am-11:40 am THEATR 6 Patricia Brown
THDA 41-01 Modern Dance I TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 43-01 Modern Dance III MW 03:50 pm-05:20 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 51-01 Ballet I MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Stanchfield
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Sharon Varosh
THDA 60-01 Dance Ensemble TBA TBA THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
*Permission of instructor required*

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
WGSS 105-01 Transnational Perspectives TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Paige Sweet
*First day attendance required.* In this course we will explore how the interlocking categories of race, class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship shape our lived experiences. We will be attentive to the global dimension of these categories and how issues such as globalization, immigration, nationhood, and technologies of communication inform the ways we understand ourselves in relation to others and as individuals. The goal of the course is to understand global feminist struggles for gender, racial, sexual, and economic equality. Toward this end, we will examine the cultural (artistic, literary, media) and material (labor, familial) forms that feminists use to advance these goals.
WGSS 110-01 Sexuality, Race, and Nation: Intro to LGBT Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Corie Hammers
*Cross-listed with AMST 112-01; First day attendance required* This interdisciplinary course offers an introduction to LGBT and queer studies. Using empirical studies, film, narratives, critical texts and various methodologies, we will trace the emergence of LGBT studies and its linkages with, and divergence from, queer theory. This critical interrogation of sexuality is one heavily influenced by feminism and social constructionist perspectives. Central to this course will be an exploration of �normativity� as it relates to sex and sexuality, how power is implicated in queer politics and sexualities, and the ways in which race, gender, nationality, and dis/ability impact and influence sexual identities and sexual subjectivities.
WGSS 117-01 Women, Health, Reproduction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Elizabeth Jansen
*Cross-listed with BIOL 117-01; First day attendance required*
WGSS 127-01 Women, Gender & Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Beth Severy-Hoven
*Cross-listed with CLAS 127-01*
WGSS 194-01 Goddesses and Ghosts: Images of Women in Chinese Culture and Literature MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with ASIA 194-01; First Year Course Only*
WGSS 194-02 Language and Gender in Japanese Society TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 402 Satoko Suzuki
*Cross-listed with JAPA 194-01 and LING 194-01; First Year Course only*
WGSS 194-03 Race, Sex, and Biology: A History of Differences MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 216 Christine Manganaro
*Cross-listed with HIST 194-01*
WGSS 200-01 Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Corie Hammers
* This course introduces students to contemporary feminist thought and queer studies. We will examine an array of feminist perspectives and methodologies which seek new and emergent possibilities and realities. Out of these feminist frameworks, we trace the development of queer theory. In addition to closely interrogating the intersections and antagonisms between these two fields of study, we examine their �liberatory potential� and limitations when it comes to representation and dealing with �difference.� More specifically, we explore the forms of privilege and power operating within feminism and queer studies by way of examining globalization, heterosexism, citizenship status and the intersections of race, sexuality, and gender.
WGSS 210-01 20th Century Anglophone Women Writers TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Paige Sweet
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-01. * In this course we will examine a selection of texts from the Anglophone (English-speaking) Caribbean. We will focus on themes of family and place; memory and history; gender, race, and sexuality; and variations of Caribbean English. Readings will include short stories, novels, poems, and essays. In the course of our study we will consider how various writers use or modify traditional literary genres (novels, memoires, poems, etc.), how they incorporate or fictionalize personal experiences and historical events, the politics of standard and non-standard uses of English (and how these standards are determined), and how these factors influence representations of gender and cultural identity.
WGSS 252-01 Gender, Sexualities and Feminist Visual Culture MW 01:10 pm-02:40 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with ART 252-01*
WGSS 294-01 Topics in Feminist Postcolonial or Postmodern Literature TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Paige Sweet
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-02.* What is the novel? Is it a political form? Is it a popular genre? Is it gendered? Since its inception in the modern period, the novel has been one medium through which nations fashion their self-identities. But it has also been dismissed at times as a �feminine� form that lacks serious literary value. This course will examine the novel genre and its specific contours in postmodern literature. Our goal will be to trace how the novel is used as a way to articulate desire and imagine different ways that gender and sexuality might be expressed. We will be especially attentive to the norms, taboos, and transgressions that organize our understanding of gender and sexuality. At all points our readings will be informed by the historical, political, and cultural circumstances of each text and how these conditions come to bear upon female and male sexuality.

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