Fall 2010 Class Schedule

This is a class schedule from a previous term. View current class schedules

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Classics
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Neuroscience Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theatre and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
AMST 103-01 Race in US Social Thought MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 213 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*First Year Course only; First day attendance required*
AMST 110-01 Intro to African American St: The Problem of the Color Line TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Jane Rhodes
From the election of Barack Obama as President of the United States, to the disproportionate suffering of blacks during the current economic crisis, African Americans have always been at the center of the nation's history, culture and politics. This course examines how the African American experience has been studied and the contributions of African American intellectuals to this enterprise. Taking a cue from W. E. B. Du Bois' 1903 dictum that the "problem of the 20th century is the problem of the color line," we will consider the history of race in America and its shifting boundaries in the 21st century.
AMST 194-02 American Voices MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Kristin Naca
*Cross-listed with ENGL 105-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 194-03 Introduction to African American Literature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with ENGL 110-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 194-04 Great Lakes American Indian History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Scott Shoemaker
*Cross-listed with HIST 194-01*
AMST 200-01 Critical Methods W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 217 Daniel Gilbert
*First day attendance required*
AMST 222-01 Imagining the American West TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Lynn Hudson
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with HIST 222-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 280-01 Re-envisioning Educ/Democracy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Cross-listed with EDUC 280-01 and POLI 211-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 292-01 Engaging the Public: Writing and Publishing in American Studies W 07:00 pm-09:00 pm HUM 215 Jane Rhodes
*2 credit course.* This course will focus on ways to disseminate research findings and knowledge beyond the American Studies classroom. Course content will focus on writing, editing, and the art of preparing a journal article for publication. It will also consider how to engage various publics, including other students, the College, and local communities, through digital publishing. Students will be involved in preparing a student peer-reviewed open access journal and will be part of a collaborative model for circulating research and criticism. Students will design and launch the journal, organize a peer-review process, and learn about some of the broader issues involved in publishing including verifying facts, copyright, intellectual property, author rights, and open access.
AMST 294-01 Indigenous People and the State in the Americas TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Erik Redix
*Cross-listed with LATI 294-01 and HISP 394-01; first day attendance required.* This course will explore various topics relevant to the interactions of indigenous people and the state in the Americas - including the United States, Guatemala, Bolivia, and Colombia-- in a comparative transnational context. The course will consider how indigenous peoples throughout the Americas assert their sovereignty in response to state law and policy. Topics include indigenous identity, education, state borders and the politics of representation of indigenous peoples, with an emphasis on indigenous voices. A reoccurring theme is the role played by indigenous women.
AMST 294-03 The U.S. Since 1945: The U.S. in the Vietnam War Era, 1950-1975 W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with HIST 244-01*
AMST 294-04 African American Literature 1900 to Present TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with ENGL 276-01*
AMST 294-05 Indigenous People and Museums MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Scott Shoemaker
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-03*
AMST 300-01 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar: Schools and Prisons M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 110 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with EDUC 394-01; permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
AMST 300-L1 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar Lab: Schools and Prisons R 09:40 am-11:10 am LEOCTR 36 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with EDUC 394-L1; permission of Instructor required; first day attendance required*
AMST 308-01 Intro to U.S. Latino Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 228 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and Lati 308-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 345-01 Race/Culture/Ethnicity M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Marceline DuBose
*Cross-listed with EDUC 340-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 354-01 Blackness in the Media TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with HMCS 354-01*
AMST 370-01 Understand/Confront Racism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 300 Kendrick Brown
*Cross-listed with PSYC 370-01*
AMST 392-01 Historians/Crit Race Theory W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 002 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with HIST 330-01; permission of instructor required; 2 credit course*
AMST 394-01 Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in American Art MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with ART 375-01 and WGSS 394-02*
AMST 494-01 Frontera: US/Mexico Border TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with HISP 494-01 and LATI 494-01; first day attendance required*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Arjun Guneratne
ANTH 111-02 Cultural Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Sonia Patten
ANTH 112-01 Archaeology/Human Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06B Scott Legge
ANTH 112-02 Archaeology/Human Evolution MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06B Scott Legge
*Limited to incoming First Years and Sophomores*
ANTH 194-01 Emerging Infectious Diseases TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Ron Barrett
*First Year Course only*
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
*First day attendance required; non-Anthropology majors need permission of instructor.*
ANTH 239-01 Medical Anthropology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06A Sonia Patten
ANTH 256-01 Peoples/Cultures South Asia MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 05 Arjun Guneratne
*Cross-listed with ASIA 256-01*
ANTH 294-01 Indigenous Peoples of the Arctic MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students* This course provides an introduction to the human settlement of the circumpolar region of the world. The arctic represents one of the most extreme environments to which humans have adapted. These adaptations include both biological and cultural changes required to settle and flourish in this formidable setting. The course will look at some of the cultural practices that appear to be ubiquitous throughout the Arctic, as well as those specializations that have developed as a result of some of the more localized environmental pressures. Finally, it will explore the consequences of rapid global climate change as well as modernization of these unique cultures to get a sense of what the future might hold for the indigenous peoples of the Arctic.
ANTH 360-01 Anthropology of Tourism MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Sonia Patten
ANTH 394-01 Darfur: Conflict and Human Rights in Africa W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
Darfur, located in Western Sudan, has been described as "Rwanda in slow motion," a reference to the unfathomable destruction of a people that occurred over the course of 100 days in Rwanda in 1994 and that has unfolded painfully over recent years in Darfur. A significant difference between Rwanda and Darfur, however, has been the remarkable and unprecedented international response to the unfolding situation in Sudan. This course will use in-depth and focused analysis to explore critical intersections in human rights, the state, and international responses. Darfur becomes a lens through which to explore central themes in issues of human rights and humanitarianism that play out domestically and internationally. A key concern throughout our analysis will be the extent to which local realities are incorporated into defining problems and developing solutions. The course is divided into three parts. First, we will examine the social, political, economic, and historical context of Sudan in an effort to understand what precipitated the explosion of violence in Darfur. Next, we will examine the international response to Darfur through a consideration of issues of human rights and international responses to the conflict. While the usual players-governments, the media, NGOs-will be examined, in this course we will also consider the roles of African public intellectuals and activist groups such as U.S. high school and college students and celebrities. As a component of this part of the course, students will work in groups on a civic engagement project of their design throughout the semester. The course will conclude with an examination of post-conflict possibilities to learn more about the complex processes involved in rebuilding and forging new communities when conflict ends.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 111, or permission of instructor.
ANTH 487-01 Theory in Anthropology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Ron Barrett
ANTH 494-01 Ethnomusicology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 202 Chuen-Fung Wong
*Cross-listed with MUSI 494-01*

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ART 130-01 Drawing I TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 123 Megan Vossler
*First day attendance required*
ART 130-02 Drawing I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 123 Megan Vossler
*First day attendance required*
ART 149-01 Intro to Visual Culture TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ART 113 Nassim Rossi
*First day attendance required*
ART 160-01 Art of the West I: Ancient Through Medieval MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am ART 113 Vanessa Rousseau
*Cross-listed with CLAS 160-01; first day attendance required*
ART 160-02 Art of the West I: Ancient Through Medieval MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ART 113 Vanessa Rousseau
*Cross-listed with CLAS 160-02.*
ART 170-01 Art of the East I: China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Georgiana Podulke
*Cross-listed with ASIA 170-01; first day attendance required*
ART 232-01 Fiber and Material Studies I MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 116 Pritika Chowdhry
*First day attendance required; $100 material fee will be charged*
ART 234-01 Painting I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 128 Christine Willcox
*First day attendance required*
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 135 Stanton Sears
*First day attendance required*
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 119 Paula Marty
*First day attendance required.*
ART 237-01 Ceramic Art I: Handbuilding TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; $100 material fee will be charged*
ART 238-01 Ceramic Art I: Wheel Throwing TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; $100 material fee will be charged*
ART 270-01 Art/Religion Along Silk Road TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 402 Georgiana Podulke
*Cross-listed with ASIA 270-01; first day attendance required*
ART 278-01 Baroque Art TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 402 Kristin Lanzoni
ART 366-01 2-D Design MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am Gudrun Lock
*Course to meet in the Lampert Building, 3rd Floor; additional studio time to be arranged with the instructor.*
ART 367-01 3-D Design TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 135 Stanton Sears
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
ART 371-01 Painting II TR TBA ART 208 Christine Willcox
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TR TBA ART 119 Paula Marty
*First day attendance required.*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; $100 material fee will be charged*
ART 375-01 Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in American Art MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01 and WGSS 394-02*
ART 378-01 Fiber and Material Studies II MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm ART 116 Pritika Chowdhry
*$100 material Fee will be charged*
ART 487-01 Art Hist Methodology Seminar W TBA Joanna Inglot
*Course to meet in the Fine Arts Lounge.*
ART 490-08 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Ruthann Godollei
ART 490-20 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Christine Willcox
ART 490-22 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Paula Marty
ART 490-26 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Joanna Inglot

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ASIA 101-01 Elementary Chinese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 112 Frederik Green
ASIA 101-02 Elementary Chinese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Frederik Green
ASIA 101-L1 Elementary Chinese I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 404 Ling Zhang
ASIA 101-L2 Elementary Chinese I Lab W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 102 Ling Zhang
ASIA 101-L3 Elementary Chinese I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Ling Zhang
ASIA 111-01 Introduction to Asian Studies TR 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 002 James Laine
ASIA 124-01 Asian Religions MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 111 Erik Davis
*Cross-listed with RELI 124-01*
ASIA 140-01 Intro to East Asian Civ TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 140-01*
ASIA 170-01 Art of the East I: China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Georgiana Podulke
*Cross-listed with ART 170-01; first day attendance required*
ASIA 203-01 Intermediate Chinese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 112 Xin Yang
ASIA 203-02 Intermediate Chinese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Xin Yang
ASIA 203-L1 Intermediate Chinese I Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Ling Zhang
ASIA 203-L2 Intermediate Chinese I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 113 Ling Zhang
ASIA 203-L3 Intermediate Chinese I Lab R 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 404 Ling Zhang
ASIA 256-01 Peoples/Cultures South Asia MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 05 Arjun Guneratne
*Cross-listed with ANTH 256-01*
ASIA 270-01 Art/Religion Along Silk Road TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 402 Georgiana Podulke
*Cross-listed with ART 270-01; first day attendance required*
ASIA 275-01 History of Modern China W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 275-01*
ASIA 276-01 History of Traditional Japan TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 276-01*
ASIA 294-01 Metropolis as Muse: Shanghai's Urban Culture Through Literature, Film and Art TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Frederik Green
*First Year Course only*
ASIA 303-01 Advanced Chinese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Patricia Anderson
ASIA 303-L1 Advanced Chinese I Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Ling Zhang
ASIA 303-L2 Advanced Chinese I Lab T 01:30 pm-02:30 pm HUM 111 Ling Zhang
ASIA 407-01 Fourth Year Chinese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Jin Stone

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
BIOL 117-01 Women, Health, Reproduction TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Elizabeth Jansen
*Cross-listed with WGSS 117-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 144-01 Lakes, Streams and Rivers MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Daniel Hornbach
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 144-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course*
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Christopher Calderone
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Lin Aanonsen
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Sarah Boyer
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-02 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Sarah Boyer
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Sarah Boyer
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L3 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Sarah Boyer
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
BIOL 345-01 Field Botany MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 345-L1 Field Botany Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-01*
BIOL 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L1*
BIOL 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L2*
BIOL 356-01 Cell/Molecular Neuroscience MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 270 Lin Aanonsen
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 356-L1 Cell/Molecular Neuroscience Lb T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 359-01 Chemical Biology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Christopher Calderone
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 365-01 Comp Vertebrate Anatomy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 270 Kristina Curry Rogers
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 365-L1 Comp Vertebrate Anatomy Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Kristina Curry Rogers
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 394-01 Computational and Synthetic Biology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Paul Overvoorde
*Cross-listed with COMP 394-01; First day attendance required*
BIOL 394-01 Computational and Synthetic Biology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Elizabeth Shoop
*Cross-listed with COMP 394-01; First day attendance required*
BIOL 489-01 Biology Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 494-01 Seminar in Epigenetics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required*

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CHEM 111-01 General Chemistry I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Susan Green
CHEM 111-02 General Chemistry I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Keith Kuwata
CHEM 111-03 General Chemistry I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Keith Kuwata
CHEM 111-L1 General Chemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee will be charged*
CHEM 111-L2 General Chemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee will be charged.*
CHEM 111-L3 General Chemistry I Lab W 01:10 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee will be charged.*
CHEM 111-L4 General Chemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee will be charged.*
CHEM 111-L5 General Chemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee will be charged.*
CHEM 111-L6 General Chemistry I Lab F 01:10 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 343 Robert Rossi
*First day attendance required; $12 lab fee will be charged*
CHEM 115-01 Accelerated General Chemistry MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg
*Available to new incoming first year students only*
CHEM 115-L1 Accel General Chemistry Lab W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 380 Keith Kuwata
*Available to new incoming first year students only; $12 lab fee will be charged.*
CHEM 120-01 CSI Macalester MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 370 Ronald Brisbois
*Intended for non-science majors; reserved for Macalester First Year students*
CHEM 211-01 Organic Chemistry I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Ronald Brisbois
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-02 Organic Chemistry I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L1 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L2 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L3 Organic Chemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L4 Organic Chemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye
*1 credit course*
CHEM 311-01 Thermodynamics and Kinetics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg
CHEM 311-L1 Thermodynamics & Kinetics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 378 Thomas Varberg
CHEM 311-L2 Thermodynamics & Kinetics Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 378 Keith Kuwata
CHEM 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-01*
CHEM 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L1; first day attendance required*
CHEM 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L2; first day attendance required**
CHEM 411-01 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Paul Fischer
CHEM 411-L1 Adv Inorganic Chemistry Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 347 Paul Fischer
*First day attendance required*

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CLAS 111-01 Elementary Latin I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 009 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 111-L1 Elementary Latin I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 009 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 113-01 Elementary Arabic I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Antoine Mefleh
*First day attendance required*
CLAS 113-02 Elementary Arabic I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 06A Antoine Mefleh
*First day attendance required*
CLAS 115-01 Elementary Greek I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 011 Brian Lush
CLAS 115-L1 Elementary Greek I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 217 Brian Lush
CLAS 115-L2 Elementary Greek I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm HUM 217 Brian Lush
CLAS 117-01 Elementary Hebrew I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 009 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 117-L1 Elementary Hebrew I Lab T 01:00 pm-02:00 pm OLRI 205 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 145-01 Pagans/Christians/Jews TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 226 Andrew Overman
*Cross-listed with HMCS 145-01 and RELI 145-01*
CLAS 160-01 Intro to Ancient/Medieval Art MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am ART 113 Vanessa Rousseau
*Cross-listed with ART 160-01; first day attendance required*
CLAS 160-02 Intro to Ancient/Medieval Art MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am Vanessa Rousseau
*Cross-listed with ART 160-02.*
CLAS 194-01 Democracy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Andrew Overman
*First year Course only*
CLAS 231-01 Intermediate Latin: Prose MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 011 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 241-01 Intermediate Arabic I TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A Antoine Mefleh
CLAS 261-01 Intermediate Greek: Prose TR 09:40 am-11:10 am Andrew Overman
*Class to meet in instructor's office.*
CLAS 272-01 Studies in Classical Civilization: Athenian Tragedy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Brian Lush
The City Dionysia was Athens' opportunity to present itself to the rest of Hellas, and to showcase the brilliance and creativity of its best dramatists. The legacy established by Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides at these dramatic competitions continues to flourish 2,500 years later. This course will seek to examine in detail many of these tragedies, whose influence is still felt in our own literature and art, and address such questions as: What was the political, religious and spatial context in which Greek tragedies were produced? Can and should an overarching theory of "the tragic" be developed? What common themes and ideas (if any) can be found in the tragedies that survive? How might these works of dramatic art have engaged with their political and intellectual milieu? What modern theories derive from, or can be fruitfully applied to Greek tragedy? How did Athenian tragedians draw upon, adapt and recreate familiar mythic narratives? We will also give close consideration to a number of approaches that recent scholars have applied to Greek tragedy, and discuss the relative merits of these analyses. Prerequisite: Classics 121, 122, 127, 129, 145 or permission of instructor.
CLAS 294-01 The Qur'an (Koran) TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Brett Wilson
*Cross-listed with RELI 200-01*
CLAS 394-01 Islamic Readings in Arabic W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Brett Wilson
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-02*
CLAS 483-01 Advanced Reading in Latin MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 488-01 Jr/Sr Seminar in Archaeology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Beth Severy-Hoven
This course caps the Classics major for students focusing on archaeology, civilization or languages, and is most appropriate for senior majors. Students participating in the course will work on their capstone or honors projects as the major paper of the course. In addition, together we will review the history of the discipline and consider how we may fit as individuals into that ever changing narrative. We will discuss what may come next for each of you and draft useful documents from CVs to cover letters to personal statements. The course will culiminate in a public presentation of student work to the department.

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
COMP 120-01 Computing and Society MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
*First Year Course only*
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Comp Sci MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 258 Susan Fox
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
COMP 221-01 Algorithm Design/Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 Susan Fox
COMP 225-01 Software Design/Devpt TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop
COMP 369-01 Discrete Applied Mathematics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Stan Wagon
*Cross-listed with MATH 469-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
COMP 394-01 Computational/Synthetic Biol M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Elizabeth Shoop
*Cross-listed with BIOL 394-01; First day attendance required.* According to the primary web resource for synthetic biology, http://syntheticbiology.org, synthetic biology is:
"A) the design and construction of new biological parts, devices, and systems and
B) the redesign of existing, natural biological systems for useful purposes."
Synthetic biologists use molecular methods to construct DNA devices that perform new functions. In this course, we will examine the relatively short history of this exciting new field, study the tools used by synthetic biologists, and employ those tools to create a new DNA device. Synthetic biology is different from traditional genetics, genomics, or molecular biology studies in that it incorporates the following notions commonly found in computing and engineering:
1. Abstraction: DNA is used to make abstract parts that can be assembled into devices, which can then be connected to make systems.
2. Modularity: parts, devices, and systems can be connected and combined in various combinations.
3. Standardization: by agreement, there are standard ways that parts, devices, and systems can connect, just as we have standardized parts in engineering.
4. Designing and modeling: before building the actual biological device, it is best to build a model of it and test it.
We will study and use these principles as we create our new devices. We will use a variety of software tools available to help us design our devices, and build the devices in the lab. The projects in this course could be used later as entries in the iGEM Jamboree undergraduate competition, held annually.
COMP 394-01 Computational/Synthetic Biol M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Paul Overvoorde
*Cross-listed with BIOL 394-01; First day attendance required.* According to the primary web resource for synthetic biology, http://syntheticbiology.org, synthetic biology is:
"A) the design and construction of new biological parts, devices, and systems and
B) the redesign of existing, natural biological systems for useful purposes."
Synthetic biologists use molecular methods to construct DNA devices that perform new functions. In this course, we will examine the relatively short history of this exciting new field, study the tools used by synthetic biologists, and employ those tools to create a new DNA device. Synthetic biology is different from traditional genetics, genomics, or molecular biology studies in that it incorporates the following notions commonly found in computing and engineering:
1. Abstraction: DNA is used to make abstract parts that can be assembled into devices, which can then be connected to make systems.
2. Modularity: parts, devices, and systems can be connected and combined in various combinations.
3. Standardization: by agreement, there are standard ways that parts, devices, and systems can connect, just as we have standardized parts in engineering.
4. Designing and modeling: before building the actual biological device, it is best to build a model of it and test it.
We will study and use these principles as we create our new devices. We will use a variety of software tools available to help us design our devices, and build the devices in the lab. The projects in this course could be used later as entries in the iGEM Jamboree undergraduate competition, held annually.
COMP 484-01 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Susan Fox
*Cross-listed with NEUR 484-01*
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 245 Shilad Sen
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 245 Susan Fox

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ECON 108-01 Quantitative Thinking: Epidemiology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Daniel Kaplan
*Cross-listed with MATH 108-01; permission from instructor required for ACTC students*
ECON 110-01 Investments TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans
ECON 113-02 Financial Accounting TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Jeff Evans
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Liang Ding
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 304 Liang Ding
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Pete Ferderer
*First Year Course only*
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Paul Aslanian
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 150 Paul Aslanian
ECON 231-01 Environmental Econ/Policy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Sarah West
*Cross-listed with ENVI 231-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ECON 256-01 Intro to Investment Banking TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Joyce Minor
ECON 294-01 Business Communications TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Joyce Minor
This course is intended to help students improve their own critical communication skills and explore how those skills can be best applied in business situations. Students will polish writing skills, with sessions that focus on resumes, cover letters and everyday business communications like email. Students will learn the best practices of effective presentations and will deliver several powerpoint presentations in class. The course will use the case method to review real corporate communications issues, such as crisis management, interpersonal communications challenges, negotiation simulations and the like. This course cannot count as the 200-level elective for the major or as fulfilling the 200-level prerequisite for 300-level courses. Prerequisite: Economics 113 or 119.
ECON 294-02 Health Economics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Steven Dehmer
This is an introductory course in health economics. This distinct but still developing subfield within economics encompasses a wide range of topics, including the study of the demand, supply, and production of health, the role of managing health risks through insurance markets, cost-effectiveness analysis, and the presence of market failures in health-related markets. This course will survey the health economic literature and emphasize the application of economic theory to health-related public policy, including measures to reform the U.S. healthcare system. Prerequisite: Economics 119.
ECON 342-01 Economics of Poverty in US TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Karine Moe
ECON 361-01 Intermed Microecon Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 226 Sarah West
ECON 371-01 Intermed Macroecon Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer
ECON 371-02 Intermed Macroecon Analysis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 309 Raymond Robertson
ECON 381-02 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 309 Raymond Robertson
ECON 381-L1 Introduction Econometrics Lab M 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 309 Raymond Robertson
ECON 381-L2 Introduction Econometrics Lab M 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 309 Raymond Robertson
ECON 426-01 Intl Economic Development M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Amy Damon
ECON 442-01 Labor Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 101 Karine Moe
ECON 444-01 Honors Seminar MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Raymond Robertson
ECON 457-01 Finance MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Liang Ding

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse
Cross-listed with PSYC-220-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 280-01 Re-Envisioning Education and Democracy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Cross-listed with AMST 280-01 and POLI 211-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 340-01 Race, Culture and Ethnicity in Education M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Marceline DuBose
*Cross-listed with AMST 345-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 394-01 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar: Schools and Prisons M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 110 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with AMST 300-01; permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
EDUC 394-L1 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar Lb TR 09:40 am-11:10 am Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with AMST 300-L1; permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
EDUC 460-01 Education and Social Change TR 08:00 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*First day attendance required*
EDUC 480-01 Urban Educ Theory/Policy W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*First day attendance required*

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENGL 101-01 College Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Rebecca Graham
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 105-01 American Voices MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Kristin Naca
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-02; first day attendance required*
ENGL 110-01 Introduction to African American Literature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-03; first day attendance required*
ENGL 115-01 Shakespeare MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 305 Theresa Krier
ENGL 125-01 Studies in Literature: Faith and Doubt TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 Neil Chudgar
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
ENGL 136-01 Drama TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Nathan Hensley
ENGL 137-01 Novel MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 001 Scott Selisker
ENGL 137-02 Novel MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Scott Selisker
ENGL 150-01 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 011 Kristin Naca
*First day attendance required; freshmen and sophomores only*
ENGL 150-02 Intro to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 217 Ping Wang
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
ENGL 150-03 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 111 Peter Bognanni
ENGL 150-04 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Jon Lurie
*First day attendance required; freshman and sophomores only*
ENGL 150-05 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 Marlon James
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-06 Intro to Creative Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Jeffrey Shotts
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 205-01 Literary/Cultural Theory: The Problem of Art TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Nathan Hensley
ENGL 220-01 18th Century British Lit TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Neil Chudgar
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 230-01 Romantic Literature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 212 Robert Warde
ENGL 240-01 20th Century British Lit TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Robert Warde
ENGL 267-01 Literature/Environment MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Theresa Krier
*Cross-listed with ENVI 267-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENGL 269-01 Environmental Classics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 247 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with ENVI 280-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENGL 272-01 19th Century American Lit TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 James Dawes
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 276-01 African American Literature 1900 to Present TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-04*
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Marlon James
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 281-02 Crafts of Writing: Fiction MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Peter Bognanni
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 282-01 Crafts of Writing: Cr Non Fict TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Ping Wang
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 284-01 Crafts of Writing: Screenwrit W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Peter Bognanni
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 304-01 Medieval Heroic Narrative MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 304 Theresa Krier
*Course suitable for new freshmen/transfer students.*
ENGL 361-01 The American Novel TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 James Dawes
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with HMCS 367-01 and INTL 367-01*
ENGL 394-01 Global Fictions of WWII W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Scott Selisker
ENGL 394-02 Literary Case Studies from Goethe to Kafka MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01 and HMCS 394-01; for detailed description, see under GERM 394-01*
ENGL 402-01 Seminar in British Authors: Literature and the Sense of Touch M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Neil Chudgar
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 405-01 Adv Writing Workshop: Novella M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Marlon James
*First day attendance required*

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENVI 140-01 The Earth's Climate System MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Louisa Bradtmiller
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students *
ENVI 140-L1 The Earth's Climate System Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 187 Louisa Bradtmiller
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 144-01 Lakes, Streams and Rivers MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Daniel Hornbach
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with BIOL 144-01; first day attendance required*
ENVI 194-01 Climate and Society MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 213 Louisa Bradtmiller
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students* Seasonal and annual patterns of temperature and precipitation influence the development, success and collapse of civilizations. Regional climate determines numerous things about how humans adapt to survival there, including the type of shelter needed, the length of the growing season, and the availability/scarcity of freshwater. Using a combination of scientific and historical records, this course will provide a brief introduction to the climate system and will then focus on how changes in climate affected three major civilizations throughout history. In the latter part of the course we will discuss observed global warming in the modern world, what the potential benefits and consequences of it may be, and whether or not there are lessons to be learned from our ancestors.
ENVI 194-02 The End of the World TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Paula Cooey
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with RELI 194-01; first day attendance required*
ENVI 225-01 100 Words for Snow MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 Marianne Milligan
*Cross-listed with LING 225-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 231-01 Environmental Econ/Policy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Sarah West
*Cross-listed with ECON 231-01; permission of instuctor required for all ACTC students*
ENVI 232-01 People/Agriculture/Environ TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with GEOG 232-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with HIST 234-01; first day attendance required; permission of instuctor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 252-01 Water and Power TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with GEOG 252-01 and POLI 252-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 267-01 Literature/Environment MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Theresa Krier
*Cross-listed with ENGL 267-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 270-01 Psyc of Sustainable Behavior TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with PSYC 270-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 280-01 Environmental Classics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 247 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with ENGL 269-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 294-02 Indigenous Peoples of the Arctic MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge
*Cross-listed with ANTH 294-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 340-01 US Urban Environmental Hist TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with HIST 340-01; first day attendance required permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 368-01 Sustain Dev/Global Future TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with INTL 368-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 477-01 Comp Environment/Development TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with GEOG 488-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 489-01 Environmental Leadership Pract M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*Permission of instructor required; S/D/NC grading only; concurrent registration required with ENVI 490-01; first day attendance required*
ENVI 490-01 Envi St Leadership Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*Permission of instructor required; concurrent registration required with ENVI 489-01; 2 credit course; first day attendance required*

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
FREN 101-01 French I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 111 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-02 French I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 111 Anne Carayon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L1 French I Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 111 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L2 French I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L3 French I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 247 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L4 French I Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am OLRI 247 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 228 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L2 French II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 217 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 402 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 194-01 Revolutionary Thought in France MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 111 Andrew Billing
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
FREN 203-01 French III MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 216 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-02 French III MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 112 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab T 09:10 am-10:10 am OLRI 245 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L3 French III Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 100 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L4 French III Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 111 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L5 French III Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 113 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 228 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 111 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab T 09:10 am-10:10 am HUM 402 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L5 Text, Film and Media Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 306-01 Intro to Literary Analysis MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*First day attendance required*
FREN 415-01 Literary Periods/Movts: Resistance/Revolution in 18th C France MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required.* Eighteenth-century France is a period characterized by vigorous literary and philosophical challenges to traditional authority and its institutions, although the events of 1789 were not anticipated by most of the leading thinkers of the period, and the notion that the Revolution was the necessary outcome of their challenges has often been viewed as a retrospective historical illusion. In this course we will examine intellectual challenges to traditional authority during the ancien regime in three primary areas: the domain of politics and the state; the domain of religion and the church; and the domain of sexuality and the family. The course will culminate with a discussion of some key revolutionary ideas and manifestos, and a review of the legacy of French Enlightenment thought and its advances and limits, in dialogue with contemporary critical and theoretical perspectives. Themes to be discussed include despotism and democracy, freedom and equality, nature and culture, tolerance and fanaticism, deism and natural religion, atheism and materialism, education, sex and libertinage. Readings will include selections from the Encyclopedie and from works by Rousseau, Montesquieu, Beaumarchais, De Gouges, Voltaire, Sade, Vivant Denon, Diderot and D'Holbach. All classes will be taught in French. Prerequisite: French 306 or permission of instructor.
FREN 494-01 Theater: Representation and Interpretations from the Middle-Ages to Contemporary Theater MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 402 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required; course taught in French.* There is a long tradition of theater in France and Francophone cultures. This class will examine the history of the French theater from the Middle-Ages to contemporary authors. We will not only discuss texts while reading, watching videos, playing excerpts and going to the theater but our approach will also integrate contemporary criticism to help us understand what is at stake in the different periods. (farce, tragedy, comedy, satire, vaudeville, crisis, absurd, existentialism and postcolonialism theater). From the Religious theater to the 'theatre de l'absurde' and contemporary comedies and tragedies we will analyze the different modes of representation and interpretations throughout the ages (staging, actors, producers, didascalies, lights, notion of 'spectacle,' audience, etc.). The principal authors involved are; Rutebeuf, La farce de Maitre Pathelin, Garnier, Theodore de Beze, Moliere, Corneille, Racine, Beaumarchais, Marivaux, Victor Hugo, Musset, Beckett, Sartre, Camus, Francis Veber, Yasmina Reza, Ariane Mnouchkine, Kossi Efoui, Koffi Kwahule.
FREN 494-02 Quebec and Others MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 111 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required; taught in French.* Quebec is uniquely situated in the world: at a crossroads between European and North American cultures, a French-speaking province surrounded by English-speaking nations, and historically both connected and disconnected from its indigenous populations. It has also recently been a destination for emigres from all over the world. This course will examine the distinctive multicultural dimensions of the francophone province of Quebec and its interactions with "les autres" (other cultures and peoples), through a study of recent literature published over the past 30 years. We will begin with a brief overview of the history of Quebec's multicultural identity, from the colonial era through the Quiet Revolution of the 1960s and up to 21st-century Quebec, including the 2008 debates over the "reasonable accommodation" law that shocked the nation. The second section will proceed with an analysis of three of Quebec's strongest cultural partners: the heritage of the French, the influence of the U.S., and the complicated interactions with First Nations. The third section of the course will focus on the relationships between Quebecois "de souche" (citizens of French or British heritage) and recent immigrants. The texts and films studied in this section will include characters originally from China, Haiti, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Lebanon, and other countries around the world. We will examine why they moved to Quebec, why they chose French as their principal language of expression, and how they interpret their new homeland. Throughout the course, we will explore issues of language, identity, exile, and memory to understand the complex negotiations between inhabitants of "la belle province."

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOG 111-01 Human Geog of Global Issues MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Kathryn Pratt
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 111-02 Human Geog of Global Issues MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 112-01 Introduction to Urban Studies MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06A Daniel Trudeau
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 194-01 Contested Land/Global Commons MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Maano Ramutsindela
*Cross-listed with INTL 194-01*
GEOG 194-02 Cultural Geography of People, Animals and the Environment MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 05 Jennifer Blecha
The area of Animal Geographies is one of the newest, most vibrant, and fastest-growing interests within geography as a whole. In this class we will explore a wide range of approaches to human/cultural geography through the lens of animals. We will read geographers writing about animals from a variety of perspectives, addressing topics such as:Conservation-monitoring and protecting animal species; Development - animals in various roles in development-as culture, fuel, power, food; Economic Geography-trade in animal bodies (exotics, livestock), 'factory farms'; Health Geographies - Avian Flu, laboratory animals, pig/human heart transplants; Political and Indigenous Geographies - fishing rights and sovereignty, "ghost nets"; Race & Gender - bees and colonialism, sexism and meat; Technology-digital zoos, GIS and abandoned pets; Tourism-swimming with dolphins, shooting elephants, ruining habitat?; Urban Geography-planning, ecology (lighted buildings and bird migration, dog parks). More than simply being about animals, this class will allow us to look at how different geographers approach research. What is the author's training and epistemology? How does this influence their research question(s) and research methods? What choices are they making about what research to do and how to do it? We will spend time discussing how students might go about constructing a research project of their own.
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required; lab required; $20 materials fee will be charged*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab M 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 232-01 People/Agriculture/Environ TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
GEOG 241-01 Urban Geography MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 242-01 Regional Geography of US and Canada TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Laura Smith
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required; $35 materials fee will be charged*
GEOG 248-01 Political Geography TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Daniel Trudeau
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 249-01 Regional Geog of Latin America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Kathryn Pratt
*Cross-listed with LATI 249-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 252-01 Water and Power TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 252-01 and POLI 252-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
GEOG 262-01 Metro Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 364-01 GIS: Concepts/Applications TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 108 Holly Barcus
*First day attendance required; lab required; $25 materials fee will be charged*
GEOG 364-L1 GIS: Concepts/Applications Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 365-01 Urban GIS TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 108 Laura Smith
*First day attendance required; lab required; $25 materials fee will be charged*
GEOG 365-L1 Urban GIS Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 488-01 Comparative Environment & Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOL 101-01 Dinosaurs TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 Kristina Curry Rogers
GEOL 150-01 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 187 John Craddock
*First year Course only*
GEOL 150-02 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Colin Robins
GEOL 150-L1 Dynamic Earth/Global Chg Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 187 John Craddock
*First Year Course only*
GEOL 150-L2 Dynamic Earth/Global Chg Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 150-L3 Dynamic Earth/Global Chg Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 260-01 Geomorphology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 175 Colin Robins
GEOL 260-L1 Geomorphology Lab TBA TBA Colin Robins
GEOL 294-01 Field Methods in Science T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth
GEOL 300-01 Paleobiology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 300-L1 Paleobiology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 302-01 Petrology and Geochemistry MWF 08:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth
GEOL 394-01 Global Tectonics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GERM 101-01 Elementary German I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela
GERM 101-L1 Elementary German I Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 102 Aurel Sieber
GERM 101-L2 Elementary German I Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Aurel Sieber
GERM 101-L3 Elementary German I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 350 Aurel Sieber
GERM 101-L4 Elementary German I Lab TBA TBA Aurel Sieber
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 214 Rachael Huener
GERM 110-L1 Accelerated Elem German Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 110-L2 Accelerated Elem German Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am OLRI 247 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 110-L3 Accelerated Elem German Lab T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm HUM 102 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 110-L4 Accelerated Elem German Lab TBA TBA Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 194-01 Vampires: From Monsters to Superheroes MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 Brigetta Abel
*First Year Course only*
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 214 Linda Schulte-Sasse
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Aurel Sieber
GERM 203-L2 Intermediate German I Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 212 Aurel Sieber
GERM 203-L3 Intermediate German I Lab W 08:10 pm-09:10 pm HUM 212 Aurel Sieber
GERM 203-L4 Intermediate German I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm HUM 102 Aurel Sieber
GERM 203-L5 Intermediate German I Lab R 09:30 am-10:30 am HUM 102 Aurel Sieber
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 215 David Martyn
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 247 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 204-L2 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 100 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm HUM 113 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 255-01 German Cinema Studies: Nazi Cinema MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 401 Linda Schulte-Sasse
*First Year Course only*
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Gisela Peters
GERM 305-L1 German Through the Media Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 113 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 305-L2 German Through the Media Lab W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 102 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 307-01 Berlin and Vienna MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 214 Rachael Huener
*Taught in German.* The two great metropolises of the German-speaking world, Berlin and Vienna, have for centuries shaped major events, intellectual movements, economic and technological developments, and the political structure of Europe. As the center of one of the largest empires in world history, the Habsburg Empire, Vienna ruled over vast territories for six centuries, and in the last two centuries has contributed enormously to science, philosophy and the arts while maintaining its political importance, most recently as one of the four United Nations World Cities. Once the capital of the economic and military powerhouse of Prussia in the 19th century, the relatively modern city of Berlin has gone through swift and radical change in the last century. As capital of the first German democracy in the 1920s, Berlin became the center of the European avant-garde and a beacon of social experimentation. In the 1930s it was re-functioned by the Nazis into the center of fascist oppression, and in the aftermath of World War II was famously torn apart by the post-war division of Germany and its despised symbol, the Berlin Wall. As capital of the united Germany, Berlin continues to transform itself, yet maintains its status as a charismatic and historically important Weltmetropole. This course will be an interdisciplinary investigation into major epochs in the history of these two great cities, emphasizing in particular cultural production, such as literature, thought, and visual and material culture. Students who have completed German Studies 305 will find this a helpful bridge course to upper-level courses in German Studies, and it is required preparation for the German study abroad program in Berlin and Vienna. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: German Studies 305 (may be taken concurrently), placement test, or permission of instructor. [Note: Students who have participated in the Study Abroad Program in Berlin & Vienna will be better served by 360-level courses.]
GERM 337-01 Dead White Men: (Anti-) Philosophy Now MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 401 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with HMCS 337-01.* Today we often hear people dismiss the Western (mostly European) philosophical tradition as a bunch of "dead white men." In other words, the argument goes, these thinkers harbored such passe notions as universal truths, a universal subject, and an individual in total control of itself and endowed with a pure reason unadulterated by rhetoric, imagination, fiction, and politics. Why should we bother with "dead white men" now that we understand that truth depends on historical context, that the self is decentered by the unconscious, that identity is constituted by gender, race, class, and other cultural factors, that truth is linked to power, and that ideology is omnipresent? Unfortunately, this all-too-familiar attitude overlooks its own faulty presupposition: it presumes a clear-cut break between philosophical tradition and contemporary thought, as if contemporary thought had no tradition out of which it emerged and could, therefore, merely discard what preceded it. Hence the popularity of phrases like "philosophy is dead." It is all the more ironic to see this attitude prevail in the West at the very moment that multiculturalism has become our cause celebre: all cultural traditions are supposed to be "respected," except the West's own tradition. (Perhaps as a new way for the West to reinstate surreptitiously its superiority as the sole culture with no tradition?) This course pursues a close reading of texts by various "dead white men" as the unconscious (i.e., repressed and, for that matter, all the more powerful) undercurrent of contemporary thought. Assigned texts will include: Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Pascal, Spinoza, Kant, Hegel, Marx, as well as texts by twentieth-century thinkers that stress the dependence of contemporary thought on philosophy. No pre-knowledge required; all readings in English. Alternate years. (4 credits) Course cross-listed as Humanities, Media and Cultural Studies 337.
GERM 363-01 Romanticism MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 214 David Martyn
*Taught in German.* The goal of this course is to introduce you to the literature of German Romanticism, which lasted roughly from 1775 to 1835 and comprised the movements generally known as Storm and Stress (Sturm und Drang), Classicism (Klassik), and Romanticism proper (Romantik). The emphasis will be on understanding the literature of this period in its intellectual context. Accordingly, we will read both literary works, including poetry, plays, and epic prose, as well as discursive (or theoretical) texts that show how Romanticism led to the invention of many modern ideas: the inherent value of the individual, of art, of the nation; the concept of secular history; the notion that language does not reflect but constructs reality. The thesis of the course is that Romanticism and Enlightenment are two opposing poles that continue to structure modern society, both culturally and politically. Readings will include all or parts of: Goethe, Faust; Herder, Ursprung der Sprache; Schiller, Don Karlos; Kleist, Das Erdbeben in Chili; Novalis, Die Lehrlinge zu Sais; Tieck, Der blonde Eckbert; Hoffmann, Der Sandmann; theoretical writings by Novalis, Friedrich Schlegel, Schleiermacher, Wilhelm von Humboldt; poetry by Goethe, Schiller, Holderlin, Novalis, Eichendorff. Requirements: 3 short papers; oral report; final exam.
GERM 394-01 Literary Case Studies from Goethe to Kafka MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 David Martyn
*Taught in English; cross-listed with ENGL 394-02 and HMCS 394-01.* A "case" can be a crime (a murder case); a trial (a court case); a madman (a nut case.) It can be an anomaly (an exceptional case) or the rule (another case of . . . ). As one of the most basic forms of narrative, cases are inherently literary. But cases are also closely tied to science, particularly medicine and empirical psychology, which employ case studies as a form of investigation and evidence. This course will trace the history of the "case" in order to explore the developing relationship between literature and knowledge since the Romantic period. We will read novels and short stories of crime, detection, retribution, and madness by several modern German authors in tandem with psychological and medical case studies. When does an event become a case? Why do cases make such good stories? What is the relationship between a case and the rule it exemplifies (or disproves)? Why is modern individuality so often portrayed in terms of exceptional or typical cases? Prose fiction by authors from Goethe (The Sorrows of Young Werther) and Schiller through Poe, Musil, and Kafka (The Trial); scientific case studies by Karl Philipp Moritz, Philippe Pinel, and Sigmund Freud. Discussion and readings in English. Requirements: Weekly reading responses; three 5-6 page papers. Students of German may read the texts in the original and write shorter papers in German.

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 228 Alicia Munoz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-02 Elementary Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 214 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm Lucrecia Zanolli
*Lab will meet in Casa Hispana*
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 113 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 101-L4 Elementary Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 101-L5 Elementary Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 216 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab M 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 102-L3 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 110-01 Accel Beginning Spanish MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 227 David Sunderland
*First day attendance required; 5 credit course*
HISP 110-02 Accel Beginning Spanish MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 David Sunderland
*First day attendance required; 5 credit course*
HISP 110-L1 Accel Beginning Spanish Lab TR 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 213 STAFF
HISP 110-L2 Accel Beginning Spanish Lab TR 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 214 STAFF
HISP 110-L3 Accel Beginning Spanish Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 227 David Sunderland
*First day attendance required*
HISP 111-L1 Accel Elem Portuguese Lab T 10:00 am-11:00 am HUM 228 STAFF
HISP 111-L2 Accel Elem Portuguese Lab T TBA STAFF
HISP 194-01 Spanish in the United States TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Cynthia Kauffeld
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with LING 194-01; first day attendance required. Spanish is the second-most common language spoken in the US after English. It is the native language of more than 17 million people in the United States and the US is home to the 2nd-largest Spanish-speaking community in the world. Chances are that even if it's not your native tongue and you've never studied it, you know many Spanish words already. Besides the obvious hispanisms like burrito, taco and guacamole, there are countless other English words whose Spanish origin is no longer transparent (cafeteria, patio, plaza, ranch, for example). In this course we will study the different varieties of Spanish found in the United States and the effects of the linguistic contact between Spanish and English. We will explore issues such as bilingualism, bilingual education, immigration patterns, and Spanglish, and students will conduct further research on a related topic of their choice. Course will include a mid-term and final exam, and a final research paper. Conducted in English.
HISP 194-02 Susurros del Pasado: Whispers towards the 21st Century MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 213 Galo Gonzalez
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required.* For centuries, indigenous peoples have been fighting to be recognized by states and nation states of the world. In recent years, the rights of indigenous peoples recaptured the global attention from nations and institutions that have been involved in preserving their way of life and their future. Since 1993, the United Nations Working Group on Indigenous Populations has been responsible for developing a universally accepted document entitled "Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples." Susurros del Pasado: Whispers toward the 21st Century will explore the definition of "indigenous peoples" and its implication within the context of the Americas, and provide a forum for discussing the suffering, oppression and discrimination experienced by this particular population. The course will also outline the continuing struggle for freedom, for cultural and physical survival, by examining specific literature and cultural production authored by 20th and 21st century indigenous and non-indigenous authors from North, Central and South America. The chosen literature and cultural texts will illustrate trans-cultural and de-colonization processes, and resistance to assimilation.
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 216 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-03 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Blanca Gimeno Escudero
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 113 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 102 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
*Lab will meet in Casa Hispana*
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 203-L5 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 203-L6 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 111 Lucrecia Zanolli
*Lab will meet in Casa Hispana*
HISP 203-L7 Intermediate Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 226 Laura Wasenius
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 215 Galo Gonzalez
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 228 Laura Wasenius
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-04 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Kristin Beamish-Brown
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 215 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 350 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L7 Intermediate Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 214 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*Permission of instruction required; first day attendance required; 5 credit course*
HISP 220-L1 Accel Intermediate Spanish Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 305-01 Oral and Written Expression MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-02 Oral and Written Expression MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 111 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-03 Oral and Written Expression MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 307-02 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-02; first day attendance required*
HISP 308-01 Intro to U.S. Latino Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 228 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and Lati 308-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with LING 309-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 394-01 Indigenous People and the State in the Americas TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Erik Redix
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-01 and LATI 294-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 414-01 Superando Limites TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 Margaret Olsen
*First day attendance required*
HISP 421-01 Romantics/Mods/Avant-Gardists MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 217 Antonio Dorca
*First day attendance required*
HISP 431-01 Spanish in the Workplace MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 215 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*First day attendance required*
HISP 494-01 Frontera: US/Mexico Border TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 494-01 and LATI 494-01; first day attendance required; This seminar explores the U.S.-Mexico border as a site of intercultural exchanges, of resistance and negotiation, of limits and possibilities. Using a variety of texts from both sides of the border, including novels, theory, and film, we will discuss issues of immigration, border control and policy, drug warfare, migratory labor, and border culture within representations of this contested space. Prerequisite: 308 or consent of the instructor.*

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HIST 110-01 Intro to European History: Why Weren't They More Like Us? MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Peter Weisensel
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
HIST 140-01 Intro to East Asian Civ TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 140-01*
HIST 194-01 Great Lakes American Indian History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Scott Shoemaker
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-04* This course examines the competing ways in which Native histories of Great Lakes region have been constructed. Primary sources are drawn from Native origin and migration stories, and oral histories, as well as secondary sources drawn from the recent work of historians and other disciplines regarding Native histories in this region. We investigate other themes such as European contact, labor, gender roles, material culture, removal, federal relationships, land tenure, treaty rights, and federal recognition.
HIST 211-01 History of Africa to 1800 MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Jamie Monson
HIST 222-01 Imagining the American West TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Lynn Hudson
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with AMST 222-01; first day attendance required*
HIST 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
HIST 244-01 The U.S. Since 1945: The U.S. in the Vietnam War Era, 1950-1975 W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-03.* This course explores "the long 1960s," a period in which social movements confronting racism, sexism, inequality, and war interwove with new cultural formations. No sooner had the Keynesian state and its demand-driven economics taken hold in the post-World War II United States than a series of challenges arose -- from a business leadership which was threatened by the new power of unions; a political establishment which was threatened by the power of the New Deal coalition and its inclusion of the left, particularly the Communist Party; African Americans and Latinos who were unwilling to sit by as the Keynesian tide lifted all boats but theirs; women who were unwilling to settle for second class citizenship, from the workplace to the political arena; and young people who were unwilling to serve as cannon fodder for yet more wars and who came to question the very culture of consumerism that was underpinned by Keynesianism's demand-driven economics. At key moments, these currents intermingled, sometimes undercutting each other, sometimes inciting each other; and sometimes these movements threatened to meld into a movement which challenged the direction of U.S. society from top to bottom and from the public sphere to the private sphere. We will use a variety of texts, readings, films, and music to explore these movements, their contexts, their roots, their courses, and their consequences. Students will be evaluated based on their class participation and a series of 4-6 page papers.
HIST 260-01 Rise/Fall of Tsarist Russia MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Peter Weisensel
*First day attendance required*
HIST 275-01 History of Modern China W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 275-01*
HIST 276-01 History of Traditional Japan TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 276-01*
HIST 294-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Peter Weisensel
*Cross-listed with RUSS 294-01 and HMCS 294-01; first day attendance required.* Throughout history, we have turned to storytelling to make sense of our world. We tell stories about the past to document and explain phenomena, to justify our political and social agendas, to create connections and continuity, and to give life meaning. In the twentieth century, Russia helped introduce the world to a spectacular new form of storytelling-film-and used it to alter previous narratives in the hope of reshaping the future. In this course, we will look at written and cinematic representations of Russian history, from medieval times to the post-Soviet era. The films that we will study, by directors including Eisenstein, Vertov, Tarkovsky, and Sokurov, are among the essential Russian contributions to world cinema. One task of the course will be to articulate how storytelling in film differs from historiography and fiction. Another will be to show how cinematic depictions of key historical events were shaped by politics, power relations, technology, and aesthetics. We will use readings in cultural history and film theory to create a conceptual framework for analyzing the films as documents of real events, as vehicles of propaganda, and as imaginative, entertaining works of art.
HIST 294-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Julia Chadaga
*Cross-listed with RUSS 294-01 and HMCS 294-01; first day attendance required.* Throughout history, we have turned to storytelling to make sense of our world. We tell stories about the past to document and explain phenomena, to justify our political and social agendas, to create connections and continuity, and to give life meaning. In the twentieth century, Russia helped introduce the world to a spectacular new form of storytelling-film-and used it to alter previous narratives in the hope of reshaping the future. In this course, we will look at written and cinematic representations of Russian history, from medieval times to the post-Soviet era. The films that we will study, by directors including Eisenstein, Vertov, Tarkovsky, and Sokurov, are among the essential Russian contributions to world cinema. One task of the course will be to articulate how storytelling in film differs from historiography and fiction. Another will be to show how cinematic depictions of key historical events were shaped by politics, power relations, technology, and aesthetics. We will use readings in cultural history and film theory to create a conceptual framework for analyzing the films as documents of real events, as vehicles of propaganda, and as imaginative, entertaining works of art.
HIST 294-02 Victorian Empire MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Aeleah Soine
This course will explore the historical development of the British Empire during the reign of Queen Victoria, including a brief introduction to pre-Victorian Britain and the Imperial crises of the brief Edwardian period that followed. Broad course themes will focus on the intertwined nature of imperial and national identities in the British Empire, political contestations over citizenship and belonging, industrialization and class conflicts, changing gender roles and sexual mores, and the flourishing of popular literature and culture. Specific topics will include cultural and ethnographic touchstones such as the Great Exhibition or the explorations of Dr. Livingstone; imperial and international conflicts such as the Crimean War, the Indian Mutiny, the Home Rule debates, and the Boer War; and domestic conflicts such as the three (voting) Reform Acts, socialist movements, health and sanitation reforms, and the women’s suffrage movement. In order to do so, we will draw upon literature, cartoons and images, films, and both scholarly and primary texts from and about the Victorian Era.
HIST 294-03 Indigenous Peoples and Museums MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Scott Shoemaker
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-05* This course looks at the complicated ways in which the histories, cultures, and art of Indigenous people have been exhibited within the context of museums. We will investigate the competing and complicated ways in which Indigenous peoples have engaged museums for their own means as well as the growing field of tribal museums. Throughout the semester, we will also visit various museums and meet with museum professionals and artists within the Twin Cities area to examine these issues at a localized level.
HIST 294-04 Modern German History MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 003 Aeleah Soine
Understandably, the modern history of Germany has been dominated by efforts to understand the rise to power of the Nazi Regime, the catastrophic human toll of the Second World War, and the legacy of these events in modern German history, culture, and politics. Still, the world wars constitute only one piece in the much longer history of the German nation-state. This course will take a chronological approach to modern German history since the founding of the Empire in 1871, through the World Wars, the Cold War, and Reunification to the present. It will focus on particular scholarly and public debates on the nature of the German people, their national identity, and their modern history. Specific topics and themes will include the Sonderweg Debate over Germany's "special path" of modernization; the role of Germany and the German people in the World Wars and the Holocaust; the divergence of politics, social structures, and cultures in East and West Germanys during the Cold War; and the emerging role of Germany as an active and peaceful partner in global economic, security, social justice, and environmental movements, as well as an economic, political, and cultural anchor in the European Union.
HIST 330-01 Historians/Crit Race Theory W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 002 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with AMST 392-01; permision of instructor required; 2 credit course*
HIST 340-01 US Urban Environmental Hist TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 340-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
HIST 379-01 The Study of History W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Jamie Monson
HIST 394-02 Transnational Latin Americas TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with LATI 394-01; This course investigates the historical tendency to build cultural and political bridges across national borders in Latin America while also interrogating the import of the nation-state as the primary force for building collective identities in the postcolonial era. We will read and discuss classic texts considering the possibility of a pan-Latin American identity by figures such as Simon Bolivar, Jose Marti, or Jose Vasconcelos as well as a growing body of critical literature endeavoring to trace the transnational, hemispheric, Atlantic, and Pacific ties of Latin American cultural and political movements. Contemporary figures like Eduardo Galeano and the latest strain of Bolivarianism epitomized by Venezuela's Hugo Chavez will also be discussed as part of this living tradition of thinking "beyond the nation."*
HIST 490-01 Special Advanced Topics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Peter Rachleff
HIST 490-02 Special Advanced Topics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Ernesto Capello

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Interdisciplinary Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTD 401-01 Urban Studies Colloquium W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Permission of instructor required; 1 credit course.*

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTL 110-01 Intro to Intl St:Globalization TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Ahmed Samatar
*First day attendance required*
INTL 111-01 Intro to Intl St: Lit/Global MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 David Moore
*First day attendance required*
INTL 112-01 Intro to Intl St: Media/Ident TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*First day attendance required*
INTL 112-02 Intro to Intl St: Media/Ident TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Amanda Ciafone
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
INTL 194-01 Contested Land and Global Commons: Land Rights in International Perspectives MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Maano Ramutsindela
*Cross-listed with GEOG 194-01* Conflicts over land ownership have long profoundly shaped human relations. From a historical perspective, land dispossession has fueled imperial projects in every corner of the globe, and forms of land ownership have long been central to agrarian studies, natural resource management, and many other fields. Indeed, countless current world conflicts, past and present, feature claims over land, almost all of which are historical claims as well. Such claims have extended to global commons such as the Arctic, Antarctic, the oceans and the moon. This course draws on examples from different parts of the world, from southern Africa to Minnesota, to understand how and why various forms of land ownership have emerged in different contexts; the nature and form of land claims; the mechanisms for resolving contestations; and the ways in which global commons represent a new wave of the scramble for land and other natural resources.
INTL 245-01 Intro to Intl Human Rights TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 James von Geldern
*First day attendance required*
INTL 253-01 Islamic Civilizations MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Alan Verskin
INTL 286-01 Media and Cultural Studies in Latin America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Cross-listed with LATI 286-01 and HMCS 286-01*
INTL 294-01 Capital, Politics, and Nature MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Maano Ramutsindela
This course examines the vexed relationship between two major imperatives of the Global South: nature conservation and popular economic development. Addressing ideologies of nature, indigenous rights, the role of Western NGOs, commercial interests, and more, we explore multiple regions and develop substantial individual research projects.
INTL 364-01 Culture and Revolution TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 James von Geldern
*Cross-listed with RUSS 364-01; first day attendance required*
INTL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01 and HMCS 367-01*
INTL 368-01 Sustain Dev/Global Future TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 368-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
INTL 477-01 Comp Environment/Development TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*Cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and GEOG 488-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
INTL 485-01 Sr Sem: Global Hatred W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky
*First day attendance required*
INTL 488-01 Sr Sem: Universalism MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 David Moore
*First day attendance required*

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
JAPA 101-01 Elementary Japanese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 110 Christopher Scott
JAPA 101-02 Elementary Japanese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 110 Christopher Scott
JAPA 101-L1 Elementary Japanese I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Eriko Ike
JAPA 101-L2 Elementary Japanese I Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 404 Eriko Ike
JAPA 101-L3 Elementary Japanese I Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Eriko Ike
JAPA 203-01 Intermediate Japanese I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 112 Sachiko Dorsey
JAPA 203-02 Intermediate Japanese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 102 Sachiko Dorsey
JAPA 203-L1 Intermediate Japanese I Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Eriko Ike
JAPA 203-L2 Intermediate Japanese I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 205 Eriko Ike
JAPA 203-L3 Intermediate Japanese I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Eriko Ike
JAPA 255-01 Japanese Film/Animation: From the Salaryman to the Shojo M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm OLRI 100 Christopher Scott
JAPA 255-01 Japanese Film/Animation: From the Salaryman to the Shojo MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Christopher Scott
JAPA 294-01 Language Variation in Japan TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
*Cross-listed with LING 294-02* This course will explore diversity of language forms and communication styles in Japan. Topics related to issues of identity and relationship such as regional dialects, bilingualism/biculturalism, and expressions of age will be discussed. The course also examines how the medium of communication influences creativity of language users. Students will be engaged with questions such as the following: What are the dialect revitalization movements in Japan like? How do bilingual individuals choose which language to use? Do Japanese children acquire literacy by reading manga (comics)? How does the prevalence of online communication affect language use? No Japanese language ability is required. (4 credits)
JAPA 305-01 Advanced Japanese I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 305-L1 Advanced Japanese I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Eriko Ike
JAPA 305-L2 Advanced Japanese I Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 402 Eriko Ike
JAPA 407-01 Fourth Year Japanese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LATI 246-01 Comparative Democratization TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Andrew Reiter
*Cross-listed with POLI 246-01*
LATI 249-01 Regional Geog of Latin America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Kathryn Pratt
*Cross-listed with GEOG 249-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 286-01 Media and Cultural Studies in Latin America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Cross-listed with INTL 286-01 and HMCS 294-02*
LATI 294-01 Indigenous People and the State in the Americas TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Erik Redix
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-01 and HISP 394-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 307-02 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts MTR 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-02; first day attendance required*
LATI 308-01 Intro to U.S. Latino Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 228 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 394-01 Transnational Latin Americas TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Ernesto Capello
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-02*
LATI 488-01 Senior Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 206 Margaret Olsen
LATI 494-01 Frontera: Us/Mexico Border TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 494-01 and HISP 494-01; first day attendance required*

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 216 Ingvar Lofstedt
LING 104-01 The Sounds of Language MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 404 Christina Esposito
*Permission of instructor required.*
LING 194-01 Spanish in the United States TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Cynthia Kauffeld
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with HISP 194-01; first day attendance required*
LING 201-01 Historical Linguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 Ingvar Lofstedt
LING 204-01 Experimental Linguistics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 227 Christina Esposito
LING 206-01 Endangered/Minority Languages MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 205 Marianne Milligan
LING 225-01 100 Words for Snow MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 Marianne Milligan
*Cross-listed with ENVI 225-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC student*
LING 294-02 Language Variation in Japan TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
*Cross-listed with JAPA 294-01*
LING 300-01 Linguistic Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Ingvar Lofstedt
LING 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with HISP 309-01*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MATH 108-01 Quantitative Thinking: Epidemiology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Daniel Kaplan
*Cross-listed with ECON 108-01; permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
MATH 116-01 Math and Society: Death, Devastation, War, Blood, Horror, and Mathematics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 301 Chad Higdon-Topaz
*First Year Course only*
MATH 135-01 Applied Calculus TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Daniel Kaplan
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 135-02 Applied Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Daniel Flath
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 135-03 Applied Calculus MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Daniel Flath
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 Thomas Halverson
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 136-02 Discrete Mathematics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 Thomas Halverson
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 137-01 Single Variable Calculus MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Michael Weimerskirch
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 137-02 Single Variable Calculus MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Michael Weimerskirch
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 153-01 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 245 Vittorio Addona
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 153-02 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 245 Vittorio Addona
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 258 Alicia Johnson
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 258 Alicia Johnson
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Michael Weimerskirch
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Stan Wagon
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 Karen Saxe
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 265-01 Philosophy of Mathematics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Janet Folina
*Cross-listed with PHIL 365-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 Chad Higdon-Topaz
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 353-01 Modern Statistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 245 Vittorio Addona
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 354-01 Probability MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 Alicia Johnson
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 373-01 Number Theory TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 David Bressoud
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 377-01 Real Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Karen Saxe
*Permission of instructor required for all ACTC students*
MATH 469-01 Discrete Applied Mathematics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Stan Wagon
*Cross-listed with COMP 369-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 471-01 Topology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Thomas Halverson
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HMCS 114-01 News Reporting/Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Howard Sinker
HMCS 126-01 Local Media Institutions W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 250 Michael Griffin
HMCS 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture TR 01:20 pm-03:50 pm HUM 401 Clay Steinman
*First day attendance required.*
HMCS 145-01 Pagans/Christians/Jews TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 226 Andrew Overman
*Cross-listed with CLAS 145-01 and RELI 145-01*
HMCS 194-01 Screens MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 John Kim
*First Year Course Only*
HMCS 248-02 History of Film 1894-1941 MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 401 Clay Steinman
*First day attendance required*
HMCS 286-01 Media and Cultural Studies in Latin America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Crosslisted with INTL 286-01 and LATI 286-01*
HMCS 294-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Julia Chadaga
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-01 and RUSS 294-01*
HMCS 294-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Peter Weisensel
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-01 and RUSS 294-01*
HMCS 337-01 Dead White Men: (Anti-) Philosophy Now MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 401 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with GERM 337-01.* Today we often hear people dismiss the Western (mostly European) philosophical tradition as a bunch of "dead white men." In other words, the argument goes, these thinkers harbored such passe notions as universal truths, a universal subject, and an individual in total control of itself and endowed with a pure reason unadulterated by rhetoric, imagination, fiction, and politics. Why should we bother with "dead white men" now that we understand that truth depends on historical context, that the self is decentered by the unconscious, that identity is constituted by gender, race, class, and other cultural factors, that truth is linked to power, and that ideology is omnipresent? Unfortunately, this all-too-familiar attitude overlooks its own faulty presupposition: it presumes a clear-cut break between philosophical tradition and contemporary thought, as if contemporary thought had no tradition out of which it emerged and could, therefore, merely discard what preceded it. Hence the popularity of phrases like "philosophy is dead." It is all the more ironic to see this attitude prevail in the West at the very moment that multiculturalism has become our cause celebre: all cultural traditions are supposed to be "respected," except the West's own tradition. (Perhaps as a new way for the West to reinstate surreptitiously its superiority as the sole culture with no tradition?) This course pursues a close reading of texts by various "dead white men" as the unconscious (i.e., repressed and, for that matter, all the more powerful) undercurrent of contemporary thought. Assigned texts will include: Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Pascal, Spinoza, Kant, Hegel, Marx, as well as texts by twentieth-century thinkers that stress the dependence of contemporary thought on philosophy. No pre-knowledge required; all readings in English. Alternate years. (4 credits) Course cross-listed as Humanities, Media and Cultural Studies 337.
HMCS 354-01 Blackness in the Media TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with AMST 354-01*
HMCS 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01 and INTL 367-01*
HMCS 394-01 Literary Case Studies from Goethe to Kafka MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-02 and GERM 394-01; for detailed description, see under GERM 394-01*
HMCS 488-01 Advanced Topics Seminar TBA TBA HUM John Kim
*Course will meet in Humanities 302.*

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MUSI 111-01 World Music MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 123 Chuen-Fung Wong
MUSI 113-01 Theory I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 202 Clare Eng
*Lab required*
MUSI 113-02 Theory I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 202 Clare Eng
*Lab required*
MUSI 113-L1 Theory I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 123 Clare Eng
MUSI 113-L2 Theory I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 123 Clare Eng
MUSI 194-01 Music and Freedom MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 202 Mark Mazullo
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
MUSI 213-01 Theory III, Form and Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 202 Randall Bauer
MUSI 294-01 Music, Race, and Ethnicity TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 202 Chuen-Fung Wong
Music has always been an important part of racial and ethnic identities. This course is an inquiry into the intersection of music-making and social life where race and ethnicity are ingrained in the production and consumption of musical sound. Our primary goal is to understand the dynamics between music and race/ethnicity in a global context by closely studying a variety of musical genres, such as opera, jazz, the blues, rap and hip-hop, as well as various folk traditions from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Through a combination of reading, critical listening, and class discussion, we examine such key issues as authenticity, minority politics, cultural policy, social stratification, racism, and multiculturalism. There is no pre-requisite. No previous knowledge of musical instrument or notation is assumed or required.
MUSI 342-01 Medieval to Mozart MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 202 Cary Franklin
MUSI 361-01 Composition TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 202 Randall Bauer
MUSI 370-01 Conducting MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MUSIC 123 Eugene Rogers
MUSI 494-01 Ethnomusicology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 202 Chuen-Fung Wong
*Cross-listed with ANTH 494-01*
MUSI 72-01 African Music Ensemble TR 05:30 pm-09:00 pm Sowah Mensah
MUSI 74-01 Macalester Concert Choir MWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 123 Eugene Rogers
*Also meets one Friday per month 4:45-6:15pm.* The Macalester Concert Choir is a chamber mixed ensemble open to all students at the College. The singers in the Concert Choir are full-time, undergraduate music and non-music major students committed to innovative and quality performances and community outreach through choral music. Repertoire of the choir includes both a capella and accompanied music from Western and Non-Western vocal traditions. The Macalester College Concert Choir tours annually throughout the United States or abroad. Past international tours have included Japan, Scotland, Poland, Costa Rica and other countries throughout the world. Under the leadership of Dr. Dale Warland from 1966-1985, the choir received national and international acclaim. This dedication to choral excellence continued under the leadership of Professor Kathy Romey, Dr. Robert Morris, Dr. Robert Peterson, and is now under the leadership of Dr. Eugene Rogers. Membership is based on an audition and callback.
MUSI 80-01 Mac Jazz Band TR 07:00 pm-08:30 pm Joan Griffith
MUSI 84-01 Pipe Band W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Michael Breidenbach
MUSI 86-01 Chamber Ensemble TBA TBA Cary Franklin
MUSI 88-01 Symphony Orchestra MTR 04:45 pm-06:00 pm Cary Franklin
MUSI 90-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:30 pm MUSIC 123 Joan Griffith
MUSI 90-02 Highland Camerata T 04:45 pm-06:15 pm Eugene Rogers
*Ensemble also meets Thursdays 6:30-7:30pm.* The Highland Camerata is a large mixed ensemble open to all students interested in singing at Macalester. Likened to the Renaissance "camerata" which was made up of musicians, poets, intellectuals and humanists, this group reflects the diverse interests and talents represented here on campus. The music of the ensemble will include such styles as classical, folk, and pop. In addition, each year the choir will combine with other Macalester Choirs to perform a major work. Past works have included: Mozart's Requiem, Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms and Vivaldi's Magnificat. Consideration for this group will be based on balance of parts and the ability to match pitch.
MUSI 90-03 Mac Early Music Ensemble TBA TBA Clea Galhano
MUSI 94-01 Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 94-03 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 94-04 Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 94-05 Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 94-08 Organ TBA TBA Winston Kaehler
MUSI 94-09 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 94-10 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 94-11 Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 94-13 African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-14 Jazz Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-15 Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-16 Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-17 Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-20 Jazz Improvisation TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 94-23 Violin TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 94-24 Viola TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 94-26 Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 94-29 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 94-2M Tuba TBA TBA Charles Wazanowski
MUSI 94-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 94-38 Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor
MUSI 94-42 African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-43 Jazz Drumming TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 94-5M African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-6M Jazz Drumming TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 94-7W Sitar TBA TBA David Whetstone
MUSI 94-C1 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin
MUSI 94-C2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 94-CC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 94-CI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 94-M Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 94-M0 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen
MUSI 94-M2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 94-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 94-M8 Trumpet (Jazz) TBA TBA David Jensen
MUSI 94-M9 Trumpet TBA TBA Lynn Erickson
MUSI 94-MB Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 94-MC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 94-MD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 94-ME Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich
MUSI 94-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 94-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 94-MJ Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 94-ML African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-MN Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-MP Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-MQ Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-MS Jazz Improvisation TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-MU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 94-MY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 94-W Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 94-W2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 94-WF Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder
MUSI 94-WH Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 96-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 96-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 96-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Claudia Chen

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Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
NEUR 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with PSYC 180-01*
NEUR 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-01*
NEUR 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-L1*
NEUR 300-01 Directed Research TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak
NEUR 362-01 Philosophy of Mind TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with PHIL 362-01*
NEUR 484-01 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Susan Fox
*Cross-listed with COMP 484-01*
NEUR 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHIL 115-01 What is Philosophy? MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 William Wilcox
PHIL 119-01 Critical Thinking MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 010 Geoffrey Gorham
PHIL 125-01 Ethics: Happiness and Philosophical Inquiry MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
PHIL 125-02 Ethics: Happiness and Philosophical Inquiry MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder
Long ago, the Greek philosopher Aristotle defined happiness as the best and ultimate goal of human existence. But was he right? What role does happiness play in the good life? Is there a relationship between happiness and ethical action? If so, what does this relationship look like? What are the reasons for thinking there might not be such a relationship? Is it possible to design one’s life so as to be happy? Is happiness even attainable? And what do we mean when we talk about “happiness” anyway? This course will be a special version of PHIL 125, designed to introduce you, through the lens of the question of human happiness, to ethical theory as well as to the character of philosophical inquiry and debate. We will be taking a close look at the role happiness plays in normative ethical theory as developed in the Western philosophical tradition, particularly in virtue-based ethics (as represented by Aristotle), consequentialism (as represented by Bentham and Mill), and the ethics of duty (as represented by Kant). Our source for these and more recent philosophical reflections on happiness, which we will also be discussing in this course, will be Stephen Cahn's and Christine Vitrano’s reader, Happiness: Classic and Contemporary Readings in Philosophy (Oxford: 2007). We will also explore some work on happiness from the emerging field of experimental philosophy as well as philosophical contributions to the developing field of happiness studies. Coursework will consist of a set of short written responses to some of the readings, three five-seven page papers, a team-based research project on a philosophical question related to happiness, and an oral presentation. For your first and second paper, you will be asked to turn in both a first and final draft. Revision of your third paper will be optional
PHIL 125-03 Ethics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Martin Gunderson
PHIL 194-01 Modern Political Philosophy MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 003 William Wilcox
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
PHIL 230-01 Ancient/Medieval Philosophies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Geoffrey Gorham
PHIL 238-01 Philosophy of Religion TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with RELI 248-01*
PHIL 250-01 Philosophy of Human Rights TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Martin Gunderson
PHIL 362-01 Philosophy of Mind TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with NEUR 362-01*
PHIL 365-01 Philosophy of Mathematics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Janet Folina
*Cross-listed with MATH 265-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
PHIL 367-01 20th C Continental Philosophy: Martin Heidegger MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MAIN 011 Diane Michelfelder
Offered every other year with a different topic, this seminar emphasizes close reading, reflection, and analysis of a work or works associated with a major figure or movement within the tradition of twentieth-century Continental philosophy. For Fall 2010, the emphasis will be on the philosophical writings of Martin Heidegger. The primary question guiding the course asks about Heidegger's evolving understanding of the aim and practice of philosophical thinking. Our explorations of this question will take us through selections from works such as Being and Time (including parts of Division II); Building, Dwelling, Thinking; What is Called Thinking?; and The Question Concerning Technology and other essays. The course will also incorporate readings from philosophers influenced by Heidegger as well as some of his sharpest critics. Prerequisite: one course in the history of philosophy or permission of instructor.
PHIL 489-01 Senior Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 102 Janet Folina

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PE 01-01 Swimming I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 02-01 Tennis I TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Martin Peper
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson
PE 04-01 Karate I TR 03:15 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-02 Yoga I TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin
PE 06-03 Yoga I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Vanessa Seljeskog
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Vanessa Seljeskog
PE 09-01 Conditioning MW 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 10-01 Racquetball I MW 01:10 pm-02:10 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Matthew Parrington
PE 11-01 Swimming II TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 12-01 Tennis II TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Martin Peper
PE 14-01 Karate II TR 03:15 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson
PE 18-01 Pilates MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard
PE 19-01 Conditioning II TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 20-01 Weight Training MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 21-01 Swim for Fitness TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 25-01 Triathlon Training TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm LEOCTR POOL Matt Haugen
PE 26-01 Tai Chi Chuan MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Phyllis Calph
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Kristine Spangard
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance T 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson
PE 40-01 Self Defense MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 41-01 Lifeguard Training TR 08:30 am-09:30 am LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 51-01 Aqua Aerobics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Robert Pearson
PE 61-01 Water Polo MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 113-01 Modern Astronomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 150 Joshua Nollenberg
PHYS 120-01 Astronomical Techniques M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 404 Joshua Nollenberg
PHYS 194-01 Nanoscience MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 404 James Heyman
*First Year Course only*
PHYS 194-L1 Nanoscience Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Heyman
*First Year Lab only*
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 Tonnis ter Veldhuis
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab M 02:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab T 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 226-L3 Principles of Physics I Lab T 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 101 James Doyle
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab R 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab R 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 331-01 Modern Physics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 James Doyle
PHYS 331-L1 Modern Physics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Doyle
PHYS 331-L2 Modern Physics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Doyle
PHYS 331-L3 Modern Physics Lab W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 154 James Doyle
PHYS 334-01 Optics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 James Heyman
PHYS 334-L1 Optics Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Heyman
PHYS 443-01 Electromagnetic Theory I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 Joshua Nollenberg
PHYS 481-01 Quantum Mechanics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
POLI 100-01 US Politics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 226 Michael Zis
POLI 101-01 Argument and Advocacy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
*First Year Course only*
POLI 120-01 International Politics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 David Blaney
POLI 120-02 International Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Andrew Latham
*First Year Course only*
POLI 140-01 Comparative Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 160-01 Foundations-Political Theory MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 202-01 Political Participation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 Julie Dolan
POLI 204-01 Urban Politics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Michael Zis
POLI 206-01 US Constitutional Law MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 208 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 211-01 Re-envisioning Educ/Democracy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Cross-listed with AMST 280-01 and EDUC 280-01; first day attendance required*
POLI 212-01 Law, Lawyers, and Litigation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 221-01 Global Governance TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 Wendy Weber
POLI 246-01 Comparative Democratization TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Andrew Reiter
*Cross-listed with LATI 246-01*
POLI 250-01 Comparative/Historic Sociology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Terry Boychuk
*Cross-listed with SOCI 275-01*
POLI 250-02 Comparative/Historic Sociology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Terry Boychuk
*Cross-listed with SOCI 275-02*
POLI 252-01 Water and Power TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 252-01 and GEOG 252-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
POLI 269-01 Empirical Research Methods MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Julie Dolan
POLI 270-01 Rhetoric of Campaign/Election MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 304 Adrienne Christiansen
POLI 272-01 Researching Political Comm TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
POLI 294-01 Transitional Justice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 Andrew Reiter
As societies emerge from periods of authoritarian rule or civil war, they face the daunting task of engaging past human rights violations. States have a myriad of options at their disposal, ranging from granting blanket amnesties to hosting complex trials and truth
commissions. In making these decisions, new leaders face pressures from former authoritarian actors, victims' groups, and international organizations. The process of settling accounts with the past is sometimes decades long and it is rife with political controversy.
This course analyzes the problems facing societies with past human rights violations, the numerous options they have at their disposal to engage these abuses, and the political, legal, economic, and moral ramifications of each choice. Most importantly, it asks – does
transitional justice work?
POLI 321-01 International Security W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Andrew Latham
POLI 363-01 Paradigms Global Citizenship TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 David Blaney
POLI 400-01 Senior Research Seminar MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 105 Andrew Latham
POLI 400-02 Senior Research Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 370 David Blaney
POLI 400-03 Senior Research Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Julie Dolan
*2 Credit course; S/NC grading only*

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 100 Michael Mensink
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 01:20 pm-02:40 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L4 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with NEUR 180-01*
PSYC 194-01 Psychology of Immigration and Acculturation MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 300 Sun No
*First Year Course only*
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 352 Rachel Lucas-Thompson
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:40 pm OLRI 354 Rachel Lucas-Thompson
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 354 Rachel Lucas-Thompson
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Sun No
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01*
PSYC 242-01 Cognitive Psychology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea
PSYC 242-L1 Cognitive Psychology Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 354 Brooke Lea
PSYC 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with NEUR 244-01*
PSYC 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with NEUR 244-L1*
PSYC 254-01 Social Psychology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Sun No
PSYC 270-01 Psyc of Sustainable Behavior TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with ENVI 270-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
PSYC 294-01 Psychology of Health MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Daniel Graham
This course will examine multiple, interactive factors that contribute to human health; we will take a biopsychosocial perspective and examine biological, psychological, and social underpinnings of health and look at the ways these various factors relate to one another as well as to wellness and illness. Among these influences, we will read about and discuss the roles of stress (and the ways we cope with stress), social relationships, and personality in the progression and prevention of disease. We will also address some ways in which our behaviors (e.g. physical activity, diet, substance use, sleep) can contribute to wellbeing or sickness, and we will examine behavior change strategies that can help us improve our own health habits! Prerequisite: Psychology 100 or permission of the instructor.
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Clark Ohnesorge
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Clark Ohnesorge
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Darcy Burgund
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 370-01 Understanding and Confronting Racism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 300 Kendrick Brown
*Cross-listed with AMST 370-01*
PSYC 394-01 Decision-Making TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Clark Ohnesorge
We constantly make decisions under conditions of uncertainty, whether we realize it or not. But how do we do it? Philosophers, economists, and psychologists have puzzled over this question for centuries, but only recently has significant progress been made in understanding this central element of human rationality. In our course we will follow three approaches to the study of human decision making. The first is the formal consideration of rational methods for choice in the traditions of economics and statistics. The second examines focuses on deviations from classical rational methods by exploring the psychological mechanisms behind those deviations. Finally, we will look at recent findings in cognitive neuroscience that look to the activity of specific brain regions for further insight into why we make the choices we do. Along the way we will touch on a variety of related topics including psychopathology in decision making, game theory, Bayesian inference, gambling, and moral decision making. Prerequisites: Psychology 100, and Psychology 201 or Math 153/Math 154/Math 155.
PSYC 488-01 Senior Seminar: Pain and Suffering MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Eric Wiertelak
PSYC 488-02 Senior Seminar: Development in Context TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Rachel Lucas-Thompson

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RELI 100-01 Introduction to Islam TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Brett Wilson
RELI 111-01 Introduction to Buddhism MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Erik Davis
RELI 121-01 New Testament TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Susanna Drake
RELI 124-01 Asian Religions MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 111 Erik Davis
*Cross-listed with ASIA 124-01*
RELI 145-01 Pagans/Christians/Jews TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 226 Andrew Overman
*Cross-listed with CLAS 145-01 and HMCS 145-01*
RELI 194-01 The End of the World TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Paula Cooey
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 194-02; first day attendance required.* "Repent and believe! The end of the world is nigh!" Or "History as we know it will come to an end with a classless society!" The concept end evokes vivid, even violent images of the end of life as we know it on planet earth, sometimes even the end of time itself. End has other meanings as well; end refers to spatial termination like "the end of the road," or "dead end." End may also mean purpose, aim, or goal as in "the end of humankind is to go forth and multiply and to have dominion over the earth," or "the end justifies the means," or "God's end in creating the world is the divine good pleasure." This course will focus on these multiple meanings of "end" in regard to environmental ethics. What does environmental change, due often to human intervention, require of us as ethical human beings? To address this question, students will study Christian, Buddhist, and indigenous traditions. Through text, film, and guest speakers we will examine how cosmologies, eschatologies, ethical practices and religious beliefs, past and present, reflect and shape different, sometimes conflicting responses to environmental concerns with ecological exploitation, scarcity of natural resources, sustainability, and global climate change. Major projects will focus on local responses in relation to wider national and global issues.
RELI 194-02 From Diatribes to Dialogue to ?? MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Barry Cytron
For twenty centuries Jews and Christians have mostly argued with one another, as each community shaped its respective identity. Fifty years ago, in the aftermath of World War II, this history of hostility was overturned, as academics and interfaith activists helped to set the relationship onto a new path. But now, political squabbles, newer church teachings, even a few media events have threatened to upend this newfound coexistence. We'll explore the complex theological and social history between the two faiths, from the first centuries of polemics to the recent attempts at harmony, tracing the repercussions into this new century.
RELI 200-01 The Qur'an (Koran) TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Brett Wilson
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01*
RELI 223-01 Orthodoxy and Heresy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 227 Susanna Drake
RELI 233-01 Hindus and Muslims MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 James Laine
RELI 235-01 Theory/Method in Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Paula Cooey
RELI 248-01 Philosophy of Religion TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with PHIL 238-01*
RELI 254-01 Dead People TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Erik Davis
RELI 294-02 Islamic Readings in Arabic W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Brett Wilson
*Cross-listed with CLAS 394-01*

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RUSS 101-01 Elementary Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 213 Laurence Bogoslaw
RUSS 101-L1 Elementary Russian I Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 401 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 101-L2 Elementary Russian I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 203-01 Intermediate Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 212 Gitta Hammarberg
RUSS 203-L1 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 401 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 203-L2 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 257-01 Tolstoy's War and Peace MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 Gitta Hammarberg
*First Year Course only*
RUSS 294-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Peter Weisensel
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-01 and HMCS 294-01*
RUSS 294-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Julia Chadaga
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-01 and HMCS 294-01*
RUSS 364-01 Culture and Revolution TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 James von Geldern
*Cross-listed with INTL 364-01; first day attendance required*
RUSS 394-01 Advanced Russian Conversation MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 212 Julia Chadaga

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm CARN 208 Khaldoun Samman
SOCI 170-01 Sociology of Work TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 304 Deborah Smith
SOCI 220-01 Sociology of Race/Ethnicity MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Mahnaz Kousha
*First Year Course only*
SOCI 220-02 Sociology of Race/Ethnicity MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Mahnaz Kousha
SOCI 275-01 Comparative/Historic Sociology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Terry Boychuk
*Cross-listed with POLI 250-01*
SOCI 275-02 Comparative/Historic Sociology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Terry Boychuk
*Cross-listed with POLI 250-02*
SOCI 290-01 Islam and the West W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 370 Khaldoun Samman
SOCI 335-01 Family Bonds MW 01:10 pm-02:40 pm HUM 402 Mahnaz Kousha
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-03*
SOCI 480-01 Senior Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk
SOCI 480-01 Senior Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Deborah Smith

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Theatre and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
THDA 105-01 Theater in the Twin Cities W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 205 Beth Cleary
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
THDA 110-01 Intro to Theatre Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
*First day attendance required*
THDA 115-01 Cultures of Dance MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 205 Wynn Fricke
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory/Performance I MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 3 Harry Waters
*First day attendance required*
THDA 120-02 Acting Theory/Performance I MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm THEATR STUDIO Cheryl Brinkley
*First day attendance required*
THDA 125-01 Technical Theater MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett
THDA 125-L1 Technical Theater Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett
THDA 125-L2 Technical Theater Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett
THDA 235-01 Fundamentals of Scene Design TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser
*$40 material fee will be charged*
THDA 240-01 Brain to Bone MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Beth Cleary
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
THDA 475-01 Advanced Scene Design TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser
*$40 material fee will be charged*
THDA 489-01 Performance Theory Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
*First day attendance required*
THDA 21-01 African Dance WF 10:10 am-11:40 am THEATR 6 Patricia Brown
THDA 21-01 African Dance WF 10:10 am-11:40 am THEATR 6 Michelle Bitney
THDA 41-01 Modern Dance I TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 43-01 Modern Dance III MW 03:50 pm-05:20 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 51-01 Ballet I MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Stanchfield
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Sharon Varosh
THDA 60-01 Dance Ensemble TBA TBA THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
*Permission of instructor required*

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
WGSS 102-01 Gender and Sport TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Corie Hammers
WGSS 105-01 Transnational Perspectives MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
WGSS 117-01 Women, Health, Reproduction TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Elizabeth Jansen
*Cross-listed with BIOL 117-01; first day attendance required*
WGSS 200-01 Feminist/Queer Theories TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Corie Hammers
WGSS 394-01 Democracy, Feminisms, Capitalism M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
WGSS 394-02 Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in American Art MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with ART 375-01 and AMST 394-01*
WGSS 394-03 Family Bonds MW 01:10 pm-02:40 pm HUM 402 Mahnaz Kousha
*Cross-listed with SOCI 335-01*

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