Spring 2009 Class Schedule

This is a class schedule from a previous term. View current class schedules

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Classics
Cognitive and Neuroscience Studies
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theatre and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
AMST 101-01 Explorations of Race/Racism MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Daniel Gilbert
*First day attendance required.*
AMST 110-01 Intro to African American St MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 217 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required.*
AMST 140-01 Black Public Intellectuals W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 214 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required.*
AMST 194-01 American Indian Sovereignty and Activism MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 112 Scott Shoemaker
*First day attendance required.* This course introduces students to the complicated history and issues facing American Indian nations in regards to American Indian sovereignty. We will investigate the ambiguity of "sovereignty" in conjunction with the numerous treaties, foundational doctrines, legislation, laws, and Federal Indian policies that have worked to limit, eliminate, or expand American Indian sovereignty. We will look at the complicated relationships of American Indian nations, the Federal Government, and State governments. American Indian nations, groups, and individuals have not been passive receivers of these imposed doctrines, laws, legislation, and policies, but have dealt with these in specific ways through activism.
AMST 194-02 Topics in US History: The History of Feminism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with HIST 190-01 and WGSS 194-02.*
AMST 203-01 Race, Ethnicity and Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Paru Shah
*Cross-listed with POLI 203-01.*
AMST 224-01 African American History: Slavery/Emancipation/Reconstruction TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with HIST 224-01.*
AMST 294-01 Race, Cultural Politics, and Social Movements TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Jane Rhodes
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with HIST 294-04.* Since the nineteenth century, the struggles for racial equality and ethnic identity formation in the United States have been situated within formal and informal social movements. This course examines the central role of culture - including music, art, performance, literature, and media - in race-based activism. We will consider various aspects of the African American freedom struggle, Asian American and Latino/a activism, and the indigenous rights movement, paying particular attention to how culture functions as a tool for organizing, group cohesion, and outreach. The course will also consider how popular culture reflects and shapes social movements.
AMST 294-02 Environmental Justice W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 170 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with ENVI 237-01 and HIST 237-01; first day attendance required.*
AMST 294-03 Race, Class, and Gender in American Art MW 02:20 pm-04:10 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with ART 375-01 and WGSS 394-01.*
AMST 294-04 Native American History TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 247 Andrea Cremer
*Cross-listed with HIST 225-01.*
AMST 294-05 Re-Envisioning Education and Democracy TR 08:00 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Cross-listed with EDUC 280-01 and POLI 211-01; first day attendance required.*
AMST 294-06 Race and Ethnicity in Japan TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Christopher Scott
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-01 and JAPA 294-01.*
AMST 294-07 Race and Masculinity in Modern U.S. History M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Daniel Gilbert
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-08.*
AMST 294-08 Community-Based Theater MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 Harry Waters
*Cross-listed with THDA 210-01.*
AMST 300-01 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar F 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 102 Karin San Juan
*First day attendance required; additional course meeting time on Thursdays 3-4:30pm (Humanities 102); 2 credit mandatory internship is required.*
AMST 300-01 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 112 Karin San Juan
*First day attendance required; additional course meeting time on Thursdays 3-4:30pm (Humanities 102); 2 credit mandatory internship is required.*
AMST 334-01 Cultural Studies and the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 113 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with HMCS 334-01.*
AMST 354-01 Blackness in the Media MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 402 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with HMCS 354-01.*
AMST 394-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 384-01 and INTL 384-01; first day attendance required.*
AMST 394-02 Latino Poetics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Kristin Naca
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-03.*
AMST 394-03 Locating US Latino Studies MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 112 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01; first day attendance required.*
AMST 394-04 Public History W 01:10 pm-04:10 pm THEATR 205 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-01.*
AMST 394-05 African-American Literature 1900 to the Present MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with ENGL 376-01.*
AMST 494-01 Seminar in American Authors: Post-Modern African-American Literature M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with ENGL 403-01.*
AMST 494-02 Senior Seminar: African American Psychology MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 300 Kendrick Brown
*Cross-listed with PSYC 488-02.*
AMST 494-03 Theorizing Contemporary US Latino Popular Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 David Sunderland
*Cross-listed with HISP 440-01.*

top of page

Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ANTH 101-01 General Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06 Scott Legge
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06 Olga Gonz�lez
ANTH 115-01 Biological Anthropology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06 Scott Legge
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Sonia Patten
*First day attendance required.*
ANTH 248-01 Magic/Witchcraft/Religion MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 05 Diana Dean
ANTH 253-01 Comparative Muslim Cultures TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Smadar Lavie
*Cross-listed with HMCS 294-03, INTL 253-01 and WGSS 294-06.*
ANTH 255-01 Peoples/Cultures Latin America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonz�lez
*Cross-listed with LATI 255-01.*
ANTH 280-01 Topics in Linguistic Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Naran Bilik
*Cross-listed with LING 280-01.*
ANTH 294-01 Peoples and Cultures of China MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Naran Bilik
ANTH 358-01 Anthropology of Violence TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonz�lez
ANTH 380-01 Adv Medical Anthropology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Sonia Patten
ANTH 394-02 Darfur: Conflict and Human Rights in Africa W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
Darfur, located in Western Sudan, has been described as "Rwanda in slow motion," a reference to the unfathomable destruction of a people that occurred over the course of 100 days in Rwanda in 1994 and that has unfolded painfully over the last few years in Darfur. A significant difference between Rwanda and Darfur, however, has been the remarkable and unprecedented international response to the unfolding situation in Sudan. This course will use in-depth and focused analysis to explore critical intersections in conflict, human rights, the state, institutional regimes, and international responses as they play out in Darfur. The course is divided into three parts. First, we will examine the social, political, economic, and historical context of Sudan in an effort to understand what precipitated the explosion of violence in Darfur. In particular, we will compare and contrast the Darfur conflict with the North-South conflict in Sudan. Next, we will examine the international response to Darfur through a consideration of issues of human rights and international responses to the conflict. While the usual players�governments, the media, NGOs�will be examined, in this course we will also consider the roles of African public intellectuals and activist groups such as U.S. high school and college students and celebrities. As a component of this part of the course, students will work in groups on a civic engagement project of their design. The course will conclude with an examination of post-conflict possibilities to learn more about the complex processes involved in rebuilding and forging new communities when conflict ends.
ANTH 490-01 Senior Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy

top of page

Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ART 130-01 Drawing I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 123 Megan Vossler
*First day attendance required.*
ART 130-02 Drawing I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 135 Stanton Sears
*First day attendance required.*
ART 149-01 Principles of Art TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 227 Christopher Atkins
ART 160-01 History of Art I MW 09:40 am-11:10 am ART 113 Paul Wilson
*Cross-listed with CLAS 160-01.*
ART 194-01 Arts of the Islamic World TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Aditi Chandra
This course is an introduction to the arts of the Islamic world from its beginnings in 7th-century Arabia to the present. Given the historical, chronological and geographic breadth of the material, our purpose is to situate the painting, architecture and film (among other media) that is the subject of our study into their specific socio-cultural, economic, and religious contexts Throughout the course, we explore issues of power, trade, regionalism and cultural interaction within the framework of artistic production and reception.
ART 232-01 Fibers I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 116 Jean Ross
*First day attendance required.*
ART 234-01 Painting I MW 01:10 pm-04:30 pm ART 128 Christine Willcox
*First day attendance required.*
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 135 Stanton Sears
*First day attendance required.*
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 119 Ruthann Godollei
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
ART 237-01 Ceramic Art I: Handbuilding TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Signature of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
ART 294-02 Popular Visual Cultures in India TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm ART 113 Aditi Chandra
This course examines the popular visual cultures of colonial and post-colonial India. The diverse materials examined, including photographs, postcards, posters, calendar art, guidebooks, advertisements, and films, are read in view of themes such as colonialism, nationalism, archaeology, conservation, tourism and commodification. Throughout the course, we investigate definitions of the popular image, cultural consumption and political identity.
ART 294-03 Studies in Roman Archaeology: Rome the City TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 David Oosterhuis
*Cross-listed with CLAS 271-01*
ART 370-01 Drawing II TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 123 Megan Vossler
ART 371-01 Painting II MW 08:30 am-11:50 am ART 128 Christine Willcox
*First day attendance required.*
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TR TBA ART 119 Ruthann Godollei
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Signature of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
ART 375-01 Race, Class, and Gender in American Art MW 02:20 pm-04:10 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-03 and WGSS 394-01.*
ART 487-01 Art Hist Methodology Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
ART 488-01 Senior Seminar MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ART Ruthann Godollei
*First day attendance required; meets in the Fine Arts Lounge.*
ART 490-08 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Ruthann Godollei
ART 490-16 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Stanton Sears
ART 490-20 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Christine Willcox

top of page

Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ASIA 102-01 Elementary Chinese II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 101 Jin Stone
ASIA 102-02 Elementary Chinese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Jin Stone
ASIA 102-L1 Elementary Chinese II Lab W 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 102-L2 Elementary Chinese II Lab W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 102-L3 Elementary Chinese II Lab W 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 213 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 124-01 Asian Religions TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 226 Erik Davis
*Cross-listed with RELI 124-01.*
ASIA 204-01 Intermediate Chinese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 102 Patricia Anderson
ASIA 204-02 Intermediate Chinese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 102 Patricia Anderson
ASIA 204-L1 Intermediate Chinese II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 370 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 204-L2 Intermediate Chinese II Lab R 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 247 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 204-L3 Intermediate Chinese II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 275-01 History of Modern China TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 275-01.*
ASIA 278-01 War Crimes and Memory in Contemporary East Asia TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed wtih HIST 278-01.*
ASIA 294-01 20th Century Chinese Literature MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 102 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with HMCS 294-04.*
ASIA 294-02 Chinese Music TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 202 Chuen-Fung Wong
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with MUSI 294-01.*
ASIA 304-01 Advanced Chinese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 110 Xin Yang
ASIA 304-L1 Advanced Chinese II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 113 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 304-L2 Advanced Chinese II Lab T 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 113 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 408-01 Fourth Year Chinese II MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Yuedong Merritt

top of page

Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
BIOL 194-01 Intro Community/Global Health MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Elizabeth Jansen
BIOL 194-01 Intro Community/Global Health MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Devavani Chatterjea
BIOL 194-L1 Community/Global Health Lab T 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 170 Elizabeth Jansen
BIOL 194-L1 Community/Global Health Lab T 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 170 Devavani Chatterjea
BIOL 194-L2 Community/Global Health Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 277 Elizabeth Jansen
BIOL 194-L2 Community/Global Health Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 277 Devavani Chatterjea
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Christopher Calderone
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Michael Anderson
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Paul Overvoorde
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Mary Montgomery
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Paul Overvoorde
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Sarah Boyer
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity/Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Sarah Boyer
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity/Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity/Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Sarah Boyer
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity/Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01.*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1.*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2.*
BIOL 342-01 Animal Behavior/Ecology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
BIOL 342-L1 Animal Behavior/Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
BIOL 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-01.*
BIOL 352-L1 Biochemistry II Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-L1.*
BIOL 352-L2 Biochemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-L2.*
BIOL 353-01 Advanced Genetics R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Paul Overvoorde
BIOL 358-01 Microbiology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 Steven Sundby
BIOL 358-L1 Microbiology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Steven Sundby
BIOL 394-01 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 270 Kristina Curry
BIOL 394-02 Current Directions in Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 101 Thaddeus Brink
This upper level seminar course will focus on nervous system structure and neuronal communication and how this leads to behavior. Students will become familiar with neuroanatomical structures of the brain, and more importantly, will examine the neural circuitry that is thought to underlie different behaviors. In addition, students will gain an appreciation for the diverse ways that neuronal communication occurs, with a special emphasis placed on the major neurotransmitter and receptor systems. Finally, students will explore how damage or other changes within individual neurons or circuitry can lead to a variety of disease and maladaptive behaviors. Prerequisites: Biology 205 (Cell/Genetics II) or Biology 255 (Cell Biology & Genetics Lab), Biology 260 (Genetics), and Biology 265 (Cell Biology). Chemistry 211 (Organic Chemistry I) is highly recommended. Three hours per week, which will include lectures, discussions, and some lab work. (4 credits)
BIOL 394-L1 Comp Vertebrate Anatomy Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Kristina Curry
BIOL 472-01 Research in Molecular Biology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 170 Mary Montgomery
BIOL 472-L1 Research Molecular Biology Lb T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 264 Mary Montgomery
BIOL 481-01 Seminar in Evolution MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Sarah Boyer
BIOL 489-01 Biology Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Paul Overvoorde

top of page

Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CHEM 112-01 General Chemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan
CHEM 112-02 General Chemistry II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Susan Green
CHEM 112-L1 General Chemistry II Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Robert Rossi
*First day attendance required; $6 lab fee charged.*
CHEM 112-L2 General Chemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Thomas Varberg
*First day attendance required; $6 lab fee charged.*
CHEM 112-L3 General Chemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $6 lab fee charged.*
CHEM 112-L4 General Chemistry II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $6 lab fee charged.*
CHEM 212-01 Organic Chemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Rebecca Hoye
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 212-02 Organic Chemistry II M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 350 Ronald Brisbois
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 212-L1 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 212-L2 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 James Wollack
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 212-L3 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Susan Green
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 212-L4 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Susan Green
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 222-01 Analytical Chemistry MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata
CHEM 222-L1 Analytical Chemistry Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Keith Kuwata
*First day attendance required.*
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan
CHEM 312-01 Physical Chemistry II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg
CHEM 312-L1 Physical Chemistry II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg
CHEM 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-01.*
CHEM 352-L1 Biochemistry II Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-L1; first day attendance required.*
CHEM 352-L2 Biochemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-L2.*
CHEM 394-01 Computational Chemistry M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata
CHEM 394-02 Supramolecular Chemistry MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 300 Ronald Brisbois

top of page

Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CLAS 123-01 Introduction to Archaeology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Andrew Overman
CLAS 129-01 Greek Myths Troy to Hollywood MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 160-01 Intro to Ancient/Medieval Art MW 09:40 am-11:10 am ART 113 Paul Wilson
*Cross-listed with ART 160-01.*
CLAS 194-01 20th Century Arabic Literature and History TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Wessam El-Meligi
*Cross-listed with HIST 194-01 and HMCS 194-01.* Course NOT approved for the Classics
major. The twentieth century witnessed enormous social change in Middle East. We will analyze Arabic literature in light of the effect of the World Wars, the beginning of the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the sweeping current of republicanism, socialism and neo-nationalism. Students will become familiar with major literary figures of the Arab world, and textual analysis of specific work will be carried out within a framework of feminist theory, post-modern reading and psychoanalysis. Special attention will be paid to the development of Arabic cinema as a means of exploring the clash between censorship and extremism versus intellectual liberalism in contemporary Arabic societies. No prerequisites.
CLAS 212-01 Elementary Latin II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 David Oosterhuis
CLAS 212-L1 Elementary Latin II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 002 David Oosterhuis
CLAS 214-01 Elementary Arabic II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Antoine Mefleh
CLAS 214-02 Elementary Arabic II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Antoine Mefleh
CLAS 218-01 Elementary Hebrew II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 010 Susan Dworsky
CLAS 235-01 Elementary Greek II MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Timothy Beck
CLAS 271-01 Studies in Roman Archaeology: Rome the City TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 David Oosterhuis
*Cross-listed with ART 294-03*
CLAS 332-01 Intermediate Latin: Poetry MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 David Oosterhuis
CLAS 362-01 Intermediate Greek: Poetry MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 394-01 Intermediate Arabic II TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 Wessam El-Meligi
CLAS 483-01 Advanced Reading in Latin: Latin Elegy TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Corby Kelly

top of page

Cognitive and Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CNS 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with PSYC 248-01.*
CNS 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 371 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with PSYC 248-L1.*
CNS 300-01 Directed Research in CNS TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak
CNS 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak

top of page

Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
COMP 121-01 Intro to Scientific Program MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 258 Yevgeniy Podolyan
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 258 Susan Fox
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
COMP 124-L1 Object-Oriented Programming Lb T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
COMP 240-01 Computer Systems Organization MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Susan Fox
COMP 261-01 Theory of Computation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Susan Fox
*Cross-listed with MATH 361-01.*
COMP 340-01 Digital Electronics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 270 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 340-01.*
COMP 340-L1 Digital Electronics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 147 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 340-L1.*
COMP 342-01 Operating Systems and Computer Architecture MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
COMP 365-01 Scientific Computation TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan
*Cross-listed with MATH 365-01.*
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 241 Karen Saxe

top of page

Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ECON 108-01 Quantitative Thinking TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Lisa Giddings
*Cross-listed with MATH 108-01.*
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Jeff Evans
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Amy Damon
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 305 Sarah West
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Sarah West
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Liang Ding
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Paul Aslanian
ECON 225-01 Comparative Econ Systems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with INTL 225-01.*
ECON 242-01 Economics of Gender TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Karine Moe
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-03.*
ECON 252-01 Economics of Not-For-Profit MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 05 Paul Aslanian
ECON 294-01 Economics of Migration MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Amy Damon
This course will examine the global movement of people through an economic lens. This course studies the impact that emigration has on the economy of the home country, such as brain drain and population change, the historic role that migration has played in economic development, and finally the effect that immigration has on immigrant-receiving countries. The various economic issues in the current immigration debate in the United States will be analyzed including the economic assimilation of immigrants, and the impact of immigration on native born workers. Prerequisite: Economics 119.
ECON 323-01 Economic Restructuring in Latin America TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Raymond Robertson
*Cross-listed with INTL 323-01.*
ECON 353-01 Managerial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Jeff Evans
ECON 356-01 Capital Markets TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Liang Ding
ECON 361-01 Intermed Microecon Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Vasant Sukhatme
ECON 371-01 Intermed Macroecon Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Pete Ferderer
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 309 Raymond Robertson
ECON 381-L1 Introduction Econometrics Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 309 Raymond Robertson
ECON 394-01 Intro to Securities Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Joyce Minor
This course will primarily focus on equity securities analysis (stocks) from the perspective of institutional (Wall Street) investors. Topics will include industry analysis and forecasting, financial statement analysis, fundamental company analysis and valuation methods. Students will form industry groups and will each research a company in that industry. Students will build complete historical and projected financial statement models in Excel. The end product of the course will be a company report written by each student. Prerequisites: Economics 113 and 119.
ECON 431-01 Public Finance MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Sarah West
ECON 442-01 Labor Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Karine Moe
ECON 461-01 Selected Topics in Microecon MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Vasant Sukhatme
*Course restricted to seniors only.*
ECON 481-01 Advanced Econometrics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 490-01 Behavorial and Experimental Economics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am LEOCTR 36 Pete Ferderer

top of page

Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01; first day attendance required.*
EDUC 230-01 Youth Development in Changing World TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*First day attendance required.*
EDUC 260-01 Philosophy of Education MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 214 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*First day attendance required.*
EDUC 280-01 Re-Envisioning Education and Democracy TR 08:00 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-05 and POLI 211-01; first day attendance required.*
EDUC 300-01 Education/Family/Community W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Marceline DuBose
*First day attendance required; course meets 2nd half of semester only.*
EDUC 320-01 Educating Exceptional Students W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*First day attendance required; course meets 1st half of semester only.*
EDUC 394-01 Education and Emerging Technologies M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 111 Brad Belbas
*Course will meet in Humanities 304.*

top of page

English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENGL 101-01 College Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Jennifer White
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 120-01 Intro to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Ping Wang
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 120-02 Intro to Creative Writing TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Ping Wang
*First day attendance required; section reserved for freshmen and sophomores only.*
ENGL 120-03 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 208 Bradley Liening
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 120-04 Intro to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 James Dawes
*First day attendance required; section reserved for freshmen and sophomores only.*
ENGL 120-05 Intro to Creative Writing TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 Peter Bognanni
*First day attendance required; section reserved for freshmen and sophomores only.*
ENGL 120-06 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 011 Stephen Healey
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 130-01 American Voices: Multi-ethnic Literature and American History TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 111 Michael Cohen
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 135-01 Poetry MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 305 Theresa Krier
ENGL 137-01 Novel TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 James Dawes
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 140-01 Shakespeare TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 228 Elizabeth Weixel
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 265-01 Justice M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 James Dawes
*Cross-listed with ENVI 265-01; first day attendance required.*
ENGL 280-01 Crafts of Writing: Poetry M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Jeffrey Shotts
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 Peter Bognanni
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 282-01 Crafts of Writing: Cr Non Fict TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Marlon James
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 294-01 International Crime Film TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 226 Casey Jarrin
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 304-01 Medieval Monsters/Magic MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 304 Theresa Krier
ENGL 311-01 Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Elizabeth Weixel
ENGL 330-01 Romantic Literature MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Kristie Allen
ENGL 332-01 Victorian Literature MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 228 Kristie Allen
ENGL 341-01 20th Century British Novel: Diasporic London TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Casey Jarrin
*Cross-listed with INTL 394-02.*
ENGL 371-01 19th Century American Lit TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Michael Cohen
ENGL 376-01 African Amer Lit 1900-Present MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-05.*
ENGL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01 and INTL 384-01; first day attendance required.*
ENGL 394-01 Poetry of the Environment MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 304 Theresa Krier
*Cross-listed with ENVI 394-01.*
ENGL 394-02 Topics in 19th Century British Literature W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Kristie Allen
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 394-03 Latino Poetics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Kristin Naca
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-02.*
ENGL 394-04 Comparative (Neo/Post) Modernities TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with HMCS 394-02 and WGSS 315-01; first day attendance required.*
ENGL 402-01 Seminar in British Authors: Oscar Wilde M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Casey Jarrin
*First day attendance required.*
ENGL 403-01 Seminar in American Authors: Post-Modern African-American Literature W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with AMST 494-01.*
ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Ping Wang

top of page

Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENVI 130-01 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 100 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 130-01.*
ENVI 130-L1 Science Renewable Energy Lab T 09:15 am-11:15 am OLRI 154 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 130-L1
ENVI 133-01 Environmental Science M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Gregory Downing
*First day attendance required.*
ENVI 133-01 Environmental Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 113 Gregory Downing
*First day attendance required.*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Jerald Dosch
*First day attendance required.*
ENVI 194-01 Introduction to Global Environmental History MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Ellen Arnold
*Cross-listed with HIST 194-02.*
ENVI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 101 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with POLI 215-01; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Karen Warren
*Cross-listed with PHIL 229-01.*
ENVI 237-01 Environmental Justice W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 170 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02 and HIST 237-01; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 265-01 Justice M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 James Dawes
*Cross-listed with ENGL 265-01; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 280-01 Environmental Classics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning
*First day attendance required.*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01.*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1.*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2.*
ENVI 294-01 Psychology of Sustainable Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 301 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with PSYC 294-01; first day attendance required.* This course is an introduction to the psychology of sustainable behavior. As scientific evidence of degraded world environmental conditions accumulates, researchers from many disciplines are joining the effort to find solutions. Technological innovation will certainly play an important role, but equally important are behavior changes at both the organizational and individual level. Psychologists use their training in the scientific study of human behavior to examine why people do or do not act sustainably in a variety of situations. In this course we will study this body of research and use psychological principles, theories, and methods to understand the factors that underlie both environmentally destructive as well as environmentally sustainable actions. A significant component of the course will be direct application of theory to one's own actions as well as to a campus-based sustainability issue. Prerequisite for Psychology majors: Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 100). No prerequisite for ES majors.
ENVI 343-01 The US and Global Environment M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 243 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with HIST 343-01; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 368-01 Sustain Dev/Global Future TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with INTL 368-01; first day attendance required.*
ENVI 394-01 Poetry of the Environment MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 304 Theresa Krier
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-01.*
ENVI 488-01 Sr Seminar in Environmental St TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Suzanne Savanick Hansen
*First day attendance required.*

top of page

French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 111 Peter Vantine
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 102-L2 French II Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 113 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 102-L3 French II Lab R 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 300 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 111 Abou Konte
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 111-02 Accelerated French I-II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 112 Abou Konte
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 110 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 111-L2 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 09:10 am-10:10 am OLRI 250 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 111-L3 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 203-01 French III MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 227 Anne Carayon
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 203-02 French III MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Anne Carayon
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab R 10:20 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 110 Peter Vantine
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 111 Jo�lle Vitiello
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-03 Text, Film and Media MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 111 Jo�lle Vitiello
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab T 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 300 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab T 10:20 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab R 10:20 am-11:10 am Sandra Vende
*Lab will meet in the French House.*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am Sandra Vende
*Lab will meet in the French House.*
FREN 204-L5 Text, Film and Media Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 204-L6 Text, Film and Media Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Sandra Vende
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 402 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression Lab T 10:20 am-11:20 am Mariane Yade
*Lab will meet in the French House.*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 305-L3 Advanced Expression Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 306-01 Intro to Literary Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 227 Peter Vantine
*First day attendance required.*
FREN 394-01 La civilisation fran�aise en �volution from Lascaux to 1789 MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required.* The course La civilisation fran�aise en �volution from Lascaux to 1789 offers non-French students the possibility to acquaint the fundamental notions that form the basis of the bagage culturel that their French counterparts would have. The goal makes explicit those everyday aspect of life that are truly second nature to the individual and to which he or she rarely gives much thought. The class will open with a Panorama de la France. This preliminary section provides a brief and schematic overview of France, including descriptions of basic geographical features and socioplitical structures, a listing of significant historical milestones and maps of France and the Francophone world. The body of the class consists of six dossiers, each treating a particular aspect of French culture: Dossier un: la pr�sence du pass� describes examples of the physical manifestations of French History that provide constant reminders to the French of their rich and varied civilization. Dossier deux: quelques personnages cl�s is composed of a series of portraits of personalities that the French learn, from the early age, to identify as key figures who played pivotal roles in the creation of their culture. Dossier trois: de la monarchie � la R�publique traces the evolution of political institutions in France from the beginnings of the monarchy and the establishment of the Ancien R�gime through the death of that system and the progressive maturation of republican ideals. Dossier quatre: La soci�t� describes the development of social structures, including the changing role of women in France, from the simplistic and hierarchical society of the Midlle Ages to the complex and shifting social situation of the modern world. Dossier cinq: les mouvements et les id�es provides a scketch of key philosophical movements and intellectual concepts as they evolved. Dossier six; les mouvements litt�raires et arttstiques offers an overview of French cultural life in all its diversity, focusing on pivotal authors, artist and works. Course is taught in French.
FREN 410-01 Art and Ideas in French Culture: Since 1968 MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 402 Anne Carayon
*Cross-listed with HMCS 410-01; first day attendance required.* This course will provide a chronological exposure to the prevailing trends and characteristics of the visual arts (paintings, sculptures, installations�) in France from the highly politicized 60's and 70's until today. Through the use of films, slides, French web art sites and critical essays, these works will be studied and problematized from a sociological, political and cultural perspective. Special attention will be given to the not-so-new notion of "francit�" embedded in France's unique "politique nationale culturelle" as opposed to other visual art practices which reflect an increasingly pluralistic French society as well as the erosion of traditional national boundaries.
This course will be taught in French. Prerequisite French 306.
FREN 494-01 De l'extr�me-orient aux antipodes: repr�sentations francophones de l'Asie et du Pacifique MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 113 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required.* This course is an introduction to colonial and postcolonial representations of the French territories in the South Pacific, including French Polynesia and New Caledonia, as well as the former French colonies of 'Indochine.' We will examine the process by which the colonized territories of the Pacific islands and South-east Asia are constructed as objects of desire and difference for a metropolitan French public, and link the formation of these colonialist ideologies to their political and economic underpinnings. We will also explore the interrogation, subversion and displacement of colonial ideology in contemporary postcolonial francophone literature and film by intellectuals in the Pacific and in the Indochinese diaspora. The course will begin with a introduction to the theory of ideology and an overview of the French colonial presence in the Asia-Pacific region. We will then move to examine the conceptualization of the Pacific as an 'antipodes' of Europe beginning in French thought in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, i.e. as an uncanny opposite or other characterized by its inversion of often corrupt metropolitan social, political and religious values and norms. This section of the course will conclude with a survey of recent work by Kanak and Polynesian writers that confront the realities of the troubled legacy of French colonialism in the Pacific. The last part of the course will begin with an examination of exoticized representations of French Indochina that draw on a long history of European stereotypes concerning the 'Orient.' The course will end with the study of recent work that thematizes the conflicts experienced by the descendants of those former Indochinese colonial subjects who immigrated to metropolitan France. The course bibliography will include texts and images by R�tif de la Bretonne, Pierre Loti, Paul Gauguin, Victor Segalen, D�w� Gorod�, Marguerite Duras, Andr� Malraux, Linda L�, and R�gis Wargnier. Course is taught in French.

top of page

Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOG 111-01 Human Geography of Global Issues MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 William Moseley
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 111-02 Human Geography of Global Issues TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geographic Information Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Holly Barcus
*First day attendance required; $20 material fee required.*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geographic Information Systems Lab M 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geographic Information Systems Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 243-01 Regional Geography of Africa TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 William Moseley
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 256-01 Medical Geography W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 258-01 Geography of Environmental Hazards TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 294-01 Regional Geography of the Middle East M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06 Katrinka Somdahl-Sands
*First day attendance required.* The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the variety of geographic factors that make up the area traditionally known as the Middle East (Egypt to Iran). Its aim is to enable the student to understand and appreciate the complex relationships of this fascinating region, both internally and to the rest of the world. We investigate the region from a variety of scales, including the individual, the ethnic group, the city and state. The course begins by laying a geographic foundation and then moving off into specific locales around the tri-continental hub. We will pay particular attention to how geography investigates some of the region's most contentious contemporary issue. Through a combination of lecture, discussion and case study activities the class will explore the region's resource base, history, politics, economy, religions and cultures. We will cover a wide variety of topics searching for the linkages between the cultural, physical and social geographies of the Middle East.
GEOG 365-01 Adv Cartography/Urban GIS TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 108 Laura Smith
*Permission of instructor required; $20 materials fee required.*
GEOG 365-L1 Adv Cartography/Urban GIS Lab TBA TBA Birgit Muehlenhaus
*Permissions of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
GEOG 377-01 Qualitative Research Methods MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Daniel Trudeau
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 378-01 Discipline and Methods of Geography MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 Laura Smith
GEOG 394-01 Rural Landscapes/Livelihoods MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Holly Barcus
*First day attendance required.* Rural Landscapes and Livelihoods: A Geography of Rural Landuse and Community Change introduces students to Rural Geography, a sub-discipline within Geography. This course emphasizes the linkages between rural and urban environments, and human and physical landscapes through the evaluation of landuse and community change in rural areas, utilizing watershed boundaries as our spatial unit of analyses. We will explore the implications of demographic (including migration and immigration), economic, cultural, and environmental changes for rural environs using several case study watersheds including St. Croix River watershed in Minnesota and Wisconsin and the Yangtze River watershed in China, among others. Rural community strategies for adapting to and accommodating competing demands for water and landuse will be considered, including pressure for new housing developments, recreation opportunities (boating, fishing, hiking, biking), and conservation needs. Students will be exposed to theoretical and empirical approaches to rural development in different regional contexts, as well as problems associated with these development paradigms. Using watershed regions to frame our discussions, we will explore the rapidly changing rural environments in developed and developing world contexts in order to deepen our understanding of the interconnectedness of human and physical systems more broadly.
GEOG 488-01 Transportation Geography W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Laura Smith
GEOG 488-02 Cities of the 21st Century TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau
*First day attendance required.*

top of page

Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOL 100-01 Oceanography TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 John Craddock
GEOL 155-01 History/Evolution of Earth MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 155-L1 History/Evolution of Earth Lab M 07:00 pm-09:30 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 155-L2 History/Evolution of Earth Lab T 09:00 am-11:30 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 194-01 Geocinema M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 100 Kelly MacGregor
*First day attendance required.* Lights, camera, ACTION! Geologists think planet Earth is incredibly exciting, but nowhere is the story of the behavior of our planet more dramatized and misrepresented than in movies! Whether they are big-budget thrillers like The Core, Volcano, or The Day After Tomorrow, or low-brow science fiction like Boa, movies tend to stretch the reality of natural hazards and earth processes to great dramatic effect. In this course, we will have the opportunity to watch a variety of movies that focus on geologic hazards (such as volcanoes, earthquakes, avalanches, floods, and tsunamis) and other earth processes (origins of life, evolution, mass extinction, climate change, and glaciers). We will examine the scientific features and processes depicted in films, learn about their scientific basis, and critique the film's portrayal of earth process. You will work in groups to identify a film depicting a geological process, and critique the way science is depicted. The final project gives you the opportunity to develop your own script for a movie that does the geology correctly. This course will cover quantitative concepts relevant to earth processes, such as describing the world quantitatively, understanding uncertainty and risk, and evaluating quality and sources of data. Format: three-hour block per week of movies, lectures, discussions, and/or laboratory and group exercises. Evaluation will be based on attendance & participation, homework/classroom assignments, a group project, an 8-10 page movie script (including drafts and peer review), and two one-hour exams.
GEOL 255-01 Structural Geology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock
GEOL 255-L1 Structural Geology Lab T 01:00 pm-04:00 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock
GEOL 265-01 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 179 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 265-L1 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy Lab R 01:00 pm-04:00 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 302-01 Petrology and Geochemistry MWF 08:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 175 Karl Wirth
GEOL 394-01 Surface and Groundwater Hydrology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor
Hydrology is the study of physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur as water interacts with the earth. In this course we will focus on the near-surface cycling of water and the physical processes that drive this motion. We will discuss the dynamics of water as it flows across the surface of the landscape, moves through channels, and passes into the shallow subsurface. Open channel flow, hydrographs, floods, and arid region water scarcity will be covered. The course will focus on the flow of water through permeable, saturated media, heterogeneity of flow, and several equations used to describe flow dynamics in aquifers. Flow through fractured and karst systems will be discussed. Importantly, we will spend time on the methods used by scientists and engineers (and consultants!) to understand the details and timescales of groundwater flow: wells, slug tests, pump tests, and geochemistry. Contaminant transport via groundwater flow will be examined in case studies. The use of quantitative tools such as calculations, numerical modeling, and estimation will be used heavily to better understand the dynamics of water transport on our planet.
GEOL 394-L1 Surface/Groundwater Lab T 01:20 pm-04:00 pm Kelly MacGregor
GEOL 450-01 Senior Seminar T TBA Karl Wirth
GEOL 450-01 Senior Seminar T TBA Raymond Rogers

top of page

German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GERM 102-01 Elementary German II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 212 Kiarina Kordela
GERM 102-L1 Elementary German II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 102-L2 Elementary German II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 102-L3 Elementary German II Lab T 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 404 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Kiarina Kordela
GERM 110-L1 Accelerated Elem German Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 102 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 110-L2 Accelerated Elem German Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 112 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 110-L3 Accelerated Elem German Lab T 02:45 pm-03:45 pm OLRI 300 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Linda Schulte-Sasse
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 110 Marcus Heim
GERM 203-L2 Intermediate German I Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am OLRI 350 Marcus Heim
GERM 203-L3 Intermediate German I Lab T 02:45 pm-03:45 pm OLRI 350 Marcus Heim
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 215 David Martyn
GERM 204-02 Intermediate German II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 215 David Martyn
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 112 Marcus Heim
GERM 204-L2 Intermediate German II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 226 Marcus Heim
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 404 Marcus Heim
GERM 204-L4 Intermediate German II Lab R 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 228 Marcus Heim
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 214 Gisela Peters
GERM 305-L1 German Through the Media Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 305-L2 German Through the Media Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 102 Benjamin Stoltenburg
GERM 306-01 Introduction to German Studies MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 214 Rachael Huener
GERM 366-01 Postwar Germany MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 214 Rachael Huener
GERM 394-01 Concepts of Freedom from Kant to Agamben MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with PHIL 394-01.* This course examines the concept of freedom in 18th century philosophy and in contemporary Continental thinkers. The first half of the course will focus on 18th-century attempts to solve the problem of the compatibility of human freedom with natural causality. If everything that occurs has a cause that precedes it in time, aren't all events predetermined? And if so, where is there room for human choice? Leibniz tried to solve the problem with a "weak" concept of freedom (we're totally predictable but free nevertheless); his critic Crusius insisted on a "strong" concept of freedom (we can change our minds in unpredictable ways) that contradicted natural causality. Kant's concept of "transcendental" freedom has been said to occupy a middle ground between these two, but depends on an idealism that is palatable only to some (Henry E. Allison). The problem of "compatibility" returns in contemporary Continental thought, but in a new guise. Now the question is how freedom is compatible not with natural causality, but with what one might call social causality: the determinative matrix of language, custom, history, capital. Michel Foucault's theory of biopolitics outlined the problem; since then, Judith Butler, Alain Badiou, and Giorgio Agamben have all advanced what seem like modern versions of a transcendental freedom in an attempt to solve it. The goal of the course is to understand these current explanations of human freedom or "agency" in the light of the history of the philosophical concept of freedom. Selected readings from the authors mentioned. Course requirements: reading journal, two 6-page papers. The course is taught in English.
GERM 394-02 Theoretical Approaches to European and American Cinema: 1910s-1980s MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 401 Kiarina Kordela
*In English; cross-listed with HMCS 394-04.* The specific movements within European film production on which this course will focus are: (1) German expressionism, as a brief introduction to an influential and widely discussed pre-WWII European movement in cinematography; (2) Italian Neo-Realism, as a radical and, again, highly influential shift in European cinematography beginning at the end of WW-II; and (3) the French nouvelle-vague, as a reconfiguration of post-WW-II cinematography. Our bridge to American cinematography will be the British and later American work of Alfred Hitchcock, and we shall conclude with American films of particularly the 1970s and 1980s. Conceptually and methodologically, the course will address films as a site which, through all of its means (from dialogue to more formal aspects, such as camera angle or editing), raises and attempts to negotiate philosophical and ideological issues and, often irresolvable, problems. All readings and class taught in English. Weekly film screenings: Tuesdays, 7:00pm, in HUM 401. In addition to several articles and book chapters that will be available on moodle, here are the books you have to purchase:
1. Andr� Bazin. What is Cinema? Vol. 2
2. Fredric Jameson: The Geopolitical Aesthetic
3. Fredric Jameson: Signatures of the Visible
4. Slavoj Zizek: Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Lacan but Were Afraid to
Ask Hitchcock
GERM 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 Linda Schulte-Sasse

top of page

Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 213 Teresa Kupin-Escobar
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Cecilia Battauz
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 215 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Laura Wasenius
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-03 Elementary Spanish II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 215 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 213 Cecilia Battauz
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 300 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 217 David Sunderland
*Permission of instructor required.*
HISP 111-L1 Accel Elem Portuguese Lab MW 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 STAFF
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 216 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Cecilia Battauz
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 226 Cecilia Battauz
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 100 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 203-L5 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 03:00 pm-03:30 pm HUM 216 STAFF
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 401 Jeremy Lehnen
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Laura Wasenius
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Laura Wasenius
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-04 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 227 Jeremy Lehnen
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 247 Cecilia Battauz
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 270 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Romina Papini
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 226 Cecilia Battauz
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 226 Cecilia Battauz
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 204-L7 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:00 pm HUM 113 STAFF
HISP 204-L8 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 217 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
HISP 220-02 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
HISP 220-L1 Accel Intermediate Spanish Lab TR TBA Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 220-L2 Accel Intermediate Spanish Lab TR 10:00 am-11:00 am Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 220-L3 Accel Intermediate Spanish Lab TR TBA Susana Blanco-Iglesias
HISP 305-01 Visions of the Hispanic World: Oral and Written Expression MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 216 Antonio Dorca
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 305-02 Visions of the Hispanic World: Oral and Written Expression MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 216 Antonio Dorca
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 305-03 Oral and Written Expression MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 227 Leila Lehnen
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required.*
HISP 307-02 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Jeremy Lehnen
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-02; first day attendance required.*
HISP 308-01 Locating US Latino Studies MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 112 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-03; first day attendance required.*
HISP 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*Cross-listed with LING 309-01; first day attendance required.*
HISP 331-01 Luso Brazilian Voices: Conversation and Composition MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 Leila Lehnen
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
HISP 417-01 Quijote as Timeless Text TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Margaret Olsen
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 426-01 Parody in the Postmodern Hispanic World MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 213 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required.*
HISP 435-01 History of Spanish Language M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 217 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with LING 435-01; first day attendance required.*
HISP 440-01 Theorizing Contemporary US Latino Popular Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 David Sunderland
*Cross-listed with AMST 494-03.*
HISP 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Antonio Dorca

top of page

History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HIST 190-01 Topics in US History: The History of Feminism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-02 and WGSS 194-02. * This is an introductory course about the history of feminism as it was articulated and experienced in the United States from roughly 1800-1970. We will focus not only on the experience of those who worked for the cause of woman�s rights but also the ideologies at home and abroad that influenced feminist thought. In so doing, we will interrogate the myths about feminism and the backlash against it that are central to the history, culture, and politics of the United States. This course is especially concerned with the multiple and contradictory strains within feminism. Topics that the class will consider include: the roots of feminism as it took shape in the anti-slavery movement, the overlap of women�s rights and the civil rights movement of the twentieth century, and the women�s health movement, among others.
HIST 194-01 20th Century Arabic Literature and History TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Wessam El-Meligi
*Cross-listed with CLAS 194-01 and HMCS 194-01.*
HIST 194-02 Introduction to Global Environmental History MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Ellen Arnold
*Cross-listed with ENVI 194-01.* This introductory course will introduce the main themes, methods, and conclusions of global environmental history. We will explore how different societies used and transformed the natural world, how they responded to the challenges of growth and environmental sustainability, how different political, cultural, and religious world-views affect land and resource use. Throughout the semester, we will work with comparative case studies (such as dam-building in America, China, and Africa or forest use in medieval and modern Europe) to see how these common themes played out in vastly different environmental and historical contexts. No prerequisites.
HIST 211-01 History of Africa to 1800: The Journey to Timbuktu MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Jones Sichali
This course explores the dynamism and complexity of African societies in the years prior to European colonial domination in the 19th century. We will examine such topics as the growth, innovation, and regional spread of material culture and ideas; the connections between trade, urbanization, and centralized state systems; the mechanisms of social hierarchy in different African communities; as well as continuity and change in the organization and expression of religious belief, including the spread of Islam and Christianity. The last part of the course will focus on the transformation of African societies as a result of the slave trades. Given the vast periodic scope and Africa being such a huge and diverse continent, the primary goal of the course is to introduce students to the major outlines of early African history whilst helping them cultivate an appreciation of Africa, its peoples, cultures, expressions, and experiences. Our broad chronological narrative will be integrated with in-depth analyses of key themes that define the distinctive regional histories of Africa.
HIST 224-01 African American History: Slavery/Emancipation/Reconstruction TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with AMST 224-01.* This mid-level course revolves around the framework of structure (institutional racism) and agency (self-activity by slaves and free blacks). We will move from the slave trade and the dispersal of Africans of diverse origins to different regions in North America (and then the U.S.), to the influence of particular crops and plantation structures, the domestic slave trade, and the making of an African American culture. We will then explore how this culture provided a foundation for activism during the Civil War and Reconstruction.
HIST 225-01 Native American History TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 247 Andrea Cremer
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-04.*
HIST 237-01 Environmental Justice W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 170 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02 and ENVI 237-01; first day attendance required.*
HIST 244-01 US Since 1945: The US During the Vietnam War Years TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff
This mid-level course explores the intersections of multiple threads between roughly 1954 and 1974 -- Keynesian economics; the "social contract" between employers and the labor movement; the Cold War and anti-communism; the civil rights and Black Arts movements; activism among Chicanos and Asian Americans; the second wave women's movement; the Vietnam War and the grassroots opposition to it; student activism and the "counter-culture;" the transformation of U.S. popular culture. In addition to readings, we will listen to music, watch films, and engage oral history interviews.
HIST 257-01 Empires MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Peter Weisensel
HIST 275-01 History of Modern China TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 275-01.*
HIST 278-01 War Crimes and Memory in Contemporary East Asia TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 278-01.*
HIST 294-02 Latin America: Art & Nation MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Ernesto Capello
This intermediate course focuses upon the interaction between artists, the state, and national identity in Latin America. After a brief introduction to the colonial and nineteenth-century legacies, the course will focus on the twentieth-century, an era in which the state mobilized artists and intellectuals to create spectacles advertising homogenized visions of "the nation." This state support bolstered impressive artistic experimentation but often came with the price of stifling censorship and persecution. This course will engage the various facets of this relationship -- including artistic resistance to the state's presence and rejection of the nation-building project -- across multiple genres, with an emphasis on painting, music, film, and architecture. We will primarily focus upon four countries: Mexico, Brazil, Peru, and Cuba.
HIST 294-03 Daily Life in Europe 800-1800 MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Ellen Arnold
A typical medieval classification of people, "those who fight, those who work, and those who pray" masks the complexity and variety of daily life in Europe. Political and religious narratives often leave out not only the bulk of the population (peasants, women, servants, children) but also ignore the daily lives of the nobility and religious leaders as well. This class will examine such aspects of daily life as family structures, standards of living (food, housing, clothing), work and the everyday economy, education and literacy, medicine and health, and how people spent their leisure time. This class will provide a chance for digging deeper into people's lived experiences, from the beginnings of medieval European culture to the dawn of the Industrial Revolution.
HIST 294-04 Race, Cultural Politics, and Social Movements TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Jane Rhodes
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with AMST 294-01.*
HIST 330-01 Historians and Critical Race Theory W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 111 Peter Rachleff
HIST 343-01 The US and Global Environment M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 243 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 343-01; first day attendance required.*
HIST 362-01 History of the Soviet Union and Its Successors MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Peter Weisensel
HIST 379-01 The Study of History W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Andrea Cremer
HIST 394-01 Public History W 01:10 pm-04:10 pm THEATR 205 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-04.*
HIST 394-02 Transnational Latin Americas M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Ernesto Capello
For over three centuries the countries that now comprise Latin America formed part of Iberian empires. Despite the success of localized independence movements in the nineteenth century, regional ties built up during that era never completely vanished. This seminar investigates the myriad attempts to reformulate a pan-Latin American cultural and political community as a post-colonial product echoing constructions of (trans)national citizenship developed during the colonial era. Subjects to be treated include the many faces of Bolivarianism, the nostalgic strains of Hispanism, the market-driven rise of pan-Americanism, revolutionary socialism, the romance of Indigenism, the raza cosmica and the Parisian invention of the idea of Latin America itself.
HIST 394-03 Dissent, Reform, Expansion TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Paula Cooey
*Cross-listed with RELI 346-01.*

top of page

Interdisciplinary Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTD 411-01 Sr Seminar in Community and Global Health R TBA Jaine Strauss
This seminar provides an integrative view of community and global health through study and discussion of current issues, research and policy. We will build on, and forge connections among, students' disciplinary interests through readings and guest speakers. Students will also use the seminar to reflect upon and deepen their experiential learning and research projects, and they will present their work in a poster session for the campus community and beyond. This course is a culminating seminar required for seniors who intend to graduate with a concentration in Community and Global Health. One credit.

top of page

International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTL 112-01 Intro to International Studies: Globalization, Media, and Cultural Identities MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with HMCS 194-02.*
INTL 114-01 Intro International Studies: International Codes of Conduct TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 James von Geldern
*First day attendance required.*
INTL 225-01 Comparative Econ Systems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with ECON 225-01.*
INTL 253-01 Comparative Muslim Cultures TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Smadar Lavie
*Cross-listed with ANTH 253-01, HMCS 294-03, and WGSS 294-06.*
INTL 294-01 Race and Ethnicity in Japan TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Christopher Scott
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-06 and JAPA 294-01.*
INTL 323-01 Economic Restructuring in Latin America TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Raymond Robertson
*Cross-listed with ECON 323-01.*
INTL 336-01 Comp Borderlands/Diasporas W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Smadar Lavie
*Cross-listed with HMCS 394-05 and WGSS 294-07.*
INTL 368-01 Sustain Dev/Global Future TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with ENVI 368-01; first day attendance required.*
INTL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01 and ENGL 384-01; first day attendance required.*
INTL 394-01 Culture & Global Capitalism: Past & Present W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
INTL 394-02 20th Century British Novel: Diasporic London TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Casey Jarrin
*Cross-listed with ENGL 341-01.*
INTL 480-01 Paradigms-Global Leadership M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Ahmed Samatar
INTL 488-01 Sr Sem: Universalism TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 David Moore

top of page

Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
JAPA 102-01 Elementary Japanese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
JAPA 102-02 Elementary Japanese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
JAPA 102-L1 Elementary Japanese II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Kiyoko Tadokoro
JAPA 102-L2 Elementary Japanese II Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 113 Kiyoko Tadokoro
JAPA 102-L3 Elementary Japanese II Lab T 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Kiyoko Tadokoro
JAPA 204-01 Intermediate Japanese II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 204-02 Intermediate Japanese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 204-L1 Intermediate Japanese II Lab R 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Kiyoko Tadokoro
JAPA 204-L2 Intermediate Japanese II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 228 Kiyoko Tadokoro
JAPA 204-L3 Intermediate Japanese II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Kiyoko Tadokoro
JAPA 294-01 Race and Ethnicity in Japan TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Christopher Scott
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-06 and INTL 294-01.*
JAPA 306-01 Advanced Japanese II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 111 Sachiko Dorsey
JAPA 306-L1 Advanced Japanese II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Kiyoko Tadokoro
JAPA 306-L2 Advanced Japanese II Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 228 Kiyoko Tadokoro
JAPA 408-01 Fourth Year Japanese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Sachiko Dorsey
JAPA 488-01 Translating Japanese: Theory and Practice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 227 Christopher Scott
*Cross-listed with LING 488-01.*

top of page

Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LATI 255-01 Peoples/Cultures Latin America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonz�lez
*Cross-listed with ANTH 255-01.*
LATI 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 227 Leila Lehnen
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required.*
LATI 307-02 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Jeremy Lehnen
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-02; first day attendance required.*
LATI 341-01 Comparative Social Movements TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with POLI 341-01.*

top of page

Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 226 Christina Esposito
*First day attendance required.*
LING 175-01 Sociolinguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 228 Amel Khalfaoui
*Cross-listed with SOCI 175-01; first day attendance required.*
LING 200-01 English Syntax MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 216 John Haiman
*First day attendance required.*
LING 205-01 Phonology MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Christina Esposito
*First day attendance required.*
LING 205-02 Phonology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Christina Esposito
*First day attendance required.*
LING 280-01 Topics in Linguistic Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Naran Bilik
*Cross-listed with ANTH 280-01.*
LING 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*Cross-listed with HISP 309-01; first day attendance required.*
LING 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea
Cross-listed with PSYC 378-01.*
LING 400-01 Field Methods in Linguistics TR 10:00 am-11:10 am John Haiman
*First day attendance required. Course will meet in the Linguistics Lab.*
LING 435-01 History of Spanish Language M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 217 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with HISP 435-01; first day attendance required.*
LING 488-01 Translating Japanese: Theory and Practice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 227 Christopher Scott
*Cross-listed with JAPA 488-01.*

top of page

Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MATH 108-01 Quantitative Thinking TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Lisa Giddings
*Cross-listed with ECON 108-01.*
MATH 135-01 Applied Calculus MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Karen Saxe
MATH 135-02 Applied Calculus MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Karen Saxe
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Andrew Beveridge
MATH 137-01 Single Variable Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 247 Thomas Halverson
MATH 137-02 Single Variable Calculus MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 247 Thomas Halverson
MATH 153-01 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 Christine Kohnen
MATH 153-02 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 245 Christine Kohnen
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 245 Vittorio Addona
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 258 Daniel Kaplan
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 Daniel Flath
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Daniel Flath
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 David Ehren
MATH 253-01 Applied Mulitivariate Stats MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 245 Christine Kohnen
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 A. Roberts
MATH 355-01 Mathematical Statistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Vittorio Addona
MATH 361-01 Theory of Computation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Susan Fox
*Cross-listed with COMP 261-01.*
MATH 365-01 Scientific Computation TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan
*Cross-listed with COMP 365-01.*
MATH 376-01 Algebraic Structures MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 247 Andrew Beveridge
MATH 437-01 Continuous Applied Mathematics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Chad Higdon-Topaz
MATH 477-01 Topics in Analysis TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud
MATH 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 241 Karen Saxe

top of page

Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HMCS 110-01 Texts and Power: Foundations of Cultural Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Clay Steinman
HMCS 110-02 Texts and Power: Foundations of Cultural Studies W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Clay Steinman
HMCS 114-01 News Reporting/Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 212 Douglas Stone
HMCS 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture TR 01:20 pm-03:30 pm HUM 401 Michael Griffin
HMCS 194-01 20th Century Arabic Literature and History TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Wessam El-Meligi
*Cross-listed with CLAS 194-01 and HIST 194-01.*
HMCS 194-02 Intro to International Studies: Globalization, Media, and Cultural Identities MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with INTL 112-01.*
HMCS 249-01 History of Film Since 1941 MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 401 Michael Griffin
HMCS 272-01 Social Theories W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06 Deborah Smith
*Cross-listed with SOCI 272-01.*
HMCS 294-01 Representing the Real: Documentary and Other Fictions W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 402 Jenny Lion
In this class the contradictions and possibilities of documentary film and video practices provide the starting point for an investigation into alternative approaches to representing the 'real.' Focusing on historical and contemporary works that utilize alternative cinematic strategies in their attempts to re-think, represent, comment on, or effect reality, we will examine issues addressed by these formally inventive documentary efforts. These issues include the problematics of power relations between maker and subject, the limits of an image to act as evidence, the enmeshing of ethnographic practice and colonialist ideologies, and the truth-telling possibilities of fictional invention, among others. In addition to extensive screenings, readings, discussion, and papers, as a way of extending critical acuity, students will complete several exercises in documentary representation, using photography, video, or sound recording. Screening times to be determined.
HMCS 294-02 Wrongdoing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 Julia Chadaga
*Cross-listed with RUSS 294-01.*
HMCS 294-03 Comparative Muslim Cultures TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Smadar Lavie
*Cross-listed with ANTH 253-01, INTL 253-01, and WGSS 294-06.*
HMCS 294-04 20th Century Chinese Literature MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 102 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-01.*
HMCS 334-01 Cultural Studies and the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 113 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with AMST 334-01*
HMCS 354-01 Blackness in the Media MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 402 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with AMST 354-01.*
HMCS 355-01 Adv Journalism: Electronic TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 217 Douglas Stone
HMCS 392-01 Video 2 Practicum F 12:00 pm-02:10 pm HUM 404 Jenny Lion
This is an advanced practicum class. Through both individual and group production and off-site research each student will continue to develop his or her own media production process. We will explore the many ways video can be embodied and exhibited�the cinema, the gallery, the monitor, large or small scale projection, multiple channel works, etc.�always with an eye to the ways these choices can shift temporal, spatial, social, and narrative relationships and the construction of meaning. Students will be encouraged to explore high- and low-tech solutions to their creative problems, and to use the campus and the Twin Cities community at large as terrain for exhibition. Certain relevant shooting, lighting, sound recording, and editing skills will be taught, with the emphasis on developing advanced conceptual, critical, and analytic acuity through an integration of theory and practice. Concurrent enrollment with HMCS 394-03 Video 2 Seminar will be required in most cases. At least one previous video practicum class in video and instructor permission required. 2 credits.
HMCS 392-02 Video 2 Practicum F 02:20 pm-04:30 pm HUM 404 Jenny Lion
This is an advanced practicum class. Through both individual and group production and off-site research each student will continue to develop his or her own media production process. We will explore the many ways video can be embodied and exhibited�the cinema, the gallery, the monitor, large or small scale projection, multiple channel works, etc.�always with an eye to the ways these choices can shift temporal, spatial, social, and narrative relationships and the construction of meaning. Students will be encouraged to explore high- and low-tech solutions to their creative problems, and to use the campus and the Twin Cities community at large as terrain for exhibition. Certain relevant shooting, lighting, sound recording, and editing skills will be taught, with the emphasis on developing advanced conceptual, critical, and analytic acuity through an integration of theory and practice. Concurrent enrollment with HMCS 394-03 Video 2 Seminar will be required in most cases. At least one previous video practicum class in video and instructor permission required. 2 credits.
HMCS 394-02 Comparative (Neo/Post) Modernities TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-04 and WGSS 315; first day attendance required.*
HMCS 394-03 Video 2 Seminar W 01:10 pm-04:30 pm HUM 404 Jenny Lion
This is an advanced seminar in video history and theory, approached in its various manifestations as cultural practice, art form, social intervention, and political tool. Video produced for cinematic screening, gallery, web, broadcast, and site-specific installation will be considered, with specific focus on contemporary and international works. Research will be conducted off-campus at museums and video archives, and issues of curatorial practice will be explored through the curation of a final exhibition and catalogue. Critique will form a significant component of the class, grounded in the conceptual, historical, technical and aesthetic issues that inform contemporary video. Students will be expected to pursue individual research and writing projects, lead discussions on texts, and participate in the collective processes of various class research and curatorial projects. At least one previous class in video and instructor permission required. Screening times to be determined.
HMCS 394-04 Theoretical Approaches to European and American Cinema: 1910s-1980s MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 401 Kiarina Kordela
*In English; cross-listed with GERM 394-02.*
HMCS 394-05 Comparative Borderlands and Diasporas W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Smadar Lavie
*Cross-listed with INTL 336-01 and WGSS 294-07*
HMCS 410-01 Art and Ideas in French Culture: Since 1968 MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 402 Anne Carayon
*Cross-listed with FREN 410-01; first day attendance required.*
HMCS 488-01 Advanced Film Analysis TR 01:20 pm-03:30 pm HUM 402 Clay Steinman
This capstone builds on the introduction to formalist film analysis in HMCS 128, which emphasizes the particularities of cinematic articulation. Students will read and discuss exemplary works of neoformalist and related modes of analysis, and write an original seminar paper responsive to the course. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: HMCS 128, Film Analysis and Visual Culture, or permission of instructor.

top of page

Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MUSI 111-01 World Music: Africa, the Americas, and the Middle East TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 202 Chuen-Fung Wong
MUSI 112-01 Basic Musicianship MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 201 Christopher Gable
MUSI 114-01 Theory II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 201 Christopher Gable
MUSI 114-L1 Theory II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 201 Christopher Gable
MUSI 114-L2 Theory II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 201 Christopher Gable
MUSI 153-01 Electronic Music MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 202 Janet Gilbert
MUSI 194-01 Music in the Twin Cities TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 123 Carleton Macy
This course will be taught as a seminar organized around types of music found in our metropolitan area. Each unit of preparatory class sessions will culminate in attendance at a live performance that is presented either on campus or in the Twin Cities. Specific events will be determined at a later date, but will most likely include an opera, an orchestral concert, an ethnic performance such as African music, a jazz performance, a solo recital (piano or voice), a �pop� music event, and a �new music� event. In lieu of a text, the class will require the purchase of up to $50 worth of tickets to events; costs will be carefully considered and transportation will be provided. Class assignments will include the writing of reviews of the concerts/events attended and two class presentations (papers) that present background information about aspects of the concert to be attended. Class attendance will be required.
MUSI 294-01 Chinese Music TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 202 Chuen-Fung Wong
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ASIA 294-02.* This course attempts to understand China/the Chinese-broadly conceived to encompass mainland China, minorities, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and diasporas-through studying and performing its music. We look at how China and the Chinese have been experienced and imagined through means that are primarily musical. We explore the sonic dimensions of both traditional and modern China by closely studying selected musical genres from various geographical and temporal Chinese worlds, including, but not limited to, Peking Opera, the Silk-and-bamboo instrumental ensemble, minority traditions, Cantonese and Taiwanese pop songs, Chinese jazz in Shanghai, film and theatrical music, Communist political songs, and ancient court music. Class materials, both readings and audiovisuals, examine issues of modernization, nationalism, ethnicity, gender, etc. In addition, this is a performance-based academic course; students have the opportunity to perform Chinese instruments (provided) and participate in an end-of-semester public performance. This course is open to both music majors/minors and non-music majors/minors. There is no pre-requisite; previous knowledge of musical instrument, notation, or Chinese languages is helpful but not required. Permission of the instructor (wong@macalester.edu), however, is required.
MUSI 294-02 Jazz in America MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 123 Joan Griffith
Jazz is a uniquely American musical style. Only in the United States did the various musical and cultural traditions of Europe and Africa come together to form the music we call jazz. The purpose of this class is to study how and where jazz began, to discuss who were the important contributors, and to follow its subsequent historical and musical development. Each of the many styles of jazz -- Ragtime, Hot Jazz, Bebop, Swing, Free Jazz -- corresponds to a particular era in 20th-century American political and social history. Through studying and listening to the composers and performers of each style, we will be able to recognize each style and put that style in its proper historical place. In addition to the study of the music itself, the student will learn to associate a style with its proper historical place and discuss how the historical context has helped to shape the artists and the message of the music.
MUSI 314-01 Theory IV, Contemp Theory/Lit TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 202 Carleton Macy
MUSI 343-01 Western Music-19th Century MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 123 Mark Mazullo
MUSI 494-01 Beethoven MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 202 Mark Mazullo
*Permission of instructor required.*
MUSI 73-01 African Music Ensemble TR 05:30 pm-07:30 pm Sowah Mensah
MUSI 75-01 Macalester Choir MTWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm Eugene Rogers
MUSI 77-01 Hildegard Singers T 07:30 pm-09:30 pm Eugene Rogers
MUSI 77-02 Singing Scotsmen T 07:30 pm-09:30 pm Eugene Rogers
MUSI 81-01 Mac Jazz Band TR 07:00 pm-08:30 pm Joan Griffith
MUSI 85-01 Pipe Band W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Michael Breidenbach
MUSI 87-01 Wind Ensemble MW 04:45 pm-06:00 pm Joseph Schlefke
MUSI 89-01 Symphony Orchestra TR 04:45 pm-06:00 pm Joseph Schlefke
MUSI 91-01 Mac Jazz Combo M 07:00 pm-10:30 pm Joan Griffith
MUSI 91-02 Collegeium TBA TBA Carleton Macy
MUSI 93-01 Chamber Music Ensemble TBA TBA STAFF
MUSI 95-01 Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
Studio instruction may be taken by any Macalester student in voice, piano, harpsichord, organ, guitar, recorder, bagpipes, standard orchestral instruments and some non-western instruments. Studio instruction fees are currently $340 for 12 half-hour lessons per semester (fee subject to change). Macalester will pay 90% of instruction fees on the major instrument or voice for students with major or minor concentrations in music. Registration instructions and other information pertaining to private studio instruction may be obtained from Rachel Hest in the Music Department (Room 105). Here's a link to current studio instructors and instruction offered: Studio Information
MUSI 95-02 Piano TBA TBA Barbara Brooks
MUSI 95-03 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 95-04 Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 95-05 Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-06 Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich
MUSI 95-08 Organ TBA TBA Winston Kaehler
MUSI 95-09 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 95-10 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-11 Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 95-13 African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-15 Acoustic Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-16 Electric Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-17 Acoustic Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson
MUSI 95-18 Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-19 Flamenco Guitar TBA TBA Michael Hauser
MUSI 95-21 Jazz Improvisation TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 95-23 Violin TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 95-24 Viola TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 95-26 Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 95-29 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 95-30 African Flute TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 95-37 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen
MUSI 95-42 African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-43 Jazz Drumming TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 95-44 Sitar TBA TBA David Whetstone
MUSI 95-45 Drumming TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 95-46 Classical Saxophone TBA TBA Kristen Hanich
MUSI 95-5M African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-7H Sitar TBA TBA David Whetstone
MUSI 95-7M Sitar TBA TBA David Whetstone
MUSI 95-8M Drumming TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 95-CD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-CI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-CQ Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-H Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 95-HC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 95-HD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-HI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-HP Acoustic Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson
MUSI 95-M0 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen
MUSI 95-M1 Harp TBA 08:00 am-09:00 am Ann Benjamin
MUSI 95-M2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 95-M3 African Flute TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 95-M7 Bassoon TBA TBA Carole Smith
MUSI 95-M9 Trumpet TBA TBA Lynn Erickson
MUSI 95-MB Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 95-MC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 95-MD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 95-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-ML African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-MQ Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-MT Jazz Improvisation TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-MU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 95-MV Violin TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 95-MY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 95-MZ Double Bass TBA TBA Jennifer Rubin
MUSI 95-W8 Jazz Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen
MUSI 95-WC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 95-WD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-WI Voice TBA 08:00 am-09:00 am Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-WJ Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 95-WO Double Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-WU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 95-WZ Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 97-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 97-02 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Barbara Brooks
MUSI 97-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 97-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 97-05 Piano for Proficiency TBA 08:00 am-09:00 am Mark Mazullo
MUSI 99-01 Piano Proficiency Exam TBA TBA STAFF

top of page

Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHIL 115-01 Problems of Philosophy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Geoffrey Gorham
PHIL 119-01 Critical Thinking MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 003 Karen Warren
PHIL 125-01 Ethics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Karen Warren
PHIL 125-03 Ethics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Martin Gunderson
PHIL 160-01 Foundations-Political Theory MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
*Cross-listed with POLI 160-01.*
PHIL 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Karen Warren
*Cross-listed with ENVI 229-01.*
PHIL 231-01 Modern Philosophy TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Geoffrey Gorham
PHIL 238-01 Philosophy of Religion TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with RELI 248-01.*
PHIL 294-01 Darwin and Philosophy MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 003 Martin Gunderson
This seminar is a philosophical celebration of Darwin on the 200th anniversary of his birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species. We will celebrate Darwin by reading several of Darwin's classic works and considering their implications for a variety of philosophical issues. What are the implications of Darwin's work for belief in a providential god? What are the implications of Darwin�s work for the justification of moral beliefs? We will also consider to what extent Darwin's own work is based on philosophical commitments. Is the sort of naturalism that Darwin assumes merely a metaphysical commitment? An underlying issue will be the question of what makes an investigation scientific as opposed to philosophical.
PHIL 294-02 Human Rights MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 003 Martin Gunderson
Human rights are a significant feature of the political landscape. We appeal to human rights to critique governments, defend policies and in some cases to argue that armed intervention is justified. But human rights are philosophically puzzling. Do human rights such as those stated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the European Convention on Human Rights reflect genuine moral rights? How do we determine what moral rights we have in the first place? If there are moral rights, is there any reason to believe that some moral rights are held solely in virtue of being human? Should some human rights be regarded as the rights of sentient beings and extended to non-human animals such as the great apes? Is there such a thing as group rights?
PHIL 301-01 Philosophy of Law TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 William Wilcox
PHIL 394-01 Concepts of Freedom from Kant to Agamben MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01; for course description, see German 394-01*

top of page

Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PE 01-01 Swimming I TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson
PE 04-01 Karate I TR 03:30 pm-04:40 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:40 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Vanessa Seljeskog
PE 09-01 Conditioning MWF 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 09-02 Conditioning TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 11-01 Swimming II TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 13-01 Intermediate Social Dance M 08:00 pm-09:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson
PE 14-01 Karate II TR 03:30 pm-04:40 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 16-01 Yoga II TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin
PE 18-01 Pilates MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard
PE 20-01 Weight Training MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 20-01 Weight Training MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Ellen Thompson
PE 20-02 Weight Training TR 09:40 am-10:40 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Ellen Thompson
PE 20-02 Weight Training TR 09:40 am-10:40 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 21-01 Swim for Fitness TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 26-01 Tai Chi Chuan MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Phyllis Calph
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard
PE 31-01 Scuba Diving TR 09:40 am-11:00 am LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance T 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson
PE 51-01 Aqua Aerobics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson

top of page

Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 112-01 Cosmos: Perspectives and Reflections M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
*2 credits*
PHYS 113-01 Modern Astronomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 150 John Cannon
PHYS 130-01 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 100 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with ENVI 130-01.*
PHYS 130-L1 Science Renewable Energy Lab T 09:15 am-11:15 am OLRI 154 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with ENVI 130-L1.*
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 Tonnis ter Veldhuis
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab R 09:15 am-11:15 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab R 01:20 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 James Heyman
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab M 02:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab T 09:15 am-11:15 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-L3 Principles of Physics II Lab T 01:20 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 340-01 Digital Electronics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 270 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with COMP 340-01.*
PHYS 340-L1 Digital Electronics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 147 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with COMP 340-L1.*
PHYS 348-01 Laboratory Instrumentation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 James Heyman
PHYS 348-L1 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Heyman
PHYS 444-01 Electromagnetic Theory II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 Norton Hintz
PHYS 460-01 Astrophysics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 404 John Cannon
PHYS 461-01 Mechanics MWF 02:20 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 101 Tonnis ter Veldhuis
PHYS 489-01 Physics Seminar F 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 150 James Doyle
(course to meet in different room on February 20th)
PHYS 494-01 Advanced Quantum Mechanics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis

top of page

Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
POLI 100-01 US Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Julie Dolan
POLI 120-01 International Politics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber
POLI 140-01 Comparative Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Paul Dosh
POLI 160-01 Foundations-Political Theory MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
*Cross-listed with PHIL 160-01.*
POLI 170-01 Theories of Rhetoric MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 401 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
POLI 203-01 Race, Ethnicity and Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Paru Shah
*Cross-listed with AMST 203-01.*
POLI 205-01 Policy Issues: Government and Medicine TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Michael Zis
Most everyone agrees that the US health care system is in need of reform, but policymakers are divided over what kind of reforms to prioritize and pursue. Since the President and Congress plan to make health care reform a top priority this Spring, I can think of no better time to take this class. The course�s aim is to enable you to participate in the coming health reform debate through a primer on health care politics and policy. Over the course of the semester, we will wrestle with a variety of complex policy, philosophical, sociological, medical, and economic questions.

o What does it mean to be uninsured in America? If there are so many un-and-underinsured Americans, why do some argue that the problem is that Americans are not under, but overtreated?
o If the US spends more money on medical care than any other advanced industrialized country, why is it the only one of its kind without national health insurance? What is the likelihood that the US will adopt national health insurance? Would this be for better or for worse?
o Looking abroad, how does the US compare to other countries, such as Canada, Japan, and France, in terms of the cost, quality, and access to care?
o What is the proper role of government for addressing the 'obesity epidemic', for regulating pharmaceutical drugs, and for rationing treatments and technologies?
o What are President Obama's options going forward? More importantly, what roll, historically and now, do other policymakers have in setting the agenda and creating health care policy?

We explore these questions from a variety of perspectives, with the aid of guest speakers and a multitude of medium. There is some lecturing, but the course aims to provide students with the tools to drive the discussion. Because the focus is American health policy, I recommend students have a fundamental understanding of the American political process before taking the class - or at least the motivation to do some background reading on your own. Still, the class has, and I hope will continue to attract a geographically diverse mix of students from across the social and health sciences. Feel free to contact me with any questions you may have or, better yet, talk to other students who have taken the class in past years.
POLI 211-01 Re-Envisioning Education and Democracy TR 08:00 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-05 and EDUC 280-01; first day attendance required.*
POLI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 101 Stephanie Rutherford
*Cross-listed with ENVI 215-01; first day attendance required.*
POLI 216-01 Legislative Politics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Julie Dolan
*Permission of the instructor required.*
POLI 242-01 Development Politics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 David Blaney
POLI 260-01 Contemporary Political Theory TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 261-01 Feminist Political Theory TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-02.*
POLI 262-01 American Political Thought MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 272-01 Researching Political Communication MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
POLI 301-01 Law, Economy, and Identity MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 321-01 International Security MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 Andrew Latham
POLI 323-01 Humanitariansim/Wld Politics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Wendy Weber
POLI 340-01 Fascism W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 341-01 Comparative Social Movements TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with LATI 341-01.*
POLI 390-01 Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 Paru Shah
*Permission of instructor required.*
POLI 394-01 Politics of Africa TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Isaac Kamola
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 David Blaney

top of page

Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Michael Mensink
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Bruce Hinrichs
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L4 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 182-01 Drugs and Society MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 350 Eric Wiertelak
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Sun No
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Sun No
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Sun No
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Kendrick Brown
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; first day attendance required.*
PSYC 246-01 Exploring Sensation/Perception MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Jeremy Loebach
PSYC 246-L1 Exp Sensation/Percep Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Jeremy Loebach
PSYC 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with CNS 248-01.*
PSYC 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 371 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with CNS 248-L1.*
PSYC 252-01 Distress/Dysfunction/Disorder MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 269-01 Children/Family/Social Policy TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Arturo Sesma
PSYC 294-01 Psychology of Sustainable Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 301 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-01; first day attendance required.* This course is an introduction to the psychology of sustainable behavior. As scientific evidence of degraded world environmental conditions accumulates, researchers from many disciplines are joining the effort to find solutions. Technological innovation will certainly play an important role, but equally important are behavior changes at both the organizational and individual level. Psychologists use their training in the scientific study of human behavior to examine why people do or do not act sustainably in a variety of situations. In this course we will study this body of research and use psychological principles, theories, and methods to understand the factors that underlie both environmentally destructive as well as environmentally sustainable actions. A significant component of the course will be direct application of theory to one's own actions as well as to a campus-based sustainability issue. Prerequisite Psychology 100.
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Brooke Lea
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Sun No
PSYC 372-01 Health Psychology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Carla Berg
PSYC 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea
*Cross-listed with LING 378-01.*
PSYC 394-01 Psychology of Hearing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 352 Jeremy Loebach
How do we hear? What do we hear? How do we know? This course will examine the perception of the acoustic world through hearing. Topics will range from the structure of sound itself (acoustics), how sound is encoded and processed by the brain, and how we come to understand sound as something beyond a physical stimulus (representation, meaning, and interpretation). Additional topics will include the perception of music, concert hall acoustics, hearing loss and cochlear implants, and sound localization. Prerequisites: Psychology 100 and Psychology 201.
PSYC 488-01 Senior Seminar: Mood and Anxiety TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 488-02 Senior Seminar: African American Psychology MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 300 Kendrick Brown
*Cross-listed with AMST 494-02.*

top of page

Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RELI 120-01 Hebrew Bible MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Susanna Drake
RELI 123-01 Jesus, Dissent, and Desire MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Paula Cooey
RELI 124-01 Asian Religions TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 226 Erik Davis
*Cross-listed with ASIA 124-01.*
RELI 130-01 Folklore and Religion M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Peter Harle
RELI 194-01 Hindus and Muslims MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 James Laine
This class will be a reflection on the long history of co-existence of people in South Asia though to belong to two very different religions, Hinduism and Islam. We will begin by looking at the formation of classical Islam in the Middle East, and looking at the classical Hindu epic, the Ramayana. From there we will move to a survey of the history of encounter and exchange, from the early period (al Biruni), to the establishment of the great Muslim sultanates. We will critically examine the evidence for religious conflict, alongside the evidence of rich cultural exchange, and interrogate the competing historiographic narratives, according to which South Asia either become a single Indo-Islamic civilization or a place of two cultures destined to become different modern nation states (India, Pakistan and Bangladesh). Finally, we will consider colonial and post-colonial South Asia and conclude with a reflection on the Babri Masjid crisis and India's debates about secularism.
RELI 194-02 Pilgrimage and Personal Transformation TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Erik Davis
RELI 248-01 Philosophy of Religion TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with PHIL 238-01.*
RELI 294-01 Christian Identity - the Rise of Anti-Judaism MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Susanna Drake
In this course we will explore the diverse relations between Jews and Christians from antiquity to the modern era. Special attention will be given to the origins of Christian anti-Judaism in the first through fifth centuries. We will examine how Christian descriptions of Jews create a background against which Christian identity is formulated, and we will trace the social, political, and religious implications of these descriptions up to the twentieth century.
RELI 294-02 Jews, Others, and Pursuit of Identity MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Barry Cytron
The variety of Jewish identities seems almost without boundaries. This course examines the multiple, often contradictory identities both ascribed to, and embraced/resisted by Jews in contemporary Western societies. We will explore Jewish identity-construction, tracing new forms of Jewish cultural, political and spiritual expression, as well as contemporary instances of anti-Semitism as they impinge on Jewish self-understanding.
RELI 346-01 Dissent, Reform, Expansion TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Paula Cooey
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-03.*
RELI 469-01 Approaches to Study of Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Paula Cooey

top of page

Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RUSS 102-01 Elementary Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 213 Julia Chadaga
RUSS 102-L1 Elementary Russian II Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 102-L2 Elementary Russian II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 204-01 Intermediate Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 212 Gitta Hammarberg
RUSS 204-L1 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 204-L2 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 252-01 20th C Russian Lit/Culture TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 212 Julia Chadaga
RUSS 294-01 Wrongdoing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 Julia Chadaga
*Cross-listed with HMCS 294-02.* The Russian word for crime literally means "overstepping," in the sense of crossing a boundary. What happens, however, when that boundary shifts, as it did in the twentieth century with the Bolshevik Revolution? Or what if the society that defines the criminal is itself "wrong"? Throughout its history, Russian literature has returned obsessively to the theme of transgression. We will take a cross-cultural approach as we juxtapose Russian texts with those from other literary traditions, comparing the views of wrongdoing in Russian culture with that of "the West" against which Russia has traditionally defined itself. Readings will introduce course participants to an intellectual axe murderer, a malicious barber, a female serial killer, demonic hooligans, men pushed over the edge by classical music, and others on the wrong side of the law. Central to the course will be the question of how fiction writers present crime and how their artistic choices influence the way readers think of such seemingly self-evident oppositions as good and evil, right and wrong. We will address such themes as: the motives for crossing over into crime; the criminal act as a work of art; gender and violence; crimes of writing; the (in)justice of punishment and the spectacle of state power. We will explore St. Paul's "underworld" history and how it has been reinvented as a tourist attraction. Students will be encouraged to apply ideas arising from our readings to current events, studying the means by which contemporary instances of wrongdoing (and the trials intended to make things right) are represented in the mass media, and analyzing how true-life stories are turned into allegory and myth. All readings and discussion will be in English.
RUSS 367-01 Dostoevsky and Gogol MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 214 Gitta Hammarberg
RUSS 488-01 Senior Seminar: Human Rights in the Former Soviet Union TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 James von Geldern

top of page

Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
SOCI 110-02 Introduction to Sociology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06 Terry Boychuk
SOCI 170-01 Sociology of Work MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Deborah Smith
SOCI 170-02 Sociology of Work MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN Deborah Smith
SOCI 175-01 Sociolinguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 228 Amel Khalfaoui
*Cross-listed with LING 175-01; first day attendance required.*
SOCI 220-01 Sociology of Race/Ethnicity MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Mahnaz Kousha
SOCI 220-02 Sociology of Race/Ethnicity MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 105 Mahnaz Kousha
SOCI 269-01 Science and Social Inquiry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Erik Larson
SOCI 272-01 Social Theories W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06 Deborah Smith
*Cross-listed with HMCS 272-01.*
SOCI 310-01 Law and Society TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Erik Larson

top of page

Theatre and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
THDA 110-01 Frames/Methods Performance TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory and Performance I. MWF 02:20 pm-04:20 pm THEATR STUDIO Cheryl Brinkley
*First day attendance required.*
THDA 121-01 Beginning Dance Composition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 125-01 Technical Theater MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser
*$30 material fee required.*
THDA 125-L1 Technical Theater Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 105 Daniel Keyser
THDA 125-L2 Technical Theater Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 105 Daniel Keyser
THDA 210-01 Community-Based Theater MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 Harry Waters
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-08.*
THDA 215-01 Reading the Dancing Body MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 205 Wynn Fricke
THDA 235-01 Fundamentals of Scene Design TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett
*$40 material fee required.*
THDA 262-01 Performing Feminisms TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-05.*
THDA 294-01 Voice and Speech MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 204 Cheryl Brinkley
A highly experiential exploration of the fundamentals of spoken voice communication required for public speaking and the specialized demands of stage performance. Focusing on healthy voice production and projection through a body-based, Lessac-influenced system, clarity of articulation and enunciation are attained through identifying and practicing the structural specifics of Standard American English Pronunciation. Students develop practical skills for realizing individual vocal potential and enhanced expressiveness.
No previous training or requirements necessary (anyone may play.)
Limited to 16 students. First Class Attendance Required. (4 credits)
THDA 294-01 Voice and Speech MF 01:00 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Cheryl Brinkley
A highly experiential exploration of the fundamentals of spoken voice communication required for public speaking and the specialized demands of stage performance. Focusing on healthy voice production and projection through a body-based, Lessac-influenced system, clarity of articulation and enunciation are attained through identifying and practicing the structural specifics of Standard American English Pronunciation. Students develop practical skills for realizing individual vocal potential and enhanced expressiveness.
No previous training or requirements necessary (anyone may play.)
Limited to 16 students. First Class Attendance Required. (4 credits)
THDA 294-02 Experiential Anatomy and the Mind Body Connection MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke
Through reading, writing, research, hands-on exercises, and structured movement activities, this course will explore the body�s design and function, focusing on the skeletal, muscle, nervous, and respiratory systems. We will use yoga postures (asanas) and breath control (pranayama) as tools to cultivate direct knowledge of anatomy and alignment. This course is designed to integrate scientific models of anatomy and one's lived experience of body and movement. We will investigate the relationship between body and mind, beginning with the question of how the body and mind are defined and understood. Along with recent scholarly research, we will use mindfulness meditation (calm, precise attention) as a means to study thought, feeling, sensation, perception, and consciousness and how they interrelate.
Objectives:

1. To learn, through research and direct experience, about human anatomy, particularly the skeletal, muscle, nervous, and respiratory systems
2. To gain knowledge and experience of physical alignment
3. To gain sensitivity and understanding of the relationship between body and mind
4. To inspire questions and look at assumptions about the nature of self
5. To develop skills for concentration and tranquility through mindfulness meditation
6. To find relevance of the course material in your own life

Texts:
Yoga Anatomy by Leslie Kaminoff
The Anatomy Coloring Book by Wynn Kapit
Satipatthana by Analayo












THDA 341-01 Intermediate Dance Composition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 350-01 Directing Theory/Production I MWF 02:20 pm-04:20 pm THEATR STUDIO Harry Waters
*Permission of instructor required.*
THDA 475-01 Advanced Scene Design M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett
*$40 material fee required.*
THDA 42-01 Modern Dance II TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 45-01 Modern Dance IV MW 03:45 pm-05:15 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 52-01 Ballet II MW 02:15 pm-03:45 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Stanchfield
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:30 pm-06:00 pm THEATR 6 Sharon Varosh
THDA 60-01 Dance Ensemble MW 05:30 pm-07:00 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
*Permission of instructor required.*

top of page

Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
WGSS 194-01 Media Anthropology: Mediating Gender and Sexuality MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Anne Kustritz
*First day attendance required.* Do we see differently when we look through a camera? Do we see ourselves differently when a camera looks at us? How do images teach us about being men and women, queer and straight? This course brings together ethnographic methods and cultural studies theory to investigate the social and cultural implications of capturing and distributing representations of gender and sexuality. Sampling from film theory, audience studies, and anthropology, we will examine the meaning and effects of representation in photography, film, television, the Internet, and mass mediated print, with an emphasis on alternative media and alternative media practices. Beginning with work on the ethics of anthropological scrutiny, the course will incorporate several small-scale exercises in participant-observation, culminating in a final, self-designed media ethnography project. Authors of interest will include John Berger, Linda Williams, Adi Kuntsman, Wilton Martinez, and Margaret Wilson.
WGSS 194-02 Topics in US History: The History of Feminism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with HIST 190-01 and AMST 194-02.
WGSS 200-01 Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies: Anthropological Perspectives MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Anne Kustritz
*First day attendance required.* Studying cultures of oppressive hierarchy presents serious moral, ethical, and methodological challenges. This course follows two recent strands of cultural anthropology and ethnography: the critique of traditional ethnographic practice from feminist and queer perspectives, and the construction of new methods for the anthropological study of gender and sexuality. Readings will include works by Ruth Behar, Don Kulick, Gelya Frank, Gayle Rubin, and Kamala Visweswaran. Throughout the term we will question the classed, racialized, and gendered underpinnings of empirical constructions in the social sciences like objectivity, while also working toward a respectful and critical practice of participant-observation which speaks with, rather than for, subjects of study. We will also work to localize and historicize sex/gender categories.
WGSS 294-01 Sexual Citizenship and the Public Sphere MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Anne Kustritz
This course investigates the categories of "the citizen" and "the public" from the perspective of feminist and queer theorists with a variety of disciplinary backgrounds. Historians, psychoanalysts, literary critics, political scientists, theorists of globalization, and cultural critics have each increasingly scrutinized the underlying sexual component of citizenship duties, rights, and obligations. Our readings will include Lauren Berlant, Michael Warner, Carole Pateman, and JK Puar. With them, we will question how sexuality and gender become public, the way in which groups organize themselves and become organized by larger social systems as "a (sex) public," and the extent to which national discourses are steeped in assumptions and directives about social and sexual life. We will also investigate strategies employed by queer and feminist activists in challenging or strategically deploying their citizenship status.
WGSS 294-02 Feminist Political Theory TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
*Cross-listed with POLI 261-01.*
WGSS 294-03 Economics of Gender TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Karine Moe
*Cross-listed with ECON 242-01.*
WGSS 294-05 Performing Feminisms TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
*Cross-listed with THDA 262-01.*
WGSS 294-06 Comparative Muslim Cultures TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Smadar Lavie
*Cross-listed with ANTH 253-01, HMCS 294-03, and INTL 253-01.*
WGSS 294-07 Comparative Borderlands and Diasporas W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Smadar Lavie
*Cross-listed with INTL 336-01 and HMCS 394-05.*
WGSS 294-08 Race and Masculinity in Modern U.S. History M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Daniel Gilbert
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-07.*
WGSS 315-01 Comparative (Neo/Post) Modernities TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-04 and HMCS 394-02; first day attendance required.* This course will contextualize fascism as a historical phenomenon and as a particular modernist ideology in the context of contemporary political, economic, social, cultural theories. It will explore the relationship of fascism to concepts of masculinity and femininity, sexuality, race, class, and nation. We will investigate the roles and impact of writers/intellectuals creating bodies of thought within and around such theories and concepts. We will relate histories past to histories present through a discussion of (post)modernity. Some of the texts are Benito Mussolini's speeches, Antonion Gramsci's and Emma Goldman's theories, Djuna Barnes's Nightwood, Grazia Deledda's Cosima, Zora Neale Hurston's I Love Myself, extracts from Gwendolyn Bennett's writings, Jean Rhys's Good Morning, Midnight, and Virginia Woolf's Three Guineas. Other media such as art and films will also be included.
WGSS 394-01 Race, Class, and Gender in American Art MW 02:20 pm-04:10 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-03 and ART 375-01.*
WGSS 400-01 Senior Seminar: Linking Theory and Practice TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker
*First day attendance required.* The questions that have been haunting you through many courses will be addressed directly in this capstone: where and how do theory and practice become linked? How does all this relate to my life and how will it help in my post-college experience? To respond to these questions, we'll review the feminist genealogies that have emerged in previous courses and contextualize our places in relation to them. We'll analyze economic, political, cultural, and literary theories and practices - socialism, capitalism, democracy, nationalism, grassroots movements, diaspora, (sur)realism, among others. We'll study how theories and practices affect each other in the works of writers such as Rosa Luxemburg, Jean Rhys, Nella Larsen, Gayatri Spivak, Joanna Kadi, Catherine Eschle, Paula Moya, and Nancy Naples, to name a few. We'll explore the meanings of our practices and the theories implicit or explicit in them. Your own experiences in academia, organizational work, and imagined professions will be part of our study because we will test various frameworks in our present and imagine how they may be part of our future.

An affiliation, membership, or intership in a group of students or community workers, while taking this course, is highly encouraged. Please establish a connection with such a group well in advance of the beginning of the course.

top of page