Spring 2013 Class Schedule

This is a class schedule from a previous term. View current class schedules

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Chinese
Classics
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Neuroscience Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theatre and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
AMST 101-01 Explorations of Race and Racism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 SooJin Pate
This is an introductory course on the social construction of race and how the category of "race" has been wielded to justify all kinds of inequality. This course will provide you with a new vocabulary as we explore the following: the difference between prejudice and racism, different kinds of racism, white privilege, and the problems with celebratory approaches to race such as "multiculturalism," "diversity," "colorblindness," and "post-race." Through a critical engagement with the readings, this course will illuminate structures of power and expose the contradictions of concepts such as equality, democracy, citizenship, and the American dream. And by engaging with critical race theory, women of color feminism, and cultural criticism, you will gain the tools to think more critically about the interlocking relationship between race and other categories of difference (e.g., gender, class, sexuality, and religion), as well as the role that culture plays in both producing and challenging dominant narratives of white and nonwhite peoples. NOTE: This course, or its equivalent, is required for majors and minors.
AMST 112-01 Intro to LGBTQ Studies MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Ryan Murphy
*Cross-listed with WGSS 110-01*
AMST 194-02 Hunger Games: Map and Mirror for the 21st Century TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 215 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*To enhance the classroom experience, spaces will be reserved for an equal number of seniors, juniors, sophomores and first-years; instructor signature required* Never mind all the Vanity Fair glitz about the young actors who play Katniss, Gale, and Peeta. In this course we will read all three books and watch the first film. Then, we will consider the Hunger Games as a serious conversation about war, revolution, global inequality, environmentalism, Reality TV, gender/sexuality, and the power of love. Throughout, we will develop and employ a language that will help us to reveal the significance of race and other proto-fascist formations in the world of Panem. Bring a sense of adventure and compassion; otherwise, no prerequisites.
AMST 194-03 Topics in US History: Women's History through Oral History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Catherine Batza
*Cross-listed with HIST 190-01 and WGSS 194-01*
AMST 203-01 Politics and Inequality MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Lesley Lavery
*Cross-listed with POLI 203-01*
AMST 244-01 Urban Latino Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Paul Dosh
First day attendance required; cross-listed with LATI 244-01 and POLI 244-01*
AMST 294-01 Black Feminist Thought MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 111 Duchess Harris
AMST 294-02 Schools to Prison Pipeline TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with EDUC 294-01; first day attendance required* When we look at the shocking rates with which poor black and brown students are disproportionately punished, suspended and expelled from classrooms across the nation—and often, within a few months, drawn into the juvenile correctional system—we cannot help but wonder: What is going on, and what can we do to fix it? This lecture-based, introductory level course will focus on Zero Tolerance policies in the U.S. public schools and juvenile corrections as connected and overlapping sites of structural racism, social segregation, and potential violations of universal human rights. We will explore these concepts from a variety of inter/disciplinary and theoretical perspectives. The question of "civil rights and human rights" will provide a central frame for thinking about the fate of youth who are funneled into the pipeline. No prerequisites.
AMST 294-03 US Racial Formations and Global Economy M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
The point of this course is to study globalization as a historical, economic, and local process. We will consider the notion that Western colonization and exploitation of people and resources in Latin America, Africa, and Asia has relied on and produced racialized experiences and identities in the contemporary United States. We read texts, watch films, write papers, and do team presentations. In addition, we will have one class field trip. No prerequisites.
AMST 294-04 African American Lit to 1900 MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with ENGL 275-01*
AMST 294-05 African American Lit 1900-Pres MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with ENGL 276-01*
AMST 294-06 Community-Based Theaters TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 113 Harry Waters
*Cross-listed with THDA 210-01*
AMST 294-07 Community Youth Development in Multicultural America TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed as EDUC 230-01*
AMST 294-08 American Philosophy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 219 Geoffrey Gorham
*Cross-listed with PHIL 294-01*
AMST 294-09 US Since 1945 TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with HIST 244-01*
AMST 294-10 History of Latinos in the US TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-08*
AMST 294-11 Sex and the City: Gender, Sexuality, and Urban Life MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Catherine Batza
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-05 and WGSS 294-03*
AMST 294-12 Wars on Poverty MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Catherine Batza
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-06 and WGSS 294-04*
AMST 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 Galo Gonzalez
*Cross-listed with Hisp 308-01 and Lati 308-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 315-01 Transnational Studies: Race, Empire and the Politics of Transracial and Transnational Adoption W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 SooJin Pate
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-03* From Tom Cruise to Madonna to Brangelina to Katherine Heigl, the transracial and transnational adoption of children of color by white Americans has become a popular trend among celebrities. Everybody’s doing it, it seems. The hypervisibility of the personal lives of Hollywood stars in American media suggests that transracial and transnational adoption is a new phenomenon; however, as this course will show, these types of adoption have a history that go back to the formation of the U.S. nation-state. In order to understand how and why the adoption of nonwhite children by white people has become normalized in the Western world, we will conduct a genealogical investigation of transracial and transnational adoption in the United States. We will uncover the political, social, cultural, and ideological reasons that worked to justify the naturalization of white bodies parenting nonwhite children. In so doing, this course introduces students to the animating debates and issues in transracial and transnational adoption by engaging with its history and cultural production (literature, film, visual art, etc.). Furthermore, we will investigate adoptee responses to being raised by white parents and, usually, in all white communities. We will end the course with alternatives to transracial and transnational adoption that have been suggested by adoptee activists.
AMST 330-01 Mellon Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 112 Duchess Harris
*2 credit course*
AMST 354-01 Blackness in the Media W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 402 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with MCST 354-01; screening times TBD*
AMST 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with ENGL 384-01 and INTl 384-01*
AMST 394-02 The Political Economy of Gender and Sexuality W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Ryan Murphy
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-01*
AMST 400-01 Senior Seminar MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 112 Duchess Harris
AMST 494-01 Adv Seminar: Visual Representations of Nation/Culture/Race/Gender TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Michael Griffin
*Cross-listed as MCST 488-01*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Ron Barrett
ANTH 111-02 Cultural Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Olga Gonzalez
ANTH 115-01 Biological Anthropology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06B Scott Legge
ANTH 123-01 Introduction to Archaeology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Andrew Overman
*Cross-listed with CLAS 123-01*
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Arjun Guneratne
*Limited to declared Anthropology majors; first day attendance required*
ANTH 239-01 Medical Anthropology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Ron Barrett
ANTH 294-01 Cultural Resource Management MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01* Archaeology in the United States is no longer practiced exclusively by universities and museums. In fact, since the 1970s, the vast majority of archaeological projects undertaken involve individuals employed in either private industry or with the federal or state government. This shift toward cultural resource management (CRM) archaeology transformed the traditional role of archaeology practiced during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. So, what changed? This course explores the role of public archaeology in the United States through an examination of the laws and practices dictating the protection of historic properties, consultation with descendent communities, and the design of archaeological management plans.
ANTH 294-01 Cultural Resource Management MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06B Edward Fleming
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01* Archaeology in the United States is no longer practiced exclusively by universities and museums. In fact, since the 1970s, the vast majority of archaeological projects undertaken involve individuals employed in either private industry or with the federal or state government. This shift toward cultural resource management (CRM) archaeology transformed the traditional role of archaeology practiced during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. So, what changed? This course explores the role of public archaeology in the United States through an examination of the laws and practices dictating the protection of historic properties, consultation with descendent communities, and the design of archaeological management plans.
ANTH 294-02 Museum Anthropology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez
This course introduces students to critical perspectives in museum studies. We will begin by examining the historical setting within which these institutions evolved, giving careful consideration to the relationship with anthropology and to how the discipline contributed to the construction of the “exotic” objects contained within the “cabinets of curiosities” that filled museums. In this course we will engage in both theoretical and practical terms with museums as public culture. Thus, we will pay close attention to the processes of collection, archives and exhibits in order to examine how curatorial practices and the gazes of visitors also contribute to make of museums sites for contestation, reconciliation, dialogue, fragmentation and community. The critical aspect of this course also includes perspectives of groups that are critical of museums but propose alternative “post-museum” experiences that enable multi-vocality and defy the monumentality of Western museum practice.
ANTH 358-01 Anthropology of Violence MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm ARTCOM 202 Olga Gonzalez
ANTH 380-01 Adv Medical Anthropology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06B Ron Barrett
ANTH 394-01 Writing Human Rights TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 James Dawes
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-03; permission of instructor required* This writing intensive seminar will explore the relationship between human rights and life narratives. Life stories are of increasing importance across a range of academic disciplines, but nowhere more so than in the interdisciplinary work of human rights. Human rights advocacy has always relied upon the use of peoples' stories—to give voice to those cruelly silenced by violence, to generate sympathy in global bystanders, to shame perpetrator governments. The special challenges of this sort of storytelling have recently become topics of special attention in academic scholarship. Many of the questions are ethical: How can you move audiences without being sensational? How can you speak for others without displacing them? How can you put incommunicable trauma into words without somehow altering the truth of it? This interdisciplinary course, co-taught by faculty in Anthropology and English, will train students in the methods and ethics of life history interviewing and the craft of narrative writing. Priority for registration will be given to students who can count the course for one or more of the following: English, Anthropology, Human Rights and Humanitarianism. We also aim to achieve a mix of sophomores, juniors, and seniors in the course.
ANTH 394-01 Writing Human Rights TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Dianna Shandy
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-03; permission of instructor required* This writing intensive seminar will explore the relationship between human rights and life narratives. Life stories are of increasing importance across a range of academic disciplines, but nowhere more so than in the interdisciplinary work of human rights. Human rights advocacy has always relied upon the use of peoples' stories—to give voice to those cruelly silenced by violence, to generate sympathy in global bystanders, to shame perpetrator governments. The special challenges of this sort of storytelling have recently become topics of special attention in academic scholarship. Many of the questions are ethical: How can you move audiences without being sensational? How can you speak for others without displacing them? How can you put incommunicable trauma into words without somehow altering the truth of it? This interdisciplinary course, co-taught by faculty in Anthropology and English, will train students in the methods and ethics of life history interviewing and the craft of narrative writing. Priority for registration will be given to students who can count the course for one or more of the following: English, Anthropology, Human Rights and Humanitarianism. We also aim to achieve a mix of sophomores, juniors, and seniors in the course.
ANTH 490-01 Senior Seminar TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy
*First day attendance required*
ANTH 490-02 Senior Seminar TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A Arjun Guneratne
*First day attendance required*

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ART 130-01 Drawing I MW 08:30 am-11:40 am MAIN 400 Megan Vossler
*First day attendance required; course to meet in 4th Floor Old Main Lounge*
ART 130-02 Drawing I MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm MAIN 400 Megan Vossler
*First day attendance required; course to meet in 4th Floor Old Main Lounge*
ART 131-01 Introduction to Ceramics MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm STAD 114 Gary Erickson
*First day attendance required; $100 material fee required*
ART 149-01 Introduction to Visual Culture MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott
ART 161-01 Art of the West II MW 10:50 am-12:20 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot
ART 171-01 Art of the East II: Japan MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott
*Cross-listed with ASIA 171-01*
ART 234-01 Painting I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm TURC LOUNGE Christine Willcox
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 08:00 am-11:10 am STAD 114 Stanton Sears
*First day attendance required*
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm LAMP 3RD Ruthann Godollei
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
ART 294-01 Introduction to Digital Photography MWF 01:10 pm-03:20 pm 45SNEL Justin Newhall
*First day attendance mandatory; course to meet in 45 Snelling. Required: An entry-level digital SLR camera (new or used).* This course introduces conceptual, technical, and historical aspects of digital photography within a fine-arts context. The emphasis throughout is on photography as a creative medium and will introduce strategies and methods related to this goal through assignments and class critiques. Additionally, the course introduces foundational aspects of the technical process of digital photography, from manual camera operation, to the editing of images through Adobe Photoshop. Along the way students will learn about different file types, color management, and how to take their images from screen to print. Also, the course offers an introductory historical overview of fine-art practice as it has evolved from conventional silver photography to current digital practice. Classroom discussions and assigned readings will help students develop the critical skills needed to understand how photographs function aesthetically and conceptually as well as how they are used in contemporary society and culture.

ART 294-02 Dissent M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Ruthann Godollei
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for First Year students* Dissent: art, action and outrage. There is a long tradition of social commentary in the arts, from protest graphics and satirical prints to street actions and performance pieces. Dissent is, literally, to "feel or think differently," something most artists naturally do. This class will comparatively examine the historical precedents, compelling output, theories, intentions, motivations and strategies in the art of various resistance movements. Research projects based on inquiry into historic and contemporary examples of protest art will include hands-on components.
ART 370-01 Drawing II: Expanded Drawing, Mixed Media TR 08:00 am-11:10 am MAIN 400 Megan Vossler
*Course will meet in Old Main, 4th Floor Lounge* Expand your definition of what drawing is, further your exploration of drawing processes, experiment with nontraditional materials, and develop your own concepts and ideas in this studio seminar. Explore the unexpected possibilities of various materials and invent your own processes for their use. This may include: traditional materials (charcoal, ink, chalk, watercolor), found objects/images (books, text, collage, transfer…), other processes (stitching, staining, writing…), 3-dimensional "drawings" (site-specific installation, performance), or time-based works (animation, video, interactive projects). Develop your own individual content in conjunction with the expressive qualities of your materials. In addition to intensive studio work, this course will include discussions, critiques, technical demonstrations, and field trips.
ART 371-01 Painting II TR 08:00 am-11:10 am TURC LOUNGE Christine Willcox
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TBA TBA LAMP 3RD Ruthann Godollei
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II MW 08:30 am-11:40 am STAD 114 Gary Erickson
*First day attendance required; $100 material fee required*
ART 394-01 Globalization and Contemporary Art MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot
This course examines contemporary art from previously neglected regions located outside Western paradigms of art history, including the Middle East, Turkey, Africa, Asia, Latin America, Russia & Eastern Europe, and examines how art produced in these regions challenge and expanded definition of contemporary art and culture. The course will start with an exhibition of visiting artist from Iran and will end with a series of virtual exhibitions on the subject of contemporary art around the globe organized by students. The course will include lectures by experts in particular regions who will provide sociopolitical and historic background for discussions on art produced around the globe. The course will be rich in theoretical discussions on globalization, transnationalism, and post-colonialism and relate these discussions to artistic expression that emerged in the last two decades. The course seeks motivated students who do not necessarily have to have a rich background in art history but who are committed to investigate the issues of contemporary art and globalization in depth and be engaged in curatorial projects assigned in the course. Contact the professor for more information.
ART 394-02 Architectural Drawing and Presentation TBA TBA STAD 114 Stanton Sears
*First day attendance required; professor will decied meeting day/time after conferring with all registrants via email* During the course, we will work with a series of different types of drawings and models as a means to explore public art, landscape architecture, and architectural design. Topics will include conceptual/design development and process drawings, study models, and the development of more finished presentation pieces in a context which includes examination of historic and contemporary design work in the built environment.
ART 488-01 Senior Studio Seminar MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 205 Christine Willcox
ART 490-08 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Ruthann Godollei
ART 490-17 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Gary Erickson

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ASIA 171-01 Art of the East II: Japan MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott
*Cross-listed with ART 171-01*
ASIA 275-01 The Rise of Modern China TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 275-01*
ASIA 294-01 Gender and Sexuality in China TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with CHIN 294-01 and WGSS 294-02*
ASIA 294-02 Global Encounters in History: China and Africa TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 204 Jamie Monson
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-07 and INTL 294-02*
ASIA 378-01 War Crimes and Memory in East Asia TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with HIST 378-01*
ASIA 494-01 Cyber China: the Internet and Contemporary Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 111 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with CHIN 494-01*

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
BIOL 112-01 Origins MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 100 Kristina Curry Rogers
BIOL 117-01 Women, Health and Reproduction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Elizabeth Jansen
*Cross-listed with WGSS 117-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 117-02 Women, Health and Reproduction MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 150 Elizabeth Jansen
*Cross-listed as WGSS 117-02; first day attendance required*
BIOL 144-01 Lakes, Streams and Rivers TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 Emily Schilling
*Cross-listed with ENVI 144-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Devavani Chatterjea
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Sarah Boyer
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Sarah Boyer
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Sarah Boyer
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 226 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
BIOL 342-01 Animal Behavior/Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 342-L1 Animal Behavior/Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 355-01 Virology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Steven Sundby
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 365-01 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 270 Kristina Curry Rogers
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 365-L1 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Kristina Curry Rogers
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 367-01 Human Physiology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Lin Aanonsen
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 367-L1 Human Physiology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 473-01 Research in Immunology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Devavani Chatterjea
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 473-L1 Research in Immunology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI Devavani Chatterjea
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 481-01 Seminar in Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Sarah Boyer
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 486-01 Seminar in Neuropharmacology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 Lin Aanonsen
*Cross-listed with PSYC 386-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 489-01 Biology Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required* Senior biology majors meet weekly for an hour in a seminar format. During some weeks students will listen to presentations made by professionals on biologically-related topics. Other weeks will be focused on career planning, job searching, and applying to post-graduate programs. Students will work independently outside of class on their Senior Presentation, a multiple-draft and semester-long writing project accompanied by an end-of-the-semester oral presentation. Each student will be advised on their Senior Presentation project by a faculty or staff member in the department. Prerequisites: Students must be seniors in either their final semester (May graduates) or next to final semester (December graduates). Offered every spring semester. (4 credits)
BIOL 494-01 Clinical Genetics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 247 Mary Montgomery
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 494-02 Computational Biology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Elizabeth Shoop
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with COMP 320-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 494-02 Computational Biology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Paul Overvoorde
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with COMP 320-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 494-L1 Computational Biology: Synthetic Biology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Elizabeth Shoop
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with COMP 320-L1; first day attendance required*
BIOL 494-L1 Computational Biology: Synthetic Biology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Paul Overvoorde
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with COMP 320-L1; first day attendance required*

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CHEM 112-01 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Paul Fischer
CHEM 112-02 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan
CHEM 112-03 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Paul Fischer
CHEM 112-04 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Susan Green
CHEM 112-L1 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L2 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L3 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity W 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L4 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L5 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Kathryn Splan
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L6 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Thomas Varberg
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L7 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Robert Rossi
*First day attendance required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 212-01 Organic Chemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 100 Ronald Brisbois
CHEM 212-02 Organic Chemistry II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L1 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Susan Green
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L2 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Susan Green
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L3 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L4 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye
CHEM 222-01 Analytical Chemistry MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata
CHEM 222-L1 Analytical Chemistry Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Keith Kuwata
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 222-L2 Analytical Chemistry Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Keith Kuwata
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Paul Fischer
*1 credit course
CHEM 312-01 Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg
CHEM 312-L1 Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 378 Thomas Varberg
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 320-01 Computational Chemistry M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata
CHEM 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Kathryn Splan
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-01; first day attendance required*

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Chinese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CHIN 102-01 First Year Chinese II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 112 Jin Stone
CHIN 102-02 First Year Chinese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 112 Jin Stone
CHIN 102-L1 First Year Chinese II Lab T 02:30 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 300 Lei Chen
CHIN 102-L2 First Year Chinese II Lab W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 102 Lei Chen
CHIN 102-L3 First Year Chinese II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 102 Lei Chen
CHIN 204-01 Second Year Chinese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 112 Patricia Anderson
CHIN 204-02 Second Year Chinese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 112 Patricia Anderson
CHIN 204-L1 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Lei Chen
CHIN 204-L2 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 300 Lei Chen
CHIN 204-L3 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 02:30 pm-03:30 pm OLRI 300 Lei Chen
CHIN 294-01 Gender and Sexuality in China TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-01 and WGSS 294-02; no Chinese background needed* Ang Lee’s 2007 Lust Caution, a story of a female spy/assassin in Japanese occupied Shanghai, was a sensation. It provoked anxiety and controversy with the intersection of female sexuality, the body, and national politics. Lust Caution is one of many hidden and forgotten novels of 20th century Chinese literature, an era that explores the depths of passion and its transfiguration amid dramatic social change. Through a rigorous analysis of the content and structure of novels and films, the course examines the politics of gender and sexuality as it is related to social transformations and engages a variety of themes including:

· (Culture) Revolution plus love: reconfiguring desire in images and pop culture
· The Socialist construction of masculinity and femininity
· Cyber writing: technology, (lack of) passion and the new cosmopolitanism
· Gender and ethnicity: Tibet through avant-garde fiction



CHIN 304-01 Third Year Chinese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 217 Xi He
CHIN 304-L1 Third Year Chinese II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Lei Chen
CHIN 304-L2 Third Year Chinese II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 300 Lei Chen
CHIN 408-01 Fourth Year Chinese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 216 Xi He
CHIN 494-01 Cyber China: the Internet and Contemporary Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 111 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed as ASIA 494-01* What is the "Great Firewall of China?" What does it say on the symbolic power of the state, the civilians, as well as the censorship and resistance politics? The Internet has played an increasingly important role in shaping contemporary Chinese life and culture in many ways. It has become an arena of intense contention among multiple political forces. This senior capstone course explores various aspects of the Internet culture in mainland China, combining close examination of up-to-date online content in original Chinese language and scholarly discourse on the Chinese internet. By critically examining the technology-enabled cultural space, the course seeks to help students develop their own research projects, which will contribute to the growing scholarship on the new media.

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
CLAS 123-01 Introduction to Archaeology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 112 Andrew Overman
*Cross-listed with ANTH 123-01*
CLAS 129-01 Greek Myths MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 009 Brian Lush
CLAS 145-01 Pagans, Christians and Jews in Classical Antiquity: Cultures in Conflict TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 226 Andrew Overman
*Cross-listed with RELI 145-01*
CLAS 194-01 Feminist Classicists Re(Read) Greek Tragedy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Brian Lush
*Cross-listed with WGSS 194-02* The genre of Greek tragedy has proven remarkably fruitful for the study of gender in antiquity. Characters such as Medea, Antigone, Clytemnestra and Helen seem simultaneously to challenge and confirm the ideology that informed gender inequity in the Greek polis. “Feminist Classicists (Re)Read Greek Tragedy” will engage with the topic of gender construction in Greek tragedy by pursuing two separate but closely related goals. First, we will read and discuss the ways in which Athens’ three great tragic dramatists - Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides – used their genre to interrogate and draw attention to issues of gender, identity and social equity. Second, the primary structural principle of the course will be a sustained, meta-disciplinary consideration of the expansive and paradigm-altering ways in which feminist thought and criticism have found expression among Classical scholars of Greek tragedy. Working chronologically from the early 1980s, we will witness the development of a feminist-critical discourse in scholarly approaches to the tragic genre, and discuss how these new critical models have affected the ways in which we have come to read and understand a crucial poetic artifact of the ancient Greek world.
CLAS 194-02 New Testament TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Susanna Drake
*Cross-listed with RELI 121-01*
CLAS 212-01 Elementary Latin II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 212-L1 Elementary Latin II Lab M 08:15 pm-09:15 pm MAIN 001 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 214-01 Elementary Arabic II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Wessam El Meligi
*First day attendance required*
CLAS 214-L1 Elementary Arabic II Lab TBA TBA Wessam El Meligi
CLAS 214-L2 Elementary Arabic II Lab R 11:30 am-12:30 pm MAIN 002 Wessam El Meligi
CLAS 218-01 Elementary Hebrew II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 011 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 218-L1 Elementary Hebrew II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm ARTCOM 102 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 235-01 Elementary Greek II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 235-L1 Elementary Greek II Lab T 02:30 pm-03:30 pm ARTCOM 102 Nanette Goldman
CLAS 294-01 Cultural Resource Management MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06B Edward Fleming
*Cross-listed with ANTH 294-01*
CLAS 294-01 Cultural Resource Management MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge
*Cross-listed with ANTH 294-01*
CLAS 301-01 Research Forum: Pompeii TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 Beth Severy-Hoven
Until Pompeii was buried by ash in the volcanic eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E., it was an ordinary town in southern Italy. In this course we will explore the remains of this preserved city -- from graffiti to wall painting, latrines to bath complexes, shops to sanctuaries -- and how we can use these remains to learn about the people who lived there. In addition to shared seminar readings, students will develop and pursue an independent research project on the site or the modern reception and interpretation of this ancient town.
Prerequisites: CLAS 121, CLAS 122, CLAS 127, CLAS 129, CLAS 145 or permission of the instructor.
CLAS 332-01 Intermediate Latin: Poetry MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 011 Brian Lush
CLAS 342-01 Intermediate Arabic II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM Wessam El Meligi
CLAS 342-L1 Intermediate Arabic II Lab T TBA Wessam El Meligi
CLAS 362-01 Intermediate Greek: Poetry MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 003 Beth Severy-Hoven
CLAS 485-01 Advanced Arabic MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Wessam El Meligi
CLAS 485-L1 Advanced Arabic Lab T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm CARN 105 Wessam El Meligi

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
COMP 121-01 Introduction to Scientific Programming MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 258 Susan Fox
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 258 Susan Fox
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Eric Theriault
*Students registered for Section 01 of COMP 124 MUST register for Lab 1*
COMP 124-02 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 256 Paul Cantrell
*Students registered for Section 02 of COMP 124 MUST register for Lab 2*
COMP 124-L1 Object-Oriented Programming Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Eric Theriault
*Students registered for Lab 1 of COMP 124 MUST register for Section 01 of the course*
COMP 124-L2 Object-Oriented Programming Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 256 Paul Cantrell
*Students registered for Lab 2 of COMP 124 MUST register for Section 02 of the course*
COMP 240-01 Computer Systems Organization MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 256 Elizabeth Shoop
COMP 261-01 Theory of Computation TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Susan Fox
*Cross-listed with MATH 361-01; *ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
COMP 320-01 Computational Biology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Paul Overvoorde
*Cross-listed with BIOL 494-02; first day attendance required*
COMP 320-01 Computational Biology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Elizabeth Shoop
*Cross-listed with BIOL 494-02; first day attendance required*
COMP 320-L1 Computational Biology Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 285 Paul Overvoorde
*Cross-listed with BIOL 494-L1; first day attendance required*
COMP 320-L1 Computational Biology Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 285 Elizabeth Shoop
*Cross-listed with BIOL 494-L1; first day attendance required*
COMP 342-01 Operating Systems and Computer Architecture MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 256 Shilad Sen
COMP 365-01 Computational Linear Algebra TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 245 Thomas Halverson
*Cross-listed with MATH 365-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
COMP 365-02 Computational Linear Algebra TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 245 Thomas Halverson
*Cross-listed with MATH 365-02; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar WF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 205 Shilad Sen
*2 credit course*

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans
ECON 113-02 Financial Accounting TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Amy Damon
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 304 Amy Damon
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 202 Sarah Humpage
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Amy Damon
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Sarah Humpage
ECON 194-01 Introduction to the American Economy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Karine Moe
*First day attendance required. This course not open to students who have already taken Economics 119* This course provides a non-technical introduction to the basic concepts in economics, with a focus on the United States. Using a small number of fundamental economic concepts, this course provides a foundation for informed decision making regarding current economic debates. The course is intended for non-majors and does not count for the economics major.
ECON 225-01 Comparative Economic Systems TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with INTL 225-01*
ECON 242-01 Economics of Gender MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Karine Moe
*First day attendance required; cross-listed wtih WGSS 242-01*
ECON 323-01 Economic Restructuring in Latin America TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 226 Raymond Robertson
*Cross-listed with INTL 323-01 and LATI 323-01*
ECON 358-01 Introduction to Securities Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 Joyce Minor
ECON 361-01 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Sarah West
ECON 361-02 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 304 Sarah West
ECON 371-01 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Pete Ferderer
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 381-02 Introduction to Econometrics TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 309 Raymond Robertson
ECON 381-L1 Introduction to Econometrics Lab T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger
ECON 381-L2 Intro to Econometrics Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm CARN 309 Raymond Robertson
ECON 431-01 Public Finance MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 105 Sarah West
ECON 490-01 Behavioral Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer
ECON 494-01 Quantitative Macroeconomics Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Mario Solis-Garcia

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
EDUC 200-01 Experiences in Education W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm HUM 215 Steven Jongewaard
*2 credit course; permission of instructor required*
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01*
EDUC 230-01 Community Youth Development in Multicultural America TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed as AMST 294-07*
EDUC 294-01 Schools to Prison Pipeline TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Karin Aguilar-San Juan
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02; first day attendance required*
EDUC 330-01 Philosophy of Education MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
EDUC 360-01 Education and Emerging Technologies M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Brad Belbas
EDUC 460-01 Education and Social Change MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai
*Permission of instructor required*

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENGL 101-01 College Writing TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Jake Mohan
ENGL 135-01 Poetry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Theresa Krier
This course aims to make its participants into resourceful, creative readers and listeners of poetry, mastering skills that will allow intimacy with a living, changing art. We'll read contemporary works and very old works, poems from English-speaking cultures as well as translated poems from ancient China and medieval Andalusia, experimental work as well as tried-and-true forms. The two things that our poems all have are strong artistry and openness to depths of life. We’ll consider different ways of writing about poetry and using poetry: descriptive essay, book review, annotation, argument, personal memoir, blog, scholarly journal, public journal, liturgy. No prior experience required; no prerequisites; non-majors welcome. For English majors this course fulfills the 100-level course requirement.
ENGL 137-01 Novel MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Robert Warde
*This course focuses on the novel as a literary form. British novelist John Fowles has said, "novelists write for countless different reasons: for money, for fame, for reviewers, for parents, for friends, for loved ones; for vanity, for pride, for curiosity, for amusement: as skilled furniture makers enjoy making furniture, as drunkards like drinking, as judges like judging, as Sicilians like emptying a shotgun into an enemy's back. I could fill a book with reasons, and they would all be true, though not true of all. Only one same reason is shared by all of us: we wish to create worlds as real as, but other than the world that is." Thinking of Fowles' view, and coupling it with many other attitudes toward that bulky grab-bag known as the novel, we will explore the genre via six books. We begin with Frances Burney's Evelina (1778), Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary (1856), and Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway (1925) which furnish examples of an eighteenth-, a nineteenth-, and a twentieth-century novel. We then backtrack slightly to Henry James's What Maisie Knew (1897), before moving ahead again to Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita (1955) and Maria Beig's Hermine: An Animal Life (1984). These latter three works offer thematic connections of interest, and all six novels feature an eponymous heroine (if “heroine” is the word). The authors include two British writers, one French writer, one German writer, one Russian writer transformed into an American, and one American writer transformed into an Englishman. Each work will be considered as a constructed artifact, as the reflection of a particular moment in time, and as a commentary on what it means to be human. Students submit a combination of papers and exams according to preference, and brief, periodic objective quizzes manifest themselves along the way. The class is discussion-based, and thus regular attendance and participation are expected.* This offering satisfies the English major requirement for an introductory course.
ENGL 137-02 Novel MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 009 Robert Warde
*This course focuses on the novel as a literary form. British novelist John Fowles has said, "novelists write for countless different reasons: for money, for fame, for reviewers, for parents, for friends, for loved ones; for vanity, for pride, for curiosity, for amusement: as skilled furniture makers enjoy making furniture, as drunkards like drinking, as judges like judging, as Sicilians like emptying a shotgun into an enemy's back. I could fill a book with reasons, and they would all be true, though not true of all. Only one same reason is shared by all of us: we wish to create worlds as real as, but other than the world that is." Thinking of Fowles' view, and coupling it with many other attitudes toward that bulky grab-bag known as the novel, we will explore the genre via six books. We begin with Frances Burney's Evelina (1778), Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary (1856), and Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway (1925) which furnish examples of an eighteenth-, a nineteenth-, and a twentieth-century novel. We then backtrack slightly to Henry James's What Maisie Knew (1897), before moving ahead again to Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita (1955) and Maria Beig's Hermine: An Animal Life (1984). These latter three works offer thematic connections of interest, and all six novels feature an eponymous heroine (if “heroine” is the word). The authors include two British writers, one French writer, one German writer, one Russian writer transformed into an American, and one American writer transformed into an Englishman. Each work will be considered as a constructed artifact, as the reflection of a particular moment in time, and as a commentary on what it means to be human. Students submit a combination of papers and exams according to preference, and brief, periodic objective quizzes manifest themselves along the way. The class is discussion-based, and thus regular attendance and participation are expected. This offering satisfies the English major requirement for an introductory course.
ENGL 150-01 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 James Dawes
ENGL 150-02 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Peter Bognanni
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-03 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Peter Bognanni
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-04 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 Marlon James
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-05 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 Jon Lurie
ENGL 150-06 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Matthew Burgess
ENGL 208-01 Literary Publishing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Jeffrey Shotts
In this course, you will be expected to address the world as an editor—someone open to wide possibilities of what contemporary literature can be, someone with discerning literary taste, someone who approaches poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction with respect, enthusiasm, and a critical eye. As an editor, you will be expected each week to pitch ideas for new literary works and promotional strategies, and you will be expected to read, evaluate, accept or reject, copyedit, fact check, and proofread literary texts. When you are not addressing the world as an editor, you will be addressing the world as a writer. You will be expected to write and revise your own creative writing and/or prepare a proposal for a literary work, professionally submit it to the class, accept critical response, revise again, submit again, and work with an editor. All the while, we will read and discuss common literary texts, consider what it means for a literary work to be published (or rejected), and imagine the many roles required to make a book a success—and question what defines "success" for a book these days. A few visits from guest speakers—a publisher, a publicist, a book reviewer—and a field trip or two may guide us along the way. This course is designed especially for students of creative writing, but also for those interested in publishing as a future career.
ENGL 230-01 Nineteenth-Century British Literature MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 05 Robert Warde
This survey is devoted to Victorian literature, focusing on the years of the Queen's reign (1837-1901). It embraces fiction, poetry, and a wide range of non-fiction prose. In addition, we will consider the visual and decorative arts within a framework of industrialization. Special attention is accorded the scientific, political, and social issues of the era, in an effort both to understand nineteenth-century Britain and to explore the ways in which this critical period establishes a foundation for modernism. We will read two novels: Elizabeth Gaskell's Mary Barton and George Gissing's The Odd Women. Nonfiction prose includes Edmund Gosse's memoir, Father and Son, and The Autobiography of Charles Darwin, along with selections from not only the canonical Victorian sages (such as Thomas Carlyle, John Stuart Mill, and John Ruskin), but also a variety of other urgent voices discussing everything from “the woman question” to imperialism, evolution, religion, aesthetics, and domestic management. On a more lyrical note, we absorb (and sometimes memorize, and sometimes proclaim loudly) poems by Tennyson, Robert and Elizabeth Browning, Matthew Arnold, Christina and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Swinburne, Alice Meynell, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and many others. Three or four pieces of work are required, involving a combination of essays and exams, depending on student preference. There are likely to be occasional, brief in-class quizzes. Attendance and participation in group discussion are expected parts of this interdisciplinary experience. This course fulfills the nineteenth-century British literature requirement for English majors.
ENGL 275-01 African American Literature to 1900 MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-04* In this survey course, we will trace the development of an African American literary tradition from the end of the 18th century to the turn of the 20th century, from Phillis Wheatley to Charles Chesnutt. We will explore the longstanding project of writing an African American self as both a literary and a political subject. We will read closely, critically, and appreciatively from multiple genres, including poetry, slave narratives, short stories, essays, and novels. We will supplement our exploration of those texts with critical and theoretical readings. Among the themes that will organize the course are: writing as a political act, generic innovation and subversion, literary representations of gendered and classed experiences of blackness in the United States, aesthetic innovation in relation to political and social change, an ongoing vernacular and/or oral tradition within African American arts and letters, the politics of audience, and the limits of literary representation itself. Requirements include: two papers of about 10 pages each, an in-class presentation, class participation, and a final exam. This course fulfills either the U.S. writers of color or the pre-1900 American literature requirement for the English major.
ENGL 276-01 African American Literature 1900 to Present MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Daylanne English
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-05* This course will trace the development of an African American literary and cultural tradition, from the turn of the century to the present. We will explore the ways that African American writers of the 20th century have expressed a history that includes trauma, migration, and survival; we will also consider how the invention or revision of literary forms may be related to that history. We will explore a wide range of genres and literary modes, from jazz poetry to speculative fiction. We will cover many topics, among them: the "New Negro," the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Migration, the Blues, Black Power and the Black Arts Movement, Black Feminism, and Afro-Futurism. Requirements include two 7-10 page papers, brief weekly response papers, an in-class presentation, and a final examination. This course fulfills the English major requirement in literature by U.S. writers of color.
ENGL 280-01 Crafts of Writing: Poetry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Kristin Naca
*First day attendance required* Students build a vocabulary in the conventions of poetry. These terms guide us in the development of a critical practice for writing poems. That practice includes: read and write about several collections of contemporary poetry; study and experiment writing various forms and modes of poetry; workshop peer work; and experience lectures and readings performed by published poets. Texts include: James Drury A Guide to Poetry, Cihlar Undoing, Cisewski Ghost Fargo, Derricotte’s Captivity, and Mac alum Sung Yung Shin’s second collection Rough and Savage. Prerequisite: Introduction to Creative Writing.
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 204 Marlon James
*First day attendance required* In English 150 Introduction To Creative Writing you encountered the fundamentals of creative writing: plot, setting imagery, voice and character. Building on that foundation, Crafts is where you put those fundamentals to striking use—where you really begin to write. Crafts Of Fiction expands on your previous learning and reshapes it in more complex and unconventional ways, a lecture on Text as Seduction or Energy and Tension, instead of the usual nuts and bolts of creative prose. The course will conducted for the most part in workshop format with the emphasis on continuing to develop writing skills, but it will also involve extensive readings and discussion of several examples of short fiction, as well as four works assigned for group study. You will think like a writer. And write like a born storyteller. Prerequisite: English 150 (Introduction to Creative Writing) taken at Macalester.
ENGL 281-02 Crafts of Writing: Fiction W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Peter Bognanni
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 294-01 British Youth Subcultures TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Casey Jarrin
From teds to skinheads, punks to football hooligans, rastas to rude boys, glam rockers to goths, mods to malcontents, in this seminar we’ll ramble the streets of postwar London, Liverpool, Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, and Cardiff to explore the phenomenon of youth subcultures – their origins, social/economic formations, aesthetic articulations, relationship to other (sub)cultures, role in urban social upheavals and transformations of the past sixty years. Through encounters with influential and iconoclastic fiction, drama, film, music, and cultural theory, we will examine: (1) how specific subcultures emerge out of specific cultural spaces and historical moments, (2) how class, race, gender, sexuality, and diasporic histories define subcultural identities, (3) how the expressive “style” of particular subcultures might encode a revolutionary or reactionary politics, (4) how/when subcultures move beyond stylistic forms into social movements. With an initial emphasis on theoretical and ethnographic frameworks generated by the Birmingham Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (BCCCS), as well as the critical response to postwar associations between youth cultures and deviance or criminality, we will examine subcultural studies as a scholarly field that combines disciplinary strategies of sociology, anthropology, literature, history, gender studies, performance studies, and musicology, among others. We’ll also approach these subcultures as lived phenomena enacted through music, photography, film, fashion and explore the relation between subcultures and popular youth culture. Though focused on subcultural formations in the UK, we’ll consider transnational subcultural exchanges, specifically how post-WWII British youth cultures relate to and persist in American youth culture today.
LIKELY TEXTS: Howard Becker, Outsiders: Studies in the Sociology of Deviance; Andrew Bolton, Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty; Bill Buford, Among the Thugs; Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange; Shelagh Delaney, A Taste of Honey; Simon Frith, Sociology of Rock; Dick Hebdige, Subculture: The Meaning of Style; Stuart Hall & Tony Jefferson, Resistance Through Rituals; John King, The Football Factory; Gautam Malkani, Londonstani; Angela McRobbie, Feminism and Youth Culture; Kobena Mercer, Welcome to the Jungle; John Osborne, Look Back in Anger; Mark Ravenhill, Shopping and F***ing; Steve Redhead, Subculture to Clubcultures; John Robb, Punk Rock: An Oral History; Alan Sillitoe, The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner; Chris Steele-Perkins & Richard Smith, The Teds; Gavin Watson, Skins & Punks; Irvine Welsh, Trainspotting; Paul Willis, Learning to Labour: How Working Class Kids Get Working Class Jobs
LIKELY FILMS: Look Back in Anger (Dir. Tony Richardson, 1959); The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner (Dir. Richardson, 1962); Billy Liar (Dir. John Schlesinger, 1963); A Hard Days Night (Dir. Richard Lester, 1964); If. . . . (Dir. Lindsay Anderson, 1968); Jubilee (Dir. Der
ENGL 294-02 Global Shakespeares: All the World TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Dana Schumacher-Schmidt
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-01* This course looks at selected works of William Shakespeare in four interlocking ways: the already-global circa 1600 aspects of his great plays Othello, Macbeth, and The Tempest; various modern adaptations such as the Voodoo Macbeth, Zulu Macbeth, and the recent Indian film Maqbool; multiple translations and worldwide stagings; and Shakespeare's global afterlife. Shakespeare is often termed a "universal" author: we will critically gaze upon this claim.
ENGL 294-03 Topics in Creative Writing: Young Adult TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Lara Avery
This course will be a space to build on your past (or lack thereof) with Young Adult literature by thoughtfully crafting your own work. Mostly, we’ll write. On a few occasions, we’ll read and discuss contemporary and classic YA novels, as well as (short) scholarly articles. As we encounter these works and your own writing, we’ll attempt to capture Young Adult fiction as a category of literature as opposed to a stylized genre, the distinct possibilities open to Young Adult writers, and why it can be a good thing that your mother and your 12-year-old cousin are reading the same books. Coursework will include but not be limited to daily writing exercises, the Internet, peer workshop, magic revelry, 5th-grade-style book reports, discussion of clones, Holden Caulfield, and hormones
ENGL 310-01 Shakespeare Studies TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Theresa Krier
We examine closely a selection of Shakespeare's tragedies, with special attention to the ways that the playwright uses dramatic craft to open questions about the very nature of character, motivation, action, and drama. We will study Shakespeare's boldest artistic choices and his fine-grained analyses of suffering, cruelty, politics, and justice. We will also situate Shakespeare in the theater culture of his time, and in the period’s cultural struggles over religion, monarchy, and gender. We'll look into the earliest detectable origins of Shakespeare's work with tragedy; we'll examine a few scenes and characters from his comedies by way of contrast; we’ll meet briefly those tragedies that we aren't studying closely; there will be ghosts and witches and gods for good measure.

This course fulfills the English major requirement for an early-period course. Non-majors are welcome. No prerequisites (if the registration system locks you out on the basis of prequisites, contact me; I'll give you an override so that you can register.)
ENGL 341-01 20th Century British Novel: Diasporic London TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 401 Casey Jarrin
London. Post-imperial city shaped by Caribbean, African, and Asian diasporas, rebuilt from the Blitz, now home to over eight million Londoners. In the wake of postwar "Windrush" labor migrations, colonial independence movements, and recent arrivals of political and economic refugees – and despite severe waves of anti-immigration legislation – the cultural cartography of London has been forever transformed. From the East End to Hounslow, Brixton to Notting Hill, Thames-side metropolis to sprawling suburbs, in this course we'll consume London's diasporic fiction, film, art, and music. We'll encounter iconoclastic novels about and by Londoners (Sam Selvon, Salman Rushdie, Hanif Kureishi, Zadie Smith, among others), exploring how these texts map London’s complex social, cultural, psychological, and architectural landscapes, challenging our conceptions of how a novel can look and sound. In addition to works of fiction, we'll read theory by George Lamming, Stuart Hall, Paul Gilroy, Kobena Mercer, Pratibha Parmar, Hazel Carby; view films by Gurinder Chadha, Stephen Frears, Isaac Julien, Mike Leigh, and Danny Boyle; consider popular music as cultural movement (reggae, ska, two-tone, desi and bhangra, hip-hop, dub-step); and view works of contemporary visual and performance art. A series of related questions will animate our discussion: What makes a Londoner? How do migratory histories (diasporic, imperial, refugee) and scenes of racial/ethnic/class conflict inflect the language and voices of contemporary British culture? What is the relationship between the postmodern and postcolonial as literary genres, theoretical movements, and historical frameworks? How does cosmopolitanism relate to histories of diaspora? How do representations of gender, sexuality, and youth cultures populate these texts? How have the horror, gothic, gangster, comedy, and war genres shaped late-twentieth century British fiction and visual culture? How have authors, filmmakers, artists recorded the individual and communal history of diaspora through the lens of social realism, satire, documentary? LIKELY TEXTS: Paul Gilroy, There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack; Hanif Kureishi, Buddha of Suburbia; Linton Kwesi Johnson, Mi Revalueshanary Fren; Gautam Malkani, Londonstani; Kobena Mercer, Welcome to the Jungle; Jean Rhys, Voyage in the Dark; Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses ; Sam Selvon, Lonely Londoners; Zadie Smith, White Teeth; Meera Syal, Life Isn’t All Ha Ha Hee Hee; Irvine Welsh, Trainspotting. LIKELY FILMS: Bhaji on the Beach (Dir. Gurinder Chadha, 1993); My Beautiful Laundrette (Dir. Stephen Frears, 1985), Sammy and Rosie Get Laid (Dir. Frears, 1987), Dirty Pretty Things (Dir. Frears, 2002); Handsworth Songs (Dir. John Akomfrah, 1987); Young Soul Rebels (Dir. Isaac Julien, 1991); Secrets and Lies (Dir. Mike Leigh, 1996); Kabhi Khushi Kabhie Gham (Dir. Karan Johar, 2001); The Rising: Ballad of Mangal Pandey (Dir. Ketan Mehta, 2005)It’s a Free World (Dir. Ken Loach, 2007); Tra
ENGL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with AMST 384-01 and INTL 384-01*
ENGL 394-01 Comics/Graphic Storytelling MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 001 Matthew Burgess
With its origins going as far back as cave paintings, graphic storytelling has been around as long as we have, and over the last few decades it has made exponential increases in both its popularity and artistic ambition. In this creative writing workshop course, we will contribute to the medium by writing and drawing (but mostly writing; don't worry if you can't draw) our own original comics over a wide range of genres, from the superhero story to the personal memoir. Readings may include Scott McCloud's UNDERSTANDING COMICS, Matt Madden's 99 WAYS TO TELL A STORY, Marjane Mastrapi's PERSEPOLIS, Alison Bechdel's FUN HOME, Frank Miller's BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS, and the BEST AMERICAN COMICS 2012 anthology, amongst others.
ENGL 394-02 Topics in English: 20th Century Poetry TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Kristin Naca
U.S poetry of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries is noted for constant innovation in free-verse forms. We will read an expanse of poets and forms, and create a timeline for the rise of major schools of aesthetics, such as: Imagism, Confessionalism, Black Mountain School, New York school, LANGUAGE poetry, Black Arts Movement and late Multicultural collections, American Surrealism, etc. We’ll examine, too, how innovations move the orthodox lines of U.S. narrative and lyric verse forms (if at all). We’ll read various ideologies and philosophies of poetry writing, including manifestos. Students will imitate and experiment with the conventions we study each week. Texts include: William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, Robert Lowell, Frank O'Hara, Denise Levertov, Allen Ginsberg, Gertrude Stein, John Ashberry, John Yau, James Wright, Yusef Komunyakaa, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, mei mei berssenbrugge, Adreinne Rich. This course will count as an advanced course in Crafts of Writing for the English Major. Prerequisite: Introduction to Creative Writing.
ENGL 394-03 Writing Human Rights TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 James Dawes
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-01; permission of instructor required* This writing intensive seminar will explore the relationship between human rights and life narratives. Life stories are of increasing importance across a range of academic disciplines, but nowhere more so than in the interdisciplinary work of human rights. Human rights advocacy has always relied upon the use of peoples' stories—to give voice to those cruelly silenced by violence, to generate sympathy in global bystanders, to shame perpetrator governments. The special challenges of this sort of storytelling have recently become topics of special attention in academic scholarship. Many of the questions are ethical: How can you move audiences without being sensational? How can you speak for others without displacing them? How can you put incommunicable trauma into words without somehow altering the truth of it? This interdisciplinary course, co-taught by faculty in Anthropology and English, will train students in the methods and ethics of life history interviewing and the craft of narrative writing. Priority for registration will be given to students who can count the course for one or more of the following: English, Anthropology, Human Rights and Humanitarianism. We also aim to achieve a mix of sophomores, juniors, and seniors in the course.
ENGL 394-03 Writing Human Rights TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Dianna Shandy
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-01; permission of instructor required* This writing intensive seminar will explore the relationship between human rights and life narratives. Life stories are of increasing importance across a range of academic disciplines, but nowhere more so than in the interdisciplinary work of human rights. Human rights advocacy has always relied upon the use of peoples' stories—to give voice to those cruelly silenced by violence, to generate sympathy in global bystanders, to shame perpetrator governments. The special challenges of this sort of storytelling have recently become topics of special attention in academic scholarship. Many of the questions are ethical: How can you move audiences without being sensational? How can you speak for others without displacing them? How can you put incommunicable trauma into words without somehow altering the truth of it? This interdisciplinary course, co-taught by faculty in Anthropology and English, will train students in the methods and ethics of life history interviewing and the craft of narrative writing. Priority for registration will be given to students who can count the course for one or more of the following: English, Anthropology, Human Rights and Humanitarianism. We also aim to achieve a mix of sophomores, juniors, and seniors in the course.
ENGL 394-04 Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with WGSS 300-01 and INTL 300-01*
ENGL 400-01 Special Topics in Literature Studies: Afrofuturism W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Daylanne English
In this senior capstone course, we will explore the flourishing of Afrofuturistic literature, theory, music, and art that has been taking place for the last decade plus, asking, "Why, and why now?" We will begin with a definition of Afrofuturism as contemporary cultural production that imagines greater justice and a fuller expression of black identities in the future or in alternative places and realities. As the semester progresses, we may well expand that definition as we trace the origins of contemporary Afrofuturism in 19th century African American novels and follow the movement's development over the course of the 20th century and on into the present. We will study a wide range of figures, genres, and works: novels by Sutton Griggs, Pauline Hopkins, George Schuyler, Ralph Ellison and Octavia Butler; short fiction and essays by W. E. B. Du Bois, Samuel Delany, and Walter Mosley; poetry by Sun Ra, A. Van Jordan, and Saul Williams; music and videos by Sun Ra, George Clinton/Parliament-Funkadelic, and Janelle Monáe; and visual art by Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Sanford Biggers. Requirements for the course include: presenting extensively on one of our texts, writing a brief response paper weekly, and producing a substantial final project.
ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 202 Marlon James
*For English (Creative Writing emphasis) majors only*

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
ENVI 130-01 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 130-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 130-L1 Science of Renewable Energy Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with PHYS 130-L1; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 133-01 Environmental Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 205 Daniel Hornbach
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Daniel Hornbach
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 144-01 Lakes, Streams and Rivers TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 Emily Schilling
*Cross-listed with BIOL 144-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 213 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with POLI 215-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 225-01 100 Words for Snow: Language and Nature TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 301 Marianne Milligan
*Cross-listed with LING 225-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Diane Michelfelder
*Cross-listed with PHIL 229-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 205 Ryan Edgington
*Cross-listed with HIST 234-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 280-01 Environmental Classics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 301 Christina Manning
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 226 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 294-01 20th C Environmental World M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 101 Ryan Edgington
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-11; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students* In the 20th Century, humans invented the car, the self-propelled combine harvester, and the airplane. They discovered vitamins, unlocked the secrets of the atom, created synthetic herbicides and pesticides, fought wars using weapons of mass destruction, and went to the moon. When in 1966, the American environmentalist Stewart Brand asked “why haven’t we seen a photograph of the whole earth yet?,” humans could back upon more than 70-years of the most profound environmental changes in history. As a result of what many saw as the degradation of nature they also created environmental organizations and studied the global impact of industrialization. This course explores the environmental history of the last century. That history is complex. We will track the flows of environmental change and environmental thought through imperialism, war, mass consumerism, nuclear power, and climate change, big conservation, the environmental commons, amongst other topics. We will cross every continent in an effort to make sense of the environmental conditions of today.
ENVI 294-02 "The Garden in the Machine": The City and Nature in the Long 20th Century MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Andrea Moerer
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-02 and LATI 294-01*
ENVI 335-01 Science and Citizenship TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with POLI 335-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 368-01 Sustainable Development and Global Future TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with INTL 368-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
ENVI 375-01 Rural Landscapes and Livelihoods TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Holly Barcus
*First day attendance required; $35 fee required; cross-listed with GEOG 375-01*
ENVI 394-01 Food, Environment, and Society in 20th Century America MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Ryan Edgington
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-04; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students* This course will follow the history of 20th century American food from the farm through the factory and then to the table. In other words, students will come to know how Supermarket America came to dominate the landscape. We will explore the transformation of the family farm to industrial endeavor and the role of the federal government, farm lobbyists, and land grant universities in that process. The course will also examine the role of technology and science in making American food systems more efficient and complex through assembly lines, pesticides and herbicides, and the genetic modification of foods. Finally we will explore the political questions surrounding Supermarket America and why many Americans revolted against it by demanding organic foods and macrobiotic diets. The environmental impact of America's ways of eating will run throughout the course.
ENVI 488-01 Sr Seminar in Environmental St TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 Louisa Bradtmiller
*Permission of instructor required for ACTC students*

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 213 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-02 French II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 404 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 111 Morgane Thiery
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L3 French II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 102 Morgane Thiery
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 404 Annick Fritz
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 10:10 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L2 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 227 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-01 French III MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 111 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 102 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 227 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 202 Martine Sauret
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 216 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-03 Text, Film and Media MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 216 Andrew Billing
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab T 09:10 am-10:10 am HUM 228 Morgane Thiery
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 227 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 Morgane Thiery
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am HUM 111 Morgane Thiery
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L5 Text, Film and Media Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 Morgane Thiery
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L6 Text, Film and Media Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 228 Rokhaya Dieng
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 227 Juliette Rogers
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 102 Morgane Thiery
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Morgane Thiery
*First day attendance required*
FREN 306-01 Introduction to Literary Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 112 Joelle Vitiello
*First day attendance required*
FREN 409-01 North Africa and France: On Both Sides of the Mediterranean through Cinema TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 402 Joelle Vitiello
This course focuses on representations of North African cultures in French cinema and in North African cinema from Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, on both sides of the Mediterranean, from colonial times to post January 2011 current events. The course offers a survey of the historical and socio-economic contexts of North African cinema. It contains units on orientalist representations, (texts, paintings, photographs and other critical material) diverse colonial times European and North African representations, representations of the Algerian-French war from diverse perspectives, multiculturalism in North Africa, gender and sexualities representations, immigration, religion, and national/post-national film production, all the way to current cinema made after the January 2011 revolution in Tunisia. Texts include readings about how to analyze film sequences, literary and cultural texts, specific readings about the films studied, as well as theoretical and critical materials about the regional cinema and film directors. Please note that films are viewed outside of class. The course is taught in French. Prerequisite: a 300-level French course and/or permission of the instructor.
FREN 410-01 Arts and Ideas in Contemporary France W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 404 Anne Carayon
*First day attendance required* This course will provide a chronological exposure to the prevailing trends and characteristics of the visual arts (paintings, sculptures, installations) in France from the highly politicized 60’s and 70’s until today. Through the use of films, slides, French web art sites and critical essays, these works will be studied and problematized from a sociological, political and cultural perspective. Special attention will be given to the not-so-new notion of “francité” embedded in France’s unique “politique nationale culturelle” as well as other visual art practices which strive to reflect an increasingly pluralistic French society.Students taking this course should have taken FREN306 and be able to make oral presentations in French throughout the semester.

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOG 111-01 Human Geography of Global Issues MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 111-02 Human Geography of Global Issues MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Nicole Simms
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Holly Barcus
*First day attendance required; $25 lab fee required*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab W 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
GEOG 243-01 Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 William Moseley
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 256-01 Medical Geography: The Geography of Health and Health Care MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Eric Carter
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 261-01 Geography of World Urbanization MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 David Lanegran
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 263-01 Geography of Development and Underdevelopment TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 365-01 Urban GIS TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith
*First day attendance required; $25 lab fee required*
GEOG 365-L1 Urban GIS Lab TBA TBA CARN 107 Ashley Nepp
GEOG 375-01 Rural Landscapes and Livelihoods TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Holly Barcus
*First day attendance required; $35 fee required; cross-listed with ENVI 375-01*
GEOG 378-01 Statistical Research Methods in Geography MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 394-01 Environmental GIS MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Sanchayeeta Adhikari
*First day attendance required; $25 lab fee required*
GEOG 394-02 Advanced Cartography and Geovisualization TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
*First day attendance required; $25 lab fee required; prerequisite of Geography 225* In our increasingly visual culture, displaying, analyzing and interpreting data visually is becoming more and more important. Governments, non-profits, marketing agencies, corporations and activists are striving to communicate with the public using data visualization. Geovisualization adds a spatial component to data visualization. Geovisualization is both a process for displaying data and an interdisciplinary field of study that develops new methods and tools for data visualization. Cartography plays an important role in geovisualization, lending design principles and techniques to this new and emerging field of study. This course is a combination of discussions on current topics and hands on lab exercises & projects based on geovisualization methods and advanced cartographic techniques. Discussion and lab topics include cartography, typography, geovisualization, spatio-temporal mapping, interactive mapping, interface design & usability, web mapping, 3D & animated mapping, neogeography and location based services. Esri’s ArcGIS suite and online open source software are used to complete lab assignments.
GEOG 394-03 Geographies of Consumption: Power, Identity, and Space in Consumer Culture W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Nicole Simms
*Prerequisite: Geography 111 or permission of instructor required* We all buy things, but the kinds of things we choose to buy, where and how we buy them, and what we do with them can reveal much about the conditions and constitution of social life. In this discussion-based class, we will explore historical and contemporary practices of consumption and their variation across different sites, including malls, garage sales, homes, and online exchange platforms such as eBay and Craigslist. We will consider the consumption, use, production, distribution, and marketing of a variety of goods as we seek to understand not only individual and societal questions of need, choice, and citizenship, but also the ways in which everyday practices of consumption are related to wider issues of power and inequality. In the first part of the class, we will consider social systems of consumption, looking at how (and where) desire, status, and identity are constructed in consumer culture, and how these intersect with traditional identity markers such as gender, race, and class. In the second part, we will consider how the everyday practices of consumption are embedded in much larger globalized networks of production and distribution. In the third and final portion of the course, we will examine and evaluate the political possibilities of consumption, including participation in second-hand, virtual, and counterfeit economies, supporting organic and fair trade products, and engaging in consumer boycotts.
GEOG 394-L1 Environmental GIS Lab TBA TBA CARN 108 Sanchayeeta Adhikari
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 394-L2 Advanced Cartography and Geovisualization Lab R TBA CARN 108 Ashley Nepp
GEOG 488-01 Sem in Medical Geog: The Human Ecology of Infectious and Vector-Borne Diseases W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Eric Carter
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required* In this course, we adopt a broadly geographical perspective to shed light on the causes, consequences, and control of infectious and vector-borne diseases, including influenza, cholera, malaria, yellow fever, dengue fever, and Lyme disease. Although we will draw largely on the literature in medical geography, an understanding of the social and ecological dimensions of these diseases requires integration of concepts from many other fields, including biology, ecology, history, economics, politics, medicine, and public health. Topics include the natural history of microbial and vector co-evolution with human populations; the modern history of medical and public health interventions against infectious and vector-borne disease, including the global malaria eradication program; the social and economic burden that disease places on developing countries today; the impact of environmental transformations (e.g. climate change, land cover change) on the ecology, intensity, and geographical distribution of these diseases; and the use of GIS and spatial analysis to evaluate and model the distribution, prevalence, and causes of infectious and vector-borne disease. We will also weigh the merits of different control strategies and study the scientific, technical, and political challenges to effectively controlling diseases in regions where they are endemic. Since this is a seminar course, we will also emphasize developing your skills in scholarly research and writing, as well as learning how to evaluate and integrate insights from different disciplines.

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GEOL 100-01 Oceanography TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 John Craddock
GEOL 103-01 Geocinema M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 100 Kelly MacGregor
*First day attendance required*
GEOL 165-01 History/Evolution of Earth MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 165-L1 History/Evolution of Earth Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 165-L2 History/Evolution of Earth Lab T 09:00 am-11:00 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole
GEOL 255-01 Structural Geology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock
*First day attendance required*
GEOL 255-L1 Structural Geology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 179 John Craddock
GEOL 265-01 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 265-L1 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy Lab R 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers
GEOL 294-01 Paleoclimate TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Louisa Bradtmiller
GEOL 294-02 Cosmochemistry: Origins of the Elements and Solar System MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 179 Karl Wirth
This course explores questions at the intersection of astronomy, chemistry, geology, and physics. How did the elements form? What are the clues to the origin of the solar system and how do we read them? How did Earth, and ultimately life, evolve out of the primordial soup that was early solar system? Course readings, discussions, and activities will explore topics from the Big Bang to stellar processes and planetary materials. Students will investigate our chemical origins using terrestrial, meteorite, and lunar samples. As a result of the course, students will develop broad "chemical thinking" skills and will be able to investigate a wide range of questions using elemental, isotopic, and mineralogical evidence. Prerequisites: at least one course completed in chemistry, geology, or physics/astronomy is required.
GEOL 294-L1 Paleoclimate Lab TBA TBA OLRI 175 Louisa Bradtmiller
*Lab meetings will include one field trip early in the semester. Other lab times will be determinded during the 1st class meeting*
GEOL 302-01 Petrology and Geochemistry MWF 08:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth
GEOL 450-01 Senior Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 Kelly MacGregor
*1 credit course*
GEOL 450-01 Senior Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 Karl Wirth
*1 credit course*

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
GERM 102-01 Elementary German II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 214 Kiarina Kordela
GERM 102-L1 Elementary German II Lab M TBA HUM 113 Daniel Bambach
GERM 102-L2 Elementary German II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 404 Daniel Bambach
GERM 102-L4 Elementary German II Lab TBA TBA Daniel Bambach
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 215 Rachael Huener
*5-credit course*
GERM 110-L1 Accel Elementary German Lab MW 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 110 Christine Hrncal
GERM 110-L2 Accel Elementary German Lab TR 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 404 Christine Hrncal
GERM 110-L3 Accel Elementary German Lab TR 02:45 pm-03:45 pm HUM 404 Christine Hrncal
GERM 110-L4 Accel Elementary German Lab TBA TBA Christine Hrncal
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 212 David Martyn
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 112 Daniel Bambach
GERM 203-L4 Intermediate German I Lab TBA TBA Daniel Bambach
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 212 David Martyn
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am OLRI 247 Daniel Bambach
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 404 Daniel Bambach
GERM 204-L4 Intermediate German II Lab TBA TBA Daniel Bambach
GERM 204-L5 Intermediate German II Lab TBA TBA Daniel Bambach
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 214 Gisela Peters
GERM 305-L1 German Through the Media Lab W 02:30 pm-03:30 pm HUM 213 Christine Hrncal
GERM 305-L2 German Through the Media Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm HUM 102 Christine Hrncal
GERM 307-01 Global Cities: Berlin and Vienna MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 214 Rachael Huener
GERM 366-01 Postwar Germany MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 113 Rachael Huener
GERM 394-01 The Power of Words W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 213 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-04; Taught in English; Core Course for the Concentration in Critical Theory* Hate speech (the Muhammad video, the Rutgers webcam suicide case), but also revolutionary messages that can cause political or religious conversions (political speeches, the gospel) are uses, perhaps abuses of language with real effects - ways of "doing things with words." In this course, we will explore how words have the power to effect real-world change, both for good and for evil. What uses of speech constitute forms of injury or of undue influence? What uses are transformative or emancipatory? How do we draw the line between these two valences of "forceful speech"? Readings and discussion topics will include theories of rhetoric, persuasion, and performativity (Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, John Austin, Derrida); instances and studies of transformative speech in religion and psychoanalysis (Hebrew Bible, New Testament, Luther, Freud); political speech from the language of emancipation (Declaration of Independence, Martin Luther King) to National Socialist propaganda (Goebbels, Hitler); racist and sexist hate speech (Judith Butler, Catharine A. MacKinnon, Critical Race Theory); the constitutionality of laws against hate speech in view of the First Amendment's protection of free speech (U.S. Supreme Court rulings); depictions and uses of rhetoric in literature (Homer, Thucydides, Shakespeare, Friedrich Schiller, Heinrich von Kleist). Requirements: Three short papers, two collaborative class presentations, periodic quizzes.
GERM 394-02 Metaphysics in Secular Thought MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-02* A widespread tendency in contemporary Western societies is to associate metaphysics with religion, if not with what is often dismissively called "irrationality." This course will dismantle this myth by turning to the tradition of European philosophy and political theory since the seventeenth century, in their relation to theology and their reception by twentieth-century critical theory, in order to examine the ways in which secular thought emerges not as an alternative to metaphysics, something which thought cannot supersede anyway, but simply as an alternative way-and one that by no means is more "rationally grounded" than religion-of dealing with the very same metaphysical questions and issues than concern religion: What can infinity be and what is its relation to the finite? I know I am mortal, but is there something immortal about me? What is the relation between matter and thought (spirit, soul, etc.)? Is there a gaze that always looks at me and judges me? Am I responsible for my wrongdoings or was I predetermined by a higher power to commit them? Is there a meaning or goal in human (and other) life and history? Is there a reason (and a purpose) for everything that happens or is it all just random? Is the universe chaotic or is there order ("entropy" being an attempt to deal with this question in physics), and so on. All readings in English. No pre-knowledge is required.
GERM 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 Gisela Peters

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 401 Maria Chavarria
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 300 Antonella Morales
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 102 Antonella Morales
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 401 Leah Sand
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 401 Leah Sand
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 113 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 102-L3 Elementary Spanish II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 113 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 110-01 Accelerated Beginning Spanish MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 216 Margaret Olsen
*5-credit course; permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 202 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 215 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 215 Rosa Rull-Montoya
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-03 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 214 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 102 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 215 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 113 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 113 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 203-L6 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 247 Cecilia Battauz
HISP 203-L7 Intermediate Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 216 Philip Thornberry
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 227 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 227 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-04 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 215 Galo Gonzalez
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Antonella Morales
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Antonella Morales
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Antonella Morales
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 247 Antonella Morales
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 404 Antonella Morales
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am HUM 217 Antonella Morales
HISP 204-L8 Intermediate Spanish II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 247 Antonella Morales
HISP 204-L9 Intermediate Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (HUM 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 Susana Blanco-Iglesias
*5-credit course; permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 220-02 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 213 Leah Sand
*5-credit course; permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 305-01 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 227 Teresa Mesa Adamuz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-02 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 214 Blanca Gimeno Escudero
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-03 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Blanca Gimeno Escudero
*First day attendance required*
HISP 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 Galo Gonzalez
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with LING 309-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 331-01 Luso-Brazilian Voices: Conversations and Composition MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 215 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz
*First day attendance required*
HISP 415-01 Cultural Resistance/Survival: Indigenous and African Peoples in Early Spanish America MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Margaret Olsen
*Cross-listed with LATI 436-01 and INTL 415-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 427-01 Dramatic Words: Hispanic Theater and Poetry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 214 Blanca Gimeno Escudero
HISP 436-01 Spanish Dialectology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 402 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with LATI 436-01 and LING 436-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 488-01 Senior Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca
*First day attendance required*
HISP 494-01 Las Voces de Inmigrantes y Exiliados en la Narrativa Postmoderna Espanola MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 215 Rosa Rull-Montoya
En este curso se analizara el concepto teorico de la metaficcion historiografica y de la importancia de este concepto dentro del contexto mas amplio de la posmodernidad. Tambien leeremos diferentes novelas historicas de la inmigracion espanola en el contexto socio-político y cultural del post-franquismo a la transicion a la democracia en Espana (1975–2012) con el fin de entender la manera en la que estos textos cuestionan desde perspectivas diversas, la vision de una "historia oficial" de Espana, con el fin de abrir el camino a otras versiones diferentes y alternativas del pasado desde la perspectiva de las voces de los exiliados de la Guerra civil espanola y los inmigrantes en la actualidad. Este curso nos permitira explorar las diferentes maneras en las que la novela espanola despues de la muerte de Franco se enfrenta con el tema de como, para que, y desde la perspectiva de quien se escribe la historia. Prerequisite: Hisp 307 or consent of the instructor.

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
HIST 110-01 Introduction to European History: Europe between the Wars MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 002 Eric Roubinek
Political crisis and conflict, cultural creativity, mass movements and mass media, powerful economic progress coupled with severe economic depression, total war and forced population movements––the first half of the twentieth century was awash with the most exciting political, social and cultural innovations and the most deadly wars and genocides. In this course, we will examine many aspects of European history in the period, from intellectual and cultural events to economics and diplomacy as they developed between the relative calm of the First and Second World Wars. We will also place this history in a global context by exploring Europe’s connections to the larger world, especially the European “periphery” in Anatolia and the Middle East and the colonies in Africa and Asia. While learning the history of interwar Europe from these many perspectives, we will also develop an understanding of how historians interpret the evidence that they gather and thereby reconstruct the past.
HIST 136-01 American Violence 1800 to 1865: The Early Republic to the Civil War MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 205 Eric Otremba
HIST 181-01 Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Andrea Moerer
*Cross-listed with LATI 181-01* What is Latin America and how was it constructed? We will answer this question by surveying Latin American history from the time of its "discovery" (15th century) through current times, focusing on large-scale events as well as small-scale actions which created Latin American society. We will learn the history of Latin America by questioning geographic, social, and political borders through looking at transnational modes of control, cultural production, and dualities such as modernity and tradition. Students will gain competency in essential Latin American history and geography. Furthermore, we will discuss countries, looking critically at nation-states through thematic categories of analysis, challenging their boundary primacy, and conceiving of borders in other Latin American contexts.
HIST 190-01 Topics in US History: Women's History through Oral History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Catherine Batza
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-03 and WGSS 194-01* Oral history lies at the heart of this course, which will consist of two complementary components. Through various readings, we will explore the different uses of oral history in a handful of important women’s history works. These assignments will paint a broad picture of women's lives in the post-WWII United States, while also illustrating how race, class, and sexuality have informed women’s lives and history. While becoming more acquainted with the importance of oral history in the field of women's history, we will also be honing our own skills as oral historians. This course will provide a solid grounding in oral history theory and then develop your skills as an oral historian through a series of assignments that will guide you through the process of preparing, conducting,and analyzing an oral history of your own. By examining existing works that draw upon oral history and exploring the craft of oral history as a research method, this course will provide you with a broad understanding of both recent women's history as well as the importance and value of oral history as a tool.
HIST 194-01 Going Global: The Experiment of World History TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Karin Velez
What broad patterns do we see repeated across human cultures and eras? How do current international concerns shape the way we perceive these patterns, and retell the past? This course is an introduction to the youngest and boldest experimenters in the discipline of history: global historians. We follow these trail-blazers to every corner of the planet and across the grandest expanses of time, all the way from the emergence of Homo sapiens to the year 2012. Such a sweeping survey of human history invites us to look beyond chronological, national, cultural and geographic boundaries. It also forces us to sharply rethink the methodology of traditional historians. Throughout our critical survey of world history, we will assess the usefulness (and potential outdatedness) of the concepts of civilization, empire, revolution, and global networks.
HIST 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 205 Ryan Edgington
*Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students
HIST 244-01 US Since 1945 TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-09* This course explores "the long 1960s," a period in which social movements confronting racism, sexism, inequality, and war interwove with new cultural formations. No sooner had the Keynesian state and its demand-driven economics taken hold in the post-World War II United States than a series of challenges arose -- from a business leadership which was threatened by the new power of unions; a political establishment which was threatened by the power of the New Deal coalition and its inclusion of the left, particularly the Communist Party; African Americans and Latinos who were unwilling to sit by as the Keynesian tide lifted all boats but theirs; women who were unwilling to settle for second class citizenship, from the workplace to the political arena; and young people who were unwilling to serve as cannon fodder for yet more wars and who came to question the very culture of consumerism that was underpinned by Keynesianism's demand-driven economics. At key moments over the course of the 1960s and early 1970s, these currents intermingled, sometimes undercutting each other, sometimes inciting each other; and sometimes these movements threatened to meld into a movement which challenged the direction of U.S. society from top to bottom and from the public sphere to the private sphere. We will use a variety of texts, readings, films, and music to explore these movements, their contexts, their roots, their courses, and their consequences. This course is appropriate for students with no prior experience in college-level history.
HIST 260-01 Rise/Fall of Tsarist Russia MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Peter Weisensel
HIST 275-01 The Rise of Modern China TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 275-01*
HIST 294-01 Race, Nation and Genocides in the Modern World MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Eric Roubinek
This course is designed to introduce students to one of the most troublesome and unnerving aspects of the modern world: the systematic exclusion and killing of populations defined by ethnicity, nationality, or race. Genocides are not the only form of political killings, and are certainly not the only form assumed by violations of human rights. They have existed in some fashion since the beginning of recorded history. But in the modern world, genocides have become more systematic, more extensive, and more deadly. In response to these and other forms of crimes against humanity, new human rights standards have arisen. The effort to define and prosecute genocides is now a major aspect of international law. In this course, we will examine the meaning of terms like genocide and crimes against humanity, and the historical development and contested nature of the categories ethnicity, nationality, and race. We will then explore a number of cases, starting with the Armenian Genocide and then move on to genocides of indigenous peoples in Africa, Australia, and North America; the Holocaust; and more contemporary atrocities in Rwanda, ex-Yugoslavia, and Darfur. We will also explore the emergence of human rights standards in response to genocides and other crimes against humanity. Readings will include a variety of historical studies as well as memoirs and eyewitness accounts. Through films and published accounts, we will also discuss the problem of representing extreme violence.
HIST 294-02 "The Garden in the Machine": The City and Nature in the Long 20th Century MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Andrea Moerer
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02 and LATI 294-01* With Latin America's extreme urbanization and traditional socio-cultural divisions among city and country, this course questions nature in Latin American urban areas: how it has existed, changed, and been perceived and represented. After some foundational non-area specific readings, we will read and look at examples from the latter 19th through the 20th century. Visual (including film, photographic and painted images, species of flora and fauna, maps, and monuments) and literary products will be important sources for class discussion and for individual case studies students design.
HIST 294-03 Slavery and Abolition during the Age of Revolution MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 003 Eric Otremba
"What, to the American slave, is your Fourth of July?"
—Fredrick Douglass

Throughout the eighteenth century the Atlantic world of Europe, Africa, and the Americas witnessed two parallel developments. One was the genesis and cultivation of sentiments on individual liberty and the concept of basic human rights. The second was a dramatic expansion in slave-based work regimes throughout the New World. By the 1770s, tensions between these antithetical movements reached a breaking point, and the result was several decades of unprecedented social upheaval across the Atlantic basin. Studying this turmoil and its effects on the New World's many slave societies will be the focus of this course. Topics will include: the development of an international slave-labor system; the birth of ideas on individual rights; the many forms of slave resistance in the New World; how slaves appropriated and incorporated ideas on human rights into their resistance strategies; the development of an international movement for slavery’s Abolition; how slaves and slavery worked to shape Atlantic ideas on freedom more broadly; and the central role of the Haitian Revolution within global history during this period.
HIST 294-04 Religion and the US Founding: Contests over the Place of Religion in Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Eric Otremba
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-05* Few debates are more ubiquitous (or often shrill) in contemporary American politics than whether we inhabit a Christian, Judeo-Christian, religious, or secular nation. Central to this debate is the role religion is thought to have played, or not played, in the founding of the country: what were the intentions of the so-called "Founding Fathers"? For some, the founders were pious and devout men intent on constructing an explicitly Christian nation; for others, they were borderline atheists who envisioned a strict separation of church and state. The historical reality is, as it so often is, much more complex than either side readily admits. Burdened by anachronism, presentism, and oversimplification, this debate is in dire need of thoughtful historical exploration from a variety of angles. This is the work that we will perform in this course. We will not only examine and contextualize the complex, conflicting, and often changing views of the founders themselves, but we will also trace the development of this debate over time. How and why has the struggle over the place of religion in politics taken the form that it has? What, if at all, is the founders' relevance for the present?
HIST 294-05 Sex and the City: Gender, Sexuality, and Urban Life MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Catherine Batza
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-11 and WGSS 294-03* This course examines gender and the urban world from the period of industrialization (late 19th century) to the present. Readings, written assignments, audio-visual assignments, and discussion will uncover the ways in which sexuality has shaped city life and vice versa in America. Central to our examination will be understanding how race, class, and sexuality have impacted historical experiences urban life. Through course readings, primary (archival) sources, online resources, and discussion, we will focus on the following themes: commercialization of sexuality, relationships between work and sexuality, (re)enforcing and challenging sexual norms, the idea of the city as a place for personal freedom and institutional oppression for both men and women. Within each of these themes, we will examine the relationship between race, class, sexuality, and gender in the urban world over time.
HIST 294-06 Wars on Poverty MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Catherine Batza
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-12 and WGSS 294-04* Four questions drive this course: 1. How have public policies created, reinforced, and challenged the oppression of people on the basis of race, gender, sexuality, and class over time? 2. What strategies and tactics have people in poverty used over time and how are they related to those in other social and political movements? 3. How has the role of the state in addressing issues of poverty evolved over the 20th century? 4. How and why does the social conception of poverty look different with regard to gender, race, and and sexuality at different points in history? In this class we will examine poverty from many different angles and from many different periods, including the present to better understand the ways in which structural forms of racism, sexism, homophobia, and able-ism shaped the past and continue to inform the present.
HIST 294-07 Global Encounters in History: China and Africa TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 204 Jamie Monson
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-02 and INTL 294-02* Is China a "new colonial power" that threatens to gobble up Africa’s natural resources? Or does China offer an alternative development model that results in a "win-win" relationship for African nations starting to “look East?” Both sides in this heated current debate about China and Africa have overlooked the critical historical dimensions of China-Africa engagement. In this course we will begin by exploring the long history of interaction between Africa and East Asia, from the time of early sailing ships in the Indian Ocean through the Afro-Asian solidarities of the Cold War. We will focus specifically on the relationship between the People’s Republic of China and African nations, from the 1960s through to the present day. We will place these relations in context, not only historically but also in terms of global processes of economic, social and cultural interaction. We will use written texts, film and visual media, poetry, life stories and other resources to understand China-Africa relations from the perspective of everyday, lived experience. Each student will also carry out a research project on an individual topic.
HIST 294-08 History of Latinos in the US TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Peter Rachleff
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-01* The U.S./Mexican border has long been an inexact, contested, and uncomfortable dividing line for Latinos. This course will begin in the 17th and 18th centuries, as an expanding Spanish presence in the western hemisphere engaged with indigenous people south and north of the Rio Grande River. We will explore the course and consequences of the U.S.-Mexican War of the 1840s, the Treaty of Guadeloupe Hidalgo, and the reconstitution of the U.S. southwest as "Occupied America" (Acuna). We will follow the initial wave of Mexican immigration into the U.S. in the 1910s-1920s, the formation of Mexican-American communities, the pressures for repatriation during the Great Depression, and the evolution of the bracero program. We will also trace and analyze the emergence of Mexican-American political, labor, and social movements, as well as the shaping of Mexican-American culture. We will also explore the diversification of the Latino presence in the U.S., particularly after the Immigration Reform Act of 1965, and we will pay particular attention to relations among Mexican Americans, Salvadorans, Hondurans, Guatemalans, and Puerto Ricans, their relations with African Americans and whites, and the complex roles played by race in shaping their positionality and experiences. Some of our work will involve engaging the Twin Cities as a micrcosm of these historical patterns and developments. This course is appropriate for students with no prior experience in college-level history.
HIST 294-09 The 1970s: History of a Crisis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Ryan Murphy
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-01*
HIST 294-11 20th C Environmental World M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 101 Ryan Edgington
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-01*
HIST 364-01 Germany from 1871 to Present MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Peter Weisensel
HIST 378-01 War Crimes and Memory in East Asia TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Yue-him Tam
*Cross-listed with ASIA 378-01*
HIST 379-01 The Study of History M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Jamie Monson
HIST 394-02 Men in Black: Religious Expansion and Expulsion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Karin Velez
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-03* This course complicates historical notions about the spread of religion across cultures by looking closely at one group of active agents who carried their beliefs overseas: the Jesuits. The Jesuit Order bears the dubious mark of distinction of being the only missionary group to be expelled from the empires of France, Spain and Portugal, and suppressed by the Catholic Church in the eighteenth century. Infamous for this failure, the Jesuits are also legendary for their martyrdoms, successful conversion strategies, precise records of indigenous voices, and pan-European membership. This course takes the Jesuit Order as a case study of Atlantic history, a new subfield that looks beyond the analytical categories of nation and empire. The same Jesuit transnationalism and global outreach that provoked the suspicion of European monarchs inspires today's Atlantic historians to seize on the Jesuits as a window into understanding the expansion of Catholicism in the early modern period. What are the limits and possibilities of religious exchange in contact zones? After reading a few case studies, we will launch our own research investigations of missionary encounters in history.
HIST 394-03 Conquering the Flesh: Renunication of Food and Sex in the Christian Religion TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Susanna Drake
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-01 and WGSS 394-02*
HIST 394-04 Food, Environment and Society in 20th Century America MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Ryan Edgington
*Cross-listed with ENVI 394-01*

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Interdisciplinary Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTD 191-01 Supplementary Writing Workshop W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm MAIN 011 Terry Boychuk
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading; 1 credit; workshop runs February 6th through April 24th*
INTD 411-01 Sr Seminar in Community and Global Health W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 370 Devavani Chatterjea

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
INTL 114-01 Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 James von Geldern
*First day attendance required*
INTL 115-01 Introduction to International Studies: World Travel MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine
INTL 202-01 Global Media Industries TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Michael Griffin
*Cross-listed with MCST 202-01*
INTL 225-01 Comparative Economic Systems TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Gary Krueger
*Cross-listed with ECON 225-01*
INTL 245-01 Intro to Intl Human Rights MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 Wendy Weber
*First day attendance required*
INTL 266-01 Performance/Documents/Rights TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
*Cross-listed with THDA 266-01; first day attendance required*
INTL 272-01 The Post-Soviet Sphere MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine
*Cross-listed with RUSS 272-01*
INTL 294-01 Global Shakespeares: All the World TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Dana Schumacher-Schmidt
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-02* This course looks at selected works of William Shakespeare in four interlocking ways: the already-global circa 1600 aspects of his great plays Othello, Macbeth, and The Tempest; various modern adaptations such as the Voodoo Macbeth, Zulu Macbeth, and the recent Indian film Maqbool; multiple translations and worldwide stagings; and Shakespeare's global afterlife. Shakespeare is often termed a "universal" author: we will critically gaze upon this claim.
INTL 294-02 Global Encounters in History: China and Africa TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 204 Jamie Monson
Cross-listed with ASIA 294-02 and HIST 294-07*
INTL 300-01 Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-04 and WGSS 300-01*
INTL 323-01 Economic Restructuring in Latin America TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 226 Raymond Robertson
*Cross-listed with ECON 323-01 and LATI 323-01*
INTL 352-01 Transitional Justice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 Brooke Coe
INTL 364-01 Culture and Revolution MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 James von Geldern
*Cross-listed with RUSS 364-04; first day attendance required*
INTL 368-01 Sustainable Development and Global Future TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 368-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
INTL 382-01 Poverty, Health, and Development TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Christy Hanson
INTL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore
*Cross-listed with AMST 384-01 and ENGL 384-01*
INTL 415-01 Cultural Resistance/Survival: Indigenous and African Peoples in Early Spanish America MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Margaret Olsen
*Cross-listed with HISP 415-01 and LATI 415-01; first day attendance required*
INTL 480-01 Paradigms of Global Leadership M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Ahmed Samatar
INTL 485-01 Senior Seminar: Confronting Global Hatred W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky
INTL 488-01 Senior Seminar: Thinking on a World Scale TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN David Moore
*Seminar will meet in Carnegie 411*

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
JAPA 102-01 First Year Japanese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
JAPA 102-02 First Year Japanese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 110 Satoko Suzuki
JAPA 102-L1 First Year Japanese II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 102-L2 First Year Japanese II Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am HUM 227 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 102-L3 First Year Japanese II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 227 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 204-01 Second Year Japanese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 204-02 Second Year Japanese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 110 Ritsuko Narita
JAPA 204-L1 Second Year Japanese II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am HUM 227 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 204-L2 Second Year Japanese II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm HUM 217 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 204-L3 Second Year Japanese II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 294-01 Narratives of Alienation: 20th Century Japanese Literature and Film TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 110 Arthur Mitchell
This seminar explores the themes of estrangement, isolation, belonging, and kinship as they are articulated and expressed in works of Japanese literature, film, and graphic novels (manga) during the 20th century. In modern Japan, the instability of modernization led to assertions of Japanese uniformity, social solidarity, and the endurance of traditional ethics. Works of literature and film however reveal how such discourses suppressed a wide diversity of ethnic groups, social identities, and divergent individual experiences. This course examines how writers and filmmakers used narratives to register marginal voices, expose the contradictions of the status quo, and argue for new ways of being in relation to modern society. It also looks at narrative art as a form that can potentially heal social ruptures while preserving difference Among the works we will study are novels by Higuchi Ichiyo, Tanizaki Jun’ichiro, Kawabata Yasunari, Oe Kenzaburo, Mishima Yukio, and Murakami Haruki, as well as films by Ozu Yasujiro, Koreeda Hirokazu, and Otomo Katsuhiro. No knowledge of Japanese required.
JAPA 306-01 Third Year Japanese II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm HUM 111 Sachiko Dorsey
JAPA 306-L1 Third Year Japanese II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 306-L2 Third Year Japanese II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 102 Junko Fukuoka
JAPA 408-01 Fourth Year Japanese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 111 Sachiko Dorsey
JAPA 488-01 Translating Japanese: Theory and Practice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Arthur Mitchell
*Cross-listed with LING 488-01*

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LATI 181-01 Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Andrea Moerer
*Cross-listed with HIST 181-01*
LATI 244-01 Urban Latino Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Paul Dosh
First day attendance required; cross-listed with AMST 244-01 and POLI 244-01*
LATI 268-01 Rights and Resistance: Theater and Film in Latin America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
*Cross-listed with THDA 268; first day attendance required*
LATI 294-01 "The Garden in the Machine": The City and Nature in the Long 20th Century MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Andrea Moerer
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02 and HIST 294-02*
LATI 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 213 Antonio Dorca
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 Galo Gonzalez
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 323-01 Economic Restructuring in Latin America TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 226 Raymond Robertson
*Cross-listed with ECON 323-01 and INTL 323-01*
LATI 415-01 Cultural Resistance/Survival: Indigenous and African Peoples in Early Spanish America MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 212 Margaret Olsen
*Cross-listed with HISP 415-01 and INTL 415-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 436-01 Spanish Dialectology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 402 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with HISP 436-01 and LING 436-01; first day attendance required*

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 100 Christina Esposito
LING 104-01 The Sounds of Language TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 217 Christina Esposito
LING 175-01 Sociolinguistics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Marianne Milligan
*Cross-listed with SOCI 175-01; first day attendance required*
LING 200-01 English Syntax MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 212 John Haiman
LING 205-01 Phonology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 214 Christina Esposito
LING 225-01 100 Words for Snow: Language and Nature TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 301 Marianne Milligan
*Cross-listed with ENVI 225-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
LING 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm HUM 217 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with HISP 309-01; first day attendance required*
LING 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea
*Cross-listed with PSYC 378-01*
LING 400-01 Field Methods in Linguistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 113 John Haiman
*6 credit course*
LING 436-01 Spanish Dialectology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 402 Cynthia Kauffeld
*Cross-listed with HISP 436-01 and LATI 436-01; first day attendance required*
LING 488-01 Translating Japanese: Theory and Practice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 113 Arthur Mitchell
*Cross-listed with JAPA 488-01*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MATH 135-01 Applied Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 245 George Leiter
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 135-02 Applied Calculus MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 245 George Leiter
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Andrew Beveridge
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 137-01 Single Variable Calculus MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 241 Wayne Roberts
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 137-02 Single Variable Calculus MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Wayne Roberts
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 153-01 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Lisa Lendway
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 153-02 Data Analysis and Statistics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 David Ehren
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 George Leiter
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 100 Daniel Kaplan
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 155-03 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 100 Daniel Kaplan
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 191-01 Data and Computing Fundamentals T 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 245 Daniel Kaplan
*1-credit; course meets February 19 - April 16* A short introduction to the handling, analysis, and interpretation of "big data," the massive datasets now routinely being collected in science, commerce, and government. Students achieve facility with a sophisticated, technical computing environment. The course aligns with techniques being used in several courses in the sciences, statistics, and mathematics; it is a corequisite for these courses. There are no prerequisites. The course is intended to be accessible to all students, regardless of background.
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Daniel Flath
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Daniel Flath
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Daniel Flath
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 253-01 Applied Mulitivariate Stats MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Lisa Lendway
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 253-02 Applied Mulitivariate Stats MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Lisa Lendway
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 265-01 Philosophy of Mathematics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 Janet Folina
*Cross-listed with PHIL 365-01; ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Chad Higdon-Topaz
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 361-01 Theory of Computation TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Susan Fox
*Cross-listed with COMP 261-01; ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 365-01 Computational Linear Algebra TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 245 Thomas Halverson
*Cross-listed with COMP 365-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 365-02 Computational Linear Algebra TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 245 Thomas Halverson
*Cross-listed with COMP 365-02; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 376-01 Algebraic Structures MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Andrew Beveridge
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 437-01 Continuous Applied Mathematics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 256 Robert Thompson
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
MATH 477-01 Topics in Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 205 Karen Saxe
*ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MCST 110-01 Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 212 Leola Johnson
MCST 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture TR 01:20 pm-03:50 pm HUM 401 Bradley Stiffler
MCST 202-01 Global Media Industries TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Michael Griffin
*Cross-listed with INTL 202-01*
MCST 234-01 New Media Theories/Practices TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 101 Allyson Shaffer
MCST 249-01 History of Film Since 1941 MW 01:10 pm-03:50 pm HUM 402 Michael Griffin
*First Year students need permission/approval of instructor*
MCST 294-01 Old and New Media M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MARKIM 201 Genevieve Yue
More than the individual histories of separate technologies, media archaeologies invoke the intertwined desires, anxieties, and aspirations that attend a device's invention, use, and obsolescence. The designation of "old" and "new" media refer less to specific technologies like the camera obscura or digital computing but to the ways in which the meanings attached to media forms are often relational, multiple, and deeply connected to both the public and private spheres. This course traces numerous media archaeological threads, including media rooted in particular functions like long-distance communication (telegraphy, telephony, television), imaging (cinema and optical devices), the ability to constitute, address, and surveil a mass audience (print, radio, and satellite and Internet networks), as well as the role media play in the practice of art. More broadly, this course theorizes the notion of media itself, particularly as manifest in the technologies we use to make sense of ourselves, others, and the world. What makes a medium new or, for that matter, old? Are we indeed in what Rosalind Krauss has called “a post-medium condition,” and how is the cultural logic of media expressed in a digitized, dematerialized age? The first half of the course will address theoretical debates and methods in the emerging field of media archaeology, while the second will focus on case studies with emphasis on the modernist articulation of medium, alongside the critical uses of media, in art and film. Prerequisite: While this class is open to all, it is strongly recommended that students have taken either Film Analysis or Texts and Power prior to enrolling in the course.
MCST 294-02 Dance for the Camera MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
*Cross-listed with THDA 294-01*
MCST 294-03 Kids, Culture, and New Media M 01:10 pm-03:50 pm OLRI 270 Jay Gabler
The rapidly increasing pervasiveness of online digital media has opened a new chapter in the long-running debate about the role of media in children's lives. What does it mean, for children and for society, that kids can now be creators as well as consumers? How is the Internet changing ideas about the nature of childhood? This course examines topics related to children and new media in a multidisciplinary social-historical context, with an emphasis on linking debates on children and new media to larger issues regarding technology and society. Through readings, discussions, and activities, students will learn to think critically about kids' increasingly connected lives.
MCST 354-01 Blackness in the Media W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 402 Leola Johnson
*Cross-listed with AMST 354-01; screening times TBD*
MCST 394-01 Adv Journalism: New Media TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 402 Mary Turck
This course asks students to think about what journalism is and about how new media continues to change the face of journalism for both practitioners and news "consumers." Students will be introduced to and will practice the use of online tools that are useful in both
"old" and new journalism. They will analyze and apply journalistic skills in new media formats, as well as identify and use new media tools.
MCST 488-01 Adv Seminar: Visual Representations of Nation/Culture/Race/Gender TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Michael Griffin
*Cross-listed as AMST 494-01* Screening times TBD* This capstone seminar will provide class members an opportunity to pursue in-depth analyses of visual representations of nation/culture/race/gender/community across various media and formats--in entertainment, advertising, political communication, journalism, infotainment, and online video and multimedia sites that circulate images of people and events. Projects may involve analyses of film, photography, television, or other printed or digital visual material.

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
MUSI 110-01 Music Appreciation M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 113 Jonas Westover
MUSI 112-01 Basic Musicianship TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 228 Jonas Westover
MUSI 114-01 Theory II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey
MUSI 114-L1 Theory II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey
MUSI 114-L2 Theory II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey
MUSI 153-01 Electronic Music MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Reid Kruger
MUSI 264-01 History of Jazz MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 228 Randall Bauer
MUSI 294-01 Cover Songs: Authenticity, Value, and Meaning in Emulation to Parody TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 228 Victoria Malawey
*Permission of instructor required*
MUSI 314-01 Theory IV, Contemporary Theory and Literature MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 228 Randall Bauer
MUSI 343-01 Western Music-19th Century MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mazullo
MUSI 394-01 Intro to North Indian Music TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Pooja Pavan
MUSI 73-01 African Music Ensemble TR 06:30 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 116 Sowah Mensah
MUSI 73-01 African Music Ensemble MW 05:00 pm-07:00 pm MUSIC 121 Sowah Mensah
MUSI 75-01 Macalester Choir MWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie
MUSI 77-01 Highland Camerata T 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie
MUSI 77-01 Highland Camerata R 06:30 pm-07:30 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie
MUSI 81-01 Mac Jazz Band MW 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Joan Griffith
MUSI 83-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 121 Joan Griffith
MUSI 83-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 116 Joan Griffith
MUSI 85-01 Pipe Band W 06:00 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 228 Michael Breidenbach
MUSI 87-01 Chamber Ensemble TBA TBA Mark Mandarano
MUSI 89-01 Orchestra TR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Mark Mandarano
MUSI 91-01 Mac Early Music Ensembles F 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Clea Galhano
MUSI 95-01 Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 95-02 Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder
MUSI 95-03 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 95-07 Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder
MUSI 95-09 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 95-10 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-11 Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 95-13 African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-17 Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-19 Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson
MUSI 95-1M Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor
MUSI 95-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 95-25 Viol de Gamba TBA TBA Julie Elhard
MUSI 95-26 Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 95-29 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 95-32 Recorder TBA TBA Clea Galhano
MUSI 95-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 95-38 Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor
MUSI 95-39 Tuba TBA TBA Charles Wazanowski
MUSI 95-41 Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 95-42 African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-4M Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball
MUSI 95-5M African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-BL Violin TBA TBA Stella Anderson
MUSI 95-CI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-CJ Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen
MUSI 95-CM Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson
MUSI 95-H1 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin
MUSI 95-HY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 95-JM Jazz Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen
MUSI 95-M Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 95-M3 African Flute TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-M4 Oboe TBA TBA Julie Williams
MUSI 95-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson
MUSI 95-M7 Bassoon TBA TBA Carole Smith
MUSI 95-M8 Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen
MUSI 95-M9 Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen
MUSI 95-MB Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 95-MD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-MG Organ TBA TBA Winston Kaehler
MUSI 95-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen
MUSI 95-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-MJ Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 95-ML African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah
MUSI 95-MP Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-MQ Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-MR Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder
MUSI 95-MU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 95-MW Viola TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki
MUSI 95-MY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg
MUSI 95-MZ Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith
MUSI 95-W2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa
MUSI 95-WA Jazz Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen
MUSI 95-WC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen
MUSI 95-WD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo
MUSI 95-WH Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols
MUSI 95-WJ Voice TBA TBA William Reed
MUSI 97-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright
MUSI 97-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl
MUSI 97-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Claudia Chen

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Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
NEUR 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with PSYC 180-01*
NEUR 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with PSYC 248-01*
NEUR 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 371 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with PSYC 248-L1*
NEUR 300-01 Directed Research TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak
NEUR 385-01 Mind Reading: Understanding Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 370 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with PSYC 385-01*
NEUR 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHIL 115-01 Introduction to Philosophy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 William Wilcox
PHIL 120-01 Introduction to Symbolic Logic MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Janet Folina
PHIL 120-02 Introduction to Symbolic Logic MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 Janet Folina
PHIL 125-01 Ethics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Martin Gunderson
PHIL 125-02 Ethics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Martin Gunderson
PHIL 229-01 Environmental Ethics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Diane Michelfelder
*Cross-listed with ENVI 229-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students* This course will be divided into three parts. In the first part, we'll be looking at some classical questions in environmental ethics. When I say I have a moral responsibility to protect the natural world, what am I really saying? To what is my responsibility directed: toward natural resources, ecosystems, species, individuals within species, or something else? And why do I have such a responsibility to begin with? Can I care for the environment and for the rights of animals at the same time? In the second part, we’ll be considering more contemporary questions in environmental ethics, focusing on the protection of wilderness areas from development, When we argue that we need to act so as to sustain resources for future generations, are we presuming that nature exists for us and us alone? How can we best respond morally to climate change? In light of the theme of this year’s International Roundtable, the third part of the course will be devoted to issues connecting environmental ethics with food production and consumption. Our texts will be a reader in environmental ethics, James Garvey's The Ethics of Climate Change: Right and Wrong in a Warming World, and David Kaplan's The Philosophy of Food.
PHIL 231-01 Modern Philosophy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Geoffrey Gorham
PHIL 294-01 American Philosophy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 219 Geoffrey Gorham
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-08*

"I think that in no country in the civilized world is less attention paid to philosophy than in the United States. The Americans have no philosophical school of their own. "
--Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America (1835)

Is there a distinct American worldview, or merely a confluence of intellectual traditions originating beyond and before the USA? This course explores the diverse intellectual strains that have contributed to the development of American philosophy in the last three centuries, including influences that have been somewhat neglected: the American Indian thought of Arthur Parker and Zit Kala Za (Gertie Bonnin); the puritan theology of Jonathan Edwards; the political theory of Thomas Paine and Thomas Jefferson; the African American philosophy of W.E.B DuBois and Alain Locke; the transcendentalism of R.W. Emerson and H.D. Thoreau; the 'classical' pragmatism of C.S. Peirce and William James; the 'radical' pragmatism of John Dewey and Jane Adams. Special attention will be given to American conceptions of justice, freedom, democracy, religiosity, nature, pragmatism, progress and self-reliance. Grades will be based on reading responses, short papers, a take-home exam and participation. No prereqs.
PHIL 365-01 Philosophy of Mathematics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 Janet Folina
*Cross-listed with MATH 265-01; ACTC students may register with permission of instructor*
PHIL 367-01 20th Century Continental Philosophy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 003 Diane Michelfelder
In our everyday life, the world is given to us from a first-person perspective. For a number of European philosophers in the 20th century, this observation formed the impetus for the development of an exciting way of thinking known as phenomenology, oriented toward understanding the experiential life of the concrete human subject. This seminar (offered every other year with a different topic) will engage this time around with phenomenological thinkers and themes. We’ll look at phenomenology through the eyes of philosophers such as Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Derrida, Gadamer, Scheler, Levinas, and Arendt. And, we’ll critically think about issues related to perception, imagination, emotion, the role of the body in cognition, the production of meaning, space and time, and our interactions with others. In the last part of this seminar, we will push the temporal envelope of this course and look at some ways in which contemporary phenomenological approaches can be found in other fields, including art history, cognitive science, and neuroscience. You’ll have a chance, among others, to co-lead a seminar discussion and to write a paper from a phenomenological point of view. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. All majors welcome.
PHIL 394-01 Contemporary Metaphysics and Epistemology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Geoffrey Gorham
Am I free? Is time an illusion? How can I know what is real? Metaphysics and Epistemology are concerned with such fundamental questions about reality and knowledge. This class investigates contemporary research in these core areas of philosophy. Likely topics in metaphysics: freedom, causality, time, fictional or possible objects, moral realism, the origin and structure of the universe. Likely topics in epistemology: realism and relativism, theories of justification, perception, epistemic values and duties, naturalized and experimental epistemology. We will also consider certain questions in meta-philosophy: what is the aim of philosophy? what is philosophical method? what is the relation between philosophy and other disciplines? This class will be conducted seminar-style. Grades will be based on student papers and class presentation/discusssion.

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PE 01-01 Swimming I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson
PE 04-01 Karate I MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:40 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 06-02 Yoga I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Vanessa Seljeskog
PE 09-01 Conditioning TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 10-01 Racquetball I TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm LEOCTR FIELDHOUSE Betsy Emerson
PE 11-01 Swimming II TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle
PE 13-01 Intermediate Social Dance M 08:30 pm-10:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson
PE 14-01 Karate II MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson
PE 16-01 Yoga II TR 10:00 am-11:10 am LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin
PE 18-01 Pilates MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard
PE 19-01 Conditioning II TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 20-01 Weight Training MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray
PE 21-01 Swim for Fitness TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle
PE 26-01 Tai Chi Chuan MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Phyllis Calph
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance T 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson
PE 51-01 Aqua Aerobics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
PHYS 112-01 Cosmos: Perspectives and Reflections M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim
*2 credit course*
PHYS 130-01 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with ENVI 130-01; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
PHYS 130-L1 Science of Renewable Energy Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Doyle
*Cross-listed with ENVI 130-L1; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Tonnis ter Veldhuis
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab R 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab R 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 John Cannon
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab M 02:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab T 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 227-L3 Principles of Physics II Lab T 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams
PHYS 348-01 Laboratory Instrumentation MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 170 James Heyman
PHYS 348-L1 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 147 James Heyman
PHYS 348-L2 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 147 James Heyman
PHYS 444-01 Electromagnetic Radiation MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 James Heyman
PHYS 460-01 Astrophysics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 404 John Cannon
PHYS 461-01 Mechanics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis
PHYS 468-01 Statistical Mechanics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 226 James Doyle
PHYS 489-01 Physics Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 150 John Cannon
*1 credit course*

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
POLI 120-01 International Politics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Mark Hoffman
POLI 160-01 Foundations of Political Theory MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 194-01 US Politics in Comparative Perspective MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Patrick Schmidt
This course offers a slight twist on the typical version of Poli 100 (Foundations of U.S. Politics) by seeking to explore American politics in comparison to other countries. What are the common challenges of democratic systems, and how much do the dynamics of America—its history, peoples, culture—make it different? Is America exceptional in any way? While still offering a survey of American politics as typical of a Foundations course, we will use key concepts such as representation and constitutionalism to open up comparisons, particularly with Europe and European democracies. This course fulfills the Foundations requirement in the Political Science major; students may not take both this course and POLI 100.
POLI 203-01 Politics and Inequality MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Lesley Lavery
*Cross-listed with AMST 203-01*
POLI 205-01 Politics and Policymaking TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Lesley Lavery
POLI 207-01 US Civil Rights and Civil Liberties MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Patrick Schmidt
POLI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am HUM 213 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 215-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students*
POLI 216-01 Legislative Politics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 06A Michael Zis
*Permission of instructor required*
POLI 220-01 Foreign Policy: China TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Andrew Latham
POLI 222-01 Regional Conflict/Security MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 105 Andrew Latham
POLI 241-01 The Holocaust: Representation and Interpretations W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 242-01 Development Politics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Mark Hoffman
POLI 244-01 Urban Latino Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 215 Paul Dosh
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with LATI 244-01 and AMST 244-01*
POLI 260-01 Contemporary Political Theory TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler
POLI 272-01 Researching Political Communication TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
POLI 294-01 Immigration MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
The United States are often described as a nation of immigrants, yet various anxieties over the status and role of immigrants have been expressed throughout the history of the country. This class offers a symptomatic reading of key historical debates over immigration in the United States. A symptomatic analysis explores the contextual forces that shape the definitions, terms, and goals of such debates, the variety of interests vested in the issues, and the political and social consequences of these controversies not only for the dominant political order but especially for the lives and identities of the immigrants, their families, and communities. In particular we will explore:
• key historical events and trends that have defined the flow and status of immigrants in the United States;
• how various anxieties about immigration have served to disenfranchise some groups while solidifying the power of others;
• the rhetorical, economic, political, and ideological challenges faced by those interested in promoting immigrants’ rights
• how the status of immigrants has consequences for the political rights of citizens and vice versa, thus challenging the notion that immigrants’ problems are theirs alone.
POLI 294-02 Boundaries of Democracy and Empire MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Mark Hoffman
What happens when democratic societies - in which citizens author the laws of the land and actively participate in shaping domestic and foreign policy - undertake imperial projects of expansion that abandon democratic principles? Are these societies still democratic? What tensions and conflicts emerge when citizens of democracies tacitly or explicitly endorse the conquest, subordination, and coercive expropriation of foreign lands, resources, and peoples? How have democratic regimes justified apparently anti-democratic practices of sexual and racial subordination, e.g., slavery and colonial exploitation? How have imperial practices served democratic societies, e.g., how have they functioned to extract wealth from non-citizen foreigners in ways that allow citizens in domestic spaces to participate in democratic deliberation? How have the empires of democratic societies maintained boundaries between sovereign citizens and colonized, non-citizen foreign subjects, e.g., the boundaries of nation, gender, race, and class? How have subordinated peoples resisted these practices, notably by invoking universal democratic principles, and how have imperial regimes responded to anti-imperial and anti-colonial resistance?
This course addresses these and related questions through an examination of historical tensions that have emerged between democratic and imperial practices of production and systems of rule. Our overarching goal will be to understand contemporary practices of imperial expansion – e.g., through projects of development, nation-building and state-building, and through the “opening of markets” to foreign investment - in the context of the system of modern democratic nation-states. To analyze this contemporary phenomenon, we will examine three historical precursors to the imperial-colonial present, namely, 1) the "golden age" of ancient Greek democracy, 2) democratic experiments in France and the United States after the French and American revolutions, and 3) the spread of Western democratic ideals in the form of commitments to the right of peoples to self-determination in the first half of the twentieth century. In each case, we will examine the ways in which apparently democratic societies - in Greece, Europe, and the United States – have participated in imperial projects of expansion and in the production of colonial hierarchies, boundaries, and divisions of labor.
POLI 300-01 American Government Institutions MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Michael Zis
POLI 305-01 Women's Voices in Politics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
*Cross-listed with WGSS 306-01*
POLI 323-01 Humanitarianism in World Politics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber
POLI 335-01 Science and Citizenship TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke
*Cross-listed with ENVI 335-01; first day attendance required; permission of instructor required for ACTC students
POLI 390-01 Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship TR 08:00 am-11:10 am MARKIM 201 Paul Dosh
*S/D/NC grading with written evaluation*
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Andrew Latham
*2 credit course*

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Jason Weaver
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 204 Joan Ostrove
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 301 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 100-L4 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 370 Jamie Atkins
PSYC 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with NEUR 180-01*
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Brooke Lea
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Brooke Lea
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Brooke Lea
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 216 Tina Kruse
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01*
PSYC 240-01 Principles of Learning and Behavior MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Julia Manor
PSYC 240-L1 Principles of Learning and Behavior T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 371 Julia Manor
PSYC 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with NEUR 248-01*
PSYC 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 371 Eric Wiertelak
*Cross-listed with NEUR 248-L1*
PSYC 252-01 Distress, Dysfunction, and Disorder: Perspectives on the DSM MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Jaine Strauss
PSYC 254-01 Social Psychology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Jason Weaver
PSYC 264-01 The Psychology of Gender TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Joan Ostrove
*Cross-listed with WGSS 264-01*
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Darcy Burgund
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Julia Manor
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Julia Manor
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Darcy Burgund
PSYC 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea
*Cross-listed with LING 378-01*
PSYC 380-01 Community Psychology and Public Health W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss
*Instructor permission required*
PSYC 385-01 Mind Reading: Understanding Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 370 Darcy Burgund
*Cross-listed with NEUR 385-01*
PSYC 386-01 Seminar in Neuropharmacology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 Lin Aanonsen
*Cross-listed with BIOL 486-01; first day attendance required*
PSYC 394-01 Psychology of Japanese-American Internment MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 352 Jason Weaver
In 1942, following the attack on Pearl Harbor, over 100,000 Japanese and Japanese-Americans were relocated from their homes to government-run internment camps. We will use this event as a historical case study to apply social psychological theory and research. Our analysis will include the perspectives of policy makers, internees, and non-Japanese American citizens. Although we will focus on the internment, we will also discuss other WWII topics, such as the perspective of Japanese-American soldiers and the decision to use nuclear weapons against Japan. Finally, we will draw parallels between the events of 1942 and current social and political situations.
PSYC 394-03 Inside the Animal Mind MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Julia Manor
*Instructor permission required for ACTC students* Ever wondered what your dog is thinking or why your cat behaves a certain way? In this course students will be introduced to the questions and concepts in the study of animal cognition. We will take a peek into the animal mind and show that many topics in animal cognition can be studied in an objective and scientific manner. The format of the seminar will include student led discussion of recent topics in the study of animal cognition. Topics may include: animal sensory abilities, abstract representations (e.g., numbers and time) cause and effect detection, memory systems, insight and reasoning, theory of mind, and communication. Book chapters and journal articles will be employed to illustrate these concepts.

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RELI 111-01 Introduction to Buddhism MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Erik Davis
*The waitlist for this class is closed.*
RELI 121-01 New Testament TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Susanna Drake
*Cross-listed with CLAS 194-02*
RELI 145-01 Pagans, Christians and Jews in Classical Antiquity: Cultures in Conflict TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 226 Andrew Overman
*Cross-listed with CLAS 145-01*
RELI 194-01 American Heretics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 110 Paula Cooey
*Open only to Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors* Just what is "the Bible" and what role has it played in shaping American life? How might it center a pattern of repeated political and cultural subversion that later becomes part of the dominant political voice in the United States? Many if not most of the earliest Europeans who colonized what is now the U.S. were considered religious heretics by the Christian churches of their original homelands at the time of their immigration. Over the course of U.S. history, “new” traditions have also emerged, often considered heretical or "not really Christian" by the subsequently established Christian traditions. While some of these traditions die out, a number of them flourish and later become part of the dominant cultural and political landscape. Much of the debate over who is and isn’t heretical or "really Christian" has focused on what counts as authoritative Christian sacred text and how to interpret it. So, for example, even today some Christian denominations and sects find the Church of Latter Day Saints (Mormons) politically, as well as religiously, unacceptable because this tradition grants the Book of Mormon divinely revealed status. Controversy over what does and does not count as sacred scripture, how it is to be interpreted, and who gets to determine right teaching of these texts for human life has gone on to shape American culture and politics in distinctive ways. The debates and the texts on which they focus have provided the primary scripts, the central narratives, and the cultural discourse, from worship to moral practice, politics to the courts, and secular ceremony to economic life. Christians have turned to scripture to justify opposing views and political action on issues from slavery to the Civil Rights, Women’s suffrage to the second wave of Feminism, capitalism to socialism, and heterosexually exclusive civil marriage laws to Gay Rights. This course will examine this pattern or movement from "heretic" to dominance, characterized by dispute, adaptation, and power, even violence, by looking at a number of these groups, their sacred texts, and their impact through the use of film, guest lecture, visual arts, field work in various different Christian communities, on-line virtual churches, and, most importantly, the texts themselves.
RELI 194-02 Jews and Christians: From Diatribe to Dialogue to ? MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Barry Cytron
For twenty centuries Jews and Christians have mostly argued with one another, as each community shaped its respective identity. Fifty years ago, in the aftermath of World War II, this history of hostility was overturned, as academics and interfaith activists helped to set the relationship onto a new path. But now, political squabbles, newer church teachings, even a few media events have threatened to upend this newfound coexistence. We'll explore the complex theological and social history between the two faiths, from the first centuries of polemics to the recent attempts at harmony, tracing the repercussions into this new century.
RELI 232-01 Religion and Food W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Peter Harle
RELI 294-02 Ritual and Ecology in Southeast Asia TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm HUM 212 Erik Davis
Ritual and Ecology in Southeast Asia introduces students to ecological and 'systems thinking' in considering the motivations, roles, and experiences of ritual behavior. Using three strategically chosen case studies - the Maring people of Papua New Guinea, the great agricultural rainforest Angkorean empire, and the contemporary Balinese water temples - we will explore the details of how humans interact with their environment in ritual and practical ways, and explore the implications of such interactions for our understanding of the role of ritual in human culture and evolution.
RELI 294-04 Muslims in Secular, Christian Europe: Identity and Belonging M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Daniel Williams
Europe and European societies have been a critical site for the meeting of a diversity of religions, religious traditions, and religious peoples. In particular, the encounter between Islam, Christianity and Secularism, though hardly new or only contemporary, has become the basis for the questioning of national identities and belonging across Europe. These identity questions are visible in both formal policies and organizations as well as in everyday life in the sense of belonging among individuals and religious groups. In this course, we will consider identity, belonging and religion in contemporary Western Europe. We will focus especially on the United Kingdom, Germany and France, both for their differences as well as their importance as sites where identity and belonging have been especially important. Given the European context, we will focus on Islam and Christianity, in the context of secularism as a feature of European societies. Specifically, the course will consider state policies and different national traditions of dealing with religion and religious diversity, religious organizations, and individuals and religious groups and their sense of national belonging and identity.
RELI 294-05 Religion and the US Founding: Contests over the Place of Religion in Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Eric Otremba
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-04*
RELI 394-01 Conquering the Flesh: Renunication of Food and Sex in the Christian Religion TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Susanna Drake
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-03 and WGSS 394-02* This course explores how bodily practices of fasting and sexual abstinence have shaped Christian identities from the first century, C.E. to today. From Paul of Tarsus’ instructions about sexual discipline to the True Love Waits campaign, from the desert fathers’ rigorous bodily regimens to the contemporary Christian diet movement, Christians have often understood the practice of renunciation as a necessary feature of spiritual perfection. In this course we will consider several ascetic movements in Christian history, including the development of ascetic practice in late antiquity, the rise of fasting practices among women in medieval Europe, and the culture of Christian dieting and chastity in the U.S. We will pay special attention to how Christian practices of piety both draw upon and contribute to cultural understandings of gender and the body.
RELI 394-02 Metaphysics in Secular Thought MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 214 Kiarina Kordela
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-02*
RELI 394-03 Men in Black: Religious Expansion and Expulsion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Karin Velez
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-02*
RELI 394-04 The Power of Words W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 213 David Martyn
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01; Taught in English; Core Course for the Concentration in Critical Theory* Hate speech (the Muhammad video, the Rutgers webcam suicide case), but also revolutionary messages that can cause political or religious conversions (political speeches, the gospel) are uses, perhaps abuses of language with real effects - ways of "doing things with words." In this course, we will explore how theory, philosophy, religion, and literature depict and come to terms with the power of words to effect real-world change, both for the better and for the worse. What constitutes undue influence? What makes for transformative or emancipatory speech? How do we draw the line between these? Readings will include theories of rhetoric, persuasion, and performativity (Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Longinus, Wittgenstein, John Austin, Derrida); instances and studies of transformative speech in religion, psychoanalysis, and witchcraft (Hebrew Bible, New Testament, Luther, Freud, Pierre Clastre, Jeanne Favret-Saada); examples of political rhetoric in literature (Homer, Thucydides, Friedrich Schiller, Heinrich von Kleist, Goebbels, Kafka); theories and instances of hate speech (Judith Butler, youtube). Requirements: three papers, periodic reading responses.
RELI 469-01 Approaches to the Study of Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Paula Cooey

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
RUSS 102-01 Elementary Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 213 Julia Chadaga
RUSS 102-L1 Elementary Russian II Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 102-L2 Elementary Russian II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 204-01 Intermediate Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am HUM 217 Svetlana Rukhelman
RUSS 204-L1 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 102 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 204-L2 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm HUM 102 Elizaveta Kundas
RUSS 252-01 20th C Russian Lit/Culture: Satire, Dystopia, and Science Fiction MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm HUM 217 Svetlana Rukhelman
Over the past century, Russian writers, artists, and filmmakers have used the genres of satire, science fiction, and dystopian fiction to respond first to the utopian ideology of Communism, then to the dismal practical conditions which this ideology engendered, and finally to the hyper-capitalist dystopia which replaced the USSR in 1991. These striking literary and cinematic responses will be the focus of this course. In addition to examining the origins of utopian thought and dystopian art, we will ask: how have Russian authors adapted the Western genre of dystopian narrative for their own purposes? Why do their works so often incorporate aspects of science fiction and satire? How does satire achieve its effect through irony, and why is dark humor so appealing? Readings (in English translation) by Zamyatin, Platonov, Bulgakov, Zoschenko, Kharms, Il’f and Petrov, Solzhenitsyn, and Pelevin; films by Eisenstein, Gaidai, and Tarkovsky; visual art by Tatlin, Kandinsky, Malevich, Komar and Melamid.
RUSS 270-01 Wrongdoing in Russian Literature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 213 Julia Chadaga
The Russian word for crime literally means "overstepping," in the sense of crossing a boundary. What happens, however, when that boundary shifts, as it did in the twentieth century with the Bolshevik Revolution? Or what if the society that defines the criminal is itself
"wrong"? Throughout its history, Russian literature has returned almost obsessively to the theme of transgression. We will take a cross-cultural approach as we juxtapose Russian texts with those from other literary traditions, bringing out similar and contrasting views of wrongdoing in Russian culture and that of "the West" against which Russia has traditionally defined itself. Primary readings will include Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, Gogol's "The Nose," Shakespeare's Macbeth, Tolstoy's The Kreutzer Sonata, Kafka's "In the Penal Colony," Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange, and Nabokov's Lolita. Secondary readings (from literary and critical theory to KGB case files) will provide context and introduce provocative ways of thinking about crime and punishment. All readings will be in English. This course counts toward the Legal Studies Concentration.
RUSS 272-01 The Post-Soviet Sphere MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine
*Cross-listed with INTL 272-01*
RUSS 364-01 Culture and Revolution MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 James von Geldern
*Cross-listed with INTL 364-01; first day attendance required*
RUSS 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm HUM 217 Julia Chadaga
Topic: Forbidden Art and the Performance of Dissent. In summer 2012, three members of the Russian feminist performance art collective Pussy Riot stood trial for an anti-Putin protest that they had staged in Russia's most famous cathedral. The women were charged with "hooliganism and religious hatred" and sentenced to two years of hard labor. Their case captured worldwide attention and provoked fierce debate about the limits of free speech and the role of the artist in an authoritarian regime. These issues have been of central importance
in Russia for centuries. In this course, we will examine verbal and visual texts that will provide different perspectives on the Russian perception of art as a dangerous weapon, which has led to attempts by authorities to police artistic production through censorship, arrests, and executions. We will also look at how Russian cultural figures have voiced opposition to the government; and we will explore how the concept of performance unites the artistic and political spheres, with special attention to the theatrical aspect of key turning points in Russian history. Texts will include stories, poems, news and historical accounts, and political commentary. Open to students who have completed RUSS 204 plus study abroad, or by permission of instructor.

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Khaldoun Samman
SOCI 110-02 Introduction to Sociology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Khaldoun Samman
SOCI 175-01 Sociolinguistics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Marianne Milligan
*Cross-listed with LING 175-01; first day attendance required*
SOCI 190-01 Criminal Behavior/Social Control MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 305 Erik Larson
*First day attendance required*
SOCI 194-02 Medical Sociology MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm CARN 305 Terry Boychuk
This course provides an overview of the political, economic, cultural, and scientific foundations of the US health care industry. Select topics include: What is the secret to a long life? What is the basis of medical knowledge about health and illness? How do we know if
medical care hurts or helps us? Why did the US health care industry develop under the auspices of markets rather than government-provided public goods? Why is it so difficult to achieve universal access to health care?
SOCI 220-01 Sociology of Race/Ethnicity M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Lesley Kandaras
SOCI 269-01 Social Science Inquiry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Erik Larson
SOCI 290-01 Islam and the West W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Khaldoun Samman
SOCI 294-01 Public Schools in America MW 09:10 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Terry Boychuk
This course offers a broad historical overview of key political controversies surrounding public schooling, including seminal conflicts over public funding of religious schools and racially segregated schools in the nineteenth century, progressive era debates about the relationship between public schools and colleges and universities in the early twentieth, the ordeal of school integration in the late twentieth century, and lastly, contemporary disputes over school choice and no-child-left behind.
SOCI 294-02 Immigrant Voices TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Mahnaz Kousha
"Once I thought to write a history of the immigrants in America. Then I discovered that the immigrants were American History" (Oscar Handling, 1951:3). Over the course of the last five centuries, millions of people, young and old, male and female, married and single, left their homelands to seek a better life. Originating in different localities, they escaped famine and hunger, war, religious persecution and intolerance, colonialism, and revolutionary turmoil. Some left following their "adventurous" spirit. While many died before reaping the benefits of their life transforming quest, others survived to build a new nation. While all contributed to building the country, not all left a written account of their experiences. Who were these people who, willingly or forcibly, left all they knew behind? What were they escaping from? What were their dreams? Hardships? How were they received by those who, by pure accident of history, had arrived before them? This class is an expedition into the past with an eye on the present, examining firsthand accounts left by immigrants and about them. What does an 18th century Scottish indentured servant may have in common with a 21st century migrant farm worker? What does a turn of the 20th century Polish immigrant might have in common with a 21st century Arab immigrant? What does a Japanese picture bride might share with a contemporary Russian bride? Delving into divergent historical periods and differing groups, the goal is to develop a better understanding of parallels and variations, hopes and dreams, the ease and challenges that immigrants have experienced, and continue to face.

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Theatre and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory and Performance I MWF 09:40 am-11:50 am THEATR STUDIO Matthew Sciple
*First day attendance required*
THDA 125-01 Technical Theater MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett
*First day attendance required*
THDA 125-L1 Technical Theater Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett
THDA 125-L2 Technical Theater Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Thomas Barrett
THDA 210-01 Community-Based Theaters TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 113 Harry Waters
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-06*
THDA 220-01 Voice and Speech MWF 12:00 pm-02:00 pm THEATR 205 Cheryl Brinkley
*First day attendance required*
THDA 220-01 Voice and Speech MWF 12:00 pm-02:00 pm THEATR 3 Cheryl Brinkley
*First day attendance required*
THDA 250-01 Experiential Anatomy and the Mind Body Connection MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke
THDA 255-01 Lighting Design M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser
*$20 materials fee will be charged*
THDA 266-01 Performance/Documents/Rights TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
*Cross-listed with INTL 266-01; first day attendance required*
THDA 268-01 Rights and Resistance: Theater and Film in Latin America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Lara Nielsen
*Cross-listed with LATI 268-01; first day attendance required*
THDA 294-01 Dance for the Camera MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
*Cross-listed with MCST 294-02*
THDA 350-01 Directing and Devising: Making Meaning on the Stage MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Beth Cleary
*First day attendance required*
THDA 360-01 Acting Theory/Performance II MWF 09:40 am-11:50 am THEATR Harry Waters
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
THDA 21-01 African Dance MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Patricia Brown
THDA 31-01 Dance Improvisation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 6 Krista Langberg
THDA 42-01 Modern Dance II TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 45-01 Modern Dance IV MW 03:50 pm-05:20 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor
WGSS 110-01 Intro to LGBTQ Studies MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Ryan Murphy
*Cross-listed with AMST 112-01* The class considers how sexuality is an organizing principle of society. As it does so, we take up the historical, political, and social dynamics in which Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) communities and identities came to be. The course pays particular attention to how LGBTQ people shape the world around us, and how the social transformation of the 20th century United States has influenced the way that LGBTQ people see and know themselves. Drawing on the diverse and complex field of LGBT and Queer Studies, this course tells not a single story of queer life, but one that is crosscut by differences of race, class, and gender, and that is embedded in broader social phenomena like urbanization, industrialization, globalization, and inequality. As it takes up queer people, places, and times, the course is motivated by the ways that alternative forms of kinship, family, domesticity, and desire might make the world a better place. While scholarly essays are the center of the course, it draws on a spectrum of sources, from visual art to popular culture to photography. A discussion-based seminar at the introductory level, the class will enhance students’ communication and analytical skills, allowing everyone to become a sharper, more critical readers and writers.
WGSS 117-01 Women, Health, Reproduction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Elizabeth Jansen
*Cross-listed with BIOL 117-01; first day attendance required*
WGSS 117-02 Women, Health, Reproduction MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 150 Elizabeth Jansen
*Cross-listed as BIOL 117-02; first day attendance required*
WGSS 194-01 Topics in US History: Women's History through Oral History MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Catherine Batza
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-03 and HIST 190-01*
WGSS 194-02 Feminist Classicists Re(Read) Greek Tragedy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Brian Lush
*Cross-listed with CLAS 194-01*
WGSS 242-01 Economics of Gender MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Karine Moe
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ECON 242-01*
WGSS 264-01 The Psychology of Gender TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm Joan Ostrove
*Cross-listed with PSYC 264-01*
WGSS 294-01 The 1970s: History of a Crisis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Ryan Murphy
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-09* The 1970s are a maligned decade. From the right, critics argued that amid a proliferation of so-called "alternative lifestyles," society had lost its moral compass. And from the left, analysts often cited the same phenomena to claim that the freedom dreams of the 1960s had faded into apolitical narcissism. This class challenges these politics of dismissal, aiming to build new ideas and inspiration out of a contentious decade. Discussions will trace how anti-colonial nationalist, radical feminist, and gay liberationist movements made enduring critiques of middle class economic commitments and cultural values. And we will grapple with how the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression – manifested in unflagging inflation, high interest rates, and persistent unemployment – spawned a new consensus among policymakers that undermined the social safety net and drove up inequality. The vigorous attack on the labor movement, the implementation of neoliberal reforms across the Americas, the rise of "postmodern"intellectual paradigms, and the production of new queer and woman of color feminist imaginaries will be core topics of the class. Drawing on scholarly texts, popular film, and visual art, the course brings a queer and feminist lens to a transnational history class about the United States in the 1970s.
WGSS 294-02 Gender and Sexuality in China TR 09:40 am-11:10 am HUM 111 Xin Yang
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-01 and CHIN 294-01*
WGSS 294-03 Sex in the City: Gender, Sexuality, and Urban Life MWF 02:30 pm-03:30 pm MAIN 009 Catherine Batza
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-11 and HIST 294-05*
WGSS 294-04 Wars on Poverty MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Catherine Batza
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-12 and HIST 294-06*
WGSS 300-01 Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-04 and INTL 300-01*
WGSS 306-01 Women's Voices in Politics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Zornitsa Keremidchieva
*Cross-listed with POLI 305-01*
WGSS 394-01 The Political Economy of Gender and Sexuality W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Ryan Murphy
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-02* We live in an intellectual and political age in which we tend to separate ideas about economics from ideas about culture. Whether in discussion about "red states" and "blue states," about "social conservatism" and "fiscal conservatism," or even about "production" and "consumption," mainstream analysts draw a barrier between the concepts of political economy – the welfare state, government regulation, the global economy, the labor movement – and cultural categories having to do with gender and sexuality – feminism, abortion, queerness, and pleasure. This class refuses such a binary, demonstrating the foundational interdependence of political economy and of gender and sexuality. The course is thus theoretical and historical, using critical race, gender, and sexuality studies to intervene in history of capitalism. We will read a variety of theoretical texts – from Marx to Foucault and from David Harvey to Patricia Hill Collins – and then use those texts to consider historical examples: the dispossession of Native Americans, forced labor, the building of the U.S. middle class, and the rise of the global financial services industry. Questions about sex, intimacy, family, and desire will guide our approach to all of those events. This is an interdisciplinary course, so materials from the social sciences and from the literary and visual arts – as well as from history – will guide our analysis. A 300-level seminar, the class enhances students’ communication and analytical skills, allowing everyone to become a sharper, more critical reader, writer, discussant, and colleague.
WGSS 394-02 Conquering the Flesh: Renunication of Food and Sex in the Christian Religion TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Susanna Drake
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-03 and RELI 394-01*
WGSS 394-03 Transnational Studies: Race, Empire and the Politics of Transracial and Transnational Adoption W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm HUM 216 SooJin Pate
*Cross-listed with AMST 315-01*
WGSS 400-01 Senior Seminar: Linking Theory and Practice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Sonita Sarker

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