Spring 2011 Class Schedule

This is a class schedule from a previous term. View current class schedules

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Classics
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Neuroscience Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theatre and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
AMST 101-01 Explorations of Race/Racism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Scott Shoemaker
*First day attendance required*
AMST 232-01 Immigration/Ethnicity US Hist TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with HIST 232-01*
AMST 248-01 Jim Crow TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with HIST 248-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 250-01 Race, Place and Space M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 212 Daniel Gilbert
*Cross-listed with GEOG 250-01.*
AMST 254-01 Peoples/Cultures Native Amer TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Diana Dean
*Cross-listed with ANTH 254-01*
AMST 262-01 Asian American Psychology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Sun No
*Cross-listed with PSYC 262-01*
AMST 270-01 Black Public Intellectuals TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required*
AMST 288-01 Race and Ethnicity in Japan TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Christopher Scott
Cross-listed with JAPA 288-01 and INTL 288-01*
AMST 294-01 Black Feminist Thought MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 213 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required.* This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to post-Civil Rights Movement Black Feminist Thought. We will read Michele Wallace, Angela Davis, Audre Lorde, bell hooks, Patricia Hill Collins and Patricia Williams to understand numerous events in the 1990s. We will question why the US Senate did not believe Anita Hill; why Senator Carol Moseley Braun didn't win re-election; why Lani Gunier did not have a hearing; why Dr. Joycelyn Elders didn't maintain her post; and why Congresswoman Barbara Lee stood alone in her opposition to the Iraq war resolution.
AMST 294-02 US Racial Formations and the Global Economy W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 214 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*First day attendance required.* The point of this course is to study the ways that globalization as a historical and economic process affects real human lives. Precisely how did the Earth evolve into a "planet of slums"? How and why do global inequalities manifest as racial formations? In what sense is the "intersection of identities" a byproduct of global economic events? We will consider the notion that Western colonization and exploitation of people and resources in Latin America, Africa, and Asia relied on and produced racialized experiences and identities. We will ask: To what extent are racial inequalities the collateral damage of progress and development in the Global North? We will also examine the idea that "another world is possible." What solidarities between constituencies in the Global North and Global South are created by the very same events that divide them? How are those solidarities being enacted now? Key authors and texts for this course include: PATRICK BOND, Looting Africa; JAMES BOGGS, American Revolution; AMY CHUA, World on Fire; MIKE DAVIS, Planet of slums; RUTH WILSON GILMORE, Golden Gulag; SUSAN GEORGE, Another world is possible if…; CHE GUEVARA, Global Justice; EDUARDO GALEANO, Open Veins of Latin America; MANNING MARABLE, How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America; DAVID HARVEY, Brief History of Neoliberalism; PIERRE JALEE, Pillage of the Third World; WALTER RODNEY, How Europe Underdeveloped Africa; IMMANUEL WALLERSTEIN, Historical Capitalism
AMST 294-05 US in the 1930's W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-01*
AMST 305-01 Race/Sex/Work Global Econ MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Corie Hammers
*Cross-listed with WGSS 305-01*
AMST 308-01 Intro to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 315-01 Transnational Studies: Politics and Cultural Exchange TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Jane Rhodes
Since the arrival of Europeans and Africans in North America, the transnational movement of bodies, ideas, labor and capital has defined what we call "America." In the United States, raced, gendered and ethnic identities have a profound influence on how America is transnational. This course will look at the exchange of politics and culture across national boundaries that are imbricated in the American experience. Topics may include transatlantic abolitionism, popular culture and the U.S.-Mexican American war, anti-colonial activism, the exporting of American jazz, mass media and the Middle East, and the internationalization of hip-hop.
AMST 334-01 Cultural Studies and the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 113 Michael Griffin
*Cross-listed with HMCS 334-01*
AMST 341-01 Urban Social Geography TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Daniel Trudeau
*Cross-listed with GEOG 341-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 380-01 Topics in African-American Literature:The Harlem Renaissance TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with ENGL 380-01*
AMST 400-01 Senior Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Duchess Harris
*First day attendance required*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ANTH 101-01 General Anthropology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Scott Legge
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Ron Barrett
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06B Arjun Guneratne
*First day attendance required; non-Anthropology majors need permission of instructor.*
ANTH 241-01 Death and Dying MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Ron Barrett
*Permission of instructor required.*
ANTH 248-01 Magic/Witchcraft/Religion MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Diana Dean
ANTH 254-01 Peoples/Cultures Native Amer TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Diana Dean
*Cross-listed with AMST 254-01*
ANTH 294-02 Culture, Law and Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Arjun Guneratne
While political anthropology is the study of how power is distributed and wielded in a society, the anthropology of law concerns itself with the way social order is maintained and how "law" - as distinct from custom - is formulated and applied. This course examines the meaning of law and politics in cross-cultural perspective. The first half of the course examines how anthropologists have approached the study of politics and the state, from the structural functionalism of the 1940s and 50s to more processual approaches that emphasize the role of agents. In the second half of the course, we examine how people in different places at different times have understood the concept of law, how their understanding has been concretely manifested in the formulation of rules governing social relations and how those rules have been enforced. Role playing in a mock court, where the class puts on trial a Comanche medicine woman for practicing medicine without a license, will be used to understand how law works in a culturally complex society. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 111.
ANTH 363-01 Anthropology of Development MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Arjun Guneratne
ANTH 368-01 Life Histories/Cultures/Selves TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
ANTH 380-01 Adv Medical Anthropology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Ron Barrett
ANTH 394-01 Primates TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge
Non-human primates can provide us with a unique perspective regarding what it means to be human. This course will begin with an introduction to primate evolution and taxonomy, followed by a general overview of behavioral ecology. It will then look at social behavior, reproduction, ethnoprimatology, conservation, and other issues related to selected groups of living primates. Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 111, or permission of instructor. Course counts toward the math/natural science distribution requirement.
ANTH 490-01 Senior Seminar MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ART 130-01 Drawing I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 123 Megan Vossler
*First day attendance required*
ART 149-01 Intro to Visual Culture TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ART 113 Nassim Rossi
ART 161-01 Art of the West II MW 10:50 am-12:20 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
ART 171-01 Art of the East II: Japan MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ART 113 Georgiana Podulke
*Cross-listed with ASIA 171-01.* This course is a survey of the arts of Japan from the neolithic era to the present, focusing on key works within their cultural, religious and historical contexts. Topics include yamato-e, the floating world, the decorative arts, landscape, and the artist as artisan.
ART 232-01 Fiber and Material Studies I MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 116 Pritika Chowdhry
*Permission of instructor required; $100 material fee; first day attendance required*
ART 234-01 Painting I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 128 Christine Willcox
*First day attendance required*
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 135 Mayumi Amada
*First day attendance required*
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 119 Paula Marty
*First day attendance required.*
ART 237-01 Ceramic Art I: Handbuilding TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Permission from instructor required; $100 Material fee; first day attendance required*
ART 252-01 Feminist Visual Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with WGSS 252-01.*
ART 263-01 Modern Art MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
ART 294-01 Art Patronage of Early Modern Italy TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 402 Kristin Lanzoni
*First day attendance required.* Recent years have seen exciting changes in the study of art patronage in Early Modern Italy. The outdated notion of artist as genius has been demystified and balanced with the fundamental role of the patron in the initiation of new trends in architecture, sculpture and painting. This course, organized according to a range of patrons, explores issues germane to art patronage in fifteenth to early seventeenth-century Florence, Venice, Rome, the Italian courts and their territories, and will consider private and communal, corporate and ecclesiastical, and large and small-scale commissions.
ART 294-02 Chinese Painting MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 402 Georgiana Podulke
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-03.* This course is an introduction to the painting tradition of China from prehistory to the present, examining works in their cultural, historical, and religious contexts. Topics to be emphasized include the painting of mountains and rivers, the integration of poetry and calligraphy into painting, and Chinese aesthetic theory.
ART 294-03 Origami and its Application TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 135 Mayumi Amada
Origami is the Japanese traditional folk art of folding paper. In this class, students will learn the basic technique of folding Origami paper with an eye to using these techniques to create both traditional and contemporary Art objects. This basic technique will be applied to Art and other fields and disciplines. Students will have the opportunity to pursue their own creative work as well as shared work in a group environment.
ART 370-01 Drawing II TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 123 Megan Vossler
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 119 Paula Marty
*First day attendance required.*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 130 Gary Erickson
*Permission of instructor required; $100 Material fee; first day attendance required*
ART 394-02 Value: the Bad, the Ugly, and the Cheap MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-02 and HMCS 394-02.*
ART 488-01 Senior Studio Seminar MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ART 113 Megan Vossler
*Meets in the Fine Arts Lounge; first day attendance required*
ART 488-01 Senior Studio Seminar MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ART 113 Christine Willcox
*Meets in the Fine Arts Lounge; first day attendance required*
ART 490-08 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Ruthann Godollei
ART 490-20 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Christine Willcox

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ASIA 102-01 Elementary Chinese II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 112 Jin Stone
ASIA 102-02 Elementary Chinese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 112 Jin Stone
ASIA 102-L1 Elementary Chinese II Lab T 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 113 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 102-L2 Elementary Chinese II Lab W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 102 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 102-L3 Elementary Chinese II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 113 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 171-01 Art of the East II: Japan MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ART 113 Georgiana Podulke
*Cross-listed with ART 171-01*
ASIA 194-01 Feminist Cultural Production: India There and Here TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ENGL 194-01, HMCS 194-01 and WGSS 194-02.
ASIA 204-01 Intermediate Chinese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 112 Patricia Anderson
ASIA 204-02 Intermediate Chinese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Patricia Anderson
ASIA 204-L1 Intermediate Chinese II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 110 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 204-L2 Intermediate Chinese II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 404 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 204-L3 Intermediate Chinese II Lab R 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 404 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 236-01 Indian Philosophies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with PHIL 236-01*
ASIA 274-01 History of Traditional China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 274-01*
ASIA 277-01 History of Modern Japan TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 277-01*
ASIA 294-01 Trans-national China: Negotiating Chineseness in the late 20th and 21st Centuries TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Frederik Green
*Cross-listed with HMCS 294-01 and INTL 294-02.* This course explores negotiations of Chinese national and cultural identities from 1949 until the present from the People's Republic, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, and the United States. The goal of the course is to explore multiple negotiations of Chineseness through a wide range of literary works and films from the post-war period to the present and to situate these works of art within their social, political, and cultural contexts. By moving beyond the confines of the Chinese Nation State, we explore the boundary zones of Chinese culture and analyze their potential challenge to the logic of national or area studies approaches to cultural phenomena. Optional film viewing
Wednesday evenings, 6-8pm, Humanities 226.
ASIA 294-02 Chinese Music TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm GDAY 308 Chuen-Fung Wong
*Cross-listed with MUSI 294-01*
ASIA 294-03 Chinese Painting MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 402 Georgiana Podulke
*Cross-listed with ART 294-02.*
ASIA 304-01 Advanced Chinese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Patricia Anderson
ASIA 304-L1 Advanced Chinese II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 110 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 304-L2 Advanced Chinese II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 402 Hong Juan Zhou
ASIA 408-01 Fourth Year Chinese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 228 Ling Zhang
ASIA 494-01 Translating Chinese: Theory and Practice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Frederik Green
*Cross-listed with LING 494-02.* How and why did the first translators who began to translate English into Chinese and Chinese into English choose the texts they translated? What problems, both linguistically and culturally, did (and do) they encounter? Did the same issues arise when translating into Chinese and English, and how were they respectively addressed? Who did the translating? This course approaches the topic of Chinese translation simultaneously from a socio-historical, empirical, and theoretical perspective. At the same time, we will study and back-translate existing translations, and attempt our own translations. Prerequisite: 2 years of Chinese language.

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
BIOL 112-01 Origins MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 100 Kristina Curry Rogers
BIOL 116-01 Community/Global Health MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Nicholette Zeliadt
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biology and Genetics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Christopher Calderone
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Paul Overvoorde
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Kristina Curry Rogers
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 226 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 226 Daniel Hornbach
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
BIOL 342-01 Animal Behavior/Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 342-L1 Animal Behavior/Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 300 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-01*
BIOL 352-L1 Biochemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-L1; first day attendance required*
BIOL 352-L2 Biochemistry II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-L2; first day attendance required*
BIOL 358-01 Microbiology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 358-L1 Microbiology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 367-01 Human Physiology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 100 Lin Aanonsen
BIOL 367-L1 Human Physiology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen
BIOL 367-L2 Human Physiology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen
BIOL 369-01 Developmental Biology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 270 Mary Montgomery
BIOL 369-L1 Developmental Biology Lab R 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 273 Mary Montgomery
BIOL 394-01 Biology of Women MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Elizabeth Jansen
*First day attendance required.* This course will cover human reproductive anatomy, physiology and endocrinology, with emphasis on the female. Lecture/discussion will cover the structure and function of the reproductive system, including the nervous and endocrine systems and inter-relationships. Topics covered will include the endometrial and ovarian cycles, sexual arousal and fertilization, contraception, infertility, abortion, pregnancy, childbirth, menopause, and selected diseases. Advances in assisted reproductive technologies, hormone therapies, and genetic engineering technologies will be discussed. Not open to those who have taken Biology/WGSS 117: Women, Health and Reproduction. Prerequisite: Biol 265 Cell Biology. Three lecture hours per week.
BIOL 394-02 Seminar in Environmental Toxicology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 370 Nicholette Zeliadt
In this seminar students will examine how environmental chemicals interact with and impact the structure and function of biological systems. The course will begin with an introduction to basic principles of toxicology, including dose-response relationships, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of toxicants, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, and risk assessment, and how environmental toxicants are tested and regulated. Critical reading of primary literature and review articles will complement additional discussions of how environmental chemicals cause harmful effects, the release of toxicants into the environment, and strategies to reduce risk and prevent harm. This course is designed for a variety of students interested in public health, environmental issues, and environmental bases for human disease. Students will participate through discussion, written and oral presentations, and a group project. Prerequisites: Biology 255 (Cell Biology and Genetics Lab), Biology 260 (Genetics) and Biology 265 (Cell Biology). (4 credits).
BIOL 475-01 Research in Neuroscience MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 475-L1 Research in Neuroscience Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 489-01 Biology Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Mary Montgomery

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CHEM 112-01 General Chemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Paul Fischer
CHEM 112-02 General Chemistry II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Susan Green
CHEM 112-03 General Chemistry II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Susan Green
CHEM 112-L1 General Chemistry II Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $6 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L2 General Chemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $6 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L3 General Chemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $6 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L4 General Chemistry II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Susan Green
*First day attendance required; $6 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L5 General Chemistry II Lab W 01:10 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $6 lab fee required.*
CHEM 112-L6 General Chemistry II Lab W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $6 lab fee required*
CHEM 212-01 Organic Chemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 150 Ronald Brisbois
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-02 Organic Chemistry II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L1 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L2 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L3 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Susan Green
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L4 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye
CHEM 222-01 Analytical Chemistry MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata
CHEM 222-L1 Analytical Chemistry Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Robert Rossi
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye
CHEM 312-01 Quantum Mech/Spectroscopy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg
CHEM 312-L1 Quantum Mech/Spectroscopy Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg
CHEM 320-01 Computational Chemistry T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata
Computation plays a key role in chemical research today, with many articles in the literature using computer modeling to make predictions of chemical behavior and to interpret experimental results. Arguably the most powerful subfield of computational chemistry is quantum chemistry-the application of quantum mechanics to atoms and molecules. This course has the following goals: (1) introducing the basic concepts of quantum chemistry; (2) illustrating the power and limitations of different quantum chemical methods; (3) providing opportunities to apply quantum chemistry to a variety of systems. The emphasis throughout the course will be on the use of computers to make predictions, instead of the mathematics and physics underlying quantum mechanics. Prerequisite: Chemistry 212 (Organic Chemistry II) or permission of the instructor.
CHEM 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 300 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-01*
CHEM 352-L1 Biochemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-L1; first day attendance required*
CHEM 352-L2 Biochemistry II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Christopher Calderone
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-L2; first day attendance required*

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CLAS 123-01 Introduction to Archaeology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Andrew Overman
CLAS 129-01 Greek Myths MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 350 Andrew Overman
*Cross-listed with RELI 135-01*
CLAS 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 350 James Laine
*Cross-listed with RELI 135-01*
CLAS 212-01 Elementary Latin II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 001 Beth Severy-Hoven
*Optional lab meets Tuesdays 3-4:00pm in Carnegie 304.*
CLAS 214-01 Elementary Arabic II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Antoine Mefleh
CLAS 218-01 Elementary Hebrew II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 001 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 218-L1 Elementary Hebrew II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 101 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 235-01 Elementary Greek II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Brian Lush
CLAS 235-L1 Elementary Greek II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm MAIN 001 Brian Lush
CLAS 332-01 Intermediate Latin: Poetry MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 342-01 Intermediate Arabic II TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 227 Antoine Mefleh
CLAS 362-01 Intermediate Greek: Poetry MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Brian Lush
CLAS 392-01 Seminar on the Middle East Conflict R 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 111 Andrew Overman
*2 credits; permission of instructor required; This upper level seminar is a cross-cultural dialogue with an upper level seminar on the same topic at Tel Hai College. The dialogue focuses on Mideast conflicts and is intended for those with in-depth knowledge of the region.
CLAS 394-01 Advanced Arabic MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Antoine Mefleh

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
COMP 121-01 Intro to Scientific Program MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 258 Eric Theriault
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 256 Susan Fox
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
COMP 123-02 Core Concepts in Comp Sci MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 256 Elizabeth Shoop
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
COMP 240-01 Computer Systems Organization MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
COMP 261-01 Theory of Computation MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 245 Susan Fox
*Cross-listed with MATH 361-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
COMP 346-01 Internet Computing W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 245 Shilad Sen
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
COMP 365-01 Computational Linear Algebra TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan
*Cross-listed with MATH 365-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 245 Shilad Sen
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 245 Susan Fox
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ECON 108-01 Quantitative Thinking TR 09:40 am-11:10 am LEOCTR 36 Lisa Giddings
*Cross-listed with MATH 108-01*
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Amy Damon
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 304 Amy Damon
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Karine Moe
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Karine Moe
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 305 Sarah West
ECON 119-06 Principles of Economics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Sarah West
ECON 221-01 Intro to Intl Economics TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 06A Raymond Robertson
ECON 221-02 Intro to Intl Economics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A Raymond Robertson
ECON 225-01 Comparative Econ Systems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 402 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with INTL 225-01*
ECON 242-01 Economics of Gender MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Karine Moe
*Cross-listed with WGSS 242-01*
ECON 333-01 Global Food Problems MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Amy Damon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 333-01 and INTL 333-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ECON 353-01 Managerial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans
ECON 356-01 Capital Markets TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Liang Ding
ECON 358-01 Intro to Securities Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Joyce Minor
ECON 361-01 Intermed Microecon Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Vasant Sukhatme
ECON 361-02 Intermed Microecon Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Vasant Sukhatme
ECON 371-01 Intermed Macroecon Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 226 Pete Ferderer
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 381-L1 Intro to Econometrics Lab TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 431-01 Public Finance MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Sarah West
ECON 485-01 Empirical Finance TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Liang Ding
ECON 490-01 Behavioral Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 230-01 Community Youth Development TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*First day attendance required*
EDUC 260-01 Philosophy of Education TR 08:00 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*First day attendance required*
EDUC 300-01 Education/Family/Community W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Marceline DuBose
*2 credit course, meets second 7 weeks of semester; S/NC grading only; first day attendance required*
EDUC 310-01 Education and Advocacy T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Tina Kruse
*2 credits; permission of instructor required; first day attendance required.*
EDUC 320-01 Educating Exceptional Students W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*2 credit course, meets first 7 weeks of the semester; S/NC grading only; first day attendance required*
EDUC 360-01 Educ/Emerging Technology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Brad Belbas
*First day attendance required; course to meet in Humanities 302.*
EDUC 370-01 Challenge of Globalization TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Cross-listed with ENVI 370-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENGL 101-01 College Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Rebecca Graham
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 105-01 American Voices TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 Scott Selisker
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 135-01 Poetry MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 111 Neil Chudgar
ENGL 135-02 Poetry MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Neil Chudgar
ENGL 137-01 Novel TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Daylanne English
ENGL 138-01 Lit in Theoretical Perspective MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Nathan Hensley
ENGL 150-01 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 James Dawes
*First day attendance required; freshmen and sophomores only*
ENGL 150-02 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 003 Ping Wang
*First day attendance required; freshmen and sophomores only*
ENGL 150-03 Intro to Creative Writing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Ping Wang
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-04 Intro to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Peter Bognanni
*First day attendance required; freshmen and sophomores only*
ENGL 150-05 Intro to Creative Writing TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Peter Bognanni
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-06 Intro to Creative Writing TR 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 011 James Cihlar
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 194-01 Feminist Cultural Productions: India There and Here TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ASIA 194-01, HMCS 194-01, and WGSS 194-02.*
ENGL 200-01 Major British Writers MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 105 Theresa Krier
ENGL 232-01 Victorian Literature MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 Nathan Hensley
ENGL 265-01 Justice M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 James Dawes
*Cross-listed with ENVI 265-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENGL 272-01 19th Century American Lit MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 James Dawes
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 274-01 American Lit 1945-Present TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Scott Selisker
ENGL 280-01 Crafts of Writing: Poetry TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Kristin Naca
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Marlon James
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 310-01 Shakespeare Studies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 Theresa Krier
ENGL 331-01 19th Century British Novel MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Robert Warde
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 380-01 Topics in African-American Literature: The Harlem Renaissance TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with AMST 380-01*
ENGL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with INTL 384-01*
ENGL 394-01 Latina/o Poetics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 217 Kristin Naca
*First day attendance required.* The terms Latina/o and Latinidad encompass myriad cultural practices, language performance, and migrations by and about Hispano American subjects. These terms also propose alternative geographic, temporal, and corporeal histories of the West. These terms allude to the desire, of multi-raced, multi-national, and/or multi-lingual subjects for self-identification and self-determination. In this course, we theorize Latina/o aesthetics' potential to engender oppositional space, through discursive practices of resistance. More specifically, we examine how poetry and prose forms might enact, replicate, or inspire social justice activism. We read examples of poetry from the ancients, the 19th century occupations of the Southwest, through the contemporary era. We read texts in original language and translation: Calo, French, English, Spanish. We study Latina/o theorists Anzaldua, Arteaga, Mesa-Baines, Monsivais, and Ybarra-Frausto to help us navigate a program of conciencia. We consider the poetics of reclamation and liberation of Puertorriquenos, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Clemente Soto Velez and Martin Espada. We walk through the fields with the character, Perfecto Flores, in the poetry and fiction of Chicanos Jimmy Santiago Baca and Helena Maria Viramontes. Poets who interpolate how "the border crossed us:" Lorna Dee Cervantes, Dolores Dorantes, and Tino Villanueva. We also consider the international and inter-ethnic gazes Latina/os cast bodies: Daisy Zamora and Francisco Aragon. As a W course, we practice thinking through writing, as well as experimentation in writing. We write fragments, queries, poems, and book reviews. Poets may also research and produce creative work, to incorporate into their final projects. Our aim is to perform scholar-activism through writing. No prerequisites.
ENGL 394-02 Topics in Literature and Creative Writing: Your Self as Character TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Marlon James
*First day attendance required.* In response to biographer Wendy Moffat's declaration that Maurice was E.M. Forster's "only truly honest novel," the Novelist Colm Toibin, countered that "novels should not be honest at all. They are a pack of lies." Where does that leave the autobiographical novel? Or the modern memoir/autobiography, which borrows so much of its form and spirit from 20th century modernist fiction? In this course we will explore true spaces and false spaces, memory and imagination, the art of confession and concealment. We will study the works of writers, and artists who map decidedly personal spaces. Memoirists using prose to come to terms with the unspeakable. Novelists using false identities to tell true stories. Poets moving lyrically and associatively to pinpoint gut truths about their inner lives. Artists and filmmakers who in moving towards abstraction and/or physicality get to the core of what we as writers still stumble over. James Joyce's Portrait Of An Artist As A Young Man. Jeannette Winterson's Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit. David Small's Stiches. William Burrough's Junkie. Joni Mitchell's Blue. Weezer's Pinkerton. Mapplethorpe's Polaroids. Karen Finley's Shut Up and Love Me and Make Love. Essentially a creative writing course, you will respond to these works with works of your own: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and audiovisual narrative telling the essential story of who you are. You will tell bald-faced lies, mine deep truths, and at the end of the semester produce a body of art that is your least sentimental but most honest work to date. Classes will be split between lectures, discussions, multimedia presentations, film viewings, theatre visits and workshops. Prerequisites: English 150, and one of English 280, 281, 282, or permission of instructor.
ENGL 394-03 Los Angeles and the American Dream MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Robert Warde
*First day attendance required; film screenings to be announced.* One out of eight Americans lives in California; Los Angeles has become the second largest city in the country; and United States history involves, among other things, a steady movement of people both East to West and South (Mexico) to North. In this course we will examine the growth and nature of Los Angeles (its need for water, its automobiles, its film industry, its ethnic makeup, its lurking potential for natural disaster) and this city's relationship to the evolving identity of the nation as a whole. It will be a study in the significance of place, the impact of urban development, and the characteristics of the American dream. The focus is on literature, and we will consider such writers as Carey McWilliams, Nathanael West, Raymond Chandler, John Fante, Karen Tei Yamashita, Walter Mosley, Anna Deavere Smith, Luis Rodriguez, and D. J. Waldie. A companion film series will include feature films such as Chinatown, L. A. Confidential, Sunset Boulevard, Mulholland Drive, Boyz N the Hood, and The Big Lebowski, as well as seldom seen documentaries such as Thom Andersen's Los Angeles Plays Itself and Kelly Parker's South Main. A music component will include a wide range of artists from Randy Newman, Madonna, and Tom Waits to Guns N' Roses, NWA, and 2Pac.
ENGL 394-04 A Kafkaesque Century MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01.*
ENGL 394-05 Comparative (Neo/Post) Modernities TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
First day attendance required; cross-listed with WGSS 315, HIST 394-03 and HMCS 394-03.*
ENGL 401-01 History of a Literary Genre: African American Detective Fiction M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Daylanne English
ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 003 Ping Wang
*First day attendance required*

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENVI 130-01 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 130-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 130-L1 Science Renewable Energy Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 130-L1; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 133-01 Environmental Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 205 Daniel Hornbach
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Daniel Hornbach
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 194-01 Three Rivers Environmental History TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with HIST 194-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with POLI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Diane Michelfelder
*Cross-listed with PHIL 229-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 236-01 Consumer Nation: American Consumer Culture in the 20th Century MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with HIST 236-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 258-01 Geog of Environmental Hazards TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*Cross-listed with GEOG 258-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 265-01 Justice M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 James Dawes
*Cross-listed with ENGL 265-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 280-01 Environmental Classics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 301 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with ENGL 269-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 226 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 226 Daniel Hornbach
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 294-02 Urban Ecology: Communities, Politics and Sustainability MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Kathryn Pratt
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with GEOG 294-02; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 294-03 Gender/Race/Nations in the Sciences TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-02; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor; no prerequisites.*
ENVI 333-01 Global Food Problems MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Amy Damon
*Cross-listed with ECON 333-01 and INTL 333-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 343-01 Imperial Nature: The US and the Global Environment TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with HIST 343-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 370-01 Challenge of Globalization TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Cross-listed with EDUC 370-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
ENVI 488-01 Sr Seminar in Environmental St R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Louisa Bradtmiller
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 111 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-02 French II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 111 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 113 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L2 French II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L3 French II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 227 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L4 French II Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am OLRI 370 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 228 Anne Carayon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 113 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L2 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-01 French III MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 111 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-02 French III MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Annick Fritz
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L3 French III Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Mariane Yade
FREN 203-L4 French III Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 111 Caroline Richard
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 216 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 111 Anne Carayon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-03 Text, Film and Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 Anne O'Neil-Henry
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab T 09:10 am-10:10 am OLRI 250 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 401 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Mariane Yade
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 111 Anne Carayon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L3 Advanced Expression Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am HUM 404 Caroline Richard
*First day attendance required*
FREN 306-01 Intro to Literary Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 113 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*
FREN 394-01 Creative Writing and Translation MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required.* We will examine pieces of literature in English and in French and analyze the different modes of expression, the various styles and compare their styles. Theoretical material will enable students to determine stylistic changes geared to specific contexts. At the same time, exercises will concentrate on translation from English to French and French to English. The books we are using progress from the specific parts of speech to general and complex questions concerning the order of the words (ordre des mots) and la mise en relief. Prerequisite: French 204, 305, 306 or permission of instructor.
FREN 394-02 French Culture from the Revolution to WWII MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 227 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required.* The course will introduce students to various social, economical and intellectual movements from the end of the French Revolution to the end of World War II (1945). We will divide these periods into logical categories; important historic personalities, key political development, attitude-shaping philosophical movements, and significant artistic trends. The book we will use for this class contains six themes. Each theme will trace the cultural manifestation in question through readings, writings of journals, discussions, and essays from major periods of French history after 1789. Authentic readings will reinforce factual presentations from a wide variety of sources, both historical and modern. Themes culminate with a section of "activites d'expansion, reperes culturels," and discussions of movies and web sites. Students will visit the Minneapolis Institute of Art and the Walker Art Center to examine paintings and sculptures relevant to the period. Prerequisite: French 204
FREN 415-01 Literary Periods/Movements: Money and Marketplace in 19th C French Literature MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 102 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required; this course taught in French.* French culture and society witnessed vast changes in its traditional structures and values during the 19th century, due to the influence of the industrial revolution and the rise of capitalism. This course will offer a survey of 19th century French literature (novels, play, short stories, and poetry) linked to the theme of the course, money and the marketplace. We will examine the different roles and uses of money in the literary texts of the course, including works by Balzac, Flaubert, Hugo, and Zola, and we will identify some of the many 19th-century characters connected with different aspects of money: the banker, the notary, the lender, the speculator, the industrialist, the inheritor, the bankrupt, the criminal, the gambler, the artist, the young girl with/without dowry, the poor, etc. We will try to understand in what respects literature itself had become an object for purchase linked to the marketplace, and, finally, we will explore the question of whether or not there exists a relationship between money and the key 19th-century literary movements and styles (Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism).
FREN 494-01 Child Soldiers Through Texts and Films MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*First day attendance required.* The phenomenon of child soldiers has taken hold of fiction in the recent years, as we can see in Edward Zwick's Blood Diamond. Various film directors and writers have chosen to give a voice to the millions of children thrown into war against their will in order to understand the conditions and mechanisms that lead to their recruitment and in order to encourage the protection of these children. In this course, we will try to consider war stories through the eyes of child soldiers. Among other questions, we will be guided by the following: How does the narrative voice of a child soldier change when the mode and genre of writing changes, for example, in novels, poetry, plays, comic books, and testimonial narratives? What differences are there between the representations of Violence and child soldiers in texts and films? How do texts and films address and respond to the moral dilemma of the child who is both victim and killer? What transforms inacceptable violence/murder into a routine, banal, and enjoyable game/activity?
Texts and films will include:
Erika Mann, Dix millions d'enfants nazis, Amadou Kourouma, Allah n'est pas oblige; Emmanuel Dongala, Johnny Chien Mechant ; Iweala Uzodinma et Alain Mabanckou, Betes sans patrie ; Sauvaire Jean Stephane, Johnny Mad Dog (film) ; Aduaka Newton, Ezra (film), De Maistre Gilles, J'ai douze ans et je fais la guerre (film). We plan to engage in discussions with some writers and ex child soldiers through Skype.

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOG 111-01 Human Geog of Global Issues MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Kathryn Pratt
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 111-02 Human Geog of Global Issues MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 Kathryn Pratt
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required; $25 materials fee required; lab required*
GEOG 225-02 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required; $25 materials fee required; lab required*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab W 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 225-L3 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 108 Birgit Muehlenhaus
GEOG 243-01 Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 William Moseley
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 250-01 Race, Place, and Space M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 212 Daniel Gilbert
*Cross-listed with AMST 250-01.*
GEOG 256-01 Medical Geography M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 258-01 Geog of Environmental Hazards TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Helen Hazen
*Cross-listed with ENVI 258-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
GEOG 263-01 Development/Underdevelopment TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*First day attendance required.*
GEOG 294-02 Urban Ecology: Communities, Politics and Sustainability MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Kathryn Pratt
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ENVI 294-02, ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor* This course examines human-environment relationships in the urban setting. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, we will advance an understanding of the political ecology of cities, and explore key ways that geographers and others are conceptualizing urban environments. In the first half of the course, we investigate forms of nature that are vital to the city-lawns, the urban forest, domestic and wild animals, parks and gardens-with the aim of understanding urban space as a blend of ecological and social processes. We will look at case studies from cities around the globe and explore the environment of the twin cities through hands-on field activities. In second half of the course we focus on urban environmental problems and solutions. We will examine the how human and non-human communities are affected by such issues as air pollution, water quality, solid waste management, and urban development. Finally, we explore the politics of sustainability and discuss possibilities for designing new urban ecologies. Key topics will include urban food systems, sustainable design, green space, and environmental justice.
GEOG 341-01 Urban Social Geography TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Daniel Trudeau
*Cross-listed with AMST 341-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 378-01 Research Methods in Geog MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 Laura Smith
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 488-01 Transportation Geography W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Laura Smith
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
GEOG 488-02 Cities of the 21st Century TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; $25 materials fee required*

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOL 100-01 Oceanography TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 John Craddock
GEOL 155-01 History/Evolution of Earth MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 155-L1 History/Evolution of Earth Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 155-L2 History/Evolution of Earth Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 194-01 Geological Hazards MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 187 Colin Robins
GEOL 255-01 Structural Geology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock
GEOL 255-L1 Structural Geology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock
GEOL 265-01 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 265-L1 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 294-01 Soils and Landscapes MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 175 Colin Robins
This course, with laboratory, is an intensive introduction to the properties and genesis of soils. Soils reflect the intricate, focused interaction of geological, hydrological, and biological factors on the Earth's surface over variable temporal and spatial scales. The study of soils can often help determine which processes were dominant in the past, and which factors may direct the future evolution of a landscape. Topics to be covered include: soil morphology, soil physical and chemical properties, phyllosilicate mineralogy, soil biology, and the geochemical cycles of C and N. Key applications of soil science to geology, environmental studies, ecology, and/or archaeology will also be emphasized. Early laboratory activities will entail physical, chemical and instrumental study of soil properties, while field sessions later in the semester will engage students in the description and sampling of soil profiles for a variety of research needs.
GEOL 294-02 Paleoclimate TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Louisa Bradtmiller
Earth's climate has evolved with the planet itself, as changing boundary conditions in the ocean, atmosphere, cryosphere and lithosphere have caused global icehouses, greenhouses and mass extinctions. Information about these events is recorded in the geologic record in the form of fossils and rock sequences, but also in lake and ocean sediment cores, ice cores, cave deposits and tree rings. This course will provide an overview of changes in climate throughout Earth history while also examining the proxies and archives used to reconstruct those changes. We will also construct our own record of paleoclimate using cores from a local lake and a variety of laboratory techniques. Prerequisites: an introductory course on either climate or Earth history.
GEOL 294-L1 Soils and Landscapes Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 175 STAFF
GEOL 294-L2 Paleoclimate Lab TBA TBA Louisa Bradtmiller
*Lab will meet 3-hours per week, to be determined during first class meeting.*
GEOL 450-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
*Permission of instructor required*

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GERM 102-01 Elementary German II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 214 Brigetta Abel
GERM 102-L1 Elementary German II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Aurel Sieber
GERM 102-L2 Elementary German II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am Aurel Sieber
GERM 102-L3 Elementary German II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 404 Aurel Sieber
GERM 102-L4 Elementary German II Lab M 08:10 pm-09:10 pm HUM 217 Aurel Sieber
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela
GERM 110-L1 Accelerated Elem German Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 102 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 110-L2 Accelerated Elem German Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 404 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 110-L3 Accelerated Elem German Lab T 02:45 pm-03:45 pm HUM 404 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 110-L4 Accelerated Elem German Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 110-L5 Accelerated Elem German Lab TBA TBA Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 215 Gisela Peters
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 113 Aurel Sieber
GERM 203-L2 Intermediate German I Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am OLRI 370 Aurel Sieber
GERM 203-L3 Intermediate German I Lab T 02:45 pm-03:45 pm OLRI 170 Aurel Sieber
GERM 203-L4 Intermediate German I Lab TBA TBA Aurel Sieber
GERM 203-L5 Intermediate German I Lab TBA TBA Aurel Sieber
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 215 Brigetta Abel
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab TBA TBA Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 204-L2 Intermediate German II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 247 Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 204-L4 Intermediate German II Lab TBA TBA Hendrick Heimboeckel
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 214 Gisela Peters
GERM 305-L1 German Through the Media Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Aurel Sieber
GERM 305-L2 German Through the Media Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 112 Aurel Sieber
GERM 305-L3 German Through the Media Lab W 10:50 am-11:50 am 45SNEL 010 Aurel Sieber
GERM 308-01 Introduction to German Studies MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 113 Rachael Huener
*Taught in German*
GERM 366-01 Postwar Germany MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 214 Rachael Huener
*Taught in German*
GERM 394-01 A Kafkaesque Century MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-04.* "Kafkaesque" is a word that has become part of everyday vocabulary in innumerous languages, used by millions of people who might or not have ever read Kafka. Evidently, the work of this German-speaking Jewish author from Prague captured something about modern life that no word could express except one deriving from his own name. This is probably why 'everybody knows' the word and 'nobody can explain' it. To understand therefore the "Kafkaesque" is to understand at once Kafka's work and modern life, at least as we know it since the early twentieth century. To do so, in this course we are going to read closely some of Kafka's short stories and novels, as well as some of the most influential commentaries on his work. All readings will be in English. Though this a 300-level course, it requires no pre-knowledge and is appropriate for all level students.
GERM 394-02 Value: the Bad, the Ugly, and the Cheap MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with ART 394-02 and HMCS 394-02.* For thousands of years value has been scrutinized in philosophy, art history, and economic analysis, as it cuts across three constitutive aspects of human and social life: ethics, aesthetics, and economy. Not only do we have and impose on the world our moral, aesthetic, and exchange values, but these three fields often become difficult to distinguish, as is evident in the slippery flexibility of words that allow us to say as much "I find this painting bad" as "I think this person is bad," or "this is a worthless remark" but also "this is a worthless check." This course will focus primarily on influential accounts of value in aesthetic theory, while also examining the ways in which aesthetic value demarcates itself from or implicates its moral and economic counterparts, and what the interplays among the three fields entail for aesthetic value. Our readings will include: Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Hume, Baumgarten, Burke, Lessing, Kant, Schiller, Schelling, Schlegel, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Croce, Tolstoy, Heidegger, Sartre, Wittgenstein, Adorno, Benjamin, Jean-Francois Lyotard. All readings in English. No pre-knowledge required.
GERM 394-03 Moscow-Berlin, 1919-1930 MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 402 Rad Borislavov
*Cross-listed with RUSS 394-01.*
GERM 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Gisela Peters
*Taught in German*

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 216 Blanca Gimeno Escudero
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab F 02:30 pm-03:00 pm HUM 113 STAFF
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 402 Alicia Munoz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 401 Laura Wasenius
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-03 Elementary Spanish II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Laura Wasenius
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 370 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 102-L3 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:00 pm HUM 217 STAFF
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 110-01 Accel Beginning Spanish MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 215 Laura Wasenius
*Permission of instructor required; 5 credit course*
HISP 110-L1 Accel Beginning Spanish Lab MW 08:00 pm-09:00 pm HUM 213 STAFF
HISP 110-L2 Accel Beginning Spanish Lab WF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 217 STAFF
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 David Sunderland
*First day attendance required*
HISP 111-L1 Accel Elem Portuguese Lab F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 111 STAFF
HISP 111-L2 Accel Elem Portuguese Lab W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 111 STAFF
HISP 111-L3 Accel Elem Portuguese T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 300 STAFF
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Cynthia Kauffeld
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 214 Cynthia Kauffeld
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-03 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 213 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 215 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 404 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 203-L5 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Lucrecia Zanolli
HISP 203-L6 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 203-L7 Intermediate Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Galo Gonzalez
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 212 Alexandra Bergmann
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 404 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 216 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 215 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm THEATR 204 Hugo Gonzalez Martinez
HISP 204-L7 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 09:00 am-09:30 am HUM 113 STAFF
*TBA sections of labs at all levels (101, 102, 203, 204) are reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all other lab sections offered. If you register for a TBA lab section you will need to see Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Any questions or concerns should be directed to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or by calling x6791.*
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; 5 credit course*
HISP 220-02 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 228 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; 5 credit course*
HISP 305-01 Oral and Written Expression TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-02 Oral and Written Expression MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-03 Oral and Written Expression MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 402 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-04 Oral and Written Expression MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 214 Blanca Gimeno Escudero
*First day attendance required*
HISP 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 308-01 Intro to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 217 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*Cross-listed with LING 309-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 331-01 Luso-Brazilian Voices TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 370 David Sunderland
*First day attendance required*
HISP 331-L1 Luso-Brazilian Voices Lab TBA TBA STAFF
HISP 415-01 Cultural Survival: Resisting the Legacy of Colonialism in the Americas TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 111 Margaret Olsen
*Cross-listed with INTL 415-01 and LATI 415-01; first day attendance required. The primary objective of this course is to trace with students the historical trajectory that connects colonialism with contemporary struggles for cultural survival in the Americas. We will use historical texts, testimonial documents and maps to explore how and why cultures and languages have been threatened, particularly among peoples of Native American and African descent in selected sites of the Caribbean, Central America, Mexico and North America. We will also examine colonial and postcolonial strategies of resistance against dominant cultures within verbal, visual and performative expressions. So that students may come to understand that cultural survival remains an urgent and local concern for many peoples in our historical moment of globalization, a central part of our course will entail semester-long community collaborations with Latino, Native American and African American cultural organizations in the Twin Cities.
HISP 420-01 Mod/Postmod Hispanic Fiction MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Galo Gonzalez
*First day attendance required*
HISP 488-01 Senior Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 111 Margaret Olsen
*First day attendance required*
HISP 494-01 Spanish in the United States MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 212 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with LING 494-01; first day attendance required.* A survey of the different varieties of US Spanish and the effects of the linguistic contact between Spanish and English. In addition to study of dialectal variation, other themes of the course will include bilingualism, bilingual education, and Spanglish. Students will conduct research on a related topic of their choice for their final projects. Course will include two exams and a research paper. Prerequisite: 309 or consent of the instructor.

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HIST 100-01 Discovering World History MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 002 Melanie Maddox
In order to fully comprehend modern cities and the societies that form them, one must first understand the circumstances that occasioned their initial development, what ideas earlier societies used to help form their concept of a city and finally the manner in which they evolved throughout the world. It is essential that one bare in mind possible geographical variation in the concept of what a city is. One of the most rudimentary problems in understanding the nature of the city, and settling the debate over its contribution to questions like the rise of urbanization, is the plethora of vocabulary, descriptions and visual images used by different societies in the discussion of what makes a city. This course will introduce students to world history by taking a look at cities from different societies and time periods, and the similarities and differences between them. By the end of the course students will have a clear understanding of the history of the City and the contributions of different societies to it. Some of the cities considered in this course will include: Athens, Dublin, Jerusalem, London, Rome and New York.
HIST 115-01 Africa Since 1800 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 228 Jamie Monson
HIST 181-01 Latin America/Caribbean MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Melanie Huska
*Cross-listed with LATI 181-01*
HIST 194-01 Three Rivers Environmental History TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 194-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
HIST 194-03 History of Feminisms TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Lynn Hudson
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with WGSS 201-01.* This is an introductory course about the history of feminism as it was articulated and experienced in the United States from roughly 1800-1970. We will focus not only on the experience of those who worked for the cause of woman's rights but also the ideologies at home and abroad that influenced feminist thought. In so doing, we will interrogate the myths about feminism and the backlash against it that are central to the history, culture, and politics of the United States. This course is especially concerned with the multiple and contradictory strains within feminism. Topics that the class will consider include: the roots of feminism as it took shape in the anti-slavery movement, the overlap of women's rights and the civil rights movement of the twentieth century, and the women's health movement, among others.
HIST 228-01 Gender and Sexuality in Colonial America TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Andrea Cremer
*Cross-listed with WGSS 228-01*
HIST 232-01 Immigration/Ethnicity US Hist TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with AMST 232-01*
HIST 236-01 Consumer Nation: American Consumer Culture in the 20th Century MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 236-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
HIST 248-01 Jim Crow TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with AMST 248-01; first day attendance required*
HIST 257-01 Empires MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 Peter Weisensel
HIST 274-01 History of Traditional China TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 274-01*
HIST 277-01 History of Modern Japan TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 277-01*
HIST 294-01 US in the 1930s W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-05.* Could there be a better time than the midst of the Great Recession to study the Great Depression? The Great Depression of the 1930s provided an opportunity to reconsider the organization of U.S. society and to explore new economic, political, social, and cultural projects and arrangements. Significant developments included the reorganization of the U.S. economy (along the lines of what would be called "Keynesianism") and politics (the emergence of the "New Deal coalition" within the Democratic Party); the emergence of new cultural aesthetics in theater, literature, dance, music, film, and visual art; the incorporation of mass cultural forms, like radio, into politics; and the questioning of long-standing patterns in race, gender, and sexuality. Much of what resulted from the turmoil of the 1930s led to the institutional arrangements ("the New Deal order") which continued to shape the U.S. into the 1980s and has been the subject of criticisms and calls for dismantlement. After the economic implosion of 2008, we have also heard debates about the desirability of a "new New Deal." That is, the developments within this decade continue to be foundational to our contemporary lives. This course provides an opportunity to explore what happened and why, and what it has meant for life in these United States. It also gives us a valuable angle from which to reflect on our present crisis.
HIST 294-02 France and Germany: Neighbors, Nations and Citizenship French Revolution to European Integration MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 010 Aeleah Soine
The histories of France and Germany have been closely intertwined due to their geographic proximity, competitive aspirations for geopolitical power and status, and collective responsibility for the stability and prosperity of the European continent as its two largest states. This course will introduce students to major theoretical and historiographic debates over national identities, nation-state formation, and citizenship, highlighting interdisciplinary work of scholars in the humanities and social sciences. Drawing upon historical the case studies of France and Germany, we will also trace the processes of defining European nationhood and citizenship since the end of the eighteenth century. Specific themes will include the dynamics and upheaval of revolutions, the unification of people and political entities, imperialism and irredentism, domestic tensions between majority and minority interests, and steps toward European integration culminating in the European Union. We will also examine the changing definitions of French, German, and European citizenship as an entry point into deeper discussions of how nations are perpetually constructing and redefining boundaries of inclusion and exclusion based upon considerations of gender, class, race, ethnicity, and religion.
HIST 294-03 Medieval Travelers and Their Accounts MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Melanie Maddox
Travelers during the Middle Ages undertook their journeys for a variety of reasons. Some made pilgrimages to holy sites, some embarked on a mission to spread Christianity, while others traveled for economic and political reasons. This course will focus on the use of primary sources to consider how Medieval travelers viewed the world around them, why they undertook their journeys and the challenges they faced on their travels. When considering the manuscript tradition of travel accounts, it becomes clear that these accounts were not only important to the individuals who undertook them or wrote them down, but also to other individuals who had the opportunity to read or hear about such travels. In order to gain a complete picture of Medieval travelers, this course will not only consider actual travel accounts, but also primary sources that describe imaginary journeys. By a close consideration of both real and imaginary journeys, students will gain a fuller understanding of what inspired Medieval travelers to discover and experience different aspects of the world around them. Some of the primary sources to be considered include works by: Adomnán, Benjamin of Tudela, Gerald of Wales, Ibn Battuta, Thomas More.
HIST 294-04 Monks, Lords, War and Pestilence: Europe 950-1350 MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 228 Melanie Maddox
Medieval Europe is often thought of in terms of violence, plague and religious conflict, but it is also a time when great works of architecture, art and literature were created, as well as the formation of views that would define both church and state. This course will consider the making of Europe by looking at the world of monks, lords and peasants, conquest, the resolution of conflicts and the arrival of the Black Death in Europe. While considering these topics, students will gain an understanding of the economic, political, religious and social growth of Europe that took place from AD 950-1350.
HIST 294-05 From Telenovelas to Tacos: Popular Culture in Mexican History MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Melanie Huska
*Cross-listed with LATI 294-01.* This course investigates the history and politics of popular culture in modern Mexico. We will examine a broad range of popular culture forms including music, telenovelas (soap operas), food, film, radio, fashion, sports and comic books. Through our analysis of these diverse sources we will consider two broad themes: politics and identity. Moving roughly chronologically we will examine issues such as the role of popular culture in Mexican nation building and collective identity; the state’s relationship with the culture industries; cultural imperialism and cultural nationalism; the relationships between regional and national cultures; cultural exports and the impacts of NAFTA; and popular culture as a site for creative resistance. Short lectures will provide background for lively and participatory discussion.
HIST 294-08 Ethics of Service M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Jamie Monson
In this course we will discuss the ethical questions that arise when students engage in service and learning in contexts of difference. Taking our examples from Peace Corps; Teach for America; travel/study abroad; community activism and human rights work, we will read and discuss diverse perspectives on the ways that power and privilege relate to service and altruism. We will place our discussion in historical perspective while considering its implications for today's world. We will therefore locate our inquiry within a broader historical and global framework that acknowledges traditions of philanthropy from diverse religious and cultural contexts. Our course materials will include personal memoirs and travel narratives; multi-disciplinary analytical texts; reflections on experience from student participants and invited guests; films and field trips. The course will take the form of an interactive seminar and will welcome all points of view.
HIST 294-11 Ethics of Service TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 Jamie Monson
HIST 330-01 Historians/Crit Race Theory W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff
*2 credit course*
HIST 343-01 Imperial Nature: The US and the Global Environment TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 343-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
HIST 362-01 Soviet Union and Successors MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Peter Weisensel
*First day attendance required*
HIST 379-01 The Study of History M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Andrea Cremer
HIST 394-01 Conquering the Flesh: Renunciation of Sex and Food in the Christian Tradition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Susanna Drake
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-02.*
HIST 394-03 Comp (Neo/Post) Modernities TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ENGL 394-05, HMCS 394-03, and WGSS 315-01.

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Interdisciplinary Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTD 411-01 Sr Seminar in CGH W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss
*1 credit course; reserved for those filing concentrations in Community and Global Health.*

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTL 113-01 Intro to International Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky
*First day attendance required*
INTL 114-01 Intro to Intl St: Intl Conduct MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 James von Geldern
*First day attendance required*
INTL 114-02 Intro to Intl St: Intl Conduct MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 James von Geldern
*First day attendance required*
INTL 202-01 Global Media Industries MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Cross-listed with HMCS 202-01*
INTL 225-01 Comparative Econ Systems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 402 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with ECON 225-01*
INTL 245-01 Intro to Intl Human Rights MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber
INTL 288-01 Race and Ethnicity in Japan TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Christopher Scott
*Cross-listed with AMST 288-01 and JAPA 288-01*
INTL 294-01 Women, Gender, and Islam TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Alan Verskin
This course examines diverse Islamic perspectives on the role of women in the public sphere, the nature of family power dynamics, and the religious implications of gender. The first half of the course surveys early Islamic views on women's roles in society, and their historical contexts. The second half explores worldwide debates among contemporary Muslims as to whether, and if so, how these traditions should be maintained.
INTL 294-02 Trans-national China: Negotiating Chineseness in the late 20th and 21st Centuries TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Frederik Green
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-01 and HMCS 294-01.*
INTL 317-01 Writers and Power: The European East in the 20th Century M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky
INTL 322-01 Culture and Global Capitalism MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Cross-listed with HMCS 322-01 and LATI 322-01*
INTL 333-01 Global Food Problems MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Amy Damon
*Cross-listed with ECON 333-01 and ENVI 333-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
INTL 345-01 Adv Themes in Human Rights TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky
INTL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 384-01*
INTL 415-01 Cultural Resistance/Survival TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 111 Margaret Olsen
*Cross-listed with HISP 415-01 and LATI 415-01; first day attendance required*
INTL 480-01 Paradigms-Global Leadership W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MARKIM 303 Ahmed Samatar
*Frist day attendance required*

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
JAPA 102-01 Elementary Japanese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
JAPA 102-02 Elementary Japanese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
JAPA 102-L1 Elementary Japanese II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Eriko Ike
JAPA 102-L2 Elementary Japanese II Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am OLRI 170 Eriko Ike
JAPA 102-L3 Elementary Japanese II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Eriko Ike
JAPA 194-01 Language and Gender in Japanese Society MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
*Cross-listed with LING 194-01 and WGSS 194-04.* Japanese is considered to be a gendered language in the sense that women and men speak differently from each other. Male characters in Japanese animation often use boku or ore to refer to themselves, while female characters often use watashi or atashi. When translated into Japanese, Hermione Granger (a female character in Harry Potter series) ends sentences with soft-sounding forms, while Harry Potter and his best friend Ron use more assertive forms. Do these fictional representations reflect reality? How do these distinct forms come about? Do speakers of Japanese manipulate their language to express themselves? These are some of the questions discussed in this course. Students will have opportunities to learn historical background of gendered language, discover different methodologies in data collection, find out about current discourse on language and gender, and compare gender expressions in Japanese with those in English. No Japanese language ability is required.
JAPA 204-01 Intermediate Japanese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 204-02 Intermediate Japanese II MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 204-L1 Intermediate Japanese II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Eriko Ike
JAPA 204-L2 Intermediate Japanese II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 227 Eriko Ike
JAPA 204-L3 Intermediate Japanese II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Eriko Ike
JAPA 288-01 Race and Ethnicity in Japan TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Christopher Scott
*Cross-listed with AMST 288-01 and INTL 288-01*
JAPA 306-01 Advanced Japanese II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 306-L1 Advanced Japanese II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 228 Eriko Ike
JAPA 306-L2 Advanced Japanese II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 247 Eriko Ike
JAPA 488-01 Translating Japanese: Theory and Practice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 Christopher Scott
*Cross-listed with LING 488-01*

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LATI 181-01 Latin America/Caribbean MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Melanie Huska
*Cross-listed with HIST 181-01*
LATI 245-01 Latin American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 212 Andrew Reiter
*Cross-listed with POLI 245-01*
LATI 294-01 From Telenovelas to Tacos: Popular Culture in Mexican History MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Melanie Huska
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-05*
LATI 307-01 Intro Analysis Hispanic Texts TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 308-01 Intro to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 322-01 Culture and Global Capitalism MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Cross-listed with INTL 322-01 and HMCS 322-01*
LATI 415-01 Cultural Resistance/Survival TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 111 Margaret Olsen
*Cross-listed with HISP 415-01 and INTL 415-01; first day attendance required*

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 216 Ingvar Lofstedt
LING 175-01 Sociolinguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Sharon Gerlach
*Cross-listed with SOCI 175-01*
LING 175-02 Sociolinguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 227 Sharon Gerlach
*Cross-listed with SOCI 175-02.*
LING 194-01 Language and Gender in Japanese Society MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
*Cross-listed with JAPA 194-01 and WGSS 194-04.*
LING 200-01 English Syntax MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 213 John Haiman
LING 205-01 Phonology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Ingvar Lofstedt
LING 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 217 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*Cross-listed with HISP 309-01; first day attendance required*
LING 400-01 Field Methods in Linguistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 217 John Haiman
*6 credit course*
LING 400-02 Field Methods in Linguistics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Ingvar Lofstedt
*6 credit course*
LING 488-01 Translating Japanese: Theory and Practice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 Christopher Scott
*Cross-listed with JAPA 488-01*
LING 494-01 Spanish in the United States MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 212 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with HISP 494-01; first day attendance required.*
LING 494-02 Translating Chinese: Theory and Practice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Frederik Green
*Cross-listed with ASIA 494-01.*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MATH 108-01 Quantitative Thinking TR 09:40 am-11:10 am LEOCTR 36 Lisa Giddings
*Cross-listed with ECON 108-01*
MATH 135-01 Applied Calculus TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Chad Higdon-Topaz
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 135-02 Applied Calculus TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Chad Higdon-Topaz
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Daniel Flath
MATH 137-01 Single Variable Calculus TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud
*Concurrent registration in MATH 137-L1 required*
MATH 137-02 Single Variable Calculus MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Michael Weimerskirch
MATH 137-L1 Single Variable Calculus Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 258 David Bressoud
*This lab required for MATH 137-01 only*
MATH 153-01 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 258 Vittorio Addona
MATH 153-02 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 David Ehren
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Alicia Johnson
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 258 Vittorio Addona
MATH 155-03 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 258 Daniel Kaplan
*First day attendance required.*
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 Thomas Halverson
MATH 236-02 Linear Algebra MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Michael Weimerskirch
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 401 Karen Saxe
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 401 Karen Saxe
MATH 253-01 Applied Mulitivariate Stats MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Alicia Johnson
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Daniel Flath
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 361-01 Theory of Computation MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 245 Susan Fox
*Cross-listed with COMP 261-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 365-01 Computational Linear Algebra TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan
*Cross-listed with COMP 365-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 376-01 Algebraic Structures MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Thomas Halverson
MATH 437-01 Continuous Applied Mathematics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Chad Higdon-Topaz
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
MATH 477-01 Topics in Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud
MATH 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 241 Karen Saxe
*1 credit course; S/NC grading only*

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HMCS 110-01 Texts and Power: Foundations of Cultural Studies MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 John Kim
HMCS 110-02 Texts and Power MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 205 John Kim
HMCS 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture MW 07:00 pm-09:30 pm HUM 401 Clay Steinman
HMCS 194-01 Feminist Cultural Productions: India There and Here TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ASIA 194-01, ENGL 194-01, and WGSS 194-02.*
HMCS 202-01 Global Media Industries MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Cross-listed with INTL 202-01*
HMCS 249-01 History of Film Since 1941 MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 402 Michael Griffin
*One evening will be spent viewing films.*
HMCS 270-01 Wrongdoing in Russian Lit TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Julia Chadaga
*Cross-listed with RUSS 270-01*
HMCS 272-01 Social Theories MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 204 Khaldoun Samman
*Cross-listed with SOCI 272-01*
HMCS 294-01 Trans-national China: Negotiating Chineseness in the late 20th and 21st Centuries TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Frederik Green
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-01 and INTL 294-02.*
HMCS 294-02 American Consumer Nation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Christopher Wells
*Cross-listed with ENVI 236-01 and HIST 236-01; first day attendance required.*
HMCS 322-01 Culture and Global Capitalism MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Amanda Ciafone
*Cross-listed with INTL 322-01 and LATI 322-01*
HMCS 334-01 Cultural Studies and the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 113 Michael Griffin
*Cross-listed with AMST 334-01*
HMCS 394-01 Spaces of Hope T 01:20 pm-04:20 pm THEATR 204 John Kim
Spaces of Hope will explore reasons for cautious and critical optimism in a world beset by seemingly intractable economic, environmental, and social problems and inequalities. Building upon work in HMCS 110, Texts and Power, we will read action-oriented, critical social theory and analysis. The class examines how local acts can derive from theoretical prescriptions for radically alternative social structures. Thus, students will work in close collaboration with a community partner committed to social justice; individually and as a group we will reflect upon the relationship between practice and theory. Course requirements include reading, discussing, writing, and organizing with a community partner. Throughout, we will keep in mind the World Social Forum's progressive declaration: Another world is possible! Prerequisite: HMCS 110, HMCS 128, or permission of instructor. Corequisite: HMCS 621 (1 credit) or preferably 622 (2 credits) Internship, graded S/D/NC, to be added near the start of the Spring semester.
HMCS 394-01 Spaces of Hope T 01:20 pm-04:20 pm THEATR 204 Clay Steinman
Spaces of Hope will explore reasons for cautious and critical optimism in a world beset by seemingly intractable economic, environmental, and social problems and inequalities. Building upon work in HMCS 110, Texts and Power, we will read action-oriented, critical social theory and analysis. The class examines how local acts can derive from theoretical prescriptions for radically alternative social structures. Thus, students will work in close collaboration with a community partner committed to social justice; individually and as a group we will reflect upon the relationship between practice and theory. Course requirements include reading, discussing, writing, and organizing with a community partner. Throughout, we will keep in mind the World Social Forum's progressive declaration: Another world is possible! Prerequisite: HMCS 110, HMCS 128, or permission of instructor. Corequisite: HMCS 621 (1 credit) or preferably 622 (2 credits) Internship, graded S/D/NC, to be added near the start of the Spring semester.
HMCS 394-02 Value: the Bad, the Ugly, and the Cheap MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with ART 394-02 and GERM 394-02.*
HMCS 394-03 Comparative (Neo/Post) Modernities TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with WGSS 315-01, HIST 394-03 and ENGL 394-05.*
HMCS 488-01 Adv Topics Seminar: Advanced Film Analysis MW 02:20 pm-04:20 pm HUM 401 Clay Steinman
This semester HMCS 488 will cover selected advanced topics in film studies and include a production assignment. Readings will include chapters from Raymond Bellour's The Analysis of Film; David Bordwell's Narration in the Fiction Film; Robert Stam's Film Theory; Judith Mayne's Directed by Dorothy Arzner, a queer study of the only woman who directed feature films in Hollywood from the late 1920s into the 1940s; and chapters from Ella Shohat and Robert Stam's Unthinking Eurocentrism: Multiculturalism and the Media. A mid-term paper will explore one area of the readings in depth. The course concludes with Robert L. Carringer's The Magnificent Ambersons: A Reconstruction, a study of how and why RKO cut Orson Welles's 1942 film from 131 to 88 minutes. Students will recreate lost segments of Ambersons on video using available cutting continuities, soundtrack recordings, and storyboards. They will also write accompanying papers using Ambersons to analyze the cultural and political-economic structuration of formal innovation in Hollywood in the studio era. Prerequisite: HMCS 128 or permission of instructor. All students who have taken HMCS 128, including non-majors, are welcome, although the course will count as a capstone only for HMCS juniors and seniors. Students not taking the course for capstone credit may count it toward other HMCS major or minor requirements or as an elective. While some films mentioned in the readings will be screened during the four-hour class time, most will be screened TBA.

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MUSI 110-01 Music Appreciation TR 09:40 am-11:10 am GDAY 308 Randall Bauer
MUSI 111-01 World Music MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 100 Chuen-Fung Wong
MUSI 112-01 Basic Musicianship MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am GDAY 306 Clare Eng
MUSI 114-01 Theory II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am GDAY 306 Clare Eng
MUSI 114-L1 Theory II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm GDAY 306 Clare Eng
MUSI 114-L2 Theory II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm GDAY 306 Clare Eng
MUSI 294-01 Chinese Music TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm GDAY 308 Chuen-Fung Wong
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-02.* The purpose of this course is to understand China/the Chinese-broadly conceived to encompass mainland China, minorities, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and diasporic communities—by studying and performing its music. We explore the sound of both traditional and modern China by closely studying selected musical genres from various geographical and temporal Chinese worlds, including Peking Opera, Silk-and-bamboo instrumental music, minority traditions, popular music, Shanghai jazz, film and theatrical music, Communist political songs, and ancient court music. Class materials, both readings and audiovisuals, examine issues of modernization, nationalism, ethnicity, socialism, gender, among others. This is a performance-based academic course; students have the opportunity to perform Chinese instruments (provided) and participate in an end-of-semester public performance. This course is open to both music majors/minors and non-music students. There is no pre-requisite; previous knowledge of musical instrument, notation, or Chinese languages is helpful but not required.
MUSI 314-01 Theory IV, Contemp Theory/Lit MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am GDAY 308 Randall Bauer
MUSI 343-01 Western Music-19th Century MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm GDAY 308 Mark Mazullo
MUSI 394-01 History of Jazz MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am GDAY 308 Randall Bauer
MUSI 425-01 Seminar in Composers/Genres: Verdi MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm GDAY 308 Mark Mazullo
MUSI 73-01 African Music Ensemble TR 05:30 pm-07:00 pm Sowah Mensah
*Location will be Turck Lounge*
MUSI 75-01 Macalester Concert Choir MWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm Eugene Rogers
*Location will be Emmanuel Lutheran Church; plus meets Tuesdays 7:30-9:30pm.* The Macalester Concert Choir is a chamber mixed ensemble open to all students at the College. The singers in the Concert Choir are full-time, undergraduate music and non-music major students committed to innovative and quality performances and community outreach through choral music. Repertoire of the choir includes both a capella and accompanied music from Western and Non-Western vocal traditions. The Macalester College Concert Choir tours annually throughout the United States or abroad. Past international tours have included Japan, Scotland, Poland, Costa Rica and other countries throughout the world. Under the leadership of Dr. Dale Warland from 1966-1985, the choir received national and international acclaim. This dedication to choral excellence continued under the leadership of Professor Kathy Romey, Dr. Robert Morris, Dr. Robert Peterson, and is now under the leadership of Dr. Eugene Rogers. Membership is based on an audition and callback.
MUSI 81-01 Mac Jazz Band TR 07:00 pm-08:30 pm Joan Griffith
*Location will be GDD 015*
MUSI 85-01 Pipe Band W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Michael Breidenbach
*Location will be Turck Lounge*
MUSI 87-01 Chamber Ensemble TBA TBA Cary Franklin
MUSI 89-01 Symphony Orchestra TR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm Cary Franklin
*Location will be Ramsey Junior High band room*
MUSI 91-01 Mac Jazz Combo M 07:00 pm-09:30 pm Joan Griffith
*Location will be GDD 015*
MUSI 91-02 Highland Camerata T 04:45 pm-06:15 pm Eugene Rogers
*Location will be Emmanuel Lutheran Church; this ensemble will also meet Thursday evenings 6:30-7:30pm.*
MUSI 91-03 Mac Early Music Ensemble TBA TBA Clea Galhano
MUSI 95-01 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 95-02 Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson
MUSI 95-04 Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 95-05 Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-06 Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich
MUSI 95-08 Organ TBA TBA Winston Kaehler
MUSI 95-09 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 95-10 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-11 Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 95-13 African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-14 Jazz Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-15 Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 95-16 Bass Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-17 Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-18 African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-1M Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor
MUSI 95-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 95-23 Violin TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 95-24 Viola TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 95-25 Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-26 Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 95-32 Recorder TBA TBA Clea Galhano
MUSI 95-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 95-36 Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen
MUSI 95-38 Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor
MUSI 95-39 Tuba TBA TBA Charles Wazanowski
MUSI 95-3M Brazilian Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-41 Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 95-44 Sitar TBA TBA David Whetstone
MUSI 95-45 Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder
MUSI 95-5M African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-5W African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-7W Sitar TBA TBA David Whetstone
MUSI 95-8W Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder
MUSI 95-C Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 95-C1 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin
MUSI 95-C2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 95-CC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 95-CI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-M Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 95-M0 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen
MUSI 95-M2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 95-M3 Jazz Improvisation TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-M4 Jazz Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen
MUSI 95-M5 Tuba TBA TBA Charles Wazanowski
MUSI 95-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 95-M7 Trumpet TBA TBA Lynn Erickson
MUSI 95-MC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 95-MD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-ME Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich
MUSI 95-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 95-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-MJ Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 95-ML African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-MN Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-MO Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen
MUSI 95-MP Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-MQ Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-MU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 95-MY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 95-WH Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 97-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 97-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 97-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Claudia Chen

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Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
NEUR 246-01 Exploring Sensation/Perception MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Clark Ohnesorge
*Cross-listed with PSYC 246-01*
NEUR 246-L1 Expl Sensation/Perception Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 371 Clark Ohnesorge
*Cross-listed with PSYC 246-L1*
NEUR 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Eric Wiertelak
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with PSYC 248-01*
NEUR 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 371 Eric Wiertelak
*Permission of instructor required; Cross-listed with PSYC 248-L1*
NEUR 300-01 Directed Research TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak
NEUR 385-01 Mind Reading TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 370 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with PSYC 385-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students.*
NEUR 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHIL 115-01 Introduction to Philosophy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Joy Laine
PHIL 120-01 Introduction to Symbolic Logic MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 107 Janet Folina
PHIL 125-01 Ethics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 William Wilcox
PHIL 125-02 Ethics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 010 Henry West
PHIL 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Diane Michelfelder
*Cross-listed with ENVI 229-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
PHIL 231-01 Modern Philosophy MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Janet Folina
PHIL 236-01 Indian Philosophies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with ASIA 236-01*
PHIL 301-01 Philosophy of Law TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 113 William Wilcox
PHIL 394-01 Ethics of Information and Computing Technologies MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Diane Michelfelder
In this course, we will give philosophical consideration to three kinds of ethical issues associated with the "networked" world. First, we will look at issues that were objects of philosophical reflection before the dawn of "cyberethics," including privacy and freedom of speech. Here our focus will be primarily on the Internet as we know and routinely access it today by means of a device with a screen. In the second part of this course, we will expand our aperture of inquiry to include ethical issues related to emerging developments in ICT such as ambient computing, the intersection of nanotechnology with computational technology, and robotics. Can, for example, a robot be a moral agent and if so, could a robot be held responsible for her or his actions? In the third part of the course, the aperture of our thinking will expand even further. What are some of the impacts of ICTs on our everyday ethical relations with others and on the overall quality of our lives? How does being networked affect the meaning of being human? Pre-requisite: one course in philosophy or permission of instructor. Please note if you are a philosophy major: this course will count toward the 300 level elective requirement.

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PE 01-01 Swimming I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson
PE 04-01 Karate I TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-02 Yoga I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Vanessa Seljeskog
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Vanessa Seljeskog
PE 09-01 Conditioning MW 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 10-01 Racquetball I TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm LEOCTR R-COURTS Betsy Emerson
PE 11-01 Swimming II TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth
PE 13-01 Intermediate Social Dance M 08:30 pm-10:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson
PE 14-01 Karate II TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson
PE 16-01 Yoga II TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin
PE 18-01 Pilates MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard
PE 19-01 Conditioning II TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 20-01 Weight Training MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 21-01 Swim for Fitness TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth
PE 26-01 Tai Chi Chuan MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Phyllis Calph
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Kristine Spangard
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance R 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson
PE 51-01 Aqua Aerobics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 112-01 Cosmos: Perspectives M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 130-01 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with ENVI 130-01; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
PHYS 130-L1 Science Renewable Energy Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with ENVI 130-L1; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 Tonnis ter Veldhuis
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab R 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab R 02:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 Joshua Nollenberg
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab M 02:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab T 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-L3 Principles of Physics II Lab T 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 348-01 Laboratory Instrumentation MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 101 James Heyman
PHYS 348-L1 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Heyman
PHYS 348-L2 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Heyman
PHYS 444-01 Electromagnetic Theory II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 James Doyle
PHYS 460-01 Astrophysics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 404 Joshua Nollenberg
PHYS 461-01 Mechanics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis
PHYS 489-01 Physics Seminar F 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 150 James Heyman
PHYS 494-01 Advanced Quantum Mechanics or Particles TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Tonnis ter Veldhuis
In this course we will continue our exploration of the fascinating world of quantum mechanics. As all but the simplest quantum systems can be solved exactly, we will develop a toolbox of approximation methods. These tools will allow us to analyze realistic physical systems in a quantitative manner. Among the approximation methods we will discuss are time independent and time dependent perturbation theory, the variational principle, the WKB (Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) approximation, and the adiabatic approximation. The systems we will study with these tools include small atoms and molecules, and we will also investigate emission and absorption of radiation. The prerequisite for the course is: PHYS481 Quantum Mechanics

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
POLI 100-01 US Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 206 Michael Zis
POLI 120-01 International Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Wendy Weber
POLI 140-01 Comparative Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Andrew Reiter
POLI 160-01 Foundations-Political Theory MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 205-01 Politics and Policymaking: A Diagnosis of National Health Reforms in the U.S. MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Michael Zis
In historical terms, national health reform is considered to be President Obama’s most significant legislative achievement to date. While most agree on its historic significance, there’s wide ranging disagreement over its merits, lessons, and future. Together, we will sort through these differing accounts and perspectives by, first, demystifying the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Act to explain what it is and what it is not; second, place the Obama health care reform effort in some global and historical context; and third, analyze the politics and interests that both stalled, led, and shaped its passage and will determine the extent to which the Act will be fully implemented, seriously amended, or mostly repealed. The plan is to do this through a mix of lectures and guest speakers, class discussion and class debates, and, finally, a class-led legislative simulation of a 2011 congressional hearing over its future.
POLI 207-01 US Civil Rights/Liberties MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor*
POLI 216-01 Legislative Politics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Julie Dolan
*Permission of instructor required.*
POLI 222-01 Regional Conflict/Security MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Andrew Latham
POLI 242-01 Development Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 401 David Blaney
POLI 245-01 Latin American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 212 Andrew Reiter
*Cross-listed with LATI 245-01*
POLI 260-01 Contemporary Political Theory TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Franklin Adler
POLI 262-01 American Political Thought MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
POLI 294-01 Medieval Political Thought TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 Andrew Latham
This course deals with the political thought of Latin Christendom (Western Europe) during the late Middle Ages (c. 1250-c. 1450). This body of thought is worthy of sustained study for two reasons. First, it is one of the glories of human civilization. In seeking to answer the timeless questions "how we should live our lives as individuals" and "how we should live together in peace and justice" late medieval political thinkers produced a body of political thought second to none in the history of human philosophical speculation. Second, late medieval political thought is worthy of study because it gave rise to many of the concepts that continue to shape our collective lives even today (including state sovereignty, separation of church and state, constitutionalism, property rights, "the people", nationalism, democracy, rule-of-law, and human rights). Indeed, it is impossible to really understand contemporary political life without delving deeply into the way in which late medieval thinkers engaged with the big political issues of their day. The goal of this course it to provide a solid introduction to the political thought of this crucially important era in human history. In it, we will critically examine the relevant works of thinkers such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of Paris, Marsilius of Padua, Bartolus of Sasseferato and Baldus de Ubaldi. To the extent that they shed light on late medieval thought, we will also touch on classical political theorists such as Aristotle and Cicero as well as Muslim and Jewish thinkers such as ibn Sina, Moshe ben Maimon, and ibn Rushd. The course is structured to promote an understanding not only of how these thinkers sought to address the pressing political challenges of their day, but also of how they how they "invented" many of the ideas that we - arrogantly and erroneously - have come to associate with the modern era. As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields (such as Philosophy) who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no prerequisites, however, and is therefore suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in political theory/philosophy or the medieval roots of contemporary political life.
POLI 294-02 The Rhetoric and Politics of Immigration TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
The United States are often described as a nation of immigrants, yet various anxieties over the status and role of immigrants have been expressed throughout the history of the country. This class offers a symptomatic reading of key historical debates over immigration in the United States. A symptomatic analysis explores the contextual forces that shape the definitions, terms, and goals of such debates, the variety of interests vested in the issue, and the political and social consequences of these controversies not only for the dominant political order but especially for the lives and identities of the immigrants, their families, and communities. In particular we will explore:
-key historical events and trends that have defined the flow and status of immigrants in the United States;
-how various anxieties about immigration have served to disenfranchise some groups while solidifying the power of others;
-the rhetorical, economic, political, and ideological challenges faced by those interested in promoting immigrants; rights
-how the status of immigrants has consequences for the political rights of citizens and vice versa, thus challenging the notion that immigrants' problems are theirs alone.
POLI 305-01 Women's Voices in Politics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
*Cross-listed with WGSS 306-01.*
POLI 320-01 Global Political Economy TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 David Blaney
POLI 323-01 Humanitariansim/Wld Politics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber
POLI 340-01 Fascism W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 390-01 Civic Engagement Fellowship MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 394-01 Political Violence TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Andrew Reiter
This course is an introduction to political violence. Throughout the semester, we will examine the various manifestations of political violence, focusing on diverse topics such as genocide, terrorism, and civil war. We will also explore the debates in the field of political science regarding the nature and causal factors behind these diverse manifestations of violence. We will conclude the semester by looking at how violence ends, how peace is maintained, and how societies attempt to heal from periods of violence.
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Julie Dolan

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Clark Ohnesorge
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Daniel Graham
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L4 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 182-01 Drugs and Society MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 250 Eric Wiertelak
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 352 Rachel Lucas-Thompson
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Rachel Lucas-Thompson
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 354 Rachel Lucas-Thompson
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students.*
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; first day attendance required*
PSYC 246-01 Exploring Sensation/Perception MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Clark Ohnesorge
*Cross-listed with NEUR 246-01*
PSYC 246-L1 Expl Sensation/Perception Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Clark Ohnesorge
*Cross-listed with NEUR 246-L1*
PSYC 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Eric Wiertelak
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with NEUR 248-01*
PSYC 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 371 Eric Wiertelak
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with NEUR 248-L1*
PSYC 250-01 Developmental Psychology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 352 Rachel Lucas-Thompson
PSYC 252-01 Distress/Dysfunction/Disorder MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 262-01 Asian American Psychology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Sun No
*Cross-listed with AMST 262-01*
PSYC 264-01 The Psychology of Gender TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Joan Ostrove
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Christina Manning
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Darcy Burgund
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Clark Ohnesorge
PSYC 374-01 Clinical/Counseling Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students.*
PSYC 379-01 Cultural Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Sun No
PSYC 385-01 Mind Reading TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 370 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with NEUR 385-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students.*
PSYC 488-01 Sr Seminar: Lives in Context TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 300 Joan Ostrove
*Cross-listed with WGSS 405-01*

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RELI 102-01 Modern Islam TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 Brett Wilson
RELI 120-01 Hebrew Bible MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Susanna Drake
RELI 125-01 Love and Death MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Paula Cooey
RELI 125-02 Love and Death MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Paula Cooey
RELI 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 350 Andrew Overman
*Cross-listed with CLAS 135-01*
RELI 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 350 James Laine
*Cross-listed with CLAS 135-01*
RELI 202-01 Atheism Past and Present TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Brett Wilson
RELI 294-01 Jews, Others and Pursuit of Identity MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Barry Cytron
RELI 294-02 World Religions and World Religion Discourse MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 James Laine
RELI 294-03 Women in the Bible MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Susanna Drake
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-01.* In this course we will examine the roles, identities, and representations of women in the Hebrew Bible, New Testament, and Jewish and Christian apocrypha. We will explore how biblical writers used women "to think with", and we will consider how gender is co-constructed alongside religious, social, and sexual identities. We will ask the following sorts of questions: What opportunities for social advancement and leadership were open to women in early Jewish and Christian communities, and how did these opportunities differ from those open to women in other religious formations in the ancient Mediterranean? How did biblical regulations of sexuality, marriage, and family life shape women's lives? What are the social and material effects of biblical representations of women? And how might current feminist theories inform our interpretation of biblical texts about women? Textbooks:
Alice Bach, ed. Women in the Hebrew Bible: A Reader
Ross Shepard Kraemer and Mary Rose D'Angelo, eds. Women and Christian Origins
The New Oxford Annotated Bible: New Revised Standard Version
Other Readings include:
Joan Wallach Scott, "Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis" and "Women's History"
Elizabeth Castelli, "Introduction," Women, Gender, and Religion: A Reader.
Caroline Walker Bynum, "Introduction: The Complexity of Symbols," in Gender and Religion: On the Complexity of Symbols
Ken Stone, "The Garden of Eden and the Heterosexual Contract," in Bodily Citations: Religion and Judith Butler
Teresa Hornsby, "The Annoying Woman: Biblical Scholarship After Judith Butler," in Bodily Citations: Religion and Judith Butler
Tivka Frymer-Kensky, Reading the Women of the Bible
Bernadette Brooten, Love Between Women: Early Christian Responses to Female Homoeroticism
Helena Zlotnick, Dinah's Daughters: Gender and Judaism from Hebrew Bible to Late Antiquity
Antoinette Clark Wire, The Corinthian Women Prophets: A Reconstruction through Paul's Rhetoric
Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza, Rhetoric and Ethic: The Politics of Biblical Studies
RELI 294-04 Marx: Religion as Ideology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Erik Davis
RELI 359-01 Religion and Revolution W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Erik Davis
RELI 394-02 Conquering the Flesh: Renunciation of Sex and Food in the Christian Tradition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Susanna Drake
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-01.* This course explores how bodily practices of fasting and sexual abstinence have shaped Christian identities from the first century, C.E. to today. From Paul of Tarsus' instructions about sexual discipline to the True Love Waits campaign, from the desert fathers' rigorous bodily regimens to the contemporary Christian diet movement, Christians have often understood the practice of renunciation as a necessary feature of spiritual perfection. In this course we will consider several ascetic movements in Christian history, including the development of ascetic practice in late antiquity, the rise of fasting practices among women in medieval Europe, and the culture of Christian dieting and chastity in the U.S. We will pay special attention to how Christian practices of piety both draw upon and contribute to cultural understandings of gender and the body.
RELI 469-01 Approaches to the Study of Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Paula Cooey

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RUSS 102-01 Elementary Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 213 Julia Chadaga
RUSS 102-L1 Elementary Russian II Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 228 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 102-L2 Elementary Russian II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 204-01 Intermediate Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 227 Rad Borislavov
RUSS 204-L1 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 228 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 204-L2 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 252-01 20th C Russian Lit/Culture MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 Rad Borislavov
RUSS 270-01 Wrongdoing in Russian Lit TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Julia Chadaga
*Cross-listed with HMCS 270-01*
RUSS 394-01 Moscow-Berlin, 1919-1930 MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 402 Rad Borislavov
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-03.* Probably no two other European cities embody the political crises and artistic achievements of the twentieth century as do Moscow and Berlin. Sites of utopian energies, political power, and artistic innovation, these huge urban centers underwent striking transformations during the 1920s but also left an indelible imprint on the post-WWI intellectual climate. In the 1920s, a decade characterized by cultural and political strife in which the borders of art and politics often became blurred, there was a lively cultural exchange between Russian and Soviet artists and political emigres and German artists intensely interested in developments in the Soviet Union. In this course we will investigate the fascinating artistic culture of Moscow and Berlin as well as the intellectual exchange of ideas between the two cities, focusing on avant-garde art in prose, theater, poetry, visual art, and film. We will begin in 1919, the year in which the Weimar republic was founded and the Civil War in Russia raged, and we will conclude in 1930, the year that marked the intensification of censorship and political control in both Germany and the Soviet Union. We will read works by Vladimir Nabokov, Viktor Shklovsky, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Bertolt Brecht, Georg Grosz, Alfred Doblin, John Heartfield, and Richard Hulsenbeck. We will explore montage principles in cinema in films by Dziga Vertov and Walter Ruttmann and ideas of urban planning and design. Course will be taught in English. No prerequisites.
RUSS 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 James von Geldern

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Mahnaz Kousha
SOCI 175-01 Sociolinguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Sharon Gerlach
*Cross-listed with LING 175-01*
SOCI 175-02 Sociolinguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 227 Sharon Gerlach
*Cross-listed with LING 175-02.*
SOCI 180-01 Sociology of Culture TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Deborah Smith
SOCI 210-01 Sociology of Sexuality TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Deborah Smith
SOCI 210-02 Sociology of Sexuality TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Deborah Smith
SOCI 230-01 Affirmative Action Policy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk
SOCI 269-01 Science and Social Inquiry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 208 Terry Boychuk
SOCI 272-01 Social Theories MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 204 Khaldoun Samman
*Cross-listed with HMCS 272-01*
SOCI 294-01 Immigrant Voices TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Mahnaz Kousha
Once I thought to write a history of the immigrants in America. Then I discovered that the immigrants were American History" (Oscar Handling, 1951:3). Over the course of the last five centuries, millions of people, young and old, male and female, married and single, left their homelands to seek a better life. Originating in different localities, they escaped famine and hunger, war, religious persecution and intolerance, colonialism, and revolutionary turmoil. Some left following their "adventurous" spirit. While many died before reaping the benefits of their life transforming quest, others survived to build a new nation. While all contributed to building the country, not all left a written account of their experiences. Who were these people who, willingly or forcibly, left all they knew behind? What were they escaping from? What were their dreams? Hardships? How were they received by those who, by pure accident of history, had arrived before them? This class is an expedition into the past with an eye on the present, examining firsthand accounts left by immigrants and about them. What does an 18th century Scottish indentured servant may have in common with a 21st century migrant farm worker? What does a turn of the 20th century Polish immigrant might have in common with a 21st century Arab immigrant? What does a Japanese picture bride might share with a contemporary Russian bride? Delving into divergent historical periods and differing groups, the goal is to develop a better understanding of parallels and variations, hopes and dreams, the ease and challenges that immigrants have experienced, and continue to face.
SOCI 394-01 The Politics of Fear MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 204 Khaldoun Samman
This course will focus primarily on how fears spread and become moral panics of our time. We will deal with a number of issues like pedophilia, gangs, and drug scares, but fear of Muslims and Islam will be the most visible example of the course. Through the works of Foucault (discursive formations and incitement), Laclau and Moufe (hegemony and articulation), and others, this course will attempt to restore the most significant contribution Moral Panic theory offers: the constitutive nature of moral panics in the production of new racial and political identities. A major sub theme of the course will be to trace the incitement process through certain networks and what sociologists call "claims makers" and "moral
entrepreneurs" (think tanks, Zionists, Jihad Watch, Military Industrial complex), especially right wing groups but also liberals, mainstream feminists, academics, and other experts. We will also look at the construction of crime waves, but of a particular sort, the kind that reconstitutes the way we understand cultural differences, human rights, immigration, culture and crime, gender inequality, patriarchy, domestic abuse, military occupation, and so on. No prerequisites.

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Theatre and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory/Performance I MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 3 Harry Waters
*First day attendance required*
THDA 121-01 Beginning Dance Composition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 125-01 Technical Theater MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett
THDA 125-L1 Technical Theater Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett
THDA 125-L2 Technical Theater Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett
THDA 210-01 Community-Based Theaters TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Harry Waters
THDA 215-01 Topics in Dance History MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 205 Wynn Fricke
THDA 220-01 Voice and Speech MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Cheryl Brinkley
*First day attendance required.*
THDA 250-01 Experiential Anatomy MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke
THDA 255-01 Lighting Design TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR STUDIO Daniel Keyser
*$20 materials fee will be charged*
THDA 261-01 Sources of Global Performance TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Joanne Zerdy
THDA 262-01 Performing Feminisms MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 204 Beth Cleary
*Cross-listed with WGSS 262-01*
THDA 341-01 Intermediate Dance Composition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 350-01 Directing Theory/Production I MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Beth Cleary
*Sophomores and above*
THDA 360-01 Acting Theory/Performance II MWF 09:40 am-11:40 am THEATR STUDIO Harry Waters
*Permission of instructor required; *first day attendance required**
THDA 465-01 Advanced Lighting Design TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR STUDIO Daniel Keyser
*$20 material fee will be charged*
THDA 31-01 Dance Improvisation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 6 Krista Langberg
THDA 42-01 Modern Dance II TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 45-01 Modern Dance IV MW 03:50 pm-05:20 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 52-01 Ballet II MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Stanchfield
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Sharon Varosh

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
WGSS 194-01 Sociology of Gender MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Corie Hammers
This course examines contemporary approaches to gender from a sociological (rather than a biological, psychological etc.) perspective. We will therefore be looking at the ways in which gender is constructed—that is, how society constructs and (re)produces "gender" and the binary gender system, which is predicated on gender difference. That gender is conceptualized as a construct means that ideologies that employ such things as "natural" and "normal" will be continually contested and challenged in this course. As you will find there is no agreed upon definition of gender. That is, gender is and can be conceptualized in a number of ways-as an attribute or "property" that individuals possess; as a symbolic and cultural product emanating from discursive systems (discourse and language); as that which is learned through socialization; as accomplished practice and performance that emerges through social interaction; and as a structural, institutionalized dimension of social life that organizes (and possibly determines) relations between men and women. Thus, this course will introduce you to a variety of theoretical perspectives on gender, thus providing a broad terrain on which to understand and conceptualize gender and gender relations. Gender cannot be understood in isolation. Understanding the operations of gender (as system, ideology, performance and so on) involves looking at how gender intersects with other social relations and identities. Thus, course readings will expose us to these intersections—that of gender with sexuality, race/ethnicity, class and so on-and how these relationships in turn shape social institutions and social life. An overriding concern in this course involves taking to task hegemonic heterosexuality and gender normativity, and thus challenging conventional ideologies as they relate to our sex/gender system.
WGSS 194-02 Feminist Cultural Production: India There and Here TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ASIA 194-01, ENGL 194-01 and HMCS 194-01.* India is still described as "exotic" in current cultural vocabularies, by Indians and by others. We will investigate the material realities on which these cultural vocabularies rest, through the mirrors held up by Indian women writers who are this nation-state's citizens, expatriates, and diasporans. These writers' historico-political contexts, tussles with language, and other self-imagings, create a compelling force, in both developing the notion of "India" and its relationships to East Africa, North America and Western Europe. Texts include writings by Meena Alexander, Monica Ali, Arundhati Roy, Suniti Namjoshi, Anita Desai, Shashi Deshpande, Bharati Mukherjee, and Meena Syal, among others, as well as films, music , performance, and other forms of cultural production from India and elsewhere.
WGSS 194-04 Language and Gender in Japanese Society MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
*Cross-listed with JAPA 194-01 and LING 194-01.*
WGSS 201-01 History of U.S. Feminisms TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with HIST 194-03; first day attendance required.*
WGSS 228-01 Gender and Sexuality in Colonial America TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Andrea Cremer
*Cross-listed with HIST 228-01*
WGSS 242-01 Economics of Gender MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Karine Moe
*Cross-listed with ECON 242-01*
WGSS 252-01 Feminist Visual Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ART 113 Joanna Inglot
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ART 252-01.*
WGSS 262-01 Performing Feminisms MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 204 Beth Cleary
*Cross-listed with THDA 262-01*
WGSS 294-01 Women in the Bible MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 105 Susanna Drake
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-03.*
WGSS 294-02 Gender/Race/Nations in the Sciences TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Sonita Sarker
*No prerequisites; cross-listed with ENVI 294-03; ACTC students may register on Friday, December 3rd with permission of instructor.* This course is an inquiry into the cultural, social, and philosophical contexts of gender and race in the domains of some sciences and technologies. How have gendered and racialized minorities been represented in established frameworks historically and how have they responded to these depictions? We will analyze the prevailing perceptions of the Ideas of science and technology; the Icons, prominent scientists and symbols of these domains; and the Instruments, the tools and apparatuses, that are defined and redefined. Our focus will be on the roles that women and indigenous peoples (separate and also overlapping identities) have played in reconstructing the foundations and transforming the meanings in some sciences and technologies today. The class will include topics such as racial and gender typologies, biodiversity, and the internet, and works by Plumwood, Warren, Shiva, Harding, Fox Keller, Schiebinger, to name only some.
WGSS 305-01 Race/Sex/Work Global Econ MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Corie Hammers
*Cross-listed with AMST 305-01*
WGSS 306-01 Women's Voices in Politics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
*Cross-listed with POLI 305-01.*
WGSS 315-01 Comparative (Neo/Post) Modernities TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ENGL 394-05, HIST 394-03 and HMCS 394-03.* To understand political and cultural continuities and shifts from the 1920s into the 1990s, this course will focus on fascism as historical phenomenon and as one ideology of modernity. In the context of political, economic, social, and cultural theories, we will explore the relationship of fascism to concepts of masculinity and femininity, sexuality, race, class, and nation. Against this backdrop, we will investigate the roles and impact of women writers/intellectuals on such concepts, as well as relate histories past to histories present. Texts by Hurston, de Gobineau, Rhys, Mussolini, Adorno, Woolf, Benjamin, Ocampo, C. L. R. James, Deledda, Sorabji among others, as well as films and music, will be included.
WGSS 400-01 Senior Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Corie Hammers
*First day attendance required.*
WGSS 405-01 Lives in Context TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 300 Joan Ostrove
*Cross-listed with PSYC 488-01*

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