Fall 2013 Class Schedule

This is a class schedule from a previous term. View current class schedules

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Chinese
Classics
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Neuroscience Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theatre and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
AMST 110-01 Intro to African American Studies: Black Culture and Politics from Du Bois to Obama TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Jane Rhodes
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* African American s ideas, and arts, and activism have informed every aspect of the American experience in the 20th and 21st centuries. In the past year, the re-election of President Barack Obama, debates about popular films like Beasts of the Southern Wild, or complaints about the lack of black lead characters on network television, all reflect the complicated and contested nature of the black presence in the United States. This course will look at the interplay between culture and politics by reading texts of important writers like Zora Neale Hurston, and James Baldwin; screening film and television created by black cultural workers; listening to music from early blues to hip hop; and examining the ideas of influential figures from W. E. B. Du Bois to President Obama.
AMST 194-01 Mixed Race Media: Identity, Representation, and Politics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 212 SooJin Pate
*First day attendance required*
AMST 200-01 Critical Methods for American Studies Research TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 SooJin Pate
*First day attendance required*
AMST 240-01 Race, Culture and Ethnicity in Education M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Ann Hite
*Cross-listed with EDUC 240-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 248-01 Jim Crow MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with HIST 248-01*
AMST 294-01 Cold War Gets Hot: Sex and Gender in First and Second World Literatures TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Anastasia Kayiatos
*Cross-listed with RUSS 294-01 and WGSS 294-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 294-02 Resisting Minnesota M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 212 Juliana Pegues
*First day attendance required*
AMST 300-01 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 SooJin Pate
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
AMST 305-01 Race, Sex, and Work in a Global Economy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Corie Hammers
*Cross-listed with WGSS 305-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 330-01 Mellon Seminar W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 113 Jane Rhodes
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; 2 credit course*
AMST 334-01 Cultural Studies and the Media TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 401 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with MCST 334-01*
AMST 445-01 Frontera: The U.S./Mexico Border MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with HISP 445-01 and LATI 445-01*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06A Olga Gonzalez
ANTH 111-02 Cultural Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Dianna Shandy
ANTH 112-01 Archaeology and Human Origins MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge
ANTH 194-01 Evolutionary Anthropology: Facts, Fantasies and Frauds MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06B Scott Legge
*First Year Course Only* Evolutionary anthropology is not a topic that generally comes to mind when one thinks about the greatest mysteries or debates in science. However, it could be argued that many themes of evolutionary anthropology are far more widespread than the more common scientific questions like “How did the universe form?” or “Can the laws of physics be unified?” For example, the concept of a hairy upright walking humanlike ape can be found in cultures spanning the globe from the Pacific Northwest in North America to the Tibetan Plateau. Nothing grabs international media headlines like a Bigfoot sighting. The history of debated discoveries in evolutionary anthropology goes back many years, and this class will examine some of the most widespread and contentious of them, as well as some of the more obscure.
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
*First day attendance required; limited to declared and intended Anthropology majors*
ANTH 239-01 Medical Anthropology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Ron Barrett
ANTH 240-01 Human Osteology and Paleopathology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge
ANTH 255-01 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06A Olga Gonzalez
*Cross-listed with LATI 255-01*
ANTH 294-01 Anthropology through Science Fiction MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Arjun Guneratne
Science fiction offers us a way to examine the human condition through the creation of imaginative and imaginary scenarios for human action. Science fiction is imaginative anthropology: it is a way to ask "what if" questions, explore alternative possibilities and stand our assumptions on their heads without being constrained by the realism of traditional ethnographic writing. The aim of this course is both to examine anthropological concepts and themes through the medium of science fiction, as well as to read some good science fiction through the lens of anthropology. A number of science fiction novels and short stories relevant to anthropological themes (such as what it means to be human, the nature of society, the role of the anthropologist, the question of ethics in anthropological research and in inter-cultural contact) will be assigned and supplemented by conventional anthropological writings and films. The course counts for the major in anthropology. Anthropology 111, Cultural Anthropology, or Anthropology 101, General Anthropology, is required.
ANTH 294-02 Representing the World As It Is: Histories and Theories of Ethnographic Film M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-01 and MCST 294-01*
ANTH 362-01 Culture and Globalization W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
*Cross-listed with INTL 362-01*
ANTH 363-01 Anthropology of Development MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 05 Arjun Guneratne
ANTH 405-01 Ethnomusicology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Chuen-Fung Wong
*Cross-listed with MUSI 405-01*
ANTH 487-01 Theory in Anthropology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Ron Barrett

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ART 130-01 Drawing I MW 08:30 am-11:40 am MAIN 400 Andy DuCett
*First day attendance required* In 2012, Andy DuCett put on the acclaimed solo exhibition Why We Do This at the Soap Factory in Minneapolis. Taking 3 years to plan, the 12,000 square foot, site-specific installation included a larger-than-life game of Battleship, a Fabio impersonator inside of a giant romance novel, a library of thousands of National Geographic magazines, a functioning planetarium, an airplane fuselage, and much, much more. It was a critic’s pick in ARTFORUM magazine. DuCett’s drawings and mixed-works have also been exhibited at venues such as the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the University of Minnesota, and the Minnesota State Fair.
ART 130-02 Drawing I MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm MAIN 400 Andy DuCett
*First day attendance required*
ART 131-01 Introduction to Ceramics MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm STAD 114 Gary Erickson
*First day attendance required, permission of the instructor required; $100 material fee required*
ART 133-01 Introduction to Ceramics: The Magic of the Wheel MW 08:30 am-11:40 am STAD 114 Gary Erickson
*First day attendance required, permission of the instructor required, $100 material fee required*
ART 149-01 Introduction to Visual Culture MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott
ART 160-01 Art of the West I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau
*Cross-listed with CLAS 160-01*
ART 170-01 Art of the East I: China MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott
*Cross-listed with ASIA 170-01*
ART 234-01 Painting I: An Introduction to Painting with Oil Paints TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm TURC LOUNGE Barbara Kreft
*First day attendance required* To gain an in depth knowledge of painting. The ultimate goal is a solid foundation and self expression/content. We will study: color, light, form, composition, content and depiction. Understanding painting as a language the student will strive for a personal voice.
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm STAD 114 Stanton Sears
*First day attendance required*
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm LAMP 3RD Ruthann Godollei
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
ART 239-01 2-D Design MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm 45SNEL Gudrun Lock
ART 252-01 Gender, Sexualities, and Feminist Visual Culture MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with WGSS 252-01*
ART 252-02 Gender, Sexualities, and Feminist Visual Culture TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with WGSS 252-02* This course will examine the ways in which gender, sexuality, and feminist theory have affected modern visual culture since the early 20th century to the present. Students will explore ways in which Western culture has defined art and artists in gendered terms, and will critically explore these constructs through weekly readings, discussions and writing assignments. Students will also engage in the examination of current global and transnational feminist trends, and consider how gender is relevant to the creation and study of arts and culture. This course is cross-listed with the WGSS Department. Course material will be drawn from multiple disciplines including feminist theory, queer theory, cultural studies, and art history.
ART 271-01 Japan and the (Inter)National Modern TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 Kari Shepherdson-Scott
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-03*
ART 294-01 Intro to Digital Photography MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm 45SNEL Eric Carroll
*First day attendance required*
ART 367-01 3-D Design: Structures and the Built Environment TR 08:00 am-11:10 am STAD 114 Stanton Sears
*First Year Course Only* A series of three-dimensional projects using a basic visual language of line, texture, shape, plane, space, volume, and form will be explored. Critiques and structural testing of the projects lead to an understanding of functional and aesthetic relationships. The problem solving approach used in this class contributes to a resolution of spatial problems in a series of projects with references to sculpture, architecture, industrial design and interior design.
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TBA TBA LAMP 3RD Ruthann Godollei
*First day attendance required, permission of the instructor required*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II MW TBA STAD 114 Gary Erickson
*First day attendance required; $100 material fee is required*
ART 487-01 Art History Methodology Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 205 Joanna Inglot
ART 490-08 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Ruthann Godollei
ART 490-16 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Stanton Sears

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ASIA 111-01 Introduction to Asian Studies TR 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 009 James Laine
ASIA 140-01 Introduction to East Asian Civilization TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 140-01*
ASIA 170-01 Art of the East I: China MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott
Cross-listed with ART 170-01*
ASIA 194-01 Love and Death in 18th-20th Century Japanese Literature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Sachiko Dorsey
*Cross-listed with JAPA 194-01*
ASIA 236-01 Indian Philosophies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with PHIL 236-01*
ASIA 255-01 China on Screen M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm HUM 401 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with CHIN 255-01*
ASIA 255-01 China on Screen MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 111 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with CHIN 255-01*
ASIA 274-01 The Great Tradition in China before 1840 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 274-01*
ASIA 277-01 The Rise of Modern Japan TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 277-01*
ASIA 294-01 Bad Women: Portrayal of Female Villians in Japanese Literature and Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Sachiko Dorsey
*Cross-listed with JAPA 294-01*
ASIA 294-02 Sanskrit and Classical Religion in India MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 James Laine
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01, LING 294-01 and RELI 236-01*
ASIA 294-03 Japan/(Inter)National Modern TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 Kari Shepherdson-Scott
*Cross-listed with ART 271-01*

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
BIOL 144-01 Lakes, Streams and Rivers TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Emily Schilling
*Cross-listed with ENVI 144-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
BIOL 194-01 The Heart and Soul of Biology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Lin Aanonsen
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* The study of life and the great questions of life can be pursued from many different disciplines and approaches. For many of us, the desire to study biology is sparked not only by the wonder and beauty that permeates all living beings, but often, also, a search for meaning. In this course, we will attempt to not only discuss and explore questions (e.g. “What is life?”) through the lens of biology, but also through the intersection of science & spirituality. Using the heart as a case study, we will discuss fundamental principles of biology. More specifically, we will explore how the heart gets energy (both physically and metaphorically) and how it interfaces with the rest of the body through nervous system and hormone action. In pursuit of gaining a better understanding of the intersection of science and spirituality, we will read and discuss papers written by scientists and theologians on science, spirituality and belief. Current research directed at understanding the effects of meditation on brain function, an area of research that has led to the incorporation of meditation as a complementary therapy in the practice of medicine, will also be discussed in this class. This course does not require a strong science background and is appropriate for students interested in pursuing either science or non-science majors. It is especially intended for students who are interested in gaining a deeper understanding of biology, as well as those eager to explore the practice of meditation and the bridge between science, spirituality, and belief.
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 100 Paul Overvoorde
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Lin Aanonsen
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 270-02 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 273 Kristina Curry Rogers
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* “From so simple a beginning, endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.” So concluded Charles Darwin in The Origin of the Species. His final words are an apt description of this course, which focuses on the diversity of life on Earth and the evolutionary processes that influence this variety. We will track the evolution of life, from the simplest single-celled organisms to the varied flora and fauna of the modern world. We will draw upon recent findings from fields as diverse as molecular genetics, developmental biology, and paleontology to decipher the long and spectacular history of life on earth. The laboratory component of this course will include hands-on interaction with data, from our own DNA, to the fossil record, to living organisms. The class will include local field trips that highlight ancient and modern biodiversity. Students in this course should be ready to explore the evolution of life on earth, and can expect to participate in class discussions and work together on a larger project that will include a written report (with revisions) and an oral presentation.
This course is required for biology majors.
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 270-L3 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Kristina Curry Rogers
*First Year Lab only; first day attendance required*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
BIOL 345-01 Field Botany MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 345-L1 Field Botany Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-01; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L1; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Marcos Ortega
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L2; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 358-01 Microbiology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 358-L1 Microbiology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 358-L2 Microbiology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
*First Day attendance required; ACTC student may register on May 3rd with the permission of the instructor*
BIOL 360-01 Neuroanatomy MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Elizabeth Jansen
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 360-L1 Neuroanatomy Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Elizabeth Jansen
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 369-01 Developmental Biology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 369-L1 Developmental Biology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 264 Mary Montgomery
*ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor
BIOL 394-01 Topics in Cancer Biology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 270 Marcos Ortega
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor* In this seminar students will learn about nucleic acids and the role they play in cancer formation at the molecular level. Students will critically analyze and evaluate current papers from primary scientific literature (reviews and research articles) that address a wide range of topics that relate genetic information and cancer. This course is designed for students interested in cancer biology and the methods utilized in molecular biology and biochemistry to study cellular dysfunction that leads to cancer formation. Classes will consist of student presentations, discussion, and a final project related to current scientific literature. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, BIOL 260 (Genetics), BIOL 265 (Cell Biology), BIOL 255 (Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods, CHEM 111 (General Chemistry I) and CHEM 112 (General Chemistry II).
BIOL 394-02 Research in Palebiology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Kristina Curry Rogers
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; must also register for course lab: BIOL 394-L1; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 394-03 Seminar in Conservation Biology R 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 170 Gina Quiram
*First day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor* In this seminar, students will examine many of the ideas and theories that are currently defining the fields of ecology, conservation biology, and restoration ecology. This course is designed for a variety of students interested in environmental education, environmental issues, conservation, restoration, ecological research, and graduate school in any of those areas. Classes will consist of lectures, discussions, readings from the primary literature, student presentations, and an occasional field trip. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, BIOL 270 (Biodiversity and Evolution) and BIOL 285 (Ecology) and at least one other upper-level field course with a lab. An ecology-oriented study abroad program will meet the upper class field course requirement.
BIOL 394-L1 Research in Paleobiology Lab W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Kristina Curry Rogers
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 472-01 Research in Molecular Biology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 270 Mary Montgomery
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 472-L1 Research in Molecular Biology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 264 Mary Montgomery
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CHEM 111-01 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Christopher Dewberry
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 111-02 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Susan Green
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 111-03 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Susan Green
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 111-04 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 111-L1 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium M 01:40 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L2 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L3 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L4 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium W 01:40 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L5 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L6 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Katherine Soo
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L7 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Katherine Soo
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L8 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Katherine Soo
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 194-01 Environmental Chemistry MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 205 Paul Fischer
*First Year Course only* Fundamental chemical knowledge is necessary to be an educated citizen in regards to environmental issues. This class and laboratory will explore the principles and theories necessary to appreciate issues such as global warming, energy, water pollution, acid rain and radioactivity. This course is ideal for students interested in pursuing Environmental Studies or anyone with intellectual curiosity about “how the world works”, but not planning to major in chemistry. No prerequisites.
CHEM 194-L1 Environmental Chemistry Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 380 Paul Fischer
*First Year Lab only*
CHEM 211-01 Organic Chemistry I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 100 Ronald Brisbois
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-02 Organic Chemistry I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L1 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 211-L2 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 211-L3 Organic Chemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 211-L4 Organic Chemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan
*1 credit course*
CHEM 311-01 Thermodynamics and Kinetics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Robert Rossi
CHEM 311-L1 Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 378 Susan Green
CHEM 311-L2 Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 378 Susan Green
CHEM 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-01; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
CHEM 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L1; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
CHEM 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Marcos Ortega
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L2; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC Students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
CHEM 361-01 Advanced Organic Chemistry M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Ronald Brisbois
CHEM 411-01 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Paul Fischer
CHEM 411-L1 Adv Inorganic Chemistry Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 347 Paul Fischer
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*

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Chinese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CHIN 101-01 First Year Chinese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 111 Rivi Handler-Spitz
CHIN 101-02 First Year Chinese I MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Rivi Handler-Spitz
CHIN 101-L1 First Year Chinese I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 113 Sijia Lan
CHIN 101-L2 First Year Chinese I Lab W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 102 Sijia Lan
CHIN 101-L3 First Year Chinese I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Sijia Lan
CHIN 203-01 Second Year Chinese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 111 Patricia Anderson
CHIN 203-02 Second Year Chinese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Patricia Anderson
CHIN 203-L1 Second Year Chinese I Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 102 Sijia Lan
CHIN 203-L2 Second Year Chinese I Lab M 07:30 pm-08:30 pm HUM 110 Sijia Lan
CHIN 203-L3 Second Year Chinese I Lab R 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 113 Sijia Lan
CHIN 255-01 China on Screen MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 111 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with ASIA 255-01*
CHIN 255-01 China on Screen M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm HUM 401 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with ASIA 255-01*
CHIN 303-01 Third Year Chinese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 112 Patricia Anderson
CHIN 303-L1 Third Year Chinese I Lab M 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 102 Sijia Lan
CHIN 303-L2 Third Year Chinese I Lab F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 102 Sijia Lan
CHIN 407-01 Fourth Year Chinese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 102 Jin Stone
CHIN 494-01 A Kaleidoscope of China: Chinese in Contexts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 Xin Yang
What is business Chinese?
What is Chinese in news reporting?
How is Chinese used differently in TV reality shows and Sitcoms?
How is Chinese employed and manipulated online and in virtual reality?

The course, which is equivalent of the Fifth Year Chinese, is to learn Chinese, Chinese society and Chinese culture in different contexts: business, media, novels, films and Internet. The focus is the authentic texts and contexts: students will watch Chinese Sitcoms and reality shows, read original Chinese novels, and communicate through Chinese Weibo, and write book reviews on Chinese amazon.com.

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CLAS 111-01 Elementary Latin I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 111-L1 Elementary Latin I Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 001 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 113-01 Elementary Arabic I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Wessam El Meligi
CLAS 113-L1 Elementary Arabic I Lab TBA TBA Wessam El Meligi
CLAS 115-01 Elementary Greek I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 115-L1 Elementary Greek I Lab T 10:00 am-11:00 am MAIN Nanette Goldman
*To meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 115-L2 Elementary Greek I Lab T 01:30 pm-02:30 pm MAIN Nanette Goldman
*To meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 121-01 The Greek World MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Brian Lush
*Cross-listed with HIST 121-01*
CLAS 160-01 Intro to Ancient/Medieval Art MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau
*Cross-listed with ART 160-01*
CLAS 194-01 Early Arab and Persian Empires (200 BCE) – 850 CE TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Andrew Overman
*Meets global and/or comparative history requirement; approved for use on the Middle Eastern Civilization and Islamic Studies concentration; cross-listed with HIST 194-01* From the Rise of the Seleucids to the Abbasid Caliphate, this course focuses on the rise and transformation of Arab and Persian empires and city-states between 200 BCE through the founding of Baghdad (762) to the close of the second great Islamic caliphate, the Abbasids in c. 950. This period in the religious, cultural and political history of the Middle East, Levant and Persian region east to at least the Zagros mountains, is an extremely productive and formative period, yet is largely overlooked or neglected altogether in our histories and analyses of the millennium between c. 250 BCE – 950 CE. In many respects the developments and effects of this period have wide ranging implications for our contemporary world. So we will attempt to acquaint ourselves with this period, and the players and powers that shaped it.
CLAS 231-01 Intermediate Latin: Prose MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 002 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 237-01 Intermediate Hebrew I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 011 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 241-01 Intermediate Arabic I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Wessam El Meligi
CLAS 241-L1 Intermediate Arabic I Lab TBA TBA Wessam El Meligi
CLAS 261-01 Intermediate Greek: Prose TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Mark Gustafson
CLAS 261-L1 Intermediate Greek: Prose Lab TBA TBA Mark Gustafson
CLAS 294-01 Sanskrit and Classical Religion in India MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 James Laine
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-02, LING 294-01 and RELI 236-01*
CLAS 294-02 Arabic Reading and Translation W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Brett Wilson
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-01*
CLAS 487-01 Advanced Reading in Greek TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Brian Lush
CLAS 490-01 Senior Seminar MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 011 Beth Severy-Hoven

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
COMP 120-01 Computing and Society: Exploring the Political and Social Structure of the Web MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
*First Year Course only* Over one billion people use Facebook every month. Half of them visit the site every day. Not all sites are as inclusive as Facebook. Although Wikipedia neutrally describes Roe v. Wade as "a pivotal case... on the issue of abortion" the right-leaning Conservapedia states that the case "created a dangerous precedent that is still followed today." How and why do people join these virtual communities, and what makes people remain active participants? In this course you will develop computer programs that analyze social mechanisms underlying the Internet. These programs will identify online behavior consistent with theories from Computer Science, Psychology and Political Science on sites such as Facebook, Wikipedia, and Twitter. Although we analyze these behavioral data, the course primarily focuses on computation. By developing programs you will learn fundamental principles of Computer Science using the Python programming language. No prior programming experience is necessary.
COMP 120-L1 Computing and Society Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
*First Year Lab only*
COMP 121-01 Introduction to Scientific Programming TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 258 Susan Fox
COMP 123-02 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 258 Susan Fox
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
COMP 124-L1 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
COMP 154-01 Ethics and the Internet MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder
*Cross-listed with PHIL 254-01*
COMP 221-01 Algorithm Design and Analysis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Susan Fox
COMP 240-01 Computer Systems Organization MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop
COMP 340-01 Digital Electronics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 340-01; ACTC students may register on May 3rd*
COMP 340-L1 Digital Electronics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 340-L1; ACTC students may regsiter on May 3rd*
COMP 440-01 Collective Intelligence MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 245 Shilad Sen
COMP 445-01 Parallel and Distributed Processing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 256 Elizabeth Shoop
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar MW 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 205 Susan Fox
*2 credit course; required for Senior*

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans
ECON 113-02 Financial Accounting TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 350 Jeff Evans
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Mario Solis-Garcia
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 304 Liang Ding
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Liang Ding
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Pete Ferderer
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 213 Minesh Amin
ECON 194-01 World Economic History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am ARTCOM 102 Pete Ferderer
*First Year Course only* This first-year course presents a broad overview of world economic history. It introduces students to basic economic models which are used to understand the causes and consequences of (a) the agricultural and industrial revolutions, (b) world population growth, (c) the economics of war and slavery, (d) the development of financial systems and the modern corporation, (e) globalization, (f) economic depressions and inflations, and (g) the growth of government. The unifying theme is an exploration of how these forces have influenced material living standards over the past 12,000 years. Students will learn (a) basic economic principles, (b) how economic historians, much like crime scene investigators, use limited evidence to understand economic events and trends, and (c) to become a better writer. This course does not count towards the Economics major. The course does count toward the Social Science distribution requirement.
ECON 210-01 Business Communications TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Joyce Minor
ECON 221-01 Introduction to International Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Raymond Robertson
ECON 221-02 Introduction to International Economics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 305 Raymond Robertson
ECON 227-01 Adam Smith and Karl Marx TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Vasant Sukhatme
ECON 256-01 Intro to Investment Banking TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 Joyce Minor
ECON 294-01 Sports Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 100 Vasant Sukhatme
The course will apply the principles of economics to the world of sports. We will examine a broad range of issues: the labor economics of sports, including matters of salary and the measurement of productivity in team and individual sports, labor unions and discrimination; public finance and sports, including the relationship between cities and sports franchises; and the industrial organization of sports, including reinforcing monopoly in professional sports leagues by restricting the entry of new teams. The course will illustrate and apply economic principles to professional sports leagues in the U.S. and abroad as well as collegiate sports. This course will count as a 200-level A elective for the Economics Major. Pre-requisite Econ 119, Principles of Economics.
ECON 325-01 China, Russia and Central Europe in Transition MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with INTL 325-01*
ECON 342-01 Economics of Poverty in US TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Karine Moe
ECON 353-01 Managerial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans
ECON 361-01 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A Sarah West
ECON 361-02 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Sarah West
ECON 371-01 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Mario Solis-Garcia
ECON 371-02 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Mario Solis-Garcia
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 381-02 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 381-L1 Intro to Econometrics Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 381-L2 Intro to Econometrics Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 426-01 International Economic Development M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Amy Damon
ECON 442-01 Labor Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Karine Moe
ECON 444-01 Honors Seminar MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Raymond Robertson
ECON 457-01 Finance MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Liang Ding

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 240-01 Race, Culture, and Ethnicity in Education M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 215 Ann Hite
*Cross-listed with AMST 240-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 275-01 Outdoor Environmental Education W 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Permission of Jerald Dosch required; cross-listed with ENVI 275-01; first day attendance required; 2 credit course; S/NC grading; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of Jerald Dosch*
EDUC 294-01 Learning to Read TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Chudgar, Kruse
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 370-01 Education and the Challenge of Globalization MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Sonia Mehta
*Cross-listed with ENVI 370-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
EDUC 390-01 Teaching and Learning in Urban Schools TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Tina Kruse
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
EDUC 460-01 Education and Social Change MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 217 Sonia Mehta
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENGL 101-01 College Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 219 Rebecca Graham
ENGL 115-01 Shakespeare TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 301 Theresa Krier
This course traces the development of Shakespeare's stagecraft and poetic imagination, by reading major plays spanning his entire writing life. We'll look at his handling of theatrical resources, language, characterization, genre. For our focus, we'll study Shakespeare's representations of families and his pondering of pain, love, vulnerability, motivation, violence, restoration in family patterns: fraught relationships between fathers and daughters or mothers and sons; foundlings separated from their parents by tempest, shipwreck, and violence; thresholds between adolescence and adulthood or adulthood and death; children loved by families or threatened by family ties; sisters, brothers, twins, cousins, uncles, step-parents; courtship, wedding, birth; incest, murderous rivalry; families broken up, families re-united. Plays will include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, 1 Henry IV, Macbeth, Lear, The Tempest, and excerpts from As You Like It, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Hamlet, The Winter’s Tale. For English majors, it fulfills the 100-level course requirement.
ENGL 125-01 Studies in Literature: Human Rights and the Humanities MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 James Dawes
*First Year Course only* This course is an introduction to the study of human rights by way of the arts and humanities. We will seek to better understand the contemporary norms and practices of human rights by examining its deep historical contexts, and by considering the philosophical and religious debates that continue to shape human rights theory and practice. We will also examine theories of trauma and torture, personal accounts of human rights and humanitarian fieldwork, representational ethics, and studies of human rights in film and media. We will scrutinize relevant literary texts as works of art, as case studies in human rights, and as models for understanding how words can change the world, whether in the form of human rights reports and newspaper accounts or of poems and novels. In other words, we will seek to better understand how spectators of suffering develop (or fail to develop) empathy for distant persons or for persons considered alien by also examining how they can so palpably feel for the dreams, desires, and dignity of fictional persons. In The Defense of Poesy Sir Philip Sidney describes the tyrant, Alexander Pheraeus, “from whose eyes a tragedy well-made and represented drew abundance of tears; who without all pity had murdered infinite numbers, and some of his own blood, so as he that was not ashamed to make matters for tragedies, yet could not resist the sweet violence of a tragedy.” What is the line that separates those who are merely moved from those who are moved to act? When does the story become real enough to change you? Our list of authors will span the range of intellectual and ethical endeavor, including Sophocles, Aristotle, Henrik Ibsen, Herman Melville, Dave Eggers, Franz Kafka, Ursula Le Guin, Hannah Arendt, Marx and Engels, Immanuel Kant, J. M. Coetzee, Kazuo Ishiguro, John Rawls, Michel Foucault, Naomi Klein, Greil Marcus, Elaine Scarry, Richard Rorty, Martha Nussbaum, Lynn Hunt, Alan Dershowitz, and Kenneth Cain.
ENGL 135-01 Poetry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Neil Chudgar
This course is an introduction to poetry. In other words, it will introduce a variety of things that we can do in relation to objects like poems and, just as much, to a variety of things that poems can do in relation to objects like us. Along the way we will have occasion to ask some challenging questions. How do we distinguish poems from other objects? Why would we want to? What kinds of things can we say about poems, and in what environments? Can they be hurt? What are they made of? What do they want? We will ponder these questions (and many others we haven’t thought of yet) in the company of many famous English poems from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, but also poems from more recently and nearer by, and also other objects that might or might not be poems at all. Some philosophy will occur. Reciting a small poem from memory is required; singing, though encouraged, is optional. You'll earn your grade for the course by good-faith participation in our class discussion, by submitting brief response papers as assigned, and by completing three formal works of different kinds. You will be able to choose, within bounds, the kinds of works that best suit your interests and abilities: you might choose, for example, to discover and report on objects from beyond our syllabus, or to interpret the poems we encounter in poems of your own. This course counts toward the English major as an introductory course, but students of all majors, all years, and all intellectual persuasions are emphatically welcome.
ENGL 137-01 Novel MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 227 Lesley Goodman
ENGL 150-01 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 217 Ping Wang
This workshop explores the artistic modes of expression in poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction writing. Students will learn how other writers create their imagery, figurative language, sound, rhythmic structures, voice, plot, character, point of view, etc., and how they use these techniques as carriers to reach their artistic goals. In other words, techniques, no matter how basic and important, are not their own ends in writing, but should be cultivated and used as tools to find our voices, and to best express our original ideas. Written exercises are designed to help students get familiar with such necessary writing skills and explore the art of finding the right forms for the contents. Students will also learn how to read their work aloud in class. Reading aloud is not only to complete the writing process, but also to train the ear for sound, rhythm, image, and the flow of a poem or story. It also teaches both the reader and listeners the art of criticism, helps them overcome their weaknesses and cultivate their strengths in writing.

There are about 6-9 hours of reading and writing assignments outside of class per week. Students are expected to enter this course with skills in close reading of literature and familiarity with literary terms and concepts, and most importantly, with a passion and devotion for reading and writing.
ENGL 150-02 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Matthew Burgess
ENGL 150-03 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Matthew Burgess
ENGL 150-04 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 102 Nick Dybek
This course offers an introduction to the techniques and vocabulary of poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction writing. We’ll read examples of published work in all three genres (and maybe a few others) with an eye towards understanding how a piece of creative writing is constructed from the ground up—how the choices a writer makes in crafting imagery, plot, characterization, language, etc., come to serve the expressive vision of the writer, and help a reader connect with that vision. This class will primarily follow the workshop model. Be prepared to discuss the creative work of your peers, and to have your own writing discussed. Vigilant attendance and participation are essential.
ENGL 150-05 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Nick Dybek
ENGL 150-06 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Jon Lurie
ENGL 150-07 Intro to Creative Writing: Creative Writing Narrative Mechanics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Marlon James
*First Year Course only* Before your first birthday, you have caught on to the fact that the louder you cry (expression) the quicker you’re picked up (response). In little over a year you have grasped language complexity and tone (stop it vs. stop it now). By age four, you’ve mastered metaphor (my toes are little piggies). Before your fifth birthday you have learned without anyone telling you that it’s a pretty red book, not a red pretty book, and by seven you have seen more drama than the total creative output of the Renaissance. So what’s left to teach in creative writing? Quite a bit. There is a universe of difference between a competent sentence and a dazzling one. Words that connect grammatically and words that fire the imagination. Otherwise there would be no difference between a training manual and a novel. In this course you will tackle creative writing from the ground up, breaking it down to the mechanics of literature: from word to phrase, sentence, paragraph, page and story. Why a romance word for love here and a Germanic word for hate there? When is a verb not an action word? Is ‘I’ necessary in first person? ‘You’ in second? How can we know a house is burning without describing house or fire? Why is his perfectly acceptable sentence more acceptable than your equally perfect one? After excellent grammar, and wonderful vocabulary, what comes next? Narrative Mechanics, is where we get down to the nuts and bolts of creative writing. Over the course of the semester we will go from merely correct, to striking prose. We will write 200 word sentences that never run out of breath, five page stories covering 500 years, and two word sentences that capture what other writers take pages to capture. We will pinpoint the 16 things that cause bad dialogue, and uncover what really happens, word for word when the reader says, “It felt like I was there.”
And yes, you will be writing as if you’ve never written before.
ENGL 265-01 Justice MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 James Dawes
This course is an introduction to the study of human rights by way of the arts and humanities. We will seek to better understand the contemporary norms and practices of human rights by examining its deep historical contexts, and by considering the philosophical and religious debates that continue to shape human rights theory and practice. We will also examine theories of trauma and torture, personal accounts of human rights and humanitarian fieldwork, representational ethics, and studies of human rights in film and media. We will scrutinize relevant literary texts as works of art, as case studies in human rights, and as models for understanding how words can change the world, whether in the form of human rights reports and newspaper accounts or of poems and novels. In other words, we will seek to better understand how spectators of suffering develop (or fail to develop) empathy for distant persons or for persons considered alien by also examining how they can so palpably feel for the dreams, desires, and dignity of fictional persons. In The Defense of Poesy Sir Philip Sidney describes the tyrant, Alexander Pheraeus, “from whose eyes a tragedy well-made and represented drew abundance of tears; who without all pity had murdered infinite numbers, and some of his own blood, so as he that was not ashamed to make matters for tragedies, yet could not resist the sweet violence of a tragedy.” What is the line that separates those who are merely moved from those who are moved to act? When does the story become real enough to change you? Our list of authors will span the range of intellectual and ethical endeavor, including Sophocles, Aristotle, Henrik Ibsen, Herman Melville, Dave Eggers, Franz Kafka, Ursula Le Guin, Hannah Arendt, Marx and Engels, Immanuel Kant, J. M. Coetzee, Kazuo Ishiguro, John Rawls, Michel Foucault, Naomi Klein, Greil Marcus, Elaine Scarry, Richard Rorty, Martha Nussbaum, Lynn Hunt, Alan Dershowitz, and Kenneth Cain.
ENGL 280-01 Crafts of Writing: Poetry TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Ping Wang
Conversation in the Mountains
If you were to ask me why I dwell among green mountains,
I should laugh silently; my soul is serene
The peach blossom follows the moving water;
There is another heaven and earth beyond the world of men --- Li Po

"Works of art are indeed always products of having been in danger, of having gone to the very end in an experience, to where man can go no further." --Rilke

We start with the body, the body in pain, the body seeking harmony with the mind and spirit, through rebellion of words, sounds, images. We’ll look inward (the shadow world of dreams and unconsciousness) as well as outward (body, nature, society), and our poetry will weave them into a tapestry of healing. This poetry workshop plays with the forms and contents, and explores different genres from the lyrical to prose poems and collage poems. We learn how to see, sing and play like a new-born, as Rilke implores to his young poet friend.
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Matthew Burgess
One of the best ways to gain a more intuitive understanding of storytelling is to re-vision a preexisting classic from the inside out. In this course students will be expected to write multiple drafts of two short stories, one fabulist and one realistic, that re-tell a myth, legend, fairy tale, or canonical work from a new point-of-view, or in a new setting, with new characters or timeframes. Throughout we will focus on the basic elements of narrative craft so that you will be better prepared to continue writing fiction, whether it be re-visions or not. Readings may include selections from the Brothers Grimm, the King James Version of the Bible, The Odyssey, Beowulf, The Metamorphoses, Joyce Carol Oates’s re-telling of James Joyce’s “The Dead,” and Neil Gaiman’s Sandman comics.
ENGL 281-02 Crafts of Writing: Fiction W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Nick Dybek
Tim O’Brien writes that a story, if truly told, makes the “stomach believe.” A story must feel true. But how do you convince a reader to believe, or even to care about, something that, by definition, never happened? In this class, we will attempt to answer this question—and many others—by reading and critiquing both published and unpublished works of fiction, and completing short exercises that aim to illuminate the finer points of craft (imagery, perspective, character, etc.). This course will follow the workshop model of peer critique, so be prepared to write and read quite a bit and have at least two pieces of fiction workshopped in class.
ENGL 294-01 Learning to Read TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Chudgar, Kruse
*Cross-listed with EDUC 294-01; first day attendance required* At Macalester, most of us spend time reading in highly specialized ways—reading code, cinema, sediments, rituals, verse—but we tend to assume that plain literacy is (or should be) as natural and automatic as breathing. Yet the act of reading is an amazing accomplishment, not natural but laboriously invented, impossible for many and complex for us all. This course invites us to ask, in the most expansive way, what it means to learn to read. From the distinct disciplinary bases of literary theory and educational psychology, we will consider reading in a variety of ways: histories of reading; arguments for its value and against its perils; methods for teaching reading and learning to read; models of reading as process, as practice, as a means and as an end in itself. Students in the course will work to synthesize the disparate theoretical materials we encounter with their own experience as readers and teachers of reading. Assignments will include daily readings, frequent informal response papers, and a final project that involves reporting on experiences of reading (broadly conceived) in practice. This course will be appropriate for students interested in, e.g., education, literacy, literary theory, psychology, public policy, etc.
ENGL 294-02 Tearjerkers MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Lesley Goodman
*First day attendance required* Why—and how—does literature make us cry? And why do we seek out aesthetic experiences that bring tears to our eyes? This course explores the idea of the “tearjerker” in its different iterations over the centuries, from Aristotelian catharsis to Bambi, considering the different techniques authors use to elicit tears and their different theories of the value of tears.
ENGL 294-03 The Literary Bible TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Theresa Krier
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-02* This course studies the Bible in the English literary imagination, investigating how its narrative, style, character, figurative language, song, and translation inform literature in English. We'll find out about political struggles over access to literacy; the creation of the King James Bible; Dissenters' traditions of biblical reading; constant issues of enslavement, freedom, and empire. We'll give time to the biblical genres most dynamic in English fiction, drama, oratory, and poetry: cosmogony, ancestor stories, folk tales, prophecy, love poetry, prayer, proverb, philosophical poetry, parables, biography, letters, and testimony. We'll survey the shape of the whole English Bible, but focus on Genesis, Exodus, the stories of David and Solomon, the prophetic books Isaiah and Hosea, the Song of Songs, Job, Psalms, the Wisdom books, the Gospel of Luke, 1 Corinthians, and the Book of Revelation. We'll focus on the strongest creative responses to the Bible – sometimes adversarial, sometimes comic – through our main English texts: modern-English tales from Chauce'’s Canterbury Tales, the anonymous comedy The Second Shepherds' Play, medieval representations of the Nativity and Passion accounts from the Gospels, Shakespeare's King Lear and excerpts from other Shakespeare plays, excerpts from Spenser's Faerie Queene and Milton's Paradise Lost, Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience. We'll view Bill Viola's great video sequence The Passions and hear music from Bach, Bernstein, and Handel to Bono and Bob Marley.
ENGL 294-04 Jane Austen MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 001 Lesley Goodman
Every generation seems to produce new adaptations and new responses to the works of Jane Austen, from the relatively straightforward (BBC miniseries) to the outlandish (Pride and Prejudice and Zombies). Indeed, Austen and her novels have long been a major touchstone in Anglo-American culture, asked to stand for often contradictory values and a passionate source of interest to many readers. Why do Jane Austen’s novels continue to be interpreted and re-interpreted? In this course, we will read Austen’s six novels and juvenilia, considering Austen's formal innovations, historical context, social critique, and aesthetic legacy.
ENGL 294-05 Creative Writing: Young Adult Fiction TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Megan Atwood
Amid recent years of rapid and turbulent change in the world of traditional publishing, young adult fiction has emerged as a powerhouse of commercial success and literary acclaim. This course strives to examine the forces behind YA lit’s popularity and the ways in which its novels defy boundaries of genre and appeal to an exceptionally diverse readership. Through creative writing projects as well as the analysis of select YA novels, students will focus on discerning the ways that voice, structure, and character work in concert to afford young adult literature a unique role in the worlds of readers, writers, and publishing industry.

ENGL 294-06 Icons, Ideas, Instruments: Feminist Re-constructions W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with WGSS 220-01; first day attendance required; no prerequisites* "Indian Women Writers:" India is still described as "exotic" in current cultural vocabularies, by Indians and others. We will investigate the material realities on which these cultural vocabularies rest, through the mirrors held up by Indian women writers who are this nation-state's citizens, expatriates, and diasporans. These writers' historico-political contexts, tussles with language, and other self-imaginings, create a compelling force in developing the idea of "India" and its relationships to East Africa, North America and Western Europe.
ENGL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with INTL 367-01*
ENGL 377-01 Native American Literature MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 Jon Lurie
ENGL 394-01 A Kafkaesque Century MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in English; cross-listed with GERM 394-01* “Kafkaesque” is a word that has become part of everyday vocabulary in innumerous languages, used by millions of people who might or not have ever read Kafka. Evidently, the work of this German-speaking Jewish author from Prague captured something about modern life that no word could express except one deriving from his own name. This is probably why 'everybody knows' the word and 'nobody can explain' it. To understand therefore the "Kafkaesque" is to understand at once Kafka’s work and modern life, at least as we know it since the early twentieth century. To do so, in this course we are going to read closely some of Kafka's stories and excerpts from his novels, as well as some influential commentaries on his work. We shall also have the chance to see and compare adaptations of his work (including his diaries) in the media of graphic novel and film. All readings will be in English. Though this a 394-level course, it requires no pre-knowledge and is appropriate for all level students.
ENGL 400-02 Literature and the Sense of Touch M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Neil Chudgar
*This course is intended for senior English majors; other students will be admitted only if space allows* In this senior seminar for English majors, we will explore the points of contact between literary language, objects, and the sense of touch. We’ll take the first third of the term to explore some of the ways Western intellectual traditions have understood encounters between sensitive bodies and tangible objects. To learn about touch, we'll read some important texts in the philosophy of sensation, from Aristotle to Locke to Maurice Merleau-Ponty. We'll also learn about objects as they take part in economies both material (Marx, Baudrillard, Michael Taussig) and libidinal (Freud, Melanie Klein, D.W. Winnicott), and we'll grapple with the object-oriented thinking that scholars are doing today (Bill Brown, Jane Bennet, Graham Harman). Having established a common theoretical framework for our discussion, we'll devote the remaining two-thirds of the semester to a workshop, discussing the texts that you and your colleagues have chosen to read and write on your own. You'll sign up for a day to assign the rest of us excerpts from the literature you're thinking about and the project you're developing, read and comment on your colleagues' written responses to the reading you've assigned, and lead our discussion of it in class. Our conversation about your work in progress will help you prepare your final project. That project may take any of several forms: from a scholarly essay to a work of prose fiction. To help graduating students prepare for their next steps in the world, we will also devote some of our time to professional development.
ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Marlon James

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENVI 140-01 The Earth's Climate System MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Louisa Bradtmiller
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 140-L1 The Earth's Climate System Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 187 Louisa Bradtmiller
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 144-01 Lakes, Streams and Rivers TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Emily Schilling
*Cross-listed with BIOL 144-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 150-01 Climate and Society MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Louisa Bradtmiller
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 160-01 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Karl Wirth
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 160-02 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor
*First Year Course only, cross-listed with GEOL 160-02; first day attendance required*
The planet Earth is an amazing place, with a dynamic interior and surface even after 4.6 billion years under its belt. At its most basic, this class is an introduction to the materials and structure of the Earth, and to the processes acting on and in the Earth to produce change. We will learn the language of geology through a study of plate tectonics, planetary structure, and rocks of all sorts. I am particularly interested in the physical forces that shape the surface of the Earth, and I am excited to teach you about a multitude of surface processes that shape our planet (rivers and glaciers and waves, oh my!). The planet has begun to show signs of our expanding population and the increasing need for natural resources, and we will consider the feedbacks between humans and the Earth as well. Broadly, the goals of the course are three-fold: first, to introduce the materials and natural processes that govern the evolution of the Earth; second, to examine global changes in the context of natural processes; and third, to inspire you to develop a lifelong interest in the Earth. The course begins with an overview of the origin of the solar system and other planets. Next, you will learn about Earth materials and how to interpret the significance of minerals and rocks in the context of our dynamic planet. We will examine the composition, structure, and evolution of the interior of our planet, as well as the well-accepted (but not complete) model of plate tectonics. We will also spend time examining the forces that shape our continental surfaces, including surface and groundwater movement, hillslope processes, coastlines, wind and deserts, and glacial processes. Throughout the course, I will strive to link the academic study of our planet to ‘real-life’ situations and events, and demonstrate the importance of understanding earth processes to being an educated global citizen.
ENVI 160-L1 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-L1; first day attendance required; *
ENVI 160-L2 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-L2; first day attendance required; *
ENVI 160-L3 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab R 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
*First Year Lab only; Cross-listed with GEOL 160-L3; first day attendance required*
ENVI 172-01 Psychology in the Material World MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Christina Manning
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with PSYC 172-01* This course is an in-depth psychological analysis of consumerism and the human relationship to “stuff”. Consumerism, materialistic aspirations, advertising, and "affluenza" (the disease of affluence) all exert profound and often undesirable effects on both people's individual lives and on society as a whole. These phenomena, and the consumerist culture they are embedded in, affect our psyches, our families, our local communities, the peoples of the world, and the integrity of our ecological system. The overarching goal of this course is not to conclude that our consumer culture is categorically bad, but to take a step back and assess the evidence.
This course draws from a range of theoretical, clinical, and methodological approaches to address several key questions: Where does the drive to consume originate? Do we control our consumer behavior? Is it possible to live in our culture and not be a consumer? Are there realistic alternatives to the status quo? We will critically examine the scholarly merits and ramifications of these ideas and discuss whether and how to act upon them in our lives and in society more broadly. A portion of class time will be spent in experiential exploration of suggested “antidotes to materialism” such as mindfulness, gratitude, and voluntary simplicity, in a variety of settings (e.g., Mall of America, a local landfill, an urban intentional community, etc.) Prerequisites/background knowledge: This course does not require any prior knowledge; however, a strong interest in psychology and/or environmental studies will likely be helpful.
ENVI 194-01 Architecture + Circumstance + Sustainability TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 David Wagner
Architecture is our constructed environment, from buildings, to plazas, to cities. It mediates our relationships with nature and frames how we understand our place in the world. Circumstance can be defined by all of the surrounding elements that influence our perception of a given place. It is the path of the sun in the sky, the movement of wind across the landscape, and the undulation of the ground under our feet. Sustainability is trickier. Is it about reducing consumable resources such as water, fuel, and building materials? Is it about choosing to build dwellings appropriate to the climate and conditions unique to their location? Is it about perpetuating a way of life? Is it about our relationship with the world and our ability to connect with nature? This course, Architecture + Circumstance + Sustainability, will explore these relationships between built form, environment, and people. Through a series of discussions, readings, research, lectures, and design explorations, students will gain an understanding of how specific design strategies can lead to a more sustained way of building, living, and engaging with our world.
ENVI 202-01 Sustainability and the Campus T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MARKIM 201 Suzanne Savanick Hansen
*2 credit course*
ENVI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 350 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with POLI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 252-01 Water and Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with GEOG 252-01 and POLI 252-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 270-01 Psychology of Sustainable Behavior TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with PSYC 270-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 275-01 Outdoor Environmental Education W 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Permission of Jerald Dosch required; cross-listed with EDUC 275-01; first day attendance required; 2 credit course; S/NC grading; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of Jerald Dosch*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 294-01 Farm and Forest: African Environmental History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Jamie Monson
*Cross-listed with HIST 239-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 294-02 Land Change Science in the Global South MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 214 Harini Nagendra
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-01* Changes in land use and land cover in the global South are emerging as central to a range of issues, including climate change, biodiversity conservation and global hunger. The purpose of this seminar course is to gain an appreciation of land change science, an organized body of research that has taken shape in recent decades to understand the way in which human driven land use and land cover change has changed the Earth’s surface. This interdisciplinary field of inquiry seeks to observe and monitor the types of land change, map their areal extent and location, identify proximate and underlying drivers, and to understand the consequences for human and ecological sustainability. This seminar course will introduce students to the major components of land change science, examining a set of land cover/land use types of major interest for the global South – primarily de/reforestation, agricultural change and urbanization, with some discussion of other types of change. We will then address how to integrate and analyze this information through modeling, forecasting and meta-analytical syntheses. The course will conclude with a focus on some emerging issues that are transforming the nature of connections between land use/land cover in different continents, including land competition, teleconnections and globalization. Student led presentations on specific themes of interest identified during the seminar course will enable students to gain a greater appreciation of the nuances of specific areas of inquiry (which could be method-based, geography-based or theme-based) within land change science of relevance to Southern sustainability, and to hone skills of critical inquiry, analysis and presentation.
ENVI 370-01 Education and the Challenge of Globalization MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Sonia Mehta
*Cross-listed with EDUC 370-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 394-01 Environmental GIS MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Sanchayeeta Adhikari
*Cross-listed with GEOG 367-01; $25 course fee will be charged*
ENVI 394-02 Intro to Remote Sensing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Harini Nagendra
*Cross-listed with GEOG 362-01; $25 course fee will be charged*
ENVI 394-L1 Environmental GIS Lab TBA TBA Ashley Nepp
*Cross-listed with GEOG 367-L1*
ENVI 394-L2 Intro to Remote Sensing Lab TBA TBA Ashley Nepp
*Cross-listed with GEOG 362-L1*
ENVI 477-01 Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*Signature of the instructor required; cross-listed with GEOG 488-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 478-01 Cities of the 21st Century TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with GEOG 488-02; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 489-01 Environmental Leadership Pract M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 490-01 Envi St Leadership Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
FREN 101-01 French I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 217 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-02 French I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L1 French I lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 113 Benjamin Cornet
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L2 French I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Benjamin Cornet
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L3 French I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Benjamin Cornet
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L4 French I Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am HUM 228 Benjamin Cornet
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 212 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 247 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L2 Accelerated French I-II Lab TBA TBA Benjamin Cornet
FREN 194-01 Representations of Culture and Identity: Children and Youth In Francophone Cinema TR 08:00 am-09:30 am ARTCOM 102 Joelle Vitiello
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* This course focuses on representations of culture and identity in French and Francophone Cinema. Most films viewed for the course focus on conflicts experienced by children and youth ( e.g. war, disabilities, sexual identity). In the course of studying films we will learn theoretical concepts and vocabulary for critical interpretation of visual media. Films will include French classics such as 400 Blows by François Truffaut, and Au-revoir les enfants by Louis Malle, and more contemporary films such as The Hedgehog by Mona Achache and Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi. We will also view films from former French colonies such as Chocolat by Claire Denis (Cameroon) and The Little Girl Who Sold the Sun by Djibril Diop Mambéty (Senegal). The course is taught in English. No prior knowledge of France is required. Films are screened outside of class time
FREN 203-01 French III MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 213 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-02 French III MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-03 French III MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM 202 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 404 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L3 French III Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Benjamin Cornet
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L4 French III Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L5 French III Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 227 Benjamin Cornet
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L6 French III Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 216 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 112 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Benjamin Cornet
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 404 Benjamin Cornet
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Benjamin Cornet
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 227 Benjamin Cornet
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 202 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-02 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 228 Martine Sauret
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 404 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 217 Claude Cassagne
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L3 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 228 Claude Cassagne
FREN 306-01 Introduction to Literary Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 202 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required*
FREN 394-01 Stylistique, grammaire et traduction (Style, Grammar, and Translation) MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 228 Martine Sauret
*Not available to advanced students who have taken FREN 306 and higher. FREN 394 does not replace FREN 306 for the French major or minor; first day attendance required* We will examine pieces of literature in English and in French and analyze the different modes of expression, the various styles and compare their styles. Theoretical material will enable students to determine stylistic changes geared to specific contexts. At the same time, exercises will concentrate on translation from English to French and French to English. The books we are using progress from the specific parts of speech to general and complex questions concerning the order of the words (ordre des mots) and la mise en relief. With the use of books, journals, newspapers etc… we will proceed to write in journals twice a week to achieve clarity and elegance in written French examining the literary (langue littéraire) to the colloquial (langue familière) and the formal French (langue soignée des gens cultivés). In addition to regular correction of journals, 4 papers will be rewritten after advice and suggestions of the instructor on content (introduction, conclusion presentation of arguments), vocabulary, stylistic and grammatical errors. Students will translate 4 short genres (literary, journalistic, theater and conversation pieces). As the topic relates to the cultural, economical, sociological and historical aspects of France, it addresses the diverse disciplinary areas well established in the French Department and the long term affiliation with the humanities, media and cultural studies, and women’s and gender studies programs. Prerequisite: French 204, placement test or permission of instructor.

FREN 407-01 Voix du Nord MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 216 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required* Quebec is uniquely situated in the world: at a crossroads between European and North American cultures, a French-speaking province surrounded by English-speaking nations, and historically both connected and disconnected from its indigenous populations. It has also recently been a destination for immigrants from all over the globe. This course examines the distinctive multicultural dimensions of the francophone province of Québec and its interactions with "les autres" (other cultures and peoples), through a study of recent literature published over the past 30 years. We begin with a brief historical overview of Quebec's multicultural identity, from the colonial era through the Quiet Revolution of the 1960s and up to 21st-century Quebec, including the 2012 assassination attempt on the new prime minister and the 2008 debates over the "reasonable accommodation" law that shocked the nation. The second section proceeds with an analysis of three of Quebec’s strongest cultural partners: the heritage of the French, the influence of the U.S., and the complicated interactions with First Nations. The third section of the course focuses on the relationships between Quebecois "de souche" (citizens of French or British heritage) and recent immigrants. The texts and films studied in this section include characters originally from China, Haïti, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Lebanon, and Vietnam. We examine why they moved to Quebec, why they chose French as their principal language of expression, and how they interpret their new homeland. Throughout the course, we explore issues of language, identity, exile, and memory to understand the complex negotiations between inhabitants of "la belle province."
FREN 416-01 Religions in Africa; Cross Readings Between Literature and Theology on Social Cultural Changes MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-01; first day attendance required; counts as Tier I course for the African Studies concentration* Many African novels have depicted the relationships between Islam, Christianity and African cultural heritage. African Theology too has framed a dialogue between Christianity, in particular, and African cultures/traditional religions. This course investigates religion’s role in shaping African culture and social changes around readings from both Francophone African literature and African Theology, alongside a viewing of a range of African films. If it is true that "natural" African religion is tied up in African traditions, then the introduction of other religions (Christianity and Islam), need to be explored for their impact across the entire social arena. Due to extensive efforts to enculturate "revealed" religions, extra-African contact yields challenges to definitions of local culture and identity. Diverse religions offer distinct social constructions, impacting indigenous ethnic and national unities. What is it that defines an African cultural heritage? How do we understand a cultural identity that combines multiple religions with "alien features?" What role can traditional African religion play in a modern and mutating society in a globalized context? What does it mean to be “African Christian”, “African Muslim” today in an Africa engaged in a radical and massive refiguring of gender equality, human rights, peace, and democracy?

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOG 111-01 Human Geography of Global Issues MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
*First Year Course only* Are you curious about the landscapes of the Twin Cities? Do you like to explore new places? Do you want to know why things are located where they are? Ever wonder about where people will live in the near future? Do you like looking at maps?
If you said yes to any of these questions, you should consider taking Human Geography as a First Year Course. Geography will enable you to answer these questions and a whole lot more with its spatial perspective and techniques of map analysis. Human Geography will give you a holistic view of your new surroundings and the world beyond. Human Geography is the study of the ways through which all places on earth are interconnected and how the human use of Earth’s surface varies over space. Field trips to places such as St. Anthony Falls immigrant commercial streets, and a variety of neighborhoods during the semester will show how geography can be applied to countless situations. Through taking Human Geography students will learn about the ways people give order to space; the growth and distribution of human population; patterns of settlement and land use, as well as, the geography of economic development and modernization. An emphasis on the geography of recreational spaces will allow students in the course to gain a better understanding and knowledge of the Twin Cities they will be able to enjoy their entire Macalester career. Students will compile the knowledge they gain from the field work, class lectures and a variety of assigned readings in papers they will write with the help of their writing assistant. In addition, students will be responsible for leading discussions of readings.
GEOG 112-01 Introduction to Urban Studies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Daniel Trudeau
GEOG 194-01 Contagion: The Human Ecology of Infectious Diseases TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 05 Eric Carter
*First Year Course only* In this course, we adopt a broadly geographical perspective to shed light on the causes, consequences, and control of infectious and vector-borne diseases, a persistent problem in global health. An understanding of the social and ecological dimensions of diseases such as malaria, influenza, or Lyme disease requires integration of concepts from many fields: geography, ecology, biology, history, economics, politics, medicine, and public health. Topics include how pathogens and people co-evolve over the long span of history; how environmental transformations (e.g. climate change, land cover change) impact the ecology, intensity, and geographical distribution of these diseases; how socio-political and ecological conditions foster the emergence of deadly new pathogens, like Nipah virus and SARS; why communicable disease continues to place a heavy burden on poor countries today; and how global health institutions and national governments prepare for and respond to disease pandemics. Since this is a first-year course, we will also emphasize developing your skills in written and oral communication, scholarly research, and information literacy. There will be a special focus on how to understand, connect, and synthesize research findings from across disciplines. This course is designed for students from any prospective major who have an interest in community and global health.
GEOG 194-02 World Regional Geography MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 107 Sanchayeeta Adhikari
This course is an introduction to the world’s major geographic regions with an emphasis on environmental, cultural, demographic, economic, historic and geopolitical aspects of the regions. The primary goal is to understand the variety and distinctiveness of places and regions, while maintaining a strong focus on interconnectedness and integration of various regions of the world. Each major world region will be discussed in detail with particular emphasis on current events that are defining the world map. The fundamental objective of this course is to enable students to acquire a mental map of the world that they live in and understand the human and environmental factors that shape and affect each region. This course is interchangeable with GEOG 111: Human Geography of Global Issues, meaning that: both courses may not be taken, and; world regional geography may be substituted for human geography of global issues on a major plan.
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Sanchayeeta Adhikari
*Permission of instructor required; $25 course fee required*
GEOG 225-02 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Ashley Nepp
*Permission of instructor required; $25 course fee required*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
GEOG 225-L3 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab W 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
GEOG 241-01 Urban Geography MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
GEOG 242-01 Regional Geography of the US and Canada TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith
*$35 course fee required*
GEOG 243-01 Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 William Moseley
GEOG 252-01 Water and Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 252-01 and POLI 252-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
GEOG 256-01 Medical Geography: The Geography of Health and Health Care TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Eric Carter
GEOG 262-01 Metro Analysis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith
GEOG 294-01 Land Change Science in the Global South MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 214 Harini Nagendra
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02* Changes in land use and land cover in the global South are emerging as central to a range of issues, including climate change, biodiversity conservation and global hunger. The purpose of this seminar course is to gain an appreciation of land change science, an organized body of research that has taken shape in recent decades to understand the way in which human driven land use and land cover change has changed the Earth’s surface. This interdisciplinary field of inquiry seeks to observe and monitor the types of land change, map their areal extent and location, identify proximate and underlying drivers, and to understand the consequences for human and ecological sustainability. This seminar course will introduce students to the major components of land change science, examining a set of land cover/land use types of major interest for the global South – primarily de/reforestation, agricultural change and urbanization, with some discussion of other types of change. We will then address how to integrate and analyze this information through modeling, forecasting and meta-analytical syntheses. The course will conclude with a focus on some emerging issues that are transforming the nature of connections between land use/land cover in different continents, including land competition, teleconnections and globalization. Student led presentations on specific themes of interest identified during the seminar course will enable students to gain a greater appreciation of the nuances of specific areas of inquiry (which could be method-based, geography-based or theme-based) within land change science of relevance to Southern sustainability, and to hone skills of critical inquiry, analysis and presentation.
GEOG 362-01 Introduction to Remote Sensing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Harini Nagendra
GEOG 362-L1 Introduction to Remote Sensing TBA TBA Ashley Nepp
GEOG 367-01 Environmental GIS MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Sanchayeeta Adhikari
*Cross-listed with ENVI 394-01; $25 materials fee required*
GEOG 367-L1 Environmental GIS Lab TBA TBA Ashley Nepp
*Cross-listed with ENVI 394-L1*
GEOG 377-01 Qualitative Research Methods MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau
Social scientists use qualitative methods to understand the ways in which societal associations operate and how people experience, contribute to, or try to change these associations. Qualitative methods are thus concerned with analyzing processes and experiences. This course trains students in research design and to use qualitative methods ethically to collect data, analyze it, and draw authoritative conclusions. The course emphasizes how qualitative methods contribute to scientific research and how ethical treatment of research participants affects the practice of qualitative research. Above all, the course focuses on training students to conduct qualitative research that contributes to our understanding of human geographies. The course emphasizes training in interviewing and observation skills and being able to critically analyze data generated through these techniques. Students will develop these skills by engaging in a semester-long research project.
In 2013, students will help evaluate a program run by the Freshwater Society. This program aims to change the ways people perceive urban watersheds and help people change their behaviors in ways that positively impact watersheds. Students will work individually and in groups to investigate the ways in which residents in several nearby Minneapolis neighborhoods perceive and interact with the Minnehaha Creek watershed, which runs through the western part of the Twin Cities metro area. Specifically, students will conduct participant observation, focus groups, and interviews with residents in these neighborhoods to understand how they perceive, interact with, and respond to the Freshwater Society’s educative programs and materials. Together, students will author a report for the Freshwater Society that identifies the ways residents come to adopt and reject perceptions and practices that contribute to the health of the Minnehaha Creek watershed.
GEOG 488-01 Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*Permission of the instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
GEOG 488-02 Cities of the 21st Century TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau
*Permission of the instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 478-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOL 160-01 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Karl Wirth
*Cross-listed with ENVI 160-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
GEOL 160-02 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 160-02; first day attendance required*
The planet Earth is an amazing place, with a dynamic interior and surface even after 4.6 billion years under its belt. At its most basic, this class is an introduction to the materials and structure of the Earth, and to the processes acting on and in the Earth to produce change. We will learn the language of geology through a study of plate tectonics, planetary structure, and rocks of all sorts. I am particularly interested in the physical forces that shape the surface of the Earth, and I am excited to teach you about a multitude of surface processes that shape our planet (rivers and glaciers and waves, oh my!). The planet has begun to show signs of our expanding population and the increasing need for natural resources, and we will consider the feedbacks between humans and the Earth as well. Broadly, the goals of the course are three-fold: first, to introduce the materials and natural processes that govern the evolution of the Earth; second, to examine global changes in the context of natural processes; and third, to inspire you to develop a lifelong interest in the Earth. The course begins with an overview of the origin of the solar system and other planets. Next, you will learn about Earth materials and how to interpret the significance of minerals and rocks in the context of our dynamic planet. We will examine the composition, structure, and evolution of the interior of our planet, as well as the well-accepted (but not complete) model of plate tectonics. We will also spend time examining the forces that shape our continental surfaces, including surface and groundwater movement, hillslope processes, coastlines, wind and deserts, and glacial processes. Throughout the course, I will strive to link the academic study of our planet to ‘real-life’ situations and events, and demonstrate the importance of understanding earth processes to being an educated global citizen.
GEOL 160-L1 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
*Cross-listed with ENVI 160-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
GEOL 160-L2 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
*Cross-listed with ENVI 160-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
GEOL 160-L3 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab R 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
*First Year Lab only; cross-listed with ENVI 160-L3; first day attendance required*
GEOL 250-01 Mineralogy MWF 08:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth
GEOL 260-01 Geomorphology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor
GEOL 260-L1 Geomorphology Lab T 08:00 am-11:00 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor
GEOL 394-01 Sequence Stratigraphy and Taphonomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 400-01 Capstone Research Methods in Geology TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 494-01 Research in Taphonomy/Bonebeds MW 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI Raymond Rogers
*Permission of the instructor required; course to meet in the Geology library room*
GEOL 494-L1 Research in Taphonomy/Bonebeds Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm Raymond Rogers
*Permission of the instructor required; lab to meet in the Geology library room*

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GERM 101-01 Elementary German I MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Kiarina Kordela
GERM 101-L1 Elementary German I Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 113 Birgit Heinrich
GERM 101-L2 Elementary German I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm Birgit Heinrich
GERM 101-L4 Elementary German I Lab F 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 300 Birgit Heinrich
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 214 Kiarina Kordela
*5 credit course*
GERM 110-L1 Accel Elementary German Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
GERM 110-L2 Accel Elementary German Lab TR 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Birgit Heinrich
GERM 194-01 Vampires: from Monsters to Superheroes MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 216 Brigetta Abel
*First Year Course only* Vampires are cyclical. Just a few years ago you ran into them anytime you walked into a bookstore or turned on the TV—just like in Victorian times when Bram Stoker’s famous work emerged from a vampire craze. Vampires have always been popular fodder and will continue to be so, even if and as the image of the vampire shifts dramatically over time. The popularity of vampires has waxed and waned for over a hundred years, partially because vampirism can be used as a metaphor for almost anything—from the plague to sexuality to addiction. We will spend the first portion of the semester looking at “classic” tales of vampires as monsters (Bram Stoker, Nosferatu, Bella Lugosi, Anne Rice) and then look at the more recent generation of vampires (Buffy & Angel, Twilight, True Blood, Let the Right One In). What happened to change our imagination of vampires from monsters into hip, outsider superheroes? And what can the examination of vampires tell us about the context in which they were created?
Course Requirements: Students are required to come to class prepared and to participate actively in the classroom discussion. As preparation for class, students will read novels and articles and/or view films and TV shows; please note that many of the screenings will be outside of class time. In addition, students will complete weekly writing assignments, including class blogs, responses to blogs, and several shorter essays that will prepare for a final paper. Students will also work in groups to design a course website and to complete a RefWorks bibliography. Please note that this is a residential first-year course. It is designed for non-majors and requires no prior knowledge of vampirism or German.
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 402 Gisela Peters
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Birgit Heinrich
GERM 203-L2 Intermediate German I Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm Birgit Heinrich
GERM 203-L3 Intermediate German I Lab W 08:10 pm-09:10 pm HUM 113 Birgit Heinrich
GERM 203-L4 Intermediate German I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm HUM 217 Birgit Heinrich
GERM 203-L5 Intermediate German I Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 214 Linda Schulte-Sasse
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 404 Birgit Heinrich
GERM 204-L2 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 228 Birgit Heinrich
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich
GERM 255-01 German Cinema Studies: The Nazi in Cinema MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 401 Linda Schulte-Sasse
*First Year Course only* The movies love to hate the Nazi, but what exactly is a “Nazi”? Whether glamorized by Third Reich propaganda, vilified by Allied propaganda, dramatized by historical thrillers, or caricatured by Hollywood fantasies, the cinematic Nazi is always a construct. This is not to say there may not be some historical, psychological, or sociological truth in the depiction of Nazis, but their filmic portrayal, like that of any historical group, necessarily involves construction or representation. And representations tend to tell us more about the era in which they were concocted than about the “real” thing. Consciously or unconsciously, they serve a purpose: to educate, to entertain, to complicate or (over)simplify our understanding of history, to thrill, disturb, or affirm us as viewers. The course will examine the questions of representation using the example of the cinematic Nazi—one case among hundreds, but an important one, as the Nazi has become the symbol of evil over the past half-century.
The first part of the course will focus on films from the historical period of the Third Reich. We will examine how the Nazis represent themselves in documentaries like Leni Riefenstahl’s Triumph of the Will or Fritz Hippler’s The Eternal Jew, as well as feature films like Hitler Youth Quex. We will then turn to U.S. counter-propaganda in dramas like Tomorrow the World, Hitler’s Children, in comedies like Chaplin’s Great Dictator or Lubitsch’s To Be Or Not To be and in Disney cartoons. The second part of the course will explore postwar representations; likely examples will include Billy Wilder’s A Foreign Affair, Lina Wertmueller’s Seven Beauties, Mel Brooks’s The Producers, Oliver Hirschbiegel’s Downfall, Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds, and Michael Haneke’s The White Ribbon (which, some argue, deals with Nazis by not dealing with them). Student obligations: a series of short papers and one longer research paper; at least one oral presentation, two exams and a journal responding to class readings. Hopefully the Twin Cities will offer some cultural events relevant to our theme that we can visit as a class.
N.B.: The course is taught in English and films are subtitled; no German language skills required. However, the course has much to offer students with an interest and background in German.
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 215 Gisela Peters
GERM 305-L1 German Through the Media Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 300 Birgit Heinrich
GERM 305-L2 German Through the Media Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 113 Birgit Heinrich
GERM 308-01 German Cultural History MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 214 Rachael Huener
*Taught in German*
GERM 327-01 Darwin/Nietzsche/Freud TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with PHIL 283-01; not open to incoming First-Year students; taught in English; core course for the Critical Theory Concentration* "God is dead! God remains dead! And we have killed him!" cries the madman in Nietzsche’s Gay Science; and in Totem and Taboo, Freud identifies the murder of "God-Father" as the origin of civilization. Both Nietzsche and Freud were reacting to Darwin’s discovery of natural selection, which dispelled nature’s divine aura and inaugurated the secular age. Writing at a moment when religious faith had lost credence as a foundation for ethics, Nietzsche and Freud were the great debunkers of the noble ideals and beliefs we all ascribe to and that give our lives meaning. But while both confronted the groundlessness of value systems, they also acknowledged and even stressed the impossibility of living without values. The course explores this tension, centering on the four domains of ethics, subjectivity, aesthetics, and theories of civilization. Topics of discussion will include: the genesis of moral values; "agency" and the loss of the subject ("there is no doer behind the deed" – Nietzsche); the split self; the will to power; art, science, and religion as sublimation; the transience of culture; the death drive. Requirements: Three papers; weekly reading reactions. No prerequisites.
GERM 364-01 Politics, Class, Culture TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 113 David Martyn
This course explores depictions and concepts of "class" in literature, film, and political discourse since the French Revolution. Discussion topics include the invention of the bourgeois family; the Lumpenproletariat (prostitutes, rogues, vagabonds) in literature and art; revolutionary culture and politics in the inter-war period; depictions of class in contemporary mass culture. How does "class consciousness" emerge in German history? Is class an economic necessity or a consequence of culture and politics? Why is culture still fascinated by class? Taught in German. Offered fall term of odd-numbered years. Prerequisite: GERM 307 or 308 (may be taken simultaneously); study abroad; or permission of the instructor.
GERM 394-01 A Kafkaesque Century MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Taught in English; cross-listed with ENGL 394-01* “Kafkaesque” is a word that has become part of everyday vocabulary in innumerous languages, used by millions of people who might or not have ever read Kafka. Evidently, the work of this German-speaking Jewish author from Prague captured something about modern life that no word could express except one deriving from his own name. This is probably why 'everybody knows' the word and 'nobody can explain' it. To understand therefore the "Kafkaesque" is to understand at once Kafka’s work and modern life, at least as we know it since the early twentieth century. To do so, in this course we are going to read closely some of Kafka's stories and excerpts from his novels, as well as some influential commentaries on his work. We shall also have the chance to see and compare adaptations of his work (including his diaries) in the media of graphic novel and film. All readings will be in English. Though this a 394-level course, it requires no pre-knowledge and is appropriate for all level students.
GERM 488-01 Sr Seminar: Die 68er-Bewegung: Shocks and Aftershocks MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Rachael Huener
This seminar will take as its starting point the "68ers" or West German "student movement" of the late 1960s. As in the United States, the late 60s and early 70s were a time of generational tension, political activism and violence in the Federal Republic of Germany. Both the American and German 60s movements criticized the disparity between the "1st" and the "3rd" worlds, gender discrimination, exploitation of the environment, and the imperialist actions of the U.S. in Southeast Asia. Germany’s 60s-generation grappled additionally with a backward-looking university system, an unfolding nuclear energy industry precisely on the border of the cold war, a society that had, in the minds of some, embraced consumerism as the predominant virtue of democracy, and the as yet barely discussed Nazi past. As the movements comprising the Studentenbewegung ebbed in the 1970s, a number of radicalized participants turned to terrorism in the RAF (Rote Armee Faktion), and many more joined the "establishment" in one form or another.
The 68ers and the issues of that era have shaped much of the social policy, political activism and cultural expression of Germany today: Many ongoing efforts for gender equality and gay and lesbian rights have their roots in this era. The Green Party is an outcome of 60s environmentalism and anti-nuclear activism. Various social contracts ranging from workers rights to public health care have been shaped by conscensuses formed several decades ago. Even the coming to grips with the Nazi past (Vergangenheitsbewaeltigung) has, in the wake of the 60s critique of the national silence, become an essential component of school curricula, national memorialization, and journalistic watchfulness. The student movement of the 60s did not resolve every conflict in West Germany, but it provoked the uncomfortable questions and framed many of the debates that make Germany what it is today.
This seminar will examine the issues, ideologies, and cultural representations of this era. In addition to historical and theoretical texts, we will read novels and short fiction such as Timm's Der Freund und der Fremde and Boells Die verlorene Ehre der Katharina Blum, watch films such as Verhoeven's Das schreckliche Maedchen and Edel's Der Baader-Meinhof-Komplex, and examine visual art and other artifacts. Participants will develop a significant research paper on a topic related to this era or to the issues of these movements, and present regularly on the progress of their work. The course will also include library research assistance, a field trip, and guest speakers.

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 212 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 150 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 215 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 215 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 102 Antonella Morales
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 404 Antonella Morales
HISP 102-L3 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 112 Antonella Morales
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 110-01 Accelerated Beginning Spanish MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 112 Leah Sand
*First day attendance required; permission of the instructor required*
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 228 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 194-01 Spanish in the United States MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 402 Cynthia Kauffeld
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required; cross-listed with LING 194-01* Spanish is the second-most common language spoken in the US after English. It is the native language of more than 17 million people in the United States and the US is home to the 2nd-largest Spanish-speaking community in the world. Chances are that even if it’s not your native tongue and you’ve never studied it, you know many Spanish words already. Besides the obvious hispanisms like burrito, taco and guacamole, there are countless other English words whose Spanish origin is no longer transparent (cafeteria, patio, plaza, ranch, for example). In this course we will study the different varieties of Spanish found in the United States and the effects of the linguistic contact between Spanish and English. We will explore issues such as bilingualism, bilingual education, immigration patterns, and Spanglish, and students will conduct further research on a related topic of their choice. Course will include a mid-term and final exam, and a final research paper. Conducted in English.
HISP 194-02 Viewing through a new Looking Glass: A Journey into U.S. Latina/o Literature MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 213 Galo Gonzalez
*First Year Course only* Latina/os in the United States are a product of colonization and mobilization. They have been transplanted, uprooted; they are in process of constant reinvention. Latina/o writers exist at the borders of Hispanic and Anglo worlds. They are hybrid subjects navigating within the English and Spanish languages, between the literary traditions from two cultural zones. Latina/o double consciousness is also the product of existing in a state of being on the "threshold" of two different existential planes. In recent years, Latina/o literary production has been defined by the writers’ pluralistic identity. Twenty-first century Latin@ writers are viewing themselves through a new looking glass.
The course will explore specific literary approaches of Latina/o authors such as: Virginia Grise, Benjamin Alire Saenz, Achy Obejas, Giannina Braschi, and Olga García Echeverría, whose fiction writing help them to construct an aesthetic space where they have defined their Latina/o Identity as hybrid subjects, existing on the "threshold" (or in-between-ness) of two existential planes. The course will examine the particularities of each literary work to help students understand the diverse challenges that Latin@ authors face while experiencing processes of assimilation to the U.S. hegemonic culture.
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 402 Cynthia Kauffeld
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 202 Cynthia Kauffeld
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-03 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 214 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-04 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 216 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 102 Antonella Morales
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 226 Antonella Morales
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 404 Antonella Morales
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 404 Antonella Morales
HISP 203-L5 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 404 Antonella Morales
HISP 203-L6 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 226 Antonella Morales
HISP 203-L7 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Antonella Morales
HISP 203-L8 Intermediate Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 213 Galo Gonzalez
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 213 Galo Gonzalez
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 Margaret Olsen
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-04 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 Margaret Olsen
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 228 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 228 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 228 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 100 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 204-L7 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 150 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 204-L8 Intermediate Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Blanca Gimeno Escudero
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 305-01 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 Antonio Dorca
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-02 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 112 Leah Sand
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-03 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 216 Blanca Gimeno Escudero
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-04 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 402 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*Cross-listed with LING 309-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 421-01 Romantics, Moderns and Avant-Gardists TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Antonio Dorca
*First day attendance required*
HISP 445-01 Frontera: The U.S./Mexico Border MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 445-01 and LATI 445-01*
HISP 494-01 Portuguese Sailors in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia (15th to 17th centuries) MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz
*First day attendance required* We will read travel accounts and official historiography from the period in which Portugal became the first European overseas empire. Portugal linked continents and cultures as never before, traveling by sea; indeed this process can be understood as the first globalization because of the cultural cross-pollination that Portugal’s voyages provoked. We will focus on analyzing the way in which the Portuguese managed to portray the Other by two contrary discourses: Portugal’s providential mission, and the race for economical profit through trade and war. We will also study works of art produced in this era. Prerequisite: 307, 308, or 309, or consent of the professor. This course satisfies Area 1 of the Hispanic Studies major. Instruction will be in Spanish, but students may choose to submit work in Portuguese.

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HIST 110-01 Introduction to European History TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Peter Weisensel
HIST 114-01 History of Africa to 1800 MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Jamie Monson
HIST 121-01 The Greek World MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Brian Lush
*Cross-listed with CLAS 121--01*
HIST 135-01 American Violence to 1800: Age of Contact to the American Revolution TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Eric Otremba
HIST 140-01 Introduction to East Asian Civilization TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 140-01*
HIST 181-01 Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 009 Andrea Moerer
*Meets global and/or comparative history requirement; cross-listed with LATI 181-01* What is Latin America and how was it constructed? We will answer this question by surveying Latin American history from the time of its "discovery" (15th century) through current times, focusing on large-scale events as well as small-scale actions which created Latin American society. We will learn the history of Latin America by questioning geographic, social, and political borders through looking at transnational modes of control, cultural production, and dualities such as modernity and tradition. Students will gain competency in essential Latin American history and geography. Furthermore, we will discuss countries, looking critically at nation-states through thematic categories of analysis, challenging their boundary primacy, and conceiving of borders in other Latin American contexts.
HIST 194-01 Early Arab and Persian Empires (200 BCE) – 850 CE TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Andrew Overman
*Meets global and/or comparative history requirement; approved for use on the Middle Eastern Civilization and Islamic Studies concentration; cross-listed with CLAS 194-01* From the Rise of the Seleucids to the Abbasid Caliphate, this course focuses on the rise and transformation of Arab and Persian empires and city-states between 200 BCE through the founding of Baghdad (762) to the close of the second great Islamic caliphate, the Abbasids in c. 950. This period in the religious, cultural and political history of the Middle East, Levant and Persian region east to at least the Zagros mountains, is an extremely productive and formative period, yet is largely overlooked or neglected altogether in our histories and analyses of the millennium between c. 250 BCE – 950 CE. In many respects the developments and effects of this period have wide ranging implications for our contemporary world. So we will attempt to acquaint ourselves with this period, and the players and powers that shaped it.
HIST 194-02 History of Sexuality MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Catherine Jacquet
From Cotton Mather to Lady Gaga, Americans from the colonial era to the modern day have focused enormous amounts of attention on sex and sexuality. It is a topic that elicits a range of responses from concern, to fear, to enjoyment, to obsession. This course will focus on sexuality in the American past and introduce students to the major topics within this complex history. We will explore how and why sexuality historically became so central to American identities, cultures, and politics. We will examine how dominant institutions (medicine, media, and the law) have intersected and interacted with this history. Course readings and discussions will include historical analyses of current public concerns such as: abortion, prostitution, sexual violence, and GLBT sexualities. The course employs an intersectional approach and will examine the relationship between sexuality and social categories such as race, gender, class, ability, ethnicity, etc.
HIST 194-03 Line in the Sand: History and Culture in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Ryan Edgington
This course examines cultural and political contacts in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands. Two-thirds of the course explores the region’s history and one-third its present-day politics and culture. We will therefore not only read historical works, but also engage literature, art, and film. Fundamentally this course argues that rather than construct the borderlands as a rigid frontier outpost, we should understand it as a site of national political discourse and an interzone of diverse cultures. In order to understand this condition we will begin with an examination of the region before the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo formalized a national border between the United States and Mexico. Two major themes will frame our discussions: militarization and violence. However, we will examine several themes through those lenses including captivity and the struggle for empire, gender and border crossings, how the construction of whiteness shaped racial identities, warfare, immigration law and the Border Patrol, the ascendency of Aztlán as political movement, among others. We will also watch films, read poetry, and listen to music in the styles of the Cumbia, Mariachi, Tejano/Tex-Mex, Musica Norteña, and Corridos.
HIST 201-01 History of U.S. Feminisms MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Lynn Hudson
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with WGSS 201-01* This year “The Feminine Mystique” by Betty Friedan turns 50 years old. Some credit this text with igniting the feminist movement of the 1960s in the United States. Did it? What is feminism and how did it change from its early articulations in the nineteenth century to the activism of the 1960s? This course examines the “f” word and its history. We will be especially concerned with the multiple and contradictory strains within feminism, including the critiques and interventions made by women of color. Topics that the class will consider include: the roots of feminism as it took shape in the anti-slavery movement, the overlap of women’s rights and the civil rights movement of the twentieth century, and the women’s health movement. Our readings include: biographies of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Sojourner Truth, anti-feminist tracts from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, essays by lesbian feminists Audre Lorde and Charlotte Bunch, and Friedan’s infamous text, among other selections.
HIST 239-01 Farm and Forest: African Environmental History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Jamie Monson
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-01*
HIST 244-01 US Since 1945 MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Ryan Edgington
HIST 248-01 Jim Crow MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Lynn Hudson
*Cross-listed with AMST 248-01*
HIST 261-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Chadaga, Weisensel
*Cross-listed with RUSS 261-01*
HIST 274-01 The Great Tradition in China before 1840 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 274-01*
HIST 277-01 The Rise of Modern Japan TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 277-01*
HIST 294-01 Archetypes and Agency: Gender in Latin American History through Film and Text M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Andrea Moerer
*Cross-listed with LATI 294-01 and WGSS 294-02* This interdisciplinary course, though rooted in history, explores relationships between gender and power, and their representation in diverse genres (biographies, scholarly analyses, literature, art, films) and in various time periods. To set the stage for the analysis of gender in cinematic representations, our first unit looks at gender theory broadly and in Latin America, and we will read about, discuss, and practice tools for “reading” film both on its own terms as a particular art form and from an historian’s perspective. We move,in loose chronological order from the 17th to the 20th centuries, looking at gender practice and representation with units on Mexican nun Sor Juana; Love and Politics; Frontiers, and Human Rights.
HIST 294-02 Pirates, Translators, Missionaries: Between Atlantic Empires MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Karin Velez
*Meets global and/or comparative history requirement* Why are cultural intermediaries often remembered as villains or traitors? This course calls the popular stereotype into question by focusing on four dramatic case studies of notorious but pivotal mediators who moved between the Spanish, Aztec, English, French, Kongolese and Portuguese empires of the early modern period. Among others, we will consider conflicting primary source accounts and current scholarship about Doña Marina, the Mexica translator for the army of Cortes; Nathaniel Courthope, an English profiteer who made a fortune peddling nutmeg between India and New York; two competing French pirates who sacked the South American port city of Cartagena de Indias twice in a single month; and Dona Beatriz, a Kongolese convert to Christianity who was burned at the stake for professing that she was possessed by the spirit of Saint Anthony. This diverse group of pirates, missionaries and translators walked a similar tightrope between worlds, both liberated and constrained by their border crossings. We will evaluate how gender, race, religion, and imperial loyalties affected the survival of this small group of interlopers, and how, in spite of this, they came to disproportionately influence events in the Atlantic world.
HIST 294-04 Socialism MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Peter Weisensel
This class will study the idea of socialism from its earliest forms in ancient times to its present through a series of original socialist texts. Two professors, one in history and the other in philosophy will teach it. We will engage thinkers like Plato, Thomas More, the early French communists, the Utopians, Marx and Engels (the heart of the course) and their Revisionists, the Fabians (an Anglo-Saxon alternative), Lenin and Stalin, the Frankfurt School, the socialist feminists, and contemporary socialist thinkers. We will study socialism critically: we will recognize its strengths but also identify its flaws when we see them. We will contextualize these socialist texts, that is, study how changes in real-world circumstances change the way socialism is written or used. Lastly, we will try to understand the gap between socialist theory as written by intellectuals and the way socialism is understood by ordinary working people. The class is discussion-based. Exams will be in class. Often students will be expected to lead class discussions.
HIST 294-05 Beyond Nations: New Approaches to Comparative History W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine
*Meets global and/or comparative history requirement; cross-listed with INTL 294-02* This course will introduce students to a variety of historical works built on comparative and transnational frameworks, which question traditional paradigms (such as the nation as locus of historical investigation). Articles and book excerpts illustrating these new approaches will guide our investigation, but students will also be engaged in broader methodological questions and archival issues. This course will also not be restricted to a particular geography, although examples will generally be drawn from North American, European and Eurasian contexts, and mostly from American and French historiography. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement.
HIST 394-01 Rights, Religion and Regicide: The English Civil Wars TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Eric Otremba
In 1620 a band of Puritans left England for America in search of "religious freedom." While this Thanksgiving story is well known in America, what is less familiar is what happened to those Puritans who stayed home: they executed their own king.

This class will cover the tumultuous period of English history from 1642 to 1689, when England and its fledgling empire endured two separate revolutions and at least five new governmental regimes. Economic and religious changes were weakening the old medieval structures which had held English society together for centuries. New questions about government came to the fore. What exactly is government’s purpose? Should the nation be run by a king, or by its own people? Do people have "rights," and what are they? Sometimes these arguments were fought with words; sometimes they were fought with swords. Topics covered will include the English Civil War and the execution of Charles II; the Diggers and other proto-communist insurgencies of this period; the military dictatorship of Oliver Cromwell and his conquest of Ireland; the "Glorious" Revolution of 1688; the political writings Thomas Hobbes and John Locke; the role of religious extremism within these battles; and the legacy of "rights" from this period within later conflicts such as the American Revolution.
HIST 394-03 Oceans in World History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Karin Velez
*Cross-listed with INTL 394-02; Meets global and/or comparative history requirement* Between 1450 and 1850, people started to venture farther outward into oceans that had previously been understood as dangerous and hostile environments. This course takes the Age of Sail as a starting point to track changes in human approaches to boundless waters. We will consider two questions in particular: How have oceans functioned as a means of global integration rather than division? How are historians using oceans to further the study of world (versus regional) history? Readings will cover and compare the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and address themes of diaspora, port cities, banditry, trade, and imperial encounters.
HIST 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar: Microhistory M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Karin Velez

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Interdisciplinary Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTD 191-01 Supplementary Writing Workshop M 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 101 Daniel Flath
*Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only; class begins on Monday, Sept 23rd*
INTD 191-02 Supplementary Writing Workshop M 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Kelly MacGregor
*Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only; class begins on Monday, Sept 23rd*
INTD 191-03 Supplementary Writing Workshop W 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 247 Geoffrey Gorham
*Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only; class begins on Wednesday, Sept 25th*
INTD 191-04 Supplementary Writing Workshop W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 003 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
*Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only; class begins on Wednesday, Sept 25th*
INTD 191-05 Supplementary Writing Workshop W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis
*Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only; class begins on Wednesday, Sept 25th*
INTD 191-06 Supplementary Writing Workshop M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 187 Karl Wirth
*Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading only; class begins on Monday, Sept 23rd*
INTD 401-01 Urban Studies Colloquium W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau
*2 credit course; limited to Seniors who've already declared Urban Studies Concentration*

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTL 110-01 Introduction to Intl Studies: Globalization - Homogeneity and Heterogeneity TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Ahmed Samatar
*First day attendance required*
INTL 111-01 Intro to International Studies: Literature and Global MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 David Moore
*First day attendance required*
INTL 111-02 Intro to International Studies: Literature and Global MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 David Moore
*First day attendance required*
INTL 190-01 Mediterranean, Baltic, Black: Seas, Identities and History TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine
*First Year Course only* In a passage from his travel account The Pillars of Hercules: A Grand Tour of the Mediterranean, the travel writer Paul Theroux encapsulates – in a lyrical nutshell – the core focus of this course. In his words: “And that was my first Mediterranean epiphany, the realization that life on these shores bore little relation to what was happening five miles inland […] That hinterland was not my subject […]. My concentration was the edge of this body of water, the ribbon of beach and cliff, and all the people who shared it, used and misused it.” In concert with this approach, this course will explore the role of bodies of water in the cultures, economies, and politics of coastal and island societies around the Baltic, Mediterranean and Black Seas and engage in critical analysis of concepts such as identity (i.e., how relationships to the sea have shaped identities), nation, territories, and borders.
Through the course’s broad temporal scope (encompassing the period from the 16th century to the present) and multidisciplinary nature (in addition to texts on current affairs, we will read seminal texts from historians such as Fernand Braudel, literary figures such as Tomas Tranströmer, Predrag Matvejevic, and Miguel de Cervantes, social scientists such as Benedict Anderson and Ernest Gellner), we will be able to trace continuities and discontinuities between past and contemporary challenges in these regions.
This course does not require specific prior knowledge.
INTL 202-01 Global Media Industries MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel
*Cross-listed with MCST 202-01*
INTL 245-01 Intro to Intl Human Rights TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 James von Geldern
INTL 282-01 Introduction to International Public Health TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Christy Hanson
INTL 285-01 Ethnicity and Nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Nadya Nedelsky
INTL 294-01 Representing the World As It Is: Histories and Theories of Ethnographic Film M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel
*Cross-listed with ANTH 294-02 and MCST 294-01* How can an experience of the world as it is be represented? What are the promises and challenges of transcultural filmmaking? This course will explore what has been called ethnographic, cross-cultural and transcultural cinema from several points of view. We will look at ethnographic film in terms of its geo-political, anthropological and cinematic origins, and then delve into its various forms and contemporary manifestations. We will examine some of the major films of the canon of ethnographic cinema, the shifting forms and representational strategies linked to technological and ideological transformations, and several types and styles of filmmaking including: salvage ethnography, observational film, self-reflexive film, autoethnography, indigenous media, and performative and hybrid forms of transcultural filmmaking.
INTL 294-02 Beyond Nations: New Approaches to Comparative History W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-05* This course will introduce students to a variety of historical works built on comparative and transnational frameworks, which question traditional paradigms (such as the nation as locus of historical investigation). Articles and book excerpts illustrating these new approaches will guide our investigation, but students will also be engaged in broader methodological questions and archival issues. This course will also not be restricted to a particular geography, although examples will generally be drawn from North American, European and Eurasian contexts, and mostly from American and French historiography. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement.
INTL 301-01 Power and Development in Africa TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN Ahmed Samatar
*Must have Sophomore standing; course meets in Carnegie 411*
INTL 325-01 China, Russia and Central Europe in Transition MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with ECON 325-01*
INTL 362-01 Culture and Globalization W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
*Cross-listed with ANTH 362-01*
INTL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01*
INTL 372-01 Post-Nationalism: The European Union TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine
INTL 394-02 Oceans in World History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Karin Velez
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-03; Meets global and/or comparative history requirement* Between 1450 and 1850, people started to venture farther outward into oceans that had previously been understood as dangerous and hostile environments. This course takes the Age of Sail as a starting point to track changes in human approaches to boundless waters. We will consider two questions in particular: How have oceans functioned as a means of global integration rather than division? How are historians using oceans to further the study of world (versus regional) history? Readings will cover and compare the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and address themes of diaspora, port cities, banditry, trade, and imperial encounters.
INTL 477-01 Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and GEOG 488-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
INTL 485-01 Senior Seminar: Confronting Global Hatred M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN Nadya Nedelsky
*Seminar will meet in Carnegie 411*
INTL 494-01 Senior Seminar: Order and Chaos in Global Affairs TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 111 James von Geldern
*Seminar will meet in Carnegie 411*

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
JAPA 101-01 First Year Japanese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 110 Arthur Mitchell
JAPA 101-02 First Year Japanese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 110 Arthur Mitchell
JAPA 101-L1 First Year Japanese I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 101-L2 First Year Japanese I Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 404 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 101-L3 First Year Japanese I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 194-01 Love and Death in 18th-20th Century Japanese Literature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Sachiko Dorsey
*Cross-listed with ASIA 194-01* In late 17th to early 18th century Japan, a series of plays featuring lovers committing double suicides became very popular. So popular was this trend that people started to emulate this act, which led the government to issue a ban on performing such plays. This was a particular moment in Japanese history, in which the mercantile economy gave tremendous power to merchants, who were ranked at the very bottom of the social hierarchical order. It also was a time when popular culture of everyday people took center stage. Starting at this point in history, we will see how the rise in the popularity of such narratives reflected social changes that were taking place, and examine these texts closely to understand what happened when gender, class and family collided. We will then study similar narratives in subsequent periods, and see how the waves of sudden westernization challenged or shaped preexisting beliefs. *No prior knowledge of Japanese necessary. This course may take field trips.
JAPA 203-01 Second Year Japanese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 203-02 Second Year Japanese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 203-L1 Second Year Japanese I Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 203-L2 Second Year Japanese I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 113 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 203-L3 Second Year Japanese I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 228 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 294-01 Bad Women:Portrayal of Female Villains in Japanese Literature and Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 110 Sachiko Dorsey
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-01* In this course, we will start with folklores, where women are, or become transformed into, fearsome creatures. We will then move on to different kinds of narratives ranging from popular culture, literature and films to recent media coverage. As part of all this, we will investigate how these characters are portrayed, and what it reveals about social anxiety over women who transgress boundaries (and what these boundaries are). We will also examine the process, in which these women are marginalized and demonized, and how it may relate to the changes and unrest Japanese society was or is undergoing. No Japanese background is needed.
JAPA 305-01 Third Year Japanese I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 111 Miaki Habuka
JAPA 305-L1 Third Year Japanese I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 305-L2 Third Year Japanese I Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 113 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 407-01 Fourth Year Japanese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 111 Miaki Habuka

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LATI 141-01 Latin America Through Women's Eyes TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Paul Dosh
*First Year Course only; S/D/NC with Written Evaluation grading only; cross-listed with POLI 141-01 and WGSS 141-01* Latin American women have overcome patriarchal “machismo” to serve as presidents, mayors, guerrilla leaders, union organizers, artists, intellectuals, and human rights activists. Through a mix of theoretical, empirical, and testimonial work, we will explore issues such as feminist challenges to military rule in Chile, anti-feminist politics in Nicaragua, the intersection of gender and democratization in Cuba, and women’s organizing amid civil war in Colombia. Teaching methods include discussion, debates, simulations, analytic papers, partisan narratives, lecture, film, poetry, and a biographical essay.

This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course “S/SD/N with Written Evaluation.” This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-pressure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.
LATI 181-01 Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 009 Andrea Moerer
*Meets global and/or comparative history requirement; cross-listed with HIST 181-01*
LATI 245-01 Latin American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with POLI 245-01; S/D/NC with written evaluation grading only; course is pre-approved for inclusion on major/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism*
LATI 255-01 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06A Olga Gonzalez
*Cross-listed with ANTH 255-01*
LATI 294-01 Archetypes and Agency: Gender in Latin American History through Film and Text M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Andrea Moerer
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-01 and WGSS 294-02* This interdisciplinary course, though rooted in history, explores relationships between gender and power, and their representation in diverse genres (biographies, scholarly analyses, literature, art, films) and in various time periods. To set the stage for the analysis of gender in cinematic representations, our first unit looks at gender theory broadly and in Latin America, and we will read about, discuss, and practice tools for "reading" film both on its own terms as a particular art form and from an historian’s perspective. We move,in loose chronological order from the 17th to the 20th centuries, looking at gender practice and representation with units on Mexican nun Sor Juana; Love and Politics; and Human Rights
LATI 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 212 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 445-01 Frontera: The U.S./Mexico Border MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Alicia Munoz
*Cross-listed with AMST 445-01 and HISP 445-01*
LATI 488-01 Senior Seminar MF 09:40 am-10:40 am MARKIM 303 Paul Dosh

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 215 John Haiman
LING 104-01 The Sounds of Language MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 Grace Kuo
LING 194-01 Spanish in the United States MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 402 Cynthia Kauffeld
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required; cross-listed with HISP 194-01*
LING 201-01 Historical Linguistics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 John Haiman
LING 204-01 Experimental Linguistics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 102 Grace Kuo
LING 206-01 Endangered/Minority Languages TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Marianne Milligan
*First day attendance required*
LING 294-01 Sanskrit and Classical Religion in India MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 James Laine
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-02, CLAS 294-01 and RELI 236-01*
LING 300-01 Linguistic Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 102 John Haiman
LING 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*Cross-listed with HISP 309-01; first day attendance required*
LING 364-01 Philosophy of Language TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with PHIL 364-01*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MATH 125-01 Epidemiology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Vittorio Addona
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 135-01 Applied Calculus MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 Lori Ziegelmeier
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 135-02 Applied Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 Lori Ziegelmeier
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 135-03 Applied Calculus TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Chad Higdon-Topaz
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 135-04 Applied Calculus TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Chad Higdon-Topaz
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 135-05 Applied Calculus MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 100 Rebekah Isaak
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics:The Unreasonable Effectivness of Discrete Mathematics TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 205 David Bressoud
*First Year Course only* What is it about mathematics that makes it so powerful, so insightful? How can it claim the absolute and universal truths that are denied even to science? Why is it that the patterns that mathematicians treasure purely for their aesthetic beauty are the ones that are so useful for understanding the world in which we live?

This will be a free-ranging course that explores the world of mathematics by doing mathematics and by exploring the works of those who have thought about these questions. The mathematics will be drawn from discrete mathematics including combinatorics and number theory. Examples include:
• How many regions in space are formed by six randomly placed planes? What about n randomly placed planes?
• How many ways can 10 be written as a sum of one or more positive integers? How can this number be computed efficiently for any given integer?
• How many perfect riffle shuffles (leaving the top card on top) does it take to return a 148-card deck to its original order? What is the underlying structure that enables us to find the answer for a deck of any size?
(Hint: The answer to the first part of each of these questions is also the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything.)

We will take excursions into the modern history of discrete mathematics including unsolved problems and current research in issues such as factorization, primality testing, and public key encryption (RSA). The emphasis will be on problem-solving, both individually and in groups.
The required books for this class are:
• S. C. Coutinho, The Mathematics of Ciphers: Number Theory and RSA Cryptography, A K Peters/CRC Press
• Daniel A. Marcus, Combinatorics: A Problem Oriented Approach, Mathematical Association of America
In addition, we will be reading and discussing:
• G.H. Hardy and C.P. Snow, A Mathematician’s Apology (you may use any edition)
• Thomas S. Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (you may use any edition)

There are no prerequisites for this course except a willingness to work hard and a curiosity about the world of mathematics.
MATH 136-02 Discrete Mathematics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 101 Andrew Beveridge
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 137-01 Single Variable Calculus MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 243 David Ehren
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 137-02 Single Variable Calculus MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Thomas Halverson
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 137-03 Single Variable Calculus MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am ARTCOM 102 David Ehren
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Daniel Kaplan
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 Alicia Johnson
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-03 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 Daniel Flath
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-04 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 Daniel Flath
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 250 Daniel Flath
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 Robert Thompson
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 258 Robert Thompson
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Robert Thompson
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 353-01 Modern Statistics: Bayesian Statistics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Alicia Johnson
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor* Bayesian statistical methods provide an alternative to the traditional frequentist approach taken in our other statistics courses. Though Bayesian theory dates back to the 18th century, with its application often requiring computing technology, it did not receive signicant attention in practice until the 1980's. Today, Bayesian methods play an integral role in modern statistics. In Math 353, we will explore Bayesian philosophy, the Bayesian approach to statistical
analysis, as well as both sides of the frequentist vs Bayesian debate.
MATH 354-01 Probability MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 241 Vittorio Addona
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 377-01 Real Analysis MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 David Bressoud
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 379-01 Combinatorics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Andrew Beveridge
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 432-01 Mathematical Modeling TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Chad Higdon-Topaz
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*
MATH 476-01 Topics in Algebra MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 205 Thomas Halverson
*ACTC students may register on May 3rd with permission of the instructor*

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MCST 110-01 Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 217 John Kim
MCST 114-01 News Reporting and Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Howard Sinker
MCST 126-01 Local News Media Institutions MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 226 Michael Griffin
*First day attendance required; First Year students welcome; manadatory film screenings TBD*
MCST 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 401 Morgan Adamson
MCST 202-01 Global Media Industries MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel
*Cross-listed with INTL 202-01*
MCST 234-01 New Media Theories/Practices TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 John Kim
MCST 247-01 Documentary Film and Video W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 401 Morgan Adamson
MCST 294-01 Representing the World As It Is: Histories and Theories of Ethnographic Film M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-01 and ANTH 294-02*
MCST 334-01 Cultural Studies and the Media TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 401 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with AMST 334-01*
MCST 488-01 Senior Seminar: Whiteness in the Media W 07:00 pm-09:30 pm HUM 217 Leola Johnson
*Screenings Sunday evenings, 6pm, Humanities 404*

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MUSI 110-01 Music Appreciation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 113 Mark Mandarano
MUSI 113-01 Theory I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 219 Randall Bauer
MUSI 113-L1 Theory I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 219 Alyssa Anderson
MUSI 131-01 African Music TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 228 Sowah Mensah
MUSI 153-01 Electronic Music MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Reid Kruger
MUSI 213-01 Theory III, Form and Analysis MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 219 Randall Bauer
MUSI 264-01 History of Jazz MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 219 Randall Bauer
*First Year Course only* Jazz is one of the few wholly original American art forms, and has enjoyed a century-long history of innovation. Jazz artists have continually reinvented the genre, demonstrating genuine breadth of originality and individuality conveyed through improvisation; throughout jazz's evolution great advances were made to the creative and expressive potential of music.

This course surveys the rich development of jazz music and its associated culture. A thorough exploration of jazz’s principal artists and style periods will be undertaken, along with related studies of race and conflict, gender, geography, and African-American cultural values. Listening is a big part of this course, and you will be expected to absorb as much via your ears as you will through reading. At the conclusion of the course, you will have gained a working knowledge of jazz artists, repertoire, and be able to distinguish the different style periods. You will have a broad understanding of the connection of racial issues to jazz, an increased knowledge of the breadth of formal jazz scholarship, and an awareness of how jazz absorbed into the socio-cultural fabric of America. There will be several writing assignments designed to help you learn research methods and work on your writing technique. Although this is a music course, students are not required to be able to read musical notation; however, you will feel at home with any hands-on musical experience you have had in the past.
MUSI 294-01 Passions and Requiems MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 228 Michael McGaghie
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-04* This course will explore two prominent genres of vocal music — the Passion (the story of Jesus' arrest, trial, and death) and the Requiem (the traditional Latin Mass for the Dead). These genres include many of the most ambitious, innovative, and seminal works of the past five hundred years. We'll begin the term by looking at these genres' plainchant roots and their growth into the grand archetypes of J. S. Bach's St. John Passion and W. A. Mozart’s unfinished Requiem. We'll then consider some 19th and 20th century expansions upon these paradigms, focusing especially on Johannes Brahms’ Ein deutsches Requiem, Benjamin Britten's War Requiem, and Krzysztof Penderecki’s St. Luke Passion. Towards the end of the semester, we’ll explore several modern settings, including works by Michael Tippett, Paul Hindemith, John Adams, Osvaldo Golijov, Tan Dun, David Lang, Dominick Argento, and others. We’ll discuss the evolving narrative/dramatic sense of these works, their roles in liturgical and/or concert performance, the inclusion of non-canonical (and non-Christological) texts, modern controversies of reception, and of course, the novelties of their musical language. An extensive background in music theory is not required, but a familiarity with Western musical notation will be assumed.
MUSI 342-01 Medieval to Mozart MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MUSIC 228 Elissa Harbert
MUSI 405-01 Ethnomusicology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Chuen-Fung Wong
*Cross-listed with ANTH 405-01*
MUSI 72-01 African Music Ensemble TR 06:30 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 116 Sowah Mensah
MUSI 72-01 African Music Ensemble MW 05:00 pm-07:00 pm MUSIC 121 Sowah Mensah
MUSI 74-01 Macalester Concert Choir MWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie
MUSI 76-01 Highland Camerata T 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie
MUSI 76-01 Highland Camerata R 06:30 pm-07:30 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie
MUSI 78-01 Asian Music Ensemble F 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Chuen-Fung Wong
MUSI 80-01 Mac Jazz Band MW 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Joan Griffith
MUSI 82-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 116 Joan Griffith
MUSI 82-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 121 Joan Griffith
MUSI 84-01 Pipe Band W 06:30 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 116 Michael Breidenbach
MUSI 84-01 Pipe Band W 06:00 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 228 Michael Breidenbach
MUSI 86-01 Chamber Ensemble: Wind Ensemble M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MUSIC 113 Mark Mandarano
MUSI 88-01 Orchestra TR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Mark Mandarano
MUSI 90-01 Mac Early Music Ensemble F 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 121 Clea Galhano
MUSI 94-02 Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 94-03 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 94-04 Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 94-06 Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich
MUSI 94-09 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 94-10 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 94-13 African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-15 Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-16 Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder
MUSI 94-18 Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-19 Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson
MUSI 94-1M Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor
MUSI 94-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 94-23 Violin TBA TBA Ruggero Allifranchini
MUSI 94-25 Gamba TBA TBA Julie Elhard
MUSI 94-29 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 94-31 Jazz Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen
MUSI 94-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 94-37 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen
MUSI 94-41 Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 94-42 African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-4M Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 94-5M African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-CD Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 94-CI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 94-H1 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin
MUSI 94-HD Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 94-HM French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen
MUSI 94-HY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 94-M Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 94-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 94-M7 Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen
MUSI 94-M8 Jazz Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen
MUSI 94-ME Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich
MUSI 94-MF Accordion TBA TBA Daniel Newton
MUSI 94-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 94-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 94-ML African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 94-MM Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-MN Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-MO Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder
MUSI 94-MP Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-MQ Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-MR Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson
MUSI 94-MU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 94-MV Violin TBA TBA Ruggero Allifranchini
MUSI 94-MW Viola TBA TBA Rebecca Albers
MUSI 94-MY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 94-MZ Bass TBA TBA Jennifer Rubin
MUSI 94-W1 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin
MUSI 94-W4 Jazz Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen
MUSI 94-WB Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 94-WH Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 94-WN Jazz Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 94-ZM Oboe TBA TBA Julie Williams
MUSI 96-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 96-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 96-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 99-02 Piano Proficiency Exam TBA TBA Claudia Chen

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Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
NEUR 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-01; permission of the instructor is required for ACTC students*
NEUR 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-L1*
NEUR 389-01 Inside the Animal Mind MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Julia Manor
*Cross-listed with PSYC 389-01* Ever wondered what your dog is thinking or why your cat behaves a certain way? In this course students will be introduced to the questions and concepts in the study of animal cognition and the neurobiological basis for cognition. We will take a peek into the animal mind and show that many topics in animal cognition can be studied in an objective and scientific manner. The format of the seminar will include student led discussion of recent topics in the study of animal cognition. Topics may include: animal sensory abilities, abstract representations (e.g., numbers and time) cause and effect detection, memory and emotion systems and their neurobiological basis, insight and reasoning, theory of mind, and communication. Book chapters and journal articles will be employed to illustrate these concepts. Prerequisites: Psychology 100 and 201 -or- Psychology/Neuroscience Studies 180 and permission of instructor.
NEUR 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Darcy Burgund
*2 credit course; S/NC grading*

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHIL 115-01 Introduction to Philosophy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Janet Folina
PHIL 115-02 Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy and Film TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 402 Geoffrey Gorham
*First Year Course only* Film seems to be an especially vivid and effective medium to explore fundamental philosophical questions. And the medium of film raises interesting philosophical questions in its own right, especially questions about art and aesthetic experience. This class will combine reading of classic and contemporary philosophical texts with viewing and discussion of contemporary and classic films. The texts will include writings by Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Mill and Nietzsche. The films may include Rashomon, The Seventh Seal, Rear Window, the Matrix, Memento, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Inception, etc. The main philosophical questions we'll examine are:
What is the relation between experience and reality?
What is the relation between reason and faith?
What is the relation between the mind and the body?
Are humans free? What is the self?
What is time? Is time travel possible?
What is the meaning of life?
What is morality? Why should I be moral?
What is the best or happiest life?

Why do films engage us so deeply?
Why do we enjoy terrifying/violent films?
What is the nature of time and space in film?
Can we 'do philosophy' with film? Are directors philosophers?

We will view one and discuss one film every one-two weeks. We will also likely travel as a group to film presentations and discussions at off-campus locations, such as the Walker Art Center, Trylon Theater and Heights Theater. Class meetings will normally consist of a brief lecture followed by general discussion of the readings and films. Coursework will consist mainly of short papers, reviews, and commentaries.
PHIL 115-03 Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy and Film TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 402 Geoffrey Gorham
Film seems to be an especially vivid and effective medium to explore fundamental philosophical questions. The medium of film raises interesting philosophical questions in its own right, especially questions about art and aesthetic experience. This class will pair readings of classic and contemporary philosophical texts with viewings and discussion of contemporary and classic films. The texts will include writings by Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Mill and Nietzsche. The films may include Rashomon, The Seventh Seal, Rear Window, the Matrix, Memento, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Inception etc. We will view and discuss one film every one-to-two weeks. We may also travel as a group to film presentations and discussions at off-campus locations, such as the Walker Art Center, Trylon Theater and Heights Theater. Class meetings will normally consist of a brief lecture followed by general discussion of the readings and films. Coursework will consist mainly of short papers, reviews, and commentaries.
PHIL 120-01 Introduction to Symbolic Logic: Reasoning and Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Janet Folina
*First Year Course only* Many arguments are persuasive. But some persuasive arguments are incorrect (some of these are fallacies); and some correct arguments are not very persuasive (at least at first glance).

Logic is the science of correct reasoning and argumentation, and symbolic logic is the use of symbols and formal rules to codify this science. (In this way, it is a bit like high school geometry.) The main aim of this course is to provide you with some formal tools for (i) determining whether an argument has a correct form, and (ii) proving a conclusion from a given set of premises. We will focus on formal "deductive" arguments, the tools of which constitute the fundamental methods of contemporary symbolic logic. We will also apply these tools in a variety of writing exercises. The payoff will be an improved ability to distinguish good arguments from bad ones, to justify such distinctions, and to provide clearer written and oral arguments in your own work.

Logic is also central to mathematics, and this course provides a good foundation for a major in mathematics as well as philosophy, and indeed any discipline that emphasizes correct, clear thinking, reading and writing.
PHIL 120-02 Introduction to Symbolic Logic MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 Janet Folina
PHIL 125-01 Ethics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder
PHIL 125-02 Ethics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 212 William Wilcox
PHIL 227-01 Bioethics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Martin Gunderson
PHIL 236-01 Indian Philosophies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with ASIA 236-01*
PHIL 254-01 Ethics and the Internet MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder
*Cross-listed with COMP 154-01*
PHIL 283-01 Darwin/Nietzsche/Freud TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with GERM 327-01; not open to incoming First-Year students; core course for the Critical Theory Concentration; for description, see under German Studies*
PHIL 364-01 Philosophy of Language TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Joy Laine
*Cross-listed with LING 364-01*
PHIL 394-01 Advanced Ethical Theory MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Martin Gunderson
Where does morality come from? This can be asked as an empirical question about how humans came to develop morality. The empirical question of where morality came from is dealt with in such disciplines as anthropology, moral psychology and evolutionary theory. The question can also be raised as a philosophical issue about what justifies us in making moral claims and what it means to speak of morality in the first place. The empirical and philosophical explorations of morality are related, and recent philosophical work has been concerned with the relevance of empirical research on morality for the philosophical justification of morality. Some have argued that empirical research regarding the origins of morality support a form of moral skepticism called error theory. Others have argued that it indicates, if not skepticism, at least that there are no moral facts. The seminar will discuss these claims and ask whether justification and objectivity in morality are possible. We will also discuss whether there are any moral facts. Finally, we will consider what it means to be a moral agent and whether moral agency is uniquely human. The prerequisite for the seminar is Ethics (PHIL 125) or permission of the Instructor.
PHIL 489-01 Senior Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 William Wilcox

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PE 02-01 Tennis I TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Martin Peper
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson
PE 04-01 Karate I MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:40 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-02 Yoga I TR 10:00 am-11:10 am LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin
PE 06-03 Yoga I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-04 Yoga I MW 02:20 pm-03:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Emily Stuber
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Vanessa Seljeskog
PE 09-01 Conditioning I TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 10-01 Racquetball I MW 01:10 pm-02:10 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Matthew Parrington
PE 12-01 Tennis II TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Martin Peper
PE 14-01 Karate II MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson
PE 18-01 Pilates I MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard
PE 19-01 Conditioning II TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 20-01 Weight Training MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 26-01 Tai Chi Chuan MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Phyllis Calph
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Kristine Spangard
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance T 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson
PE 40-01 Self Defense TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 51-01 Aqua Aerobics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth
PE 61-01 Water Polo MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 112-01 Cosmos: Perspectives and Reflections M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
*2 credit course*
PHYS 113-01 Modern Astronomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 150 Brendan Miller
PHYS 120-01 Astronomical Techniques M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 404 Brendan Miller
*2 credit course*
PHYS 194-01 Nanotechnology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 James Heyman
*First Year Course only* Nanoscience is the emerging field of science concerned with the control of matter on the atomic and molecular scale. This interdisciplinary field sits at the convergence of Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Materials Science and Electrical Engineering. Our course will introduce science at the nanometer length scale, the fabrication of nano-scale systems and some of their technological applications. This quantitative course will use mathematics at the introductory calculus level, and high-school physics and calculus are recommended.
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 Tonnis ter Veldhuis
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab M 02:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab T 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 226-L3 Principles of Physics I Lab T 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Thomas Christensen
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab R 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab R 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 331-01 Modern Physics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 James Heyman
PHYS 331-L1 Modern Physics Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Heyman
PHYS 331-L2 Modern Physics Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Heyman
PHYS 340-01 Digital Electronics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with COMP 340-01; ACTC students may register on May 3rd*
PHYS 340-L1 Digital Electronics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm James Doyle
*Cross-listed with COMP 340-L1; ACTC students may register on May 3rd*
PHYS 394-01 Black Holes MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 170 Brendan Miller
This course covers the properties of black holes, including their geometry, formation and growth, and impact on their surroundings. Emphasis will be placed on using astronomical observations to characterize stellar mass and supermassive black holes throughout the Universe. Topics include stellar remnants, black hole binary systems, gamma ray bursts, luminous and distant quasars, quiescent supermassive black holes (such as Sgr A* at the center of our own Milky Way), and links between galaxy and black hole evolution. Relevant theory will be developed and interwoven throughout, in particular special and general relativity, accretion via thin and thick disks, wind and jet launching and feedback, and gravitational wave emission. We will additionally discuss contemporary insights into new research frontiers, including the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes, measurement of black hole spin using X-ray spectroscopy, ongoing searches for intermediate-mass black holes, and the encounter of gas cloud G2 with Sgr A* projected to occur in late 2013. Students will be evaluated on homework assignments, two midterms and a final exam, and an in-depth report on an instructor-approved topic produced with a partner. Prerequisites: previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 331 or consent of instructor.
PHYS 443-01 Electromagnetic Theory MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 100 James Doyle
PHYS 481-01 Quantum Mechanics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
POLI 100-01 US Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Michael Zis
POLI 101-01 Argument and Advocacy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
POLI 120-01 International Politics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 David Blaney
*First Year Course only*
This course has multiple goals. Some revolve around introducing the understandings, protocols, terrains of debate, and inchoate confusions that constitute the field of international politics/relations. For example, the course aims
1. To introduce students to different perspectives or intellectual frameworks for making sense of what conventionally has been called international relations (though many prefer terms like international, transnational, global, or world politics) and to cultivate skills in applying perspectives in aid of understanding events, processes, and/or practices;
2. To introduce some of the multiple forms of social science research and some of the debates about the nature of the social sciences;
3. To introduce the competing notions of power and explore their implications for analyzing world affairs;
4. To help students see international relations as an important study of a more general set of issues: the relations of self and other and the problems and possibilities of living with difference;
5. In sum, I hope that the lessons learned from the class will be (a) sociological/theoretical, in that we will better understand how the world works; (b) meta-theoretical, in that we will reflect a bit on how we study the world; and (c) practical, in that we will think about how we are to live in the world as it is and might be.

The course also emphasizes the development of skills necessary to intellectual inquiry (and perhaps life), particularly deepening reading, thinking, and writing skills.
POLI 120-02 International Politics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber
POLI 140-01 Comparative Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 141-01 Latin America Through Women's Eyes TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Paul Dosh
*First Year Course only; S/D/NC with Written Evaluation grading only; cross-listed with LATI 141-01 and WGSS 141-01* Latin American women have overcome patriarchal “machismo” to serve as presidents, mayors, guerrilla leaders, union organizers, artists, intellectuals, and human rights activists. Through a mix of theoretical, empirical, and testimonial work, we will explore issues such as feminist challenges to military rule in Chile, anti-feminist politics in Nicaragua, the intersection of gender and democratization in Cuba, and women’s organizing amid civil war in Colombia. Teaching methods include discussion, debates, simulations, analytic papers, partisan narratives, lecture, film, poetry, and a biographical essay.

This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course “S/SD/N with Written Evaluation.” This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-pressure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.
POLI 160-01 Foundations of Political Theory MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 205-01 Politics and Policymaking TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Lesley Lavery
*This course to be offered in the fall semester only*
POLI 206-01 US Constitutional Law and Thought MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 208 Clare Ryan
POLI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 350 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
POLI 221-01 Global Governance TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Wendy Weber
POLI 245-01 Latin American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Paul Dosh
*Cross-listed with LATI 245-01; S/D/NC with written evaluation grading only; course is pre-approved for inclusion on major/concentration plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Human Rights and Humanitarianism*
POLI 252-01 Water and Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 252-01 and GEOG 252-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
POLI 265-01 Work, Wealth, Well-Being TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 David Blaney
POLI 269-01 Empirical Research Methods MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Lesley Lavery
POLI 294-01 Conservative Political Thought MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 202 Andrew Latham
This course deals with the conservative currents(s) running through the Western tradition of political thought from the time of Edmund Burke (d. 1797) to today. Its main goal of to provide a solid introduction to this body of philosophical speculation. Through a close reading of texts and commentaries, we will critically (though empathetically) examine the relevant works of thinkers such as Burke, John Henry Newman, C.S. Lewis, Carl Schmitt, Russell Kirk, William F. Buckley Jr., Leo Strauss, John Courtney Murray, Richard Neuhas, Friedrich von Hayek, Irving Kristol, Michael Oakshott, Alasdair MacIntyre, Michael Novak, and George Weigel. The focus of our inquiries will be upon topics such as “how should I lead my life?” (ethics), and “how should we lead our lives together?” (politics).

Important secondary goals of the course include:

1. Familiarizing students with the various “languages” or “idioms” of conservative political thought;
2. Helping students understand the great political debates between conservative and liberals.
3. Applying conservative political frames and concepts to a range of contemporary “hot-button” social and political issues.

As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields (such as Philosophy) who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in conservative political theory/philosophy
POLI 301-01 Law, Economy, and Identity MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 304 Clare Ryan
POLI 320-01 Global Political Economy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 David Blaney
POLI 394-01 Food Politics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Michael Zis
Most people tend to think of eating as a very personal decision, but the availability, price, and nutritional value of our food is strongly influenced by governmental policy. The premise of this course is that buying food and eating is a political and ethical activity: a civic act with political and social consequences. The driving focus is American food politics and policymaking, albeit viewed at points in a comparative context. Areas of discussion include farm subsidies, food safety laws, organic food standards, food stamps, school lunch programs, food deserts, and the campaign against obesity today. While Michael Pollan’s Omnivore’s Dilemma and Eric Schlosser’s Fast Food Nation will serve as our points of departure, it is important to note that classic theories and studies of the dynamics of American political institutions and the policy process will also serve as touchstones for our analysis.
For the course’s final class project, student groups of three, according to shared interest, will be assigned to a local, Twin Cities food organization, such as Frogtown Gardens or Open Arms of Minnesota, for a legislative advocacy paper and project. Students will then present their findings to both the organization and to the class at course’s end, checking in with that organization periodically along the way. This project is made possible and done in partnership with Macalester College’s Center for Civic Engagement.
POLI 400-01 Senior Research Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
POLI 400-02 Senior Research Seminar MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber
POLI 400-03 Senior Research Seminar MF 10:50 am-12:20 pm MARKIM 303 Paul Dosh
POLI 400-04 Senior Research Seminar MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Lesley Lavery
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium W 07:00 pm-09:00 pm CARN 204 Andrew Latham
*2 credit course*

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Kathryn Hecht
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Katrina Archambault
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L4 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 172-01 Psychology in the Material World MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Christina Manning
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 172-01* This course is an in-depth psychological analysis of consumerism and the human relationship to “stuff”. Consumerism, materialistic aspirations, advertising, and "affluenza" (the disease of affluence) all exert profound and often undesirable effects on both people's individual lives and on society as a whole. These phenomena, and the consumerist culture they are embedded in, affect our psyches, our families, our local communities, the peoples of the world, and the integrity of our ecological system. The overarching goal of this course is not to conclude that our consumer culture is categorically bad, but to take a step back and assess the evidence.
This course draws from a range of theoretical, clinical, and methodological approaches to address several key questions: Where does the drive to consume originate? Do we control our consumer behavior? Is it possible to live in our culture and not be a consumer? Are there realistic alternatives to the status quo? We will critically examine the scholarly merits and ramifications of these ideas and discuss whether and how to act upon them in our lives and in society more broadly. A portion of class time will be spent in experiential exploration of suggested “antidotes to materialism” such as mindfulness, gratitude, and voluntary simplicity, in a variety of settings (e.g., Mall of America, a local landfill, an urban intentional community, etc.) Prerequisites/background knowledge: This course does not require any prior knowledge; however, a strong interest in psychology and/or environmental studies will likely be helpful.
PSYC 194-01 Minding the Body TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 270 Kayiatos, Ostrove
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with RUSS 194-01 and WGSS 194-01*
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the body primarily from the perspectives of psychology, disability studies, and feminist studies, with a strategically split focus primarily on the United States and Russia/Eastern Europe. We will rely on analysis of theoretical and empirical research, personal narrative, and film, as well as visits from a variety of guest speakers, to explore such questions as: What is a “normal” body? A “beautiful” body? How does the media inform how we feel about our bodies? How are bodies – especially women’s bodies – objectified, exploited, commodified, and regulated? How and why do we discriminate against people with non-normative bodies? How do people represent the experience of having a disabled body? How can we think critically about the various ways in which people change, regulate, and enhance their bodies (e.g., via body building, cosmetic surgery, diet, etc.)? How do sexism, racism, classism, homophobia, and other forms of oppression influence how different bodies are viewed, treated, educated, and experienced? And how does all this change when we travel in time or across space?

The course’s cross-listing with Russian Studies will give students a comparative context for thinking about how the body is built – and minded – differently depending on cultural, political, and economic considerations.

This will be a writing-intensive course in which students will write (and re-write) personal essays, analytical and reflective essays, and a research paper.
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Steve Guglielmo
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Steve Guglielmo
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Steve Guglielmo
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Julia Manor
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; first day attendance required*
PSYC 242-01 Cognitive Psychology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea
PSYC 242-L1 Cognitive Psychology Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 354 Brooke Lea
PSYC 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with NEUR 244-01; permission of the instructor is required for ACTC students*
PSYC 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with NEUR 244-L1*
PSYC 250-01 Developmental Psychology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 352 Anna Johnson
PSYC 254-01 Social Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Patrick Dwyer
PSYC 264-01 The Psychology of Gender TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Joan Ostrove
*Cross-listed with WGSS 264-01*
PSYC 270-01 Psychology of Sustainable Behavior TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Christina Manning
*Cross-listed with ENVI 270-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Burgund, Guglielmo, Johnson, Strauss
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Burgund, Guglielmo, Johnson, Strauss
PSYC 370-01 Understanding and Confronting Racism M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 301 Stephanie Pituc
*Cross-listed with AMST 370-01*
PSYC 374-01 Clinical and Counseling Psych TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 374-02 Clinical and Counseling Psych TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 370 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 389-01 Inside the Animal Mind MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Julia Manor
*Cross-listed with NEUR 289-01* Ever wondered what your dog is thinking or why your cat behaves a certain way? In this course students will be introduced to the questions and concepts in the study of animal cognition and the neurobiological basis for cognition. We will take a peek into the animal mind and show that many topics in animal cognition can be studied in an objective and scientific manner. The format of the seminar will include student led discussion of recent topics in the study of animal cognition. Topics may include: animal sensory abilities, abstract representations (e.g., numbers and time) cause and effect detection, memory and emotion systems and their neurobiological basis, insight and reasoning, theory of mind, and communication. Book chapters and journal articles will be employed to illustrate these concepts. Prerequisites: Psychology 100 and 201 -or- Psychology/Neuroscience Studies 180 and permission of instructor.
PSYC 394-02 Stress and Development TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 370 Anna Johnson
All children, adults, and families experience stressful life events. This course will examine ways in which chronic and acute stressors influence biological and behavioral development. We will explore both psychological and physiological processes involved in the experience of “stress.” Specific topics include, but are not limited to, early life stress and brain development, adolescent stress and coping, and the impact of stress on cognitive function, psychological well-being, and physical health throughout the lifespan. Finally, we will explore strategies and interventions that aim to reduce stress-related risks and foster healthy development. This course has a student led component. Prerequisite: PSYC 250, Development Psychology.
PSYC 394-03 Psychology of Adoption W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 301 Oh Myo Kim
PSYC 488-01 Lives in Context TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Joan Ostrove

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RELI 100-01 Introduction to Islam: Formation and Expansion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Brett Wilson
*First Year Course only* This course will survey the formation and development of Islam, examining major elements of the Islamic religious tradition (prophecy, scripture, mysticism, intellectual traditions) and putting them into conversation with historical and contemporary events. By the end of this course, students will gain a critical understanding of Muslim theology, sacred texts, ritual practices and cultural phenomena. In other words, you will also be able to examine and discuss contemporary issues with the benefit of historical insight and first hand acquaintance with the primary sources of the Islamic tradition. The course aims to develop critical thinking and public speaking skills through discussion, oral presentations, and writing. No prior knowledge is required and this class is open to majors and non-majors. It is especially recommended for those who are considering the Middle Eastern Studies and Islamic Civilizations concentration.
RELI 100-02 Introduction to Islam: Formation and Expansion TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Brett Wilson
RELI 111-01 Introduction to Buddhism MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Erik Davis
*First day attendance required*
RELI 120-01 Hebrew Bible TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Susanna Drake
RELI 130-01 Folklore and Religion W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 206 Peter Harle
RELI 194-01 Sex, Lies and Religious Ethics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am ARTCOM 202 Barry Cytron
This study of Christian and Jewish moral perspectives has two goals: 1.) to understand how and why these inherited religious traditions are used to answer contemporary ethical problems, and 2.) to explore the extent to which, within as well as between these distinctive religious cultures, authoritative texts and community practices often yield diverse viewpoints. Issues include: abortion, biomedical parenting and stem cell research; the ethics of assisted suicide and caring for the dying; scarce resources and responsibility to the other; the environment and religious stewardship; and forgiveness and the call to justice.
RELI 194-02 Virginity from Mary to Miley TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Susanna Drake
*First Year Course only* In this course we will explore the diverse understandings of Christian sexual renunciation from the first century, C.E. to today. From the veneration of the Virgin Mary in early and medieval Christianity to the more recent celebration of virgins and born-again virgins in U.S. pop culture, many Christians have understood the practice of virginity as a mark of spiritual progress or perfection. Students in this course will examine the rise of Christian sexual renunciation in the first through fourth centuries, C.E., the veneration of virgin saints in the Middle Ages, the shifting attitudes toward virginity in the Reformation era, the recent development of Christian chastity movements in the U.S. (True Love Waits, Silver Ring Thing), and the proliferation of Christian chastity advice literature. In written assignments and class discussions, we will explore how Christian practices of renunciation draw upon and contribute to cultural understandings of gender, sexuality, and the body.
RELI 235-01 Theory and Method in the Study of Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Erik Davis
*First day attendance required*
RELI 236-01 Sanskrit and Classical Religion in India MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 James Laine
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-02, CLAS 294-01 and LING 294-01*
RELI 294-01 Arabic Reading and Translation W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Brett Wilson
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-02*
RELI 294-02 The Literary Bible TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Theresa Krier
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-03*
RELI 294-03 Seeing is Believing: Global Religions in Minnesota M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Shana Sippy
Somali Muslims in Rice County? Hindus in Maple Grove? Hmong shamans in St. Paul hospitals? Sun Dances in Pipestone? In light of globalization, the religious landscape of Minnesota, like America more broadly, has become more visibly diverse. Lake Wobegon stereotypes aside, Minnesota has always been characterized by some diversity but the realities of immigration, dispossession, dislocation, economics, and technology have made religious diversity more pressing in its implications for every arena of civic and cultural life. This course bridges theoretical knowledge with engaged field research focused on how Midwestern contexts shape global religious communities and how these communities challenge and transform Minnesota. Engaging in a public scholarship project together—using ethnographic and anthropological methods—we will see religious communities first-hand and develop living portraits of different religious sites. The course is part of a larger collaboration with Carleton College students and faculty and builds upon web-based research project that encourages students to play to their strengths and use different types of media—written, photographic, audio, video—to document stories of Minnesota's religious diversity.
RELI 294-04 Passions and Requiems MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 228 Michael McGaghie
*Cross-listed with MUSI 294-01*
RELI 394-01 Religions in Africa; Cross Readings Between Literature and Theology on Social Cultural Changes MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Jean-Pierre Karegeye
*Cross-listed with FREN 416-01; first day attendance required; counts as Tier I course for the African Studies concentration* Many African novels have depicted the relationships between Islam, Christianity and African cultural heritage. African Theology too has framed a dialogue between Christianity, in particular, and African cultures/traditional religions. This course investigates religion’s role in shaping African culture and social changes around readings from both Francophone African literature and African Theology, alongside a viewing of a range of African films. If it is true that "natural" African religion is tied up in African traditions, then the introduction of other religions (Christianity and Islam), need to be explored for their impact across the entire social arena. Due to extensive efforts to enculturate "revealed" religions, extra-African contact yields challenges to definitions of local culture and identity. Diverse religions offer distinct social constructions, impacting indigenous ethnic and national unities. What is it that defines an African cultural heritage? How do we understand a cultural identity that combines multiple religions with "alien features?" What role can traditional African religion play in a modern and mutating society in a globalized context? What does it mean to be “African Christian”, “African Muslim” today in an Africa engaged in a radical and massive refiguring of gender equality, human rights, peace, and democracy?

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RUSS 101-01 Elementary Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 212 Julia Chadaga
RUSS 101-L1 Elementary Russian I Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 Ekaterina Efimenko
RUSS 101-L2 Elementary Russian I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Ekaterina Efimenko
RUSS 151-01 "Things Don't Like Me": The Material World and Why It Matters MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 Julia Chadaga
*First Year Course only* The hapless hero of Yuri Olesha’s novel Envy laments: “Things don’t like me. Furniture purposely sticks out its legs for me. A polished corner once literally bit me. My blanket and I have always had a complicated relationship...” Olesha was writing in the turbulent decades after the Russian revolution, when the Bolsheviks, who had just come to power, sought to abolish religion in favor of a materialist approach to life, while Constructivist artists proclaimed a new way of thinking about things, not as possessions but as “comrades.” By transforming our relationship to material objects, by envisioning them as equals rather than things to be exploited, consumed, and possessed, we would ultimately transform our social relations, and treat one another more humanely. A bright, benevolent future was on the horizon.

Olesha’s novel is very much a product of its time, yet its hero’s plight is a universal one. We all have a contentious relationship with our material reality. The blankets are tangled, the roads are icy, the colors of the walls are wrong, the sun is too hot, the universe is too big. Once our basic needs are met, why do we continue to adapt, transform, and refine our physical environment? Why and how do human beings invest objects with meaning—and at what cost to others? How do the objects that surround us shape the world of ideas, emotions, and other essential aspects of human existence? Drawing upon the insights of scholars from such fields as history, literature, anthropology, visual art, architecture, and material culture studies, we will seek answers to these questions. We will read literary texts and analyze how the authors reflect as well as imagine material reality, and how they deploy concrete objects to create meaning in their work.
RUSS 194-01 Minding the Body TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 270 Kayiatos, Ostrove
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with PSYC 194-01 and WGSS 194-01*
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the body primarily from the perspectives of psychology, disability studies, and feminist studies, with a strategically split focus primarily on the United States and Russia/Eastern Europe. We will rely on analysis of theoretical and empirical research, personal narrative, and film, as well as visits from a variety of guest speakers, to explore such questions as: What is a “normal” body? A “beautiful” body? How does the media inform how we feel about our bodies? How are bodies – especially women’s bodies – objectified, exploited, commodified, and regulated? How and why do we discriminate against people with non-normative bodies? How do people represent the experience of having a disabled body? How can we think critically about the various ways in which people change, regulate, and enhance their bodies (e.g., via body building, cosmetic surgery, diet, etc.)? How do sexism, racism, classism, homophobia, and other forms of oppression influence how different bodies are viewed, treated, educated, and experienced? And how does all this change when we travel in time or across space?

The course’s cross-listing with Russian Studies will give students a comparative context for thinking about how the body is built – and minded – differently depending on cultural, political, and economic considerations.

This will be a writing-intensive course in which students will write (and re-write) personal essays, analytical and reflective essays, and a research paper.
RUSS 203-01 Intermediate Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Anastasia Kayiatos
RUSS 203-L1 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Ekaterina Efimenko
RUSS 203-L2 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Ekaterina Efimenko
RUSS 261-01 Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Chadaga, Weisensel
*Cross-listed with HIST 261-01*
RUSS 294-01 Cold War Gets Hot: Sex and Gender in First and Second World Literatures TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Anastasia Kayiatos
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-01 and WGSS 294-01; first day attendance required* "In our country there is no sex." These words, uttered by a female bureaucrat from Leningrad during the first US-Soviet telebridge in 1987, struck a chord with viewers on either side of the ideological divide. The readings for this class tell a different story, peeling back the Iron Curtain to reveal the steamier scenes of the Cold War: both the passions of late-capitalism in the West, and the hot-cha in the dacha of the communist East. Keeping in mind the historical contexts in which these works by American, Czech, Croatian, German, and Russian authors were produced, this course aims to map out the manifold relationships between intimacy and ideology, sex and poetics, which took shape during the atomic age. In these readings, we will pay special mind to how certain bodies—sexual, textual, and political—acquired additional resonance as suspicious or perverse. Though we will search for the pleasure in the text, we will not lose sight of the pleasure of the text, as we consider how desire operates on multiple, intersecting planes: between characters; between readers and writers; and between the First and Second Worlds.

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Lesley Kandaras
SOCI 194-01 The Medical Industry MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk
*First Year Course only* This course provides an overview of the political, economic, cultural, and scientific foundations of the US health care industry. Select topics include: What is the secret to a long life? What is the basis of medical knowledge about health and illness? How do we know if medical care hurts or helps us? What is distinctive about the professionalization of medicine in the US compared to other nations? Why did the US health care industry develop under the auspices of markets rather than government-provided public goods? Why is it so difficult to achieve universal health insurance coverage in the US? How will the Obama health reforms work?
SOCI 205-01 Public Schooling in America M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk
SOCI 220-01 Sociology of Race/Ethnicity MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm CARN 105 Mahnaz Kousha
SOCI 220-02 Sociology of Race/Ethnicity TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Mahnaz Kousha
SOCI 230-01 Affirmative Action Policy MW 09:10 am-10:40 am CARN 105 Terry Boychuk
SOCI 272-01 Social Theories MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Daniel Williams
SOCI 294-01 Immigration, Ethnicity, and Citizenship in the US and Europe MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 105 Daniel Williams
While immigration has been a defining feature of American society for over a century, it has increasingly become one in many European countries as well. In both the U.S. and Europe, similar questions have been raised by immigration and the presence of immigrants--about national identity, citizenship, integration and assimilation, and rights, among others. Many of these terms themselves are contested, evincing the complexity of the topic of immigration and immigrants' lives. Who are contemporary immigrants in the US and Europe? How are they incorporated into European and American societies? In what ways are immigrants assimilating, and what kinds of ties do they maintain to their countries of origin? How do state actors and policies respond to and shape immigrants and immigration? How is immigration framed and debated by governments and state actors in both Europe and the U.S.? These are some of the questions that we will explore in this course, from the both the perspective of immigrants as well as host societies. Our perspective in this course is decidedly comparative—between different countries and different immigrant groups. As such, one of the intellectual goals of course work is to uncover the similarities and differences between countries and different groups of immigrants. We will also consider both actual migrants as well as their children (the “second generation”).
SOCI 480-01 Senior Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Kousha, Larson

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Theatre and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
THDA 105-01 Theatre and Performance in the Twin Cities MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 205 Beth Cleary
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required*
The Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul are second only to New York City in the number of “live performance” tickets sold annually. This is a creative community with dynamic artistic institutions! In this class, we examine the many histories, forms, signifying systems and strategies of performance-making in these Twin Cities. We will attend theatre and dance performances in urban venues as various as professional theatres, small puppet-show venues, dance concert halls, among others. We will read playscripts, scholarly articles and research documents, as appropriate, in preparation for attending shows, and we will practice the vocabularies of analysis and critique, and the art of reflection and review, after the performances.
The course meets MWF for one hour per class period. We will attend 4-6 off-campus productions during the semester, on Thursday or Friday nights. This will be announced in the syllabus on the first day of class. All transportation and tickets are pre-arranged for students in the class -- the students do not pay for either bus or tickets. We will also prepare to see both Macalester THDA productions in the fall: Nikolai Gogol's The Government Inspector, and the Fall Dance Concert. Inclusion of both off-campus and on-campus productions allows us to identify conventions of performance in any setting, and discuss variations on the spectrum of educational to professional, text-based to experimental and non-speaking performance. In preparing for the interpretative encounters of live performance, we learn and practice vocabularies of re-collection crucial to discussing and analyzing performance. We will consider the histories and innovations in the forms we see, developing a capacity for what Brecht called “complex seeing” as we actively watch, hear and make critical new meanings in the performance event. We will meet with directors, actors and designers in connection with several of the productions; this always enhances spectators' understanding of process and the various specialized labors of performance-making.
Course readings change every year, selected for connections to productions we will see. Beth Cleary will communicate with the class in August about a pre-reading for the first class meeting. Required texts for the course will be available in the college bookstore.
Course Requirements:
Attendance is required at all productions listed on syllabus, with the group. Arrangements should be made early in the semester with coaches, program leaders, etc., if you will need to miss a game or an event. Beth Cleary can send letters prioritizing this coursework to any parties involved.
Students will be taught to engage in critical writing about performance. Mastery in this form will be measured as part of the grade. Critical writing about performance translates readily into all forms of analytic writing in the arts, humanities and social sciences. Students will undertake
THDA 110-01 Introduction to Theatre Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Eric Colleary
THDA 115-01 Cultures of Dance MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 205 Wynn Fricke
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory and Performance I MW 12:00 pm-01:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Harry Waters
THDA 121-01 Beginning Dance Composition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 125-01 Technical Theater MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett
*First day attendance required*
THDA 125-L1 Technical Theater Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett
THDA 125-L2 Technical Theater Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett
THDA 230-01 Physical Approaches MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Robert Rosen
THDA 235-01 Fundamentals of Scene Design TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser
THDA 240-01 Brain to Bone: Aliveness, from Rehearsal through Performance MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 3 Beth Cleary
THDA 263-01 African American Theatre MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 Harry Waters
*First day attendance required*
THDA 341-01 Intermediate Dance Composition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 475-01 Advanced Scene Design TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser
*$40 material fee required*
THDA 489-01 Seminar in Performance Theory and Practice TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Eric Colleary
*First day attendance required*
THDA 21-01 African Dance MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 6 Patricia Brown
THDA 41-01 Modern Dance I TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 43-01 Modern Dance III MW 03:50 pm-05:20 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 51-01 Ballet I MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile
THDA 52-01 Ballet II MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
WGSS 102-01 Gender and Sport TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Corie Hammers
This course views sport as a social institution and a microcosm of the longer social processes that stage, reinforce, and perpetuate myriad inequalities in society. In this course we analyze the gendered aspects of sport, and relationship among gender, sexuality, and sport. We consider the ways that sport reinforces, and potentially undermines, heteronormality, as well as hegemonic notions of masculinity and femininity. Drawing from a variety of theoretical frameworks such as feminism, queer theory, and critical race theory, this course examines through a critical lens the institution of sport, wherein sport is understood as a microcosm of American society. As a core part of our social structure, sport offers a lens through which to better understand larger social processes that reinforce, support and perpetuate myriad social inequalities, such as gender inequality, racism, homophobia, and class inequality. We focus in this course on the gendered dimensions of sport, and consider the ways sport reinforces, as well as potentially undermines, heteronormativity and the normative gender binary.
WGSS 105-01 Transnational Perspectives on Gender, Race, Class, and Sexuality MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*First day attendance required* Could it be possible that your own gender, race, class, and sexuality as well as your questions about them, are intimately related to global politics and culture? How does your life connect to a corporate executive’s in Thailand, a migrant laborer’s in Italy, a sweatshop worker’s in Colombia, and immigrant professionals’ in Silicon Valley? And how do different histories of women’s and gender studies intersect to expand this matrix of identities?
Through feminist analyses of actual events and phenomena such as globalization and transnationalism, this course offers surprising and exciting discoveries surrounding these questions that reveal how our past and present are linked. It uses historical documents, film, fiction, ethnographies, and autobiographies to show how we accept, negotiate, resist, and recreate where we belong in the world and how we interact with others, through texts such as Women’s Lives: Multicultural Perspectives and Gender Through the Prism of Difference. Some writers included are bell hooks, Adrienne Rich, R.W. Connell, Alice Walker, Nawal el Saadawi, Richard Falk, Barbara Smith, and Gloria Anzaldua.
WGSS 141-01 Latin America Through Women's Eyes TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Paul Dosh
*First Year Course only; S/D/NC with Written Evaluation grading only; cross-listed with POLI 141-01 and LATI 141-01* Latin American women have overcome patriarchal “machismo” to serve as presidents, mayors, guerrilla leaders, union organizers, artists, intellectuals, and human rights activists. Through a mix of theoretical, empirical, and testimonial work, we will explore issues such as feminist challenges to military rule in Chile, anti-feminist politics in Nicaragua, the intersection of gender and democratization in Cuba, and women’s organizing amid civil war in Colombia. Teaching methods include discussion, debates, simulations, analytic papers, partisan narratives, lecture, film, poetry, and a biographical essay.

This class employs an innovative system of qualitative assessment. Students take the course “S/SD/N with Written Evaluation.” This provides a powerful opportunity for students to stretch their limits in a learning community with high expectations, but without a high-pressure atmosphere. This ungraded course has been approved for inclusion on major/minor plans in Political Science, Latin American Studies, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.
WGSS 194-01 Minding The Body TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 270 Kayiatos, Ostrove
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with PSYC 194-01 and RUSS 194-01*
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the body primarily from the perspectives of psychology, disability studies, and feminist studies, with a strategically split focus primarily on the United States and Russia/Eastern Europe. We will rely on analysis of theoretical and empirical research, personal narrative, and film, as well as visits from a variety of guest speakers, to explore such questions as: What is a “normal” body? A “beautiful” body? How does the media inform how we feel about our bodies? How are bodies – especially women’s bodies – objectified, exploited, commodified, and regulated? How and why do we discriminate against people with non-normative bodies? How do people represent the experience of having a disabled body? How can we think critically about the various ways in which people change, regulate, and enhance their bodies (e.g., via body building, cosmetic surgery, diet, etc.)? How do sexism, racism, classism, homophobia, and other forms of oppression influence how different bodies are viewed, treated, educated, and experienced? And how does all this change when we travel in time or across space?

The course’s cross-listing with Russian Studies will give students a comparative context for thinking about how the body is built – and minded – differently depending on cultural, political, and economic considerations.

This will be a writing-intensive course in which students will write (and re-write) personal essays, analytical and reflective essays, and a research paper.
WGSS 200-01 Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*First day attendance required; no prerequisites* This course is an exploration of the intertwined histories of feminist and queer imaginaries of sexuality, gender, class, race, and nation. Journeying across 500 years of Native American, South Asian, European, African, and many other worlds of experience, this course will visit the statements and debates, conversations and controversies that inform our present. How we theorize and practice on a range of issues--from equal rights to earn and learn, to mass protests to individual art, from what we consume to what we produce--these are all illuminated by the provocative and complicated histories of feminist and queer theories and methodologies.
WGSS 201-01 History of U.S. Feminisms MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Lynn Hudson
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with HIST 201-01* This year “The Feminine Mystique” by Betty Friedan turns 50 years old. Some credit this text with igniting the feminist movement of the 1960s in the United States. Did it? What is feminism and how did it change from its early articulations in the nineteenth century to the activism of the 1960s? This course examines the “f” word and its history. We will be especially concerned with the multiple and contradictory strains within feminism, including the critiques and interventions made by women of color. Topics that the class will consider include: the roots of feminism as it took shape in the anti-slavery movement, the overlap of women’s rights and the civil rights movement of the twentieth century, and the women’s health movement. Our readings include: biographies of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Sojourner Truth, anti-feminist tracts from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, essays by lesbian feminists Audre Lorde and Charlotte Bunch, and Friedan’s infamous text, among other selections.
WGSS 220-01 Icons, Ideas, Instruments: Feminist Re-constructions W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-06; first day attendance required; no prerequisites* "Indian Women Writers:" India is still described as "exotic" in current cultural vocabularies, by Indians and others. We will investigate the material realities on which these cultural vocabularies rest, through the mirrors held up by Indian women writers who are this nation-state's citizens, expatriates, and diasporans. These writers' historico-political contexts, tussles with language, and other self-imaginings, create a compelling force in developing the idea of "India" and its relationships to East Africa, North America and Western Europe.
WGSS 252-01 Gender, Sexualities and Feminist Visual Culture MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot
*Cross-listed with ART 252-01*
WGSS 252-02 Gender, Sexualities and Feminist Visual Culture TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ART 252-02* This course will examine the ways in which gender, sexuality, and feminist theory have affected modern visual culture since the early 20th century to the present. Students will explore ways in which Western culture has defined art and artists in gendered terms, and will critically explore these constructs through weekly readings, discussions and writing assignments. Students will also engage in the examination of current global and transnational feminist trends, and consider how gender is relevant to the creation and study of arts and culture. This course is cross-listed with the WGSS Department. Course material will be drawn from multiple disciplines including feminist theory, queer theory, cultural studies, and art history.
WGSS 264-01 The Psychology of Gender TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Joan Ostrove
*Cross-listed with PSYC 264-01*
WGSS 294-01 Cold War Gets Hot: Sex and Gender in First and Second World Literatures TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Anastasia Kayiatos
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-01 and RUSS 294-01; first day attendance required*
WGSS 294-02 Archetypes and Agency: Gender in Latin American History through Film and Text M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Andrea Moerer
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-01 and LATI 294-01*
WGSS 305-01 Race, Sex, and Work in a Global Economy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Corie Hammers
*Cross-listed with AMST 305-01; first day attendance required* This seminar presents feminist and queer studies of global capitalism, which examine power relations under contemporary globalization in terms of the racial and sexual dynamics of labor, citizenship, and migration. Course material considers the local and transnational dynamics of free trade, labor fragmentation, and structural adjustment, as these shape industrial and informal labor, and community organizing around gender, sexuality, and HIV/AIDS. The material foregrounds ethnographic analyses of the everyday conditions of people situated in struggles with the effects of global capitalism.
Drawing from various feminist frameworks and queer theory, this advanced seminar interrogates the ways in which race, sexuality, class, gender, and nation are imbricated in, and thus connected to, the global marketplace. This course thus examines power relations under contemporary globalization in terms of the racial and sexual dynamics of labor, citizenship, and migration. Course material considers the local and transnational dynamics of free trade, labor fragmentation, and structural adjustment, as these shape industrial and informal labor, community organizing, and global trends as they pertain to gender, sexuality, and racial/ethnic formations. The material foregrounds ethnographic analyses of the everyday conditions of people situated in struggles with the effects of global capitalism

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