Fall 2014 Class Schedule

Fall 2014 Class Schedule - updated November 22, 2014 at 10:56 pm

This is a snapshot of the class schedule and enrollment information, updated only once daily. For the most current information on class schedule and enrollment, Macalester students, faculty and staff should log in to 1600grand and use the "Search Class Schedule" link.

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Chinese
Classics
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Neuroscience Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theatre and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

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Supplemental Course Information icon Indicates link to supplemental information about this course provided by the instructor

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
AMST 103-01 The Problems of Race in US Social Thought and Policy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 217 Karin Aguilar-San Juan 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* In this discussion-based and residential course, we will explore the hypothesis that 21st century racism has morphed from simple and evil formulations of bigotry and exploitation into decentralized and seemingly benign systems of cultural camouflage and ideological control. We will focus particularly on the ways that “structural” inequalities inform complex racial formations, and consequently, individual life chances. We will consider the idea that racism involves a “hidden curriculum” that is promoted by well-intentioned and highly educated people. Our interdisciplinary and integrative approach will employ multiple methods of inquiry and expression, including: self-reflective essays and maps; a scavenger hunt in the Twin Cities; library research; and deep, critical analysis of arguments about race/ethnicity/assimilation/multiculturalism. We will hone writing and speaking skills through highly structured assignments paired with open-ended conversations in order to discover the questions that truly matter to each of us.
AMST 110-01 Introduction to African American Studies TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 110 Duchess Harris 5 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
AMST 194-01 Hunger Games M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 213 Karin Aguilar-San Juan 0 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required* Did you love the books and hate the movies? Do you wonder what serious messages they carry? This course uses the youth-oriented Hunger Games dystopia as a platform for launching scholarly conversations about racism and heteropatriarchy, Reality TV, security and surveillance, environmentalism, violence, revolution, and the power of love. We will watch both films and read all three books in the first two weeks of the semester. Then we will take an interdisciplinary, hands-on approach to learning and teaching, that includes archery lessons, bread baking, role plays, and our own class blog. A major goal of the course is to open up our hearts and minds, and to discover more precisely what we hunger for—as scholars, gendered and racialized subjects, and human residents of the planet Earth.
AMST 194-02 Asian America: A Social History W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 212 Juliana Pegues -1 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with HIST 194-02* This course is an introduction to Asian American Studies, an interdisciplinary field of inquiry that studies how histories of immigration, exclusion, racial construction, and citizenship have shaped Asian American communities and identities. In turn, Asian American Studies asks how Asian Americans, configured as immigrants, refugees, “forever foreigners,” and “model minorities,” impact how American nation, empire, rights, and belonging are defined both discursively and materially. We will explore the history of Asian migration to the United States beginning in the 19th century and the ensuing debates over race, immigration, and citizenship that resulted. After examining the causes and consequences of the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II, we examine the new waves of migration from Asia in the second half of the 20th century, Asian Americans and civil rights, and contemporary issues such as Asian American education and popular culture. Special attention will be given to ethnic and racial affinities and antagonisms, as well as how class, gender, and sexuality influence the historical and contemporary lives of Asian Americans. Class texts center the voices and ideas of everyday Asian Americans, including memoir, novels, graphic novels, and film.
AMST 200-01 Critical Methods for American Studies Research TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 213 Jane Rhodes 8 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required* This course will introduce students to the critical and intellectual underpinnings of research approaches in interdisciplinary scholarship. Fields like American Studies were founded, in part, to critique the canons and assumptions embedded in the disciplines. American Studies and Ethnic Studies scholars also insist that race, ethnicity, gender, class, and other categories of difference be in the forefront of the research agenda, and that researchers be cognizant of the role difference plays for the researcher, the subject under scrutiny, and the results. This course will consider these factors as you get hands-on experience with historical, field research and cultural studies approaches to scholarship.
AMST 225-01 Native American History TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 Katrina Phillips 15 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 225-01* This course examines American Indian history to 1900, considering the complex and fraught history of the nation's indigenous people. By looking at American Indian interactions with Spanish, French, British, and American explorers, settlers, missionaries, militaries, and government officials, this course argues that the history of American Indians is essential to understanding past as well as present issues. Furthermore, this course looks to move beyond the notion that American Indian history is one of inevitable decline. Students will use primary and secondary sources to question this assumption and create a more nuanced understanding of the American Indian experience.
AMST 240-01 Race, Culture and Ethnicity in Education M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 216 Ann Hite -3 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with EDUC 240-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 250-01 Race, Place and Space MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Karin Aguilar-San Juan 1 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 250-01; first day attendance required* How do racial formations manifest in space and place? Through lecture and discussion, we will define what is spatial or “platial.” A discussion of visual culture will help us to engage the difficult practice of “looking” at race and space. Then we consider how race and racism operate at various levels of scale: women’s reproductive health (Dorothy Roberts, Killing the Black Body), urban renewal (“Detropia” and Detroit: An American Autopsy, by Charlie LeDuff), and the planet (“A Fierce Green Planet”). Prior exposure to American Studies, Urban Studies, or Environmental Studies will help ground you in this course.
AMST 256-01 Transatlantic Slave Trade TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Lynn Hudson 12 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 256-01*
AMST 275-01 African American Literature to 1900 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Daylanne English 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 275-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 294-01 Lines in the Sand: The U.S.—Mexico Borderlands MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Ryan Edgington 4 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-03*
AMST 294-02 Immigration and Citizenship in American Political Development MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 208-01*
AMST 300-01 Jr Civic Engagement Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 111 Duchess Harris 4 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required* This course examines the backlash against affirmative action in the late 1980s and early 1990s—just as courts, universities, and other institutions began to end affirmative action programs. We will learn how law professors of color created Critical Race Theory to resist a cautious approach to social transformation. These scholars favor a race conscious approach to transformation rather than liberalism's embrace of color blindness, and favor an approach that relies more on political organizing, in contrast to liberalism's reliance on rights-based remedies. We will read about Critical White Studies as the next step in Critical Race Theory. In focusing on whiteness, not only do theorists ask nonwhites to investigate more closely for what it means for others to be white, but also they invite whites to examine themselves more searchingly and to "look behind the mirror." To balance out the course, we will end by reviewing Dan Subnotik’s text, “Toxic Diversity.” He analyzes the work of preeminent legal scholars such as Patricia Williams, Derrick Bell, Lani Guinier, and Richard Delgado, and argues that race and gender theorists divert the implementation of America's social justice agenda. In the elusive quest for racial justice, is equality enough, and if not, in the words of Toni Morrison, how can we race justice and engender power?
AMST 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 213 Alicia Munoz 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 330-01 Mellon Seminar W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 113 Duchess Harris 3 / 10 Materials icon
*Must be on of the ten Mellon Fellows to register; first day attendance required; 2 credit course*
AMST 334-01 Cultural Studies and the Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 402 Leola Johnson 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MCST 334-01*
AMST 370-01 Understanding and Confronting Racism T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 301 Kendrick Brown 5 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 370-01*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ANTH 101-01 General Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Scott Legge 1 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Dianna Shandy 4 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ANTH 194-01 Politics of Truth and Memory in Latin America TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06B Olga Gonzalez 1 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only* This course examines and critically analyzes various approaches to the study of how different individuals and communities in particular historical and cultural scenarios in contemporary Latin America create meanings about their past experience with political violence. The course addresses questions related to the tension between remembering and forgetting, the presence of conflicting memories and truths and how these are negotiated or not through distinct forms of representation. The cultural analysis of different means of representation: human rights and truth commissions’ reports, testimonials, film, art and memorials will be the basis for class discussions on different notions of truth and different forms of truth-telling. A close examination of these forms of representation will reveal the extent to which they can conflict with each other while at the same time feed on each other, creating “effects of truth” and leaving room for secrecy as a mode of truth-telling. Finally, the course will also compel students to think about what consequences the politics of memory have for the future. This course will combine lectures and class discussions. It will have a strong writing component with a series of short papers and one longer final research paper. There will be one final exam. Grades will be based on written assignments in addition to oral presentations and participation in class discussions.
ANTH 206-01 Endangered/Minority Languages TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 217 Marianne Milligan 1 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 206-01; total class limit is set for 15 instructor is looking for a mix of 5 seats Jr/Sr and 10 seats for Soph/FY*
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 10 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; declared and intended Anthropology Major required*
ANTH 239-01 Medical Anthropology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A Ron Barrett -6 / 30 Materials icon
*Counts towards Community and Global Health Concentration*
ANTH 241-01 Anthropology of Death and Dying M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Ron Barrett 6 / 15 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; course to meet in the Chapel*
ANTH 248-01 Magic, Witchcraft and Religions MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Anna Jacobsen 6 / 20 Materials icon
ANTH 258-01 Peoples and Cultures of Africa MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06A Anna Jacobsen 13 / 20 Materials icon
ANTH 259-01 Indigenous Peoples of the Arctic MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06B Scott Legge 5 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 259-01*
ANTH 280-01 Topics in Linguistic Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 212 Marianne Milligan 15 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 280-01; no prerequisites*
ANTH 362-01 Culture and Globalization W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 5 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 362-01*
ANTH 394-01 Introduction to Museum Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 402 Gonzalez, Overman 8 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ART 394-01 and CLAS 394-01*
ANTH 487-01 Theory in Anthropology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Ron Barrett 7 / 20 Materials icon

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ART 130-01 Drawing I MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 302 Megan Vossler 2 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 131-01 Introduction to Ceramics MWF 01:10 pm-03:10 pm ART 113 Gary Erickson -1 / 10 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required; $100 material fee*
ART 133-01 Introduction to Ceramics: The Wheel MWF 09:40 am-11:40 am ART 113 Gary Erickson 1 / 10 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; permission of instructor required; $100 material fee*
ART 149-01 Introduction to Visual Culture MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only* This course considers the production and reception of multiple visual culture forms, from standards of fine art practice such as painting and sculpture to mass media including TV, film, advertising, and the Internet. Students will learn different theoretical paradigms and techniques for visual analysis in order to understand how visual media inscribes power, difference, and desire as it mediates numerous social, economic, cultural and political relationships. We will investigate diverse types of visual culture through lectures, exhibitions, guest speakers, film, historical art and media and, of course, those proliferating images that define our daily experiences.
No prerequisites.
ART 160-01 Art of the West I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau 3 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with CLAS 160-01*
ART 170-01 Art of the East I: China MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott -3 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 170-01*
ART 233-01 Introduction to Digital Photography MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm ART 301 Eric Carroll 1 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 234-01 Painting I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 308 Christine Willcox 4 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 235-01 Sculpture I: Basic Sculpture with a Dose of Hot Metal TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 118 Stanton Sears 2 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Appropriate for freshmen and incoming first year students* We begin with an exploration of the nature of vision, creating life-size clay portrait heads of a partner. We move on to an exploration of the tools and processes available in the new sculpture studio, including woodworking tools for both carving and fabrication. Sculpture I introduces students to cast metal work in our new foundry, where we will learn a lost wax ceramic shell casting system. The range of form which can be explored is infinite and starts with a wax form which is eventually replaced with the 2100 degree bronze. Like my other course offerings, Sculpture I will include an off-site project that includes a class trip to my farm/studio in western Wisconsin.
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 214 Ruthann Godollei 3 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 239-01 2-D Design MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 301 Eric Carroll 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ART 294-01 Art and the American Culture Wars TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 102 Lauren DeLand 15 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-03* This course surveys the American “Culture Wars” as played out on the intersecting fields of art, visual culture, and politics. Students will focus intensively on a period encompassing the late 1980s to the early twenty-first century as a fever point in public debates over censorship, expression, and the relationship between art and public money. The class will also challenge this periodization by analyzing the ways in which the reverberations of the events that transpired over this time impact the contemporary art landscape in America today. Through critical analysis of works of art, art historical texts, and primary sources, students will consider the ways in which broader social debates about the ideal relationship of the individual to the state manifested in the art and visual culture of this period, as well as legislative responses to these works.
ART 294-02 Art and Technology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM 102 Lauren DeLand 12 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MCST 294-02* This course provides students with the theoretical frameworks necessary to understand the intertwined histories of performance art, video, digital media, and art that intersects with the biological sciences. Students will consider simultaneously the reasons why these histories are typically fragmented and presented in isolation from one another, and thus investigate recent historical shifts in cultural definitions of “art.” Students will examine works of art, art historical texts, and theoretical texts and learn to read them in concert with one another. Students will consider technological developments in terms of the artworks they make possible, as well as the influence these developments have on broader concepts of life, culture, and what it means to be human.
ART 294-03 Art and Power: World War I and Inflicted traumas TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 202 Vicky Karaiskou -2 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 294-02. This course counts for fine arts general distribution if registered as ART and social science general distribution if registered as POLI* The course will examine art as a potent means to establish political power and shape social notions. In particular it will approach modernity in the beginning of the 20th century as a revolt against the values established by the ‘old regime’ and its arts. In order to set the frame for the relationships between art and power, the course will call upon distinct artworks and artistic expressions from Greek-roman antiquity, the medieval era, renaissance, baroque and neoclassicism and will analyse their role in propagating political and social order. Having set that frame, the course will highlight especially artistic trends of the first thirty years of the 20th century that include the years of World War I. Visual artworks and writings will be explored as the result of an urgent need to reject the pre-existing cultural memory which was regarded as the cause for modern society’s traumatic experiences. The course will examine expressionism, dada and surrealism as illustrations of individual and social traumas resulting both from the despair of WW I and the disintegration of the pre-existing social and moral/social value-system. We will approach futurism as an attempt to erase past memory and create a new individual and social awareness. The course ends with an examination of art’s political and social context as expressed through Russian avant-garde.
ART 294-04 Roman Art TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau 21 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01* In this course we will explore the art and archaeology of the Roman empire from its beginnings to the fourth century C.E. We will consider what art and architecture reveal about Roman cultural ideologies, including the use of images and building programs to define political agendas, the roles and representation of women and freedmen, funerary beliefs, and the relationship of the Roman center with its diverse populations in other parts of the empire. We will also look beyond the original stories of artworks to explore their contemporary histories, including the antiquities trade and the effects of social and political events on the world’s cultural heritage. Research projects may involve provenance research, including working with primary source documents confiscated during investigations into the illegal trafficking of antiquities, allowing students to do original research and participate in the process of finding solutions to this global problem.
ART 334-01 Figure Painting TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 202 Christine Willcox 7 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 367-01 3-D Design: Structures and the Built Environment TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 118 Stanton Sears 11 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Appropriate for freshmen and incoming first year students* We are surrounded by three dimensional design; from the architecture of our built environment to the tools and objects that surround us, to the human-altered landforms and plantings of our larger environment. All of these elements can be considered and affected by design choices which we make. In the class we build structures which can be considered from structural, aesthetic, and functional points of view. Some of these projects are built to very specific parameters so that trade offs can be observed and measured. We smash a lot of things, but learn a lot about problem solving along the way. The course includes a field trip to my farm/studio in western Wisconsin where we install a large site specific project. Past projects have included a collaboratively-built ninety-three foot long illuminated lantern across the pastures, as well as a series of kinetic structures. The food is great too.
ART 370-01 Drawing II: Mixed Media and Idea Development MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm ART 206 Megan Vossler 3 / 10 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Prerequisite of Drawing I or permission of the instructor required*
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TR TBA ART 214 Ruthann Godollei -2 / 6 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II MWF 02:20 pm-04:20 pm ART 113 Gary Erickson -1 / 5 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; $100 material fee*
ART 394-01 Introduction to Museum Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 402 Gonzalez, Overman 8 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-01 and CLAS 394-01*

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ASIA 111-01 Introduction to Asian Studies TR 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 009 James Laine 14 / 25 Materials icon
ASIA 150-01 Language and Gender in Japanese Society TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 110 Satoko Suzuki 1 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with JAPA 150-01, LING 150-01 and WGSS 150-01*
Japanese is considered to be a gendered language in the sense that certain linguistic forms are associated with gender. Male characters in Japanese animation often use boku or ore to refer to themselves, while female characters often use watashi or atashi. When translated into Japanese, Hermione Granger (a female character in Harry Potter series) ends sentences with soft-sounding forms, while Harry Potter and his best friend Ron use more assertive forms. Do these fictional representations reflect reality? How did gendered language come about? Are Japanese women and men always expected to sound feminine/masculine? How do people who do not align their identity with femininity or masculinity deal with gendered forms? These are some of the questions discussed in this course. Students will have opportunities to learn about historical background of gendered language and find out about current discourse on language and gender. No Japanese language ability is required.
ASIA 170-01 Art of the East I: China MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott -3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ART 170-01*
ASIA 274-01 The Great Tradition in China before 1840 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam 9 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 274-01*
ASIA 277-01 The Rise of Modern Japan TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam 16 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 277-01*
ASIA 294-01 Opulence and Decadence: China, Europe, and the Early Modern World MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 216 Rivi Handler-Spitz 3 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CHIN 294-01*
ASIA 294-02 Dialects, Multilingualism and the Politics of Speaking Japanese TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 110 Satoko Suzuki 12 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with JAPA 294-01 and LING 294-01*

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
BIOL 117-01 Women, Health and Reproduction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Elizabeth Jansen 1 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 117-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 144-01 Lakes, Streams and Rivers MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Anika Bratt 4 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 144-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 194-01 Creatures and Curiosities MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 Sarah Boyer 1 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* This course deals with unfamiliar, mysterious, beautiful, grotesque, and overlooked animals all around us: the invertebrates. We will explore animal evolution and focus on the biology of creatures such as jellyfish, insects, starfish, spiders, and corals. In addition, we will discuss the cultural role of animals as curiosities – as specimens in cabinets and museums, or the subjects of phobias and urban legends – and the history and significance of the visual arts in zoology. Drawing on topics in marine biology and entomology, students will learn about the ecology, life cycles, and anatomy of major groups of animals through lectures, observation of live animals, and dissections. Two 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour lab per week. We will take several field trips outside of class time to Macalester’s field station and local natural history and art museums – these will be scheduled to ensure that every student can participate in at least two excursions. This course is appropriate for biology majors and non-majors alike, but it is not part of the biology major’s required core curriculum.
BIOL 194-02 Bodies on Fire: Inflammatory Diseases of the 21st Century TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Devavani Chatterjea 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* Complex cascades of inflammation orchestrate our bodies' response to our environment. Inflammation (der. ignition; setting alight) resolves infections, heals wounds, and restores internal balance to the body. However, these same inflammatory responses, when uncontrolled, can destroy the body with frightening rapidity. Diabetes, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disease, allergies and asthma, neuro-degenerative conditions, pain and depression are some of the most pervasive and confounding health challenges that confront the global population today. Chronic inflammation underlies all of these diverse pathologies. In this course, you will be introduced to the beautifully elaborate world of the immune system through lectures, discussions and critical reading of scientific and popular texts on the global pandemic of inflammatory non-communicable diseases. You will have opportunities to share ideas through reflective and analytical writing, oral presentations with additional possibilities for art and community-engagement projects.
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Steven Sundby 8 / 21 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Michael Anderson 4 / 21 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Michael Anderson 9 / 21 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-04 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Susan Bush 10 / 21 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor; 2 credit course*
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Mary Montgomery 1 / 40 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 260-02 Genetics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Susan Bush -1 / 40 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 113 Lin Aanonsen 7 / 64 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Kristina Curry Rogers 4 / 44 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Kristina Curry Rogers 2 / 22 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Kristina Curry Rogers 2 / 22 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Mark Davis 11 / 46 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 7 / 23 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis 4 / 23 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 344-01 Aquatic Ecology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 247 Daniel Hornbach 7 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 344-L1 Aquatic Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Daniel Hornbach 7 / 12 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan 3 / 54 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Marcos Ortega 5 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L1; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Marcos Ortega 1 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CHEM 351-L2; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 351-L3 Biochemistry I Lab W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 289 Jonathan Dozier -1 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L2; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 357-01 Immunology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 202 Devavani Chatterjea 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 357-L1 Immunology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 277 Devavani Chatterjea 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 358-01 Microbiology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Steven Sundby 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 358-L1 Microbiology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Steven Sundby 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 361-01 Invertebrate Animal Diversity MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Sarah Boyer 6 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 361-L1 Invertebrate Animal Div Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Sarah Boyer 6 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 368-01 Plant Physiology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 270 Susan Bush 10 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 368-L1 Plant Physiology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Susan Bush 10 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 369-01 Developmental Biology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Mary Montgomery 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 369-L1 Developmental Biology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Mary Montgomery 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 394-01 Soil Ecology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson 2 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 394-L1 Soil Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Michael Anderson 2 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 474-01 Research in Biochemistry MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 170 Marcos Ortega 1 / 8 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 474-L1 Research in Biochemistry Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 289 Marcos Ortega 1 / 8 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHEM 111-01 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 301 Kathryn Splan 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* This course, along with General Chemistry II (CHEM 112), which is typically taken in the spring semester of the first year, together satisfy the prerequisites for Organic (CHEM 211) and Analytical (CHEM 222) Chemistry. General Chemistry I offers a rigorous, foundational treatment of atoms and molecules. We study the nature of chemical bonding and how bonding gives rise to the three-dimensional structure of matter. We explore how the macroscopic properties of substances can be interpreted in terms of atomic and molecular structure. We also learn mathematical and conceptual tools for quantifying chemical equilibrium, with an emphasis on the reactions of acids and bases. Laboratory work reinforces concepts in lecture, and also provides a review of fundamental topics, such as stoichiometry, gas laws, and solution-phase reactions, that are essential for future course work in chemistry. Writing is another important part of this course. Writing assignments will include both formal reports on laboratory work and a research paper due at the end of the semester. Students planning to enroll in this course should have taken one year of chemistry in high school, and should already be familiar with topics like nomenclature, oxidation states, stoichiometry (including balancing chemical equations and calculating solution concentrations), and simple chemical reactions in solution.
CHEM 111-02 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Christopher Dewberry 6 / 39 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 111-03 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Susan Green 2 / 39 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 111-04 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 250 Christopher Dewberry 4 / 39 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 111-05 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Susan Green 6 / 39 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 111-L1 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium M 01:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 7 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L2 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 0 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L3 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice 5 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L4 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 1 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L5 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium W 01:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 4 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L6 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 1 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L7 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Susan Green 1 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L8 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Gregory Rohde 1 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L9 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium F 01:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Kathryn Splan 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Lab only; attendance at first lab meting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 111-L10 General Chemistry I: Structure and Equilibrium T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 347 Amy Rice 1 / 12 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 115-01 Accelerated General Chemistry MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg 3 / 18 Materials icon
*Available to new incoming First Year only*
CHEM 115-L1 Accel General Chemistry Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 380 Thomas Varberg 3 / 18 Materials icon
*Available to new incoming First Year only; $12 lab fee required*
CHEM 211-01 Organic Chemistry I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 100 Ronald Brisbois 5 / 40 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-02 Organic Chemistry I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye 4 / 48 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 211-L1 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois 4 / 22 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 211-L2 Organic Chemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois 1 / 22 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 211-L3 Organic Chemistry I Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye 5 / 22 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 211-L4 Organic Chemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye 3 / 22 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan 4 / 50 Materials icon
*1 credit course*
CHEM 311-01 Thermodynamics and Kinetics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg 20 / 48 Materials icon
CHEM 311-L1 Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 378 Keith Kuwata 5 / 14 Materials icon
CHEM 311-L2 Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 378 Thomas Varberg 3 / 14 Materials icon
CHEM 311-L3 Thermodynamics/Kinetics Lab T 08:30 am-11:10 am OLRI 378 Keith Kuwata 7 / 14 Materials icon
CHEM 320-01 Computational Chemistry R 08:30 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Keith Kuwata 5 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHEM 351-01 Biochemistry I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan 3 / 54 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
CHEM 351-L1 Biochemistry I Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Marcos Ortega 5 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L1; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
CHEM 351-L2 Biochemistry I Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Marcos Ortega 1 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L2; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
CHEM 351-L3 Biochemistry I Lab W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 289 Jonathan Dozier -1 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 351-L2; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
CHEM 411-01 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 Gregory Rohde 4 / 20 Materials icon

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Chinese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHIN 101-01 First Year Chinese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 112 Rivi Handler-Spitz 7 / 20 Materials icon
CHIN 101-02 First Year Chinese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 112 Rivi Handler-Spitz 7 / 20 Materials icon
CHIN 101-L1 First Year Chinese I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 113 Sijia Lan 1 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 101-L2 First Year Chinese I Lab W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 404 Sijia Lan 2 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 101-L3 First Year Chinese I Lab W 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 404 Sijia Lan 8 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 203-01 Second Year Chinese I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 112 Jin Stone 8 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 203-02 Second Year Chinese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 112 Jin Stone -1 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 203-L1 Second Year Chinese I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 112 Sijia Lan -1 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 203-L2 Second Year Chinese I Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm NEILL 112 Sijia Lan 4 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 203-L3 Second Year Chinese I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm NEILL 102 Sijia Lan 0 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 294-01 Opulence and Decadence: China, Europe, and the Early Modern World MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 216 Rivi Handler-Spitz 3 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-01*
CHIN 303-01 Third Year Chinese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 111 Patricia Anderson 6 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*With enough student interest there's a possibility that a second section of CHIN 303 might be added. Please see instructor for more details.*
CHIN 303-02 Third Year Chinese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 217 Patricia Anderson 11 / 20 Materials icon
CHIN 303-L1 Third Year Chinese I Lab M 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 113 Sijia Lan 9 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 303-L2 Third Year Chinese I Lab M 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 102 Sijia Lan 8 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 407-01 Fourth Year Chinese I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 113 Sijia Lan 2 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 494-01 Learning Chinese in Context MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 102 Fang Wang 6 / 15 Materials icon
This course will explore a wide variety of authentic readings, from the political to the literary; all classroom discussions and homework assignments will be in Chinese. This is a course appropriate for students who have completed the equivalent of 4th Year Chinese.

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CLAS 111-01 Elementary Latin I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 113 Mark Gustafson 14 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 111-L1 Elementary Latin I Lab T 08:35 am-09:35 am MAIN 010 Mark Gustafson 14 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab will meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 113-01 Elementary Arabic I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 Wessam El Meligi -6 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CLAS 113-L1 Elementary Arabic I Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am Wessam El Meligi -3 / 10 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Lab will meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 113-L2 Elementary Arabic I Lab TBA TBA STAFF -3 / 10 Materials icon
CLAS 115-01 Elementary Greek I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Brian Lush 13 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 115-L1 Elementary Greek I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm Brian Lush 14 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab will meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 115-L2 Elementary Greek I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm STAFF 24 / 25 Materials icon
*To meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 117-01 Elementary Hebrew I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 002 Nanette Goldman 14 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CLAS 117-L1 Elementary Hebrew I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm Nanette Goldman 19 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab meets in Campus Center 216*
CLAS 117-L2 Elementary Hebrew I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm MAIN 011 Nanette Goldman 21 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Laine, Overman 2 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RELI 135-01*
CLAS 160-01 Intro to Ancient/Medieval Art MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau 3 / 30 Materials icon
0Cross-listed with ART 160-01*
CLAS 194-01 Tenors in Togas: Greek and Roman Myth in Opera MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Nanette Goldman 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* Composers and librettists of opera and musical theatre have long mined the rich sources of Classical myth and literature for their subjects. From Orpheus and Eurydice to the Roman emperor Nero, from Renaissance Europe to 20th century Broadway, figures of classical antiquity have found vibrant musical afterlives. In this course we will examine the connection between the classical ideas and their subsequent musical renderings. Course time will be divided between reading the Greek and Roman material in its original context and listening to the operas and musicals that treat it. We will develop skills in formal speaking, argumentative writing, critical reading and analytical listening, while examining a variety of aesthetic and socio-political issues that accompany the scholarly study of these genres. We’ll plan to attend a musical performance or two in the Twin Cities and meet with local singers experienced in operatic productions. A few examples of our likely foci include Ariadne (Hesiod, Catullus, Strauss), Orpheus (Pindar, Apollodorus, Gluck) Odysseus (Homer, Monteverdi, Berlioz), Dido and Aeneas (Vergil, Purcell), Elektra (Sophocles, Strauss), Hades and Persephone (Hesiod, Homeric Hymns, Stravinsky), Alcestis (Euripides, Gluck), Julius Caesar (Caesar, Cicero, Suetonius, Handel), Titus (Josephus, Suetonius, Cassius Dio, Mozart) and Nero (Tacitus, Suetonius, Seneca, Monteverdi, Handel). No prior experience with Latin, Greek, Music History, Theory or Performance is assumed.
CLAS 200-01 Ancient and Medieval Philosophies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 226 Geoffrey Gorham -6 / 26 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 200-01* A study of major philosophers of ancient Greece, Rome and the medieval period, including the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoics, Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas. Major topics include: the origin and structure of the universe; reality vs. appearance; being and becoming; time, space and matter; happiness and the good life; love, sex and friendship; death; freedom and fatalism; the ideal state; the relation between reason and faith; the nature and existence of God; the relation between church and state.
CLAS 231-01 Intermediate Latin: Prose MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 011 Mark Gustafson 17 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 241-01 Intermediate Arabic I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Wessam El Meligi 14 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 241-L1 Intermediate Arabic I Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am Wessam El Meligi 24 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab will meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 241-L2 Intermediate Arabic I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 0 / 10 Materials icon
CLAS 261-01 Intermediate Greek: Prose MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Brian Lush 18 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 261-L1 Intermediate Greek: Prose Lab TBA TBA Brian Lush 19 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 294-01 Roman Art TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau 21 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ART 294-04* In this course we will explore the art and archaeology of the Roman empire from its beginnings to the fourth century C.E. We will consider what art and architecture reveal about Roman cultural ideologies, including the use of images and building programs to define political agendas, the roles and representation of women and freedmen, funerary beliefs, and the relationship of the Roman center with its diverse populations in other parts of the empire. We will also look beyond the original stories of artworks to explore their contemporary histories, including the antiquities trade and the effects of social and political events on the world’s cultural heritage. Research projects may involve provenance research, including working with primary source documents confiscated during investigations into the illegal trafficking of antiquities, allowing students to do original research and participate in the process of finding solutions to this global problem.
CLAS 294-02 Medieval Political Thought MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Andrew Latham 1 / 26 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 294-02 and POLI 266-01* Interested in the roots of contemporary political life (including issues such as state sovereignty, separation of church and state, constitutionalism, just war, property rights, “the people”, nationalism, democracy, rule-of-law, and human rights)? Then this course is for you. Through a careful examination of the political thought of Latin Christendom (Western Europe) during the later Middle Ages (c. 1050-c. 1550) we explore the deep roots of the contemporary world order, demonstrating the ways in which medieval thinkers such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of Salisbury, John of Paris, Giles of Rome, Marsilius of Padua, Dante, Las Casas, ibn Sina, Moshe ben Maimon, and ibn Rushd “invented” many of the ideas that we – presumptuously and erroneously – have come to associate with the modern era. As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields (such as Philosophy or Classics) who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in political theory/philosophy or the medieval roots of contemporary political life. This course fulfills the Political Science Department’s Theory Requirement.
CLAS 345-01 Arabic Reading and Translation MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Gregory Lipton 9 / 15 Materials icon
Cross-listed with RELI 245-01* This course aims to improve your Arabic reading and translation skills while introducing you to selected genres of Arabic and Islamic literature. The course will proceed in a workshop format and focus on the comprehension and translation of texts in question. Students will learn to use an Arabic dictionary, expand their vocabulary, deepen their understanding of grammar and syntax, and develop skills in reading manuscripts, navigating Arabic texts, and producing English translations. Prerequisite: 3 previous semesters of Arabic language.
CLAS 394-01 Introduction to Museum Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 402 Gonzalez, Overman 8 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-01 and ART 394-01* Museum studies stands at the confluence of a range of critical topics that span cultural, ethical, and legal questions concerning ownership, provenience, cultural rights, and preservation of sites and remains, to name but a few. Museum Studies also directly engages the science and the practice of running Museums, and laboratory work of a wide range: preservation and conservation, curatorial practices, and the identification of art and artifacts from a wide range of periods. Museum studies is a field of work and intellectual endeavor that is inherently interdisciplinary, and is a dynamic reflection of the liberal arts at work. This course will use a team approach.
Introduction to Museum Studies offered in fall 2014 will be team taught by Profs. Gonzalez and Overman. The bigger team that planned and wrote the course will also participate by offering select classes or units within the broader Introduction.
The outline of the course is based on the usual departments found in most Museums. The larger units are:
1. Collections
2. Conservation
3. Curating
4. Funding and Management
5. Education, Outreach, Visitorship
6. Summary and Conclusion: Post Museum Studies

This course will take advantage of the state-of-the-art facilities in the Janet Wallace Fine and Performing Arts Center, and of the museums and labs in the Twin Cities.
CLAS 490-01 Senior Seminar MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 003 Andrew Overman 17 / 25 Materials icon

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
COMP 110-01 Data/Computing Fundamentals W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 241 Daniel Kaplan 40 / 48 Materials icon
*1 credit; ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 258 Elizabeth Ernst 1 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 123-02 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 258 Elizabeth Ernst -3 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 123-03 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 258 Katherine Kinnaird -1 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 123-04 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 258 Katherine Kinnaird -4 / 24 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 256 Bret Jackson 2 / 16 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 124-02 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Elizabeth Shoop 3 / 16 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 124-L1 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 256 Bret Jackson 6 / 16 Materials icon
COMP 124-L2 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Elizabeth Shoop 0 / 16 Materials icon
COMP 154-01 Ethics and the Internet MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Diane Michelfelder 1 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with PHIL 225-01* In this course, we will spend time with ethical questions connected with the Internet as we know it today: an online environment where content is generated and shared through user activities such as blogging, media sharing, social networking, tagging, tweeting, virtual world gaming, wiki developing, and the like.

The course will roughly be divided into two parts. In the first half, we will take a close look at ethical issues predating the Internet but which, because of its development, have taken on new dimensions. We will consider how the Internet opens up new forms of censorship (think the censorship of social networking services themselves); new forms of surveillance (think dataveillance), and new issues related to privacy (think the controversial “right to be forgotten”). We will also look at the moral values undergirding, and the contentious debates surrounding, current copyright law in the US. In the second half of the course, we will consider some ethical questions connected to the integration of the Internet into devices other than the personal computer and mobile phone, developments that open up the prospect of a world of “ubiquitous computing” or integrated networked systems. What are some of the impacts of such integration on our everyday ethical relations with others and on the overall quality of our lives? How might being networked affect the meaning of being human?

This course is also designed to give you a broad exposure into different ways of “doing philosophy,” from blogging, podcasting, and writing essays for public media to more traditional forms of expressions such as journal articles and books. On occasion we will join forces with another First Year Course--Information Policy, Politics, and Law--taught by Political Science professor Patrick Schmidt. You’ll have many opportunities to write, including a major paper in which you imagine yourself as a philosophical consultant providing ethical perspectives and advice to designers interested in developing a new “smart” device or social media platform.
COMP 221-01 Algorithm Design and Analysis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 205 Susan Fox -2 / 28 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 221-02 Algorithm Design and Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 205 Susan Fox -2 / 28 Materials icon
COMP 240-01 Computer Systems Organization TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop -2 / 16 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 240-02 Computer Systems Organization TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 256 Elizabeth Shoop 0 / 16 Materials icon
COMP 346-01 Internet Computing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 Bret Jackson -1 / 24 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 484-01 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Susan Fox -2 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with NEUR 484-01; ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar MW 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 205 Fox, Shoop 1 / 24 Materials icon
*2 credit course; ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans 1 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 113-02 Financial Accounting TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 100 Jeff Evans 2 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 304 Liang Ding 2 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Liang Ding -2 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Raymond Robertson 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* This class provides a foundation in economic theory and addresses many major topics in economics. We will discuss and apply economic theory to behavioral and policy questions and develop tools needed to critically evaluate international events and policies. The goal of this class is that you, the student, be introduced to a wide range of economic theory and be able to approach policy decisions with the tools and information necessary to make good decisions. This class uses examples from Latin America and supports the Latin American Studies program.
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer 0 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer 0 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 119-06 Principles of Economics TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Amy Damon 0 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only* This course is an introduction to economic concepts and basic economic theory. The course is split between the study of microeconomics, which focuses on the decision making of individual consumers and firms and macroeconomics with focuses on aggregate level economic questions such as interest rates and government spending, among others. In this course we will develop economic tools to analyze and evaluate public policies, poverty and welfare questions, and other applied topics.
ECON 221-01 Introduction to International Economics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 304 Raymond Robertson -6 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 221-02 Introduction to International Economics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 304 Raymond Robertson 2 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 229-01 World Economic History MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 208 Pete Ferderer 9 / 25 Materials icon
This course presents a broad overview of world economic history. It uses concepts and models developed in Principles of Economics to explore how the interplay between geography, institutions, and technology has influenced material living standards from the Stone Age to the present. In particular, we will study the causes and consequences of long-term structural forces such as the agriculture, industrial and informational revolutions, the Malthusian trap and demographic transition, slavery, globalization, and the rise of government. We will also explore more cyclical phenomena such as wars, financial crises, economic depressions and hyper-inflations. Students will learn how economic historians use evidence to make sense of the past and the role economic history plays in guiding current policy debates. Prerequisite: ECON 119.
ECON 294-01 Climate Change: Science, Economics, and Policy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Bradtmiller, West 3 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor* Students registering for the course as ECON 294 will receive credit toward the general distribution requirement in social sciences; those registering for ENVI 294 will receive credit towards the natural science requirement. **This course counts as a 200s-level Group A elective for the economics major.**This team-taught course will introduce students to models that integrate the science of climate change with the economic determinants and effects of climate change and analysis of policies that might be used to address the problem. It will contain six modules. First we will study climate change science, including the greenhouse effect, the carbon cycle, the climate system, and feedbacks that amplify or dampen changes to these systems. Second, we will cover topics from environmental economics, including market efficiency, externalities, public goods, growth, and discounting, specifically as they apply to climate change. Next, we will explore models used for understanding and predicting climate, including basic 1 and 2-dimensional models as well as more complex 3D models and Global Circulation Models (GCMs). The module will then combine these topics in an exploration of what impacts, natural and economic, are predicted by climate models for the near (100 year) future. Fourth, we will explore policy interventions for the reduction in greenhouse gases, including carbon taxes and cap and trade, and other regulation such as that taking place under the U.S. Clean Air Act. Where relevant we will discuss the successes and failures of these systems as they have been applied to date. We will also discuss the costs and benefits of subsidizing renewable energy and carbon-free energy sources and the costs of negative impacts of climate change on human and natural systems. Fifth, we will discuss the wide array of technological solutions that have been proposed to slow, stop or even reverse climate change. These range from things that are now common (wind turbines) to things that are gaining in popularity (geothermal) to the truly esoteric (mirrors in space). The final module will show how the preceding topics factor into Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs). Governments and NGOs use these models to combine scientific and socioeconomic information in order to predict the outcomes of various climate and policy scenarios. These are the state of the art in climate science, economics and policy; students will be exposed to several of the most commonly used models and to research from their critics.

While the course will have substantial quantitative content, its only prerequisite is ECON 119: Principles of Economics, and we hope to attract a diverse group of students of varying academic and personal experience.
ECON 294-03 Trading and Investment TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 112 Lee Jacobsohn 5 / 20 Materials icon
This course will focus on investing and trading in financial markets. Trading topics will explore various trading strategies, styles, and tools, market mechanics and history. Investment topics will include formulating investment portfolio strategies, risk & return, asset allocation, diversification, performance measurement and investment vehicles and the proliferation of hedge funds. Students will participate in trading simulations and create and track their own trading strategies throughout the semester. Guest speakers will include a hedge fund manager and an investment portfolio manager. Students will gain a working knowledge of trading in financial markets and the management of an investment portfolio. This course will count toward the Group B elective for the major. Prerequisites: ECON 119 and ECON 113 or instructor approval.
ECON 333-01 Economics of Global Food Problems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Amy Damon 14 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 333-01 and INTL 333-01*
ECON 342-01 Economics of Poverty in US TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Karine Moe 10 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
ECON 353-01 Managerial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans 16 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 361-01 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Vasant Sukhatme 8 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 361-02 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 304 Vasant Sukhatme 14 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 371-01 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Mario Solis-Garcia 6 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 371-02 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 208 Mario Solis-Garcia 5 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger 2 / 20 Materials icon
ECON 381-02 Introduction to Econometrics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger -1 / 20 Materials icon
ECON 381-L1 Intro to Econometrics Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger 3 / 22 Materials icon
ECON 381-L2 Intro to Econometrics Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger 5 / 22 Materials icon
ECON 442-01 Labor Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Karine Moe 10 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 444-01 Honors Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Sarah West 3 / 12 Materials icon
ECON 457-01 Finance MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Liang Ding 11 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 481-01 Advanced Econometrics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger 12 / 22 Materials icon

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 215 Rachel Wannarka -4 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 240-01 Race, Culture, and Ethnicity in Education M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 216 Ann Hite -3 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 240-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 275-01 Outdoor Environmental Education W 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Dosch, Kurth-Schai 2 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of the instructor, Jerald Dosch is required; cross-listed with ENVI 275-01; first day attendance required; S/NC grading; 2 credit course; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of Jerald Dosch*
EDUC 294-01 Building Trust: Education and International Development MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am ARTCOM 102 Sonia Mehta 4 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
This course explores the concept of international development and ways in which education policies and practices either diminish or enhance efforts towards change that is inclusive, just, sustainable and effective in relieving human suffering while expanding human potential. Our approach will emphasize knowledge, theories and processes that build relationships necessary to support mutual exchange, cooperation and skilled advocacy. We will consider questions such as: What are the social, political, economic and ideological foundations that shape approaches to international development? Given historical, cultural and economic inequities, how might we build trust and confidence among people working within the context of unequal power dynamics? How are educators in developing countries best supported as they work towards positive change, and what lessons might be gleaned to guide education reform in the U.S. and other ‘developed’ countries?
EDUC 330-01 Philosophy of Education MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 216 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 6 / 20 Materials icon
EDUC 460-01 Education and Social Change MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 217 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 4 / 10 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENGL 101-01 College Writing TR 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 001 Rebecca Graham 1 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ENGL 105-01 American Voices MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 001 Kristin Naca 4 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
This course traces the development of Chicana and Chicano writing over the last fifty years, from a collection of personal narratives and poems into a complex and diverse, American literary tradition. We will read a range of texts to ask, What constitutes a vital literary tradition? What’s its range? Who does it include? And whom it serves? We examine literary texts produced through grassroots publishing efforts, in English and Spanish translations. We read Chicana/o cultural theory texts that address issues of race and indigenism, class, citizenship, the status of migrant workers, border crossings, gender and sexuality. We examine experimental and cross-genre writing in relation to the role aesthetics plays in the way we read texts. We will examine a range of genres, from experimental to commercial fiction, ethnography and folklore, poetry, comedy stand-up and performance art, plays and films. We reflect on how these authors re-invent and re-imagine stories based on traditional myths as well as the more recent forces of oppression that affect Chicana/o communities. Our writing will be an experiment, too. Assignments include short writing exercises performed in class that build toward two eight-page, literary analysis papers. Authors include: Sandra Cisneros, Helena Viramontes, Tomás Rivera, Americo Paredes, George Lopez, Josefina Lopez, Lorraine Lopez, Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong.
ENGL 135-01 Poetry and the Gods MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Theresa Krier 4 / 20 Materials icon
This term the English Department’s regular introduction to poetry organizes itself around poetry's ancient relationship to mythology. What does poetry make of deities and numinous beings from Greece, Rome, Africa, India, North America; underworlds and paradises, fertility and nature spirits, hymns, invocations, spells, blessings, chants; human longings, rejections, nostalgia, ecstasies, skepticism, and celebration of divine forces? What is it about such spirits and stories that enliven the reach and resources of poetic languages? This course aims to make its participants into resourceful, creative readers and listeners of poetry, mastering skills that will allow intimacy with a living, changing art. We read contemporary works and very old works, poems from English-speaking cultures as well as translated poems from other cultures, experimental work as well as tried-and-true forms. We consider different ways of writing about poetry and using poetry: descriptive essay, book review, annotation, argument, personal memoir, among others. No prior experience required; no prerequisites; non-majors welcome. For English majors this course fulfills the requirement for a foundation course.
ENGL 150-01 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Kristin Naca 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* This course introduces students to the study of technique, convention, form and genre that engrosses writers of literary texts. Student writers engage in analysis of model literary works and frequent writing exercises that lead to longer - more complex and polished - pieces. We also practice dissecting student writing in workshop and learn how to provide the kinds of feedback that lead to meaningful revisions. Our goal is to inspire greater risks and experimentation in each other’s writing through rigorous yet compassionate dialogue.
Through writing exercises, students learn to engage the reader’s senses by gaining fluency with concrete language. Through discussion of prose and poetry arguments, student writers learn what shapes persuade the reader to reflect on life experience. Typically, we read one collection of short stories, one collection of poetry, and one book on writing conventions and process—all by contemporary authors.
ENGL 150-02 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Peter Bognanni 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 150-03 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 217 Ping Wang 1 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 150-04 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Marlon James 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required* Prose. Poetry. Fiction. Nonfiction. Narrative. Linear. Categories. Boundaries. limitations. What if you want to write a prose poem? A short story that rhymes? A memoir with footnotes? An event in reverse? A thought that stretches time, or a point of view that switches bodies in the same story? Paragraph? Line? Maybe you wish to write something that you have never seen before and are not sure exists? Maybe you want to confront a memory from childhood in the voice of YA, or maybe your fan fiction suddenly came to life. What does it mean to write without boundaries?

At the end of this course you will know what it means to write like a storyteller and read like a writer. As such, Intro to Creative Writing will be as much about active reading as it will be about actual writing. To become a better rule breaker first you have to know the rules. You must learn how to objectively analyze and critique a wide range of texts in your genre. How did the author make that text work?

Intro to Creative Writing will be for many an introduction to the writer inside you, a person that you might be meeting for the first time. It’s about the joys and challenges of expression and learning about your abilities and yourself. It’s an introduction to the art of writing in all shapes and forms, and the craft of critiquing your work and the work of your peers. Inside out, upside down, at the end of this course you will like your were meant to.
ENGL 150-05 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Matthew Burgess 5 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ENGL 150-06 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Matthew Burgess 1 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ENGL 230-01 Nineteenth-Century British Literature: Victorian Literature and the Global Imagination TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Lesley Goodman 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* For many people in Great Britain in the nineteenth century, their world seemed to be growing. The British Empire was expanding, and new and more sophisticated communications and travel technologies brought hitherto isolated regions and communities into mutual awareness and interchange. Raymond Williams has suggested that novels traditionally show their readers “knowable communities,” but how do they so in an age of global community? At a certain point, does the world become too big and too complicated to be fully understood or represented? This was a question many Victorian writers were asking themselves, contemplating the limits of individual comprehension; as George Eliot cautioned, “To shift one’s point of view beyond certain limits is impossible to the most liberal and expansive mind; we are none of us aware of the impression we produce on Brazilian monkeys of feeble understanding — it is possible they see hardly anything in us.”
In this class, we will read British texts of the nineteenth century that struggle to represent the emerging sense of global interconnectedness, including The Secret Garden, Dracula, Wilkie Collins’ The Moonstone (the first detective novel), and adventure fiction by H. Rider Haggard. We will consider how these texts represent the structures of power and domination that constituted Britain’s relationship with the rest of the world, how they depict the consequences of a global community for life at home, and how they understand “home.”
ENGL 273-01 American Literature 1900-1945 TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 James Dawes 0 / 20 Materials icon
This course will examine several landmark novels in American literary modernism. We will first examine these texts as aesthetic achievements with specific formal requirements. What are the hidden structures that make up a novel? How do authors produce beautiful effects at the level of line and paragraph? How do they use these small beautiful effects (a phrase that jars the reader into seeing the world anew, a paragraph that has the delicate structure of a stanza) to develop the larger themes of the work as a whole? We will also consider questions of cultural production and political and ethical consequence. How do codes of race, class, and gender function in these texts? How do social systems (manners, language, employment structures) detract from or contribute to the promotion of human dignity? How is the reader changed by the act of reading? We will pay special attention to questions of beauty, humor, cognition, power, epistemology, the grotesque, narrative theory, ideology, urbanization, aesthetics, and ethics. The class will engage in intensive readings of individual texts, but will also seek to examine the larger backgrounds of American literary and cultural history. Authors of special attention may include William Faulkner, Willa Cather, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Zora Neale Hurston.
ENGL 275-01 African American Literature to 1900 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Daylanne English 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 275-01; first day attendance required*
ENGL 280-01 Crafts of Writing: Poetry TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 112 Ping Wang 2 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Marlon James 3 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 281-02 Crafts of Writing: Creative Writing through Homer MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 305 Matthew Burgess 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
Dozens of creative writing handbooks are written every year, but in this intermediate workshop we will read only two, the Iliad and the Odyssey, for pretty much everything we’d need to know about plot structure, characterization, descriptive imagery, domestic drama, and of course fantastical action scenes we can learn directly from Homer. Students will be expected to write multiple drafts of two original works of short fiction—no connection to the classics required—and one narrative poem.
ENGL 284-01 Crafts of Writing: Screenwriting MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 003 Peter Bognanni 1 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 294-01 The Literary Bible MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 102 Theresa Krier 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-01* This course studies the Bible in the English literary imagination, investigating how its narrative, style, character, figurative language, song, and translation inform literature in English. Topics include political struggles over access to literacy; the creation of the King James Bible; dissenters’ traditions of biblical reading; constant issues of enslavement, freedom, and empire. We’ll give time to the biblical genres most dynamic in English fiction, drama, oratory, and poetry: cosmogony, ancestor stories, folk tales, prophecy, love poetry, prayer, proverb, philosophical poetry, parables, biography, letters, and testimony. We’ll survey the shape of the whole English Bible, but focus on Genesis, Exodus, the stories of David and Solomon, the prophetic books Isaiah and Hosea, the Song of Songs, Job, Psalms, the Wisdom books, the Gospel of Luke, 1 Corinthians, the Book of Revelation, nativity stories, angel stories, stories of women. We’ll focus on the strongest creative responses to the Bible – sometimes adversarial, sometimes comic – through our main English texts: modern-English tales from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, the anonymous comedy The Second Shepherds’ Play, literary versions of the Nativity and Passion accounts from the Gospels, Shakespeare’s King Lear and excerpts from other Shakespeare plays, excerpts from Spenser’s Faerie Queene and Milton’s Paradise Lost, Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience. We’ll view Bill Viola’s great video sequence The Passions and hear music from Bach, Bernstein, and Handel to Bono and Bob Marley.
ENGL 294-02 Comparative Feminisms: Whiteness and Postcolonialisms MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker 7 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 240-01*
ENGL 308-01 Literature/Sexuality: Wilde, Warhol, Waters: Queer Aesthetes and Outlaws TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Casey Jarrin 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 308-01; permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required* Oscar Wilde, Andy Warhol, John Waters AND Claude Cahun, David Bowie, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Quentin Crisp, William S. Burroughs, Fran Leibowitz, Morrissey. Dandies, aesthetes, chameleonic artists, writers, innovators, iconoclasts, masters of the pose, flaneurs, raconteurs, visionary voyeurs, celebrity culture connoisseurs, queer heroes and outlaws, pop icons. We’ll begin with the public and private faces of Wilde: Irish-born, Trinity and Oxford educated, aspiring philosopher, Woman’s World editor, London playboy, literary celebrity, prisoner and exile. We’ll encounter his early poems and reviews, aesthetic lectures (on art, style, interior design, diva culture), essays (“House Beautiful,” “Truth of Masks,” “Decay of Lying,” “Critic As Artist”), key plays (Importance of Being Earnest, Salome), notorious “novel” (Picture of Dorian Gray), prison poem (Ballad of Reading Gaol), posthumously published letter to his estranged lover (De Profundis). How did Wilde link autobiography with artifice? Life and lifestyle with art? Plagiarism with originality? We’ll contextualize Wilde’s body of work at the intersection of fin-de-siècle aesthetics and sexual politics (Aestheticism, Dandyism, rise of the New Woman), and view his struggles against censorship, criminalization of homosexuality, and the Victorian prison as pivotal steps towards queer liberation movements of the 20th century.

We’ll then turn to the paintings, films, and autobiographical writings of Pittsburgh-born Andy Warhol: iconic silkscreens of commodity and celebrity culture (soup cans, Marilyn, Jackie O, Liz, Elvis, Mao, Christ), Death in America series (crime scenes, electric chairs, mushroom clouds), censored Thirteen Most Wanted Men mural, diaries, pop culture magazine (Interview), brief foray into reality television (Andy Warhol’s TV, Warhol’s Fifteen Minutes for MTV). How did Warhol’s Factory link industry, advertising, high art, pornography, street life, junkies, dandies, and the cult of personality known as celebrity? How do Warhol’s films (silent Screen Tests; Haircut, Eat, Sleep, Kiss, Empire; Trash / Flesh / Heat trilogy) and cult films of Baltimore native John Waters (Pink Flamingoes; Female Trouble) perform gender, sex(uality), desire? Fuse the beautiful with the grotesque? Embody camp or cultural kitch? Throughout, we’ll look at contemporaneous artists (Aubrey Beardsley, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein, Cindy Sherman, Adrian Piper, Keith Haring, Alexander McQueen), filmmakers (Kenneth Anger, Jean Genet, Paul Morrissey, Derek Jarman, Sally Potter, Isaac Julien, Todd Haynes), musicians (Lou Reed/Velvet Underground, Bowie, Blondie, Smiths/Morrissey, Grace Jones, Rufus Wainwright, Prince, Hahn-Bin, Peaches, Lady Gaga, Janelle Monae), choreographer Matthew Bourne, Olympian Johnny Weir, dandies (Quentin Crisp, Betty Bourne, Fran Leibowitz), cultural theorists (Susan Sontag, Leo Ber
ENGL 310-01 Shakespeare Studies: Unruly Women, Agency, and Resistance MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Theresa Krier 4 / 20 Materials icon
In Shakespeare's time monarchs, governors, ethicists, churchmen, schoolmasters, fathers, husbands, and aristocrats spoke in discourses of control, authority, order, and the divine establishment of patriarchy. But they did so partly in response to their strong-willed queen Elizabeth, who refused to wed and refused to bear children. Shakespeare's is in fact an age of rebellion, revolt, transgression, mockery, cross-dressing, witchcraft, misrule, insubordination, and generally rumbustious forms of life and literature. This course studies those forms, with focus on his women characters. Through them we'll ponder creative agency, resistance, power, and the relations of all these to dramatic genres. Works may include A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It, Much Ado about Nothing, Measure for Measure, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Antony & Cleopatra, The Winter's Tale, Coriolanus, Venus & Adonis, and scenes from The Taming of the Shrew, Othello, Richard III, 1 Henry VI.
ENGL 331-01 The Brontes TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 227 Lesley Goodman 4 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will.” – Charlotte Brontë
For the Victorians, the Brontë sisters were mysterious and fascinating figures. Their novels were considered shocking, even monstrous, and anything but ladylike in their depiction of the heights and depths of human passion, but the sisters themselves were demure, had lived lonely, isolated lives, and seemed to shy away from attention or scrutiny. Their works never quite seemed to fit the standards and conventions of nineteenth-century readers, but they’ve become some of the mostly wide read and adapted novels of that period, especially Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. In this class, we will read works by Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Brontë, including Jane Eyre, Villette, Wuthering Heights, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, and relevant film adaptions, exploring their similarities and differences, their representation of the limited power and freedom available in Victorian society, and the consequences of these limitations on the minds and hearts of women. We will also examine the creation of the Brontë myth—the fantasies and anxieties that have followed these women over the centuries, from gothic anecdotes about Emily Brontë violently beating her pet dog to the Brontë Sisters Power Dolls.
ENGL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 105 David Moore 6 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 367-01*
ENGL 386-01 From Literature to Film: Studies in Adaptation: Vietnam: Text, Film, Culture TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 226 Casey Jarrin 2 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* Through encounters with film, photography, memoirs, music, plays, and poems, we’ll examine cultural histories, ideological/military contexts, prevailing mythologies, protest movements, and critical reassessments of American involvement in Vietnam and the ensuing conflict (1959-1975). What distinguished the Vietnam War from other 20th-century American military actions? How did the media transmit visions of the war and the anti-war movement to an international audience (via newspapers, photographs, on television), contemporaneous with images of violence at "home" (urban riots, student protests, assassinations of JFK, RFK, MLK)? How have artists, authors, filmmakers responded to the war – its origins, traumas, aftermath – and in what genres/voices (prose, image, performance art, the 1967 International War Crimes Tribunal)? How might we see the ideological and military dramas of Vietnam revisited in Afghanistan and Iraq?
We’ll begin with contexts for the Vietnam conflict and Cold War policy/anxiety (Graham Greene, The Quiet American; Peter Weiss, Discourse on Vietnam; Manchurian Candidate), then view films about psychopathologies of war (Apocalypse Now, The Deer Hunter, Full Metal Jacket), read novels and memoirs (Michael Herr, Dispatches; Tim O'Brien, The Things They Carried; Norman Mailer, Why Are We in Vietnam?; Eldridge Cleaver, Soul on Ice; Denis Johnson, Tree of Smoke), poetry (Adrienne Rich, Yusef Komunyakaa, Muriel Rukheiser, Denise Levertov, Lawrence Ferlinghetti), David Rabe’s Vietnam trilogy of plays (Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel, Sticks and Bones, Streamers), contemporaneous music. We’ll consider representations of Vietnam-era masculinity (Deliverance, Taxi Driver), the trauma of veterans returning from combat (Coming Home, Rambo, Born on the Fourth of July), documentary reassessments (Far from Vietnam, Hearts and Minds, Unfinished Symphony, The Fog of War), and conclude with echoes of Vietnam in Afghanistan and Iraq (Jarhead; An-My Le’s photographs of Vietnam war re-enactors, Small Wars). Essays by Philip Caputo, Susan Sontag, Paul Virilio, Susan Faludi, Howard Zinn, Vivian Sobchack, Lawrence Weschler, Jean Baudrillard. Sunday film screenings.
ENGL 394-01 British Romanticism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Jennifer Baltzer-Lovato 11 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
Study of the great pan-European movement of Romanticism, as it emerges in British literary culture in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Our survey will encompass poetry, fiction, essays, manifestoes, and philosophical works; we’ll meet writers’ transformative literary inventiveness in the quest to give voice to issues of women’s rights, slavery and empire, revolution, class struggles; we’ll take up the great Romantic philosophical concerns, among them new views of nature, resistance to the preceding “age of reason,” explorations into the nature of imagination and the visionary. We’ll also examine stereotypes and misconceptions that arise about Romanticism.
ENGL 394-02 18th C American Literature MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 204 Patricia Baehler 17 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* In this course we will consider the many social, religious, political, and intellectual forces at play in America’s metamorphosis from colony to nation. The American eighteenth century was a time of profound change, and the era’s literature, rich in generic diversity, reflects this volatility. We will read a variety of literary forms, from sermons to treatises, poetry to pamphlets, journals to novels, and explore the relationship between genre and the emerging American identity.
ENGL 394-03 Dead White Men MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GERM 337-01, MCST 337-01 and PHIL 294-03; taught in English* The shift away from feudal theocracy (when divinity grounded truth and political authority) to secular capitalist modernity has entailed unforeseen re-conceptualizations of both time and of the distinction between truth and fiction—the latter approaching extinction, as truth is increasingly perceived as a culturally arbitrary (hence fictional) construct. To examine these modern mutations of the central categories of time and truth-fiction, the course will pursue two parallel itineraries. On the one hand, the two competing modes of the secularization of time, as (a) human history progressing toward a certain telos (end or aim), and (b) as a machinic time within which inter-relations within an autonomous structure (one not controlled by humans) determine its participants. And, on the other hand, the replacement of faith with modern philosophy, ideology, and biopolitics. No prerequisites.
ENGL 400-02 Seminar: Special Topics in Literary Studies (Capstone) TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 370 James Dawes 2 / 12 Materials icon
Suffering deforms and destroys language, turning articulated sound into inarticulate sobs and groans. But suffering also accelerates language, calling into being not only fervent acts of supplication and prayer but also the ornate literary and cultural lament. This course examines the relationship between literature and violations of human rights. How does literature represent the shock that results from witnessing bodies opened in torture and on the battlefield? How does it represent the trauma of peacetime structural violence and domestic injury? What kinds of suffering are more difficult to narrate, and why? How can we use language to alleviate suffering, or to decelerate group violence? We will consider the variety of ways authors and cultural theorists have attempted to speak the unspeakable, paying particular attention to the relationships among pain, belief, and the body. Authors of interest may include Edwidge Danticat, Junot Diaz, Nathan Englander, Julia Alvarez, Thomas Glave, John Edgar Wideman, and others.
ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Kristin Naca 2 / 12 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required* This capstone in Creative Writing will focus on poetry. Writers compose and revise several drafts of poems, toward compiling a twenty-page manuscript. Writers will develop a critical practice by reading and annotating up to forty poetry collections and books of poetic craft. Writers will explore avenues of funding for their continued work, drafting letters of aesthetics, craft, and purpose for programs, grants, residencies, etc. Attending several public poetry readings is also required.

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENVI 130-01 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 350 James Doyle 2 / 55 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHYS 130-01*
ENVI 140-01 The Earth's Climate System MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Louisa Bradtmiller 4 / 21 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 140-L1 The Earth's Climate System Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 187 Louisa Bradtmiller 4 / 21 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 144-01 Lakes, Streams and Rivers MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Anika Bratt 4 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 144-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
ENVI 160-01 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Kelly MacGregor 12 / 48 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-01*
ENVI 160-L1 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 4 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-L1*
ENVI 160-L2 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 8 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOL 160-L2*
ENVI 202-01 Sustainability and the Campus T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MARKIM 303 Suzanne Savanick Hansen 7 / 16 Materials icon
*2 credit course; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Roopali Phadke -3 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Chris Wells 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First year Course only; cross-listed with HIST 234-01* People have always had to contend with the natural world, but only recently have historians begun to explore the changing relationships between people and their environments over time. In this course, we will examine the variety of ways that people in North America have shaped the environment, as well as how they have used, labored in, abused, conserved, protected, rearranged, polluted, cleaned, and thought about it. In addition, we will explore how various characteristics of the natural world have affected the broad patterns of human society, sometimes harming or hindering life and other times enabling rapid development and expansion. By bringing nature into the study of human history, and the human past into the study of nature, we will begin to see the connections and interdependencies between the two that are often overlooked.
ENVI 234-02 American Environmental History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Chris Wells -1 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 234-02; first day attendance required*
ENVI 252-01 Water and Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Roopali Phadke 4 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 252-01 and POLI 252-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor; ENVI/GEOL 120 or ENVI 133 or ENVI/GEOG 232 are useful background but not required*
ENVI 258-01 Geog of Environmental Hazards TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Eric Carter 11 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 258-01; first day attendance required*
ENVI 259-01 Indigenous Peoples of Arctic MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06B Scott Legge 5 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 259-01*
ENVI 270-01 Psychology of Sustainable Behavior TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Christina Manning 9 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 270-01; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 275-01 Outdoor Environmental Education W 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Dosch, Kurth-Schai 2 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of the instructor, Jerald Dosch required; cross-listed with EDUC 275-01; first day attendance required; S/NC grading; 2 credit course; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of Jerald Dosch*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Mark Davis 11 / 46 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 7 / 23 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Mark Davis 4 / 23 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
ENVI 294-01 Climate Change: Science, Economics, and Policy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Bradtmiller, West 3 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ECON 294-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor* Students registering for the course as ECON 294 will receive credit toward the general distribution requirement in social sciences; those registering for ENVI 294 will receive credit towards the natural science requirement. **This course counts as a 200s-level Group A elective for the economics major.** This team-taught course will introduce students to models that integrate the science of climate change with the economic determinants and effects of climate change and analysis of policies that might be used to address the problem. It will contain six modules. First we will study climate change science, including the greenhouse effect, the carbon cycle, the climate system, and feedbacks that amplify or dampen changes to these systems. Second, we will cover topics from environmental economics, including market efficiency, externalities, public goods, growth, and discounting, specifically as they apply to climate change. Next, we will explore models used for understanding and predicting climate, including basic 1 and 2-dimensional models as well as more complex 3D models and Global Circulation Models (GCMs). The module will then combine these topics in an exploration of what impacts, natural and economic, are predicted by climate models for the near (100 year) future. Fourth, we will explore policy interventions for the reduction in greenhouse gases, including carbon taxes and cap and trade, and other regulation such as that taking place under the U.S. Clean Air Act. Where relevant we will discuss the successes and failures of these systems as they have been applied to date. We will also discuss the costs and benefits of subsidizing renewable energy and carbon-free energy sources and the costs of negative impacts of climate change on human and natural systems. Fifth, we will discuss the wide array of technological solutions that have been proposed to slow, stop or even reverse climate change. These range from things that are now common (wind turbines) to things that are gaining in popularity (geothermal) to the truly esoteric (mirrors in space). The final module will show how the preceding topics factor into Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs). Governments and NGOs use these models to combine scientific and socioeconomic information in order to predict the outcomes of various climate and policy scenarios. These are the state of the art in climate science, economics and policy; students will be exposed to several of the most commonly used models and to research from their critics.

While the course will have substantial quantitative content, its only prerequisite is ECON 119: Principles of Economics, and we hope to attract a diverse group of students of varying academic and personal experience.
ENVI 294-02 Land Change and Conservation Planning: Understanding and Mitigating a Threat to Critical Habitat MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Robert Rose 5 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 294-02*
ENVI 294-04 Environmental History of Modern Europe TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Julia Fein 19 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-05*
ENVI 333-01 Economics of Global Food Problems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Amy Damon 14 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ECON 333-01 and INTL 333-01*
ENVI 394-01 Introduction to Remote Sensing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Robert Rose 8 / 15 Materials icon
*$25 course fee required; cross-listed with GEOG 362-01*
ENVI 394-L1 Intro Remote Sensing Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 108 Ashley Nepp 8 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 362-L1*
ENVI 477-01 Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley 7 / 15 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; cross-listed with GEOG 488-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required; this is a Geography Senior seminar*
ENVI 489-01 Environmental Leadership Pract M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Permission of the Instructor required; first day attendance required; this course is concurrently registered with ENVI 490-01; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 490-01 Envi St Leadership Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 241 Roopali Phadke 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Permission of the Instructor required; 2 credit course; first day attendance required; this course is concurrently registered with ENVI 489-01; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 494-01 Environmentalism, Industrialization and Nature in 19th-century Literature and Art TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 404 Juliette Rogers 7 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with FREN 415-01; first day attendance required; taught in French*

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
FREN 101-01 French I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 111 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 1 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-02 French I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 111 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 4 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L1 French I Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon -1 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L2 French I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 111 Julien Berthelon 1 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L3 French I Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 227 Julien Berthelon 4 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 101-L4 French I Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am NEILL 216 Julien Berthelon 1 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 227 Claude Cassagne 10 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon 4 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L2 French II Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am OLRI 100 Rokhaya Dieng 6 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 404 Annick Fritz 4 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 228 Julien Berthelon 5 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 194-01 Science Fiction and Technology in French Film and Literature MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 202 Andrew Billing 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* (Full title: Loving and Loathing our Posthuman Future: Science Fiction and Technology in French Film and Literature)
We live in a society obsessed with the promise and the perils of technology. We love our computers, tablets, smartphones and other electronic gadgets, our video games and our social media apps. Yet we also fear the zombification caused by technology addiction; electronic surveillance and its threat to privacy and freedom; and the possibility that in the near future robots might take our jobs. Moreover, some thinkers foresee that we will soon arrive at a moment of “singularity” in our relationship to technology with the creation of new forms of intelligence including superintelligent biologically-enhanced "posthumans," a possibility alternately exciting and frightening.

These fears and desires have been shaped by a long and often suspicious history of reflection on technology in western culture, including a particularly rich French literary and cinematic tradition. In this course, we will gain perspective on our contemporary situation and attitudes through the analysis of French fiction, film and graphic novels associated with the genre of science fiction. The works we will study are drawn from a wide range of contexts and historical periods, but all take as their principal themes speculation on technology and science; travel in time and space; human nature and its limits and our differences from other terrestrial and extra-terrestrial beings; and utopian or dystopian representations of the future.

Guiding our discussions will be the following questions: 1) what do these French science fiction works tell us about how we should understand technology as a distinct form of human endeavor? 2) and what do they also tell us about what it means to be human or even posthuman? 3) are French science fiction works a projection or "journey into fear" reflecting only the anxieties of the historical moments that produce them, or can they suggest real possibilities for radical social transformation? and 4) how have French science fiction works contributed to the development of the science fiction genre, and to what extent do they reflect a specifically French attitude to technology and science?

Texts and films studied will include some prophetic early literary works such as Cyrano de Bergerac's The Other World: The Societies and Government of the Moon (1657) and Louis-Sebastien Mercier's 1771 novel The Year 2440; Jules Verne's From the Earth to the Moon (1865); Pierre Boulle's seminal sci-fi classic Planet of the Apes (1963) and its cinematic adaptations; graphic novels including Jodorowsky and Moebius's The Incal (1982); and films including Marker's The Jetty (1962); Franju's classic take on plastic surgery Eyes Without a Face (1960); Godard's Alphaville (1965); Laloux's Fantastic Planet (1973); Jeunet and Caro's City of Lost Children (1995); Besson's Fifth Element (1997); and Happy End
FREN 203-01 French III MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 112 Joelle Vitiello 9 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-02 French III MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 213 Andrew Billing 2 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-03 French III MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 213 Andrew Billing 9 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 113 Rokhaya Dieng 7 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 401 Rokhaya Dieng 3 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L3 French III Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng 0 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L4 French III Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 Rokhaya Dieng 3 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L5 French III Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 227 Rokhaya Dieng 3 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L6 French III Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng 4 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 212 Annick Fritz 2 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 212 Annick Fritz 9 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon 0 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng 1 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon 3 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon 7 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 402 Joelle Vitiello 11 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools R 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng 5 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng 6 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 306-01 Intro to Literary Analysis: "The World Upside Down" TR 08:00 am-09:30 am NEILL 404 Juliette Rogers 10 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; taught in French* The theme for this semester’s course will focus on the notion of “the world upside down,” a term used to describe the novels of Renaissance author François Rabelais (Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World, 1965). When the world is in tumult, although it may seem upsetting or shocking, Rabelais, as well as other French and francophone authors, believed that it was a moment for innovation – changing identities, finding new perspectives, and contesting traditional ways. We will analyze a variety of texts, written from the 13th century to the 21st century, that look at the “world upside down.” We will analyze texts together in class and you will also analyze them on your own in a number of writing projects.

This course is a writing intensive course, and we will study different types of writing, including critical analysis and argumentative writing as well as some creative writing. We will also develop critical tools for textual interpretation and integrate cultural and historical contexts for the works we are studying. There will be guided library research, several short papers with rewrites, and a long final paper that incorporates a research component.

The course counts for the French major and minor and is taught entirely in French.
FREN 307-01 La France contemporaine: histoire, culture et actualite MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 404 Joelle Vitiello 12 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; taught in French; for students who have already taken French 204 or French 305 (or who have the equivalent level). Not open to students who have already taken French 306 or higher* This course is designed for students who want to understand contemporary events and issues in France. The course includes a review of essential historical events that have shaped modern France, in particular the legacy of the French Revolution, the colonial empire, WWII and the French-Algerian War. These events have shaped all contemporary debates (i.e. the recent law regarding wearing religious symbols in schools, the October 2005 suburb riots, recent immigration laws, and many other topics). The course also studies the place of France in relationship with the United States and the European community. Some units focus on the production of French culture, French regions, and various intellectual/artistic movements through a variety of up-to-date authentic materials: newspaper articles, films, TV news, radio, and websites accessible through Moodle. This course is ideal for students planning to spend time in France, for students who want to include the study of France in various disciplines, from a cultural rather than literary angle, or who want to be able to understand what is going on in France today.
FREN 415-01 Environmentalism, Industrialization and Nature in 19th-century Literature and Art TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 404 Juliette Rogers 7 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 494-01; first day attendance required; taught in French* Nature is a temple where living columns sometimes emit confused lyrics – Charles Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du mal

To hell with civilization, long live nature and poetry ! – Théodore Rousseau, peintre

Ecolos avant l’heure? Environmentalism, Industrialization and Nature in 19th-century Literature and Art: The Industrial Revolution and the rise of Capitalism had a major impact on the environment in France during the nineteenth century, as it did in other European countries and the U.S. In what ways did the French respond to the environmental crisis in the nineteenth century and how did that set the stage for later developments? In 1854, the same year that Thoreau published Walden, the French created the Société Nationale de la Protection de la Nature. And in 1861 the first Réserve Naturelle was created by the French government to protect the forests of Fontainebleau from clear cutting, due in large part to the well-written petitions by writers and artists such as Victor Hugo, George Sand, and others.

In this course, we will look at a number of literary, cultural, and political texts written during the nineteenth century that focus on nature, the environment, and issues related to the rapid urbanization and industrialization of France. We will also study artworks by the Barbizon school, and by later artists including the impressionists of the later part of the nineteenth century. Texts will include works by well-known authors such as Honoré de Balzac, George Sand, and Emile Zola, but also less well-known writers Olympe Audouard and Marceline Desbordes-Valmore among others. We will also study a variety of contemporary critical theories on the subject, from Claude Brosseau’s Romans-Géographes and Bertrand Westphal’s La Géocritique to Blanc, Pughe et Chartier’s works on l’écopoétique.

In the end, we will try to answer the question of why and how the green movement developed in France and why it has been so different (some would say “behind”) the ecology movements of other western nations in Europe and in North America.

This course counts toward the French major or minor and will be taught entirely in French; prerequisite of one course at the 300-level in French.
FREN 416-01 Of a Beautiful Mind: Literature and Philosophy at Crossroads W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 9 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 294-01*
‘What is the beautiful?’ Plato, Hippias Major
‘To love beauty is to see light’ Victor Hugo

A 2012 New York Times article entitled “Is Philosophy Literature?” raised the following question: “Do people read philosophy for pleasure?” The question clearly suggests that the article’s author links “pleasure” to literature. Indeed, in a general manner, literature is understood as a work of aesthetic language and, above all, imagination through its narrative, spatiotemporal, mythical, and symbolic manifestations. There are those who would assert that philosophy is reflection on the whole of reality- the study of ideas about knowledge. In other words, literature is beautiful and philosophy is intelligent (smart); however, these distinctions about pleasure and rationality are neither radical nor absolute. Conversely, we may explore how literature “makes you think” and how philosophy delves into the “pleasure of the text”. While distinct, the two disciplines are mutually dependent, to some extent.

This course scrutinizes the encounter or dialogue between literary and philosophical texts in light of critical theory, as well as through the examination of case-topics (e.g. moral choice, human freedom, commitment, gender issues). Readings will include writings by Plato, Aristotle, Voltaire, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Gérard Genette, Paul Ricoeur, Julia Kristeva, Simone de Beauvoir and Léopold Sédar Senghor. We will follow three axes:

1. The discovery of literature as a vehicle for philosophical ideas

2. A discussion of philosophical content posed by the literature in view

3. A discussion of critical theories that blend literature and philosophy, including Narratology, Structuralism, Phenomenology, Deconstruction and Feminist theories.

This interdisciplinary course is taught in English. In order for it to count toward the French major or minor, students are required to write their papers in French and to meet every three weeks for a ‘Café philo-littéraire’.

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOG 111-01 Human Geography of Global Issues MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran -1 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GEOG 111-02 Human Geography of Global Issues MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 107 Nicole Simms 7 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GEOG 201-01 Introduction to Urban Studies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Paul Schadewald 14 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GEOG 201-02 Introduction to Urban Studies MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 105 Daniel Trudeau 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only*
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Holly Barcus -3 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of the instructor required; $25 course fee required*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp -2 / 15 Materials icon
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab W 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp -1 / 15 Materials icon
GEOG 241-01 Urban Geography MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 David Lanegran 4 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GEOG 242-01 Regional Geography of the US and Canada TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith 7 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
$35 course fee required*
GEOG 243-01 Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 107 William Moseley 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only* This class goes beyond the superficial media interpretations of the vast African continent to complicate our understanding of this fascinating region. As geographers, we will place contemporary African developments in their historical and global context. The course provides a basic background in African history and physical geography, leading to discussion of advanced topics in contemporary African studies. The course covers a broad range of contemporary topics, including: human-environment interactions (forest and drylands management); population dynamics (population growth, distribution and mobility); medical geography (disease, health care and policy); agricultural development (traditional farming systems, cash crops, policy); urban economies (evolution of the urban structure, industry, housing); political geography (democratization, conflict); culture and change (religion, modernization); development (ideology and economic development, Africa in the global economy); and social geography (African women and development, education).
GEOG 250-01 Race, Place and Space MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Karin Aguilar-San Juan 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 250-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 252-01 Water and Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Roopali Phadke 4 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 252-01 and POLI 252-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor; ENVI/GEOL 120 or ENVI 133 or ENVI/GEOG 232 are useful background but not required*
GEOG 256-01 Medical Geography: The Geography of Health and Health Care TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 Eric Carter 9 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GEOG 258-01 Geography of Environmental Hazards TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Eric Carter 11 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 258-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 262-01 Metro Analysis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith 1 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GEOG 294-02 Land Change and Conservation Planning: Understanding and Mitigating a Threat to Critical Habitat MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Robert Rose 5 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02* The world is in the midst of a biodiversity loss crisis, driven in part by a loss of critical habitat. An estimated 96 elephants are lost each day, a scant 3500 tigers remain in the wild and vast habitats from rainforest to open grassland to coral reefs are rapidly degrading. Since conservation practitioners have limited resources, they need to understand drivers of habitat loss and degradation, carefully choose and prioritize their strategies to prevent further loss, monitor whether those strategies are effective, and change strategies when they are not working. Furthermore, to obtain support from funders, partners, or stakeholders, practitioners need to be able to clearly communicate their goals and strategies, demonstrate their effectiveness, and rely on clear, transparent decision-making. This course draws on the instructor's experience in conservation management at the Wildlife Conservation Society and is designed to introduce students to two critical components of conservation practice: understanding how land use and land cover change threaten critical habitat, and developing a management plan to reduce the threats in a landscape. The course will culminate in a series of mock stakeholder exercises to develop a management plan to curb habitat loss in the Madidi-Tambopata protected area in Bolivia and Peru. Students completing this course will: (1) be familiar with the prominent theories of land change; (2) be able to identify drivers and proximate causes of land change; (3) understand how to assess monitor and predict land change over time; (4) be fluent in the language of conservation planning and adaptive management; and (5) participate in the development of a management plan to reduce habitat loss in one real-world conservation landscape.
GEOG 362-01 Introduction to Remote Sensing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Robert Rose 8 / 15 Materials icon
*$25 course fee required; crosslisted with ENVI 394-01*
GEOG 362-L1 Intro to Remote Sensing Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 108 Ashley Nepp 8 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 394-L1*
GEOG 364-01 GIS and Community Partnerships TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Holly Barcus 5 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*$25 course fee required*
GEOG 488-01 Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley 7 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of the instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required; this is a Geography Senior seminar*

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOL 101-01 Dinosaurs MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Kristina Curry Rogers -8 / 48 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
GEOL 160-01 Dynamic Earth/Global Change MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Kelly MacGregor 12 / 48 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 160-01*
GEOL 160-L1 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 4 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 160-L1*
GEOL 160-L2 Dynamic Earth/Global Chng Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 8 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 160-L2*
GEOL 165-01 History/Evolution of Earth MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 187 Raymond Rogers 0 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only* History and Evolution of the Earth will provide an overview of Earth history that spans ~4.54 billion years. Students in the class will explore the concept of geologic time as they delve into the vast past of our evolving planet. Major emphasis will be placed on tracking the evolution of life, from the simplest single-celled organisms of the ancient Earth to today's diverse floras and faunas. Another major focus of the course will be the linkage and various feedbacks among abiotic and biotic systems—the lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere did not and do not evolve independently. The laboratory component of the course is designed to familiarize students with the rocks and fossils that archive the history of Earth. The class will include a field trip to local areas of geologic and paleontologic interest. This course is required for geology majors and minors.
GEOL 165-L1 History/Evolution of Earth Lab R 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 0 / 15 Materials icon
*First Year Lab only*
GEOL 240-01 Field Methods R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth 9 / 15 Materials icon
This course is designed to train students in observation, spatial thinking, integrative problem-solving, and critical thinking in the field. Students will keep a detailed field notebook, complete three field projects, and use software to prepare professional quality maps and reports, all of which are important skills needed for careers in the biological, environmental, and geological sciences. Tools used include brunton compass, Jacob staff, GPS, aerial photographs, topographic maps, and computer software. Includes a weekend mapping project and weekly field trips during class. Occasional fourth hour meetings. Prereqs: GEOL 160, 165, or permission of instructor.
GEOL 250-01 Mineralogy MWF 08:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth 4 / 18 Materials icon
GEOL 260-01 Geomorphology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor 5 / 22 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GEOL 260-L1 Geomorphology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor 5 / 22 Materials icon
GEOL 300-01 Paleobiology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers -2 / 18 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GEOL 300-L1 Paleobiology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers -2 / 18 Materials icon
GEOL 400-01 Capstone Research Methods in Geology TR 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 6 / 10 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; 1 credit course*

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GERM 101-01 Elementary German I MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela 7 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GERM 101-L1 Elementary German I Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 1 / 7 Materials icon
GERM 101-L2 Elementary German I Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 4 / 7 Materials icon
GERM 101-L3 Elementary German I Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 3 / 7 Materials icon
GERM 101-L4 Elementary German I Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 2 / 7 Materials icon
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela 6 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GERM 110-L1 Accel Elementary German Lab MR 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 227 Birgit Heinrich 0 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 110-L2 Accel Elementary German Lab TR TBA Birgit Heinrich 1 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 110-L3 Accel Elementary German Lab TR 09:00 am-10:00 am NEILL 401 Birgit Heinrich 2 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 110-L4 Accel Elementary German Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 3 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 214 Brigetta Abel 13 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Birgit Heinrich 2 / 7 Materials icon
GERM 203-L2 Intermediate German I Lab W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm NEILL 217 Birgit Heinrich 2 / 7 Materials icon
GERM 203-L3 Intermediate German I Lab W 08:10 pm-09:10 pm NEILL 217 Birgit Heinrich 4 / 7 Materials icon
GERM 203-L4 Intermediate German I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm NEILL 404 Birgit Heinrich 3 / 7 Materials icon
GERM 203-L5 Intermediate German I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 7 / 7 Materials icon
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 215 Linda Schulte-Sasse 9 / 20 Materials icon
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab M 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 102 Birgit Heinrich 0 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 204-L2 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 404 Birgit Heinrich 2 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 2 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 255-01 German Cinema Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 401 Linda Schulte-Sasse 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* One often hears horror movies referred to as trash. Does horror necessarily deserve this condemnation (or plug)? Why does an occasional horror film like The Silence of the Lambs win respectability or even a best-picture Oscar? What are the criteria by which we determine whether any film or work of art is good, bad, or perhaps not art at all? The course will examine horror films from various periods and places, some of which were repudiated at their release only to be recuperated later as art house classics. But all challenge cultural assumptions about art and horror as mutually exclusive categories, and all employ shock, horror, and gore as compelling means of representing social anxieties and historical traumas. Our objective will be to reflect on questions of aesthetic valuation, and to explore the themes, narrative strategies, and audience effects of horror; we will draw on a variety of theoretical approaches like Freud’s notion of the uncanny or Todorov’s of the fantastic. Likely examples will include pre-World War II Germany (Wiene, Murnau, Lang), depression-era USA (Tod Browning), the invention of body horror (Franju, Powell, Hitchcock), and contemporary “post-modern” horror (Argento, Romero, Cronenberg, Haneke).

Course prerequisite: guts. First, films like Tod Browning’s Freaks (1932) or Franju’s Les Yeux sans Visage (1960) will disabuse you of any notion that Quentin Tarantino invented grossness. Second, you may find that by seriously engaging film studies, introducing theoretical concepts, and doing what some call “over”-reading, the course will “ruin the fun.” My hope is that the opposite will be the case (and that fun and work are no more mutually exclusive than art and horror). The course counts for credit toward a German Studies major, although it is international in focus. German cinema was especially important in the early days of horror, and I will work with students who wish to have a particular German focus.

Student obligations: a series of short papers, oral presentations, and one longer research paper. Two exams and an informal log responding to class readings. Hopefully the Twin Cities will offer some cultural events relevant to our theme that we can visit as a class.
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 215 David Martyn 12 / 20 Materials icon
GERM 305-L1 German Through Media Lab R 10:50 am-12:30 pm Birgit Heinrich 7 / 10 Materials icon
GERM 305-L2 German Through Media Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am Birgit Heinrich 5 / 10 Materials icon
GERM 308-01 German Cultural History MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 214 Brigetta Abel 12 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Taught in German* German Cultural History I is one of two introductory courses for advanced-level German courses. This cultural-historical investigation of Germany begins at the end of the Napoleonic Wars (ca. 1815) and covers through the end of the Weimar Republic.

This course will provide a historical and contextual grounding for future advanced work in German Studies, and, primarily through the critical examination of a wide variety of texts and media, will introduce students to the methodologies that make up our interdisciplinary discipline. Students will develop college-level German reading, writing and discussion skills, and will develop the analytical vocabulary necessary for advanced work. Our texts and media will include historical, autobiographical and literary texts, numerous artifacts and images and several films.
GERM 337-01 Dead White Men MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela 1 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-03, MCST 337-01 and PHIL 294-03; taught in English* The shift away from feudal theocracy (when divinity grounded truth and political authority) to secular capitalist modernity has entailed unforeseen re-conceptualizations of both time and of the distinction between truth and fiction—the latter approaching extinction, as truth is increasingly perceived as a culturally arbitrary (hence fictional) construct. To examine these modern mutations of the central categories of time and truth-fiction, the course will pursue two parallel itineraries. On the one hand, the two competing modes of the secularization of time, as (a) human history progressing toward a certain telos (end or aim), and (b) as a machinic time within which inter-relations within an autonomous structure (one not controlled by humans) determine its participants. And, on the other hand, the replacement of faith with modern philosophy, ideology, and biopolitics. No prerequisites.
GERM 363-01 Crime and the Fantastic MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 217 David Martyn 6 / 20 Materials icon
*Taught in German*
GERM 394-01 Concepts of Freedom from Aristotle to Agamben MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 216 David Martyn 10 / 25 Materials icon
*Taught in English* "Free choice" is a concept we can neither explain nor do without. Democracy, the "free" market, the emancipation movements of the 20th century: these and other institutions could not function without the assumption that humans are free agents; but a coherent theory of free agency has yet to be invented. This course will approach the problem of free will by historicizing it. We will read authors from Greek antiquity to the present to understand what freedom meant at different junctures in the history of thought. In the process, we will discover just how peculiar to our own capitalist and secular epoch our notion of freedom is. Discussion topics will include free will in Stoic, religious, and secular thought; the emergence of modern individualism and its effect on the concept of freedom; freedom between Marxism and capitalism; the questionable freedom of "coming out" (Foucault, Judith Butler); art, science, politics, and love as forms of freedom (Badiou); freedom and states of exception (Agamben). Selected readings from Epictetus, Augustine, Luther, Leibniz, Kant, Marx, Hannah Arendt, Milton Friedman, and the other authors mentioned. Course requirements: one reading response per week, two 6-page papers. Core course for the Critical Theory Concentration.

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 216 Justin Butler 3 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-02 Elementary Spanish I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 402 Justin Butler 4 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-03 Elementary Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 216 Abby Bajuniemi -1 / 20 Materials icon
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 113 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto -2 / 15 Materials icon
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 212 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto -2 / 15 Materials icon
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 113 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 0 / 15 Materials icon
HISP 101-L4 Elementary Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 10 / 15 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 215 Rosa Rull-Montoya 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 215 Rosa Rull-Montoya 2 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 216 Anna Pomata Garcia -1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 226 Anna Pomata Garcia -3 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L3 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 247 Anna Pomata Garcia 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 7 / 10 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 110-01 Accelerated Beginning Spanish MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 112 Margaret Olsen 2 / 15 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 4 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 111-02 Accel Elementary Portuguese MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 102 Fernanda Bartolomei 5 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM 202 Fernanda Bartolomei 2 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 213 Leah Sand 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-03 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 213 Leah Sand 1 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-04 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 202 Fernanda Bartolomei 7 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 216 Anna Pomata Garcia 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 02:25 pm-03:25 pm NEILL 228 Anna Pomata Garcia 3 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 227 Anna Pomata Garcia -1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 247 Anna Pomata Garcia 3 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L5 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 247 Anna Pomata Garcia 1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L6 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 247 Anna Pomata Garcia -3 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L7 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 02:25 pm-03:25 pm OLRI 247 Anna Pomata Garcia 2 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L8 Intermediate Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 7 / 10 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 227 Claudia Giannini 5 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 111 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 0 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 215 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 9 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-04 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 215 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 10 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 102 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 02:25 pm-03:25 pm NEILL 404 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 113 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 113 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 102 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 2 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 212 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 3 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L8 Intermediate Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 9 / 10 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 111 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 0 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 305-01 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 214 Antonio Dorca 1 / 13 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required* This course is primarily designed to improve oral communication and to strengthen the students’ written proficiency and their awareness of grammar intricacies. In relation to writing, it serves as a bridge to upper-level courses. Conversations and compositions are based on critical issues related to the Hispanic world such as identity, resistance and assimilation, historical memory, stereotypes, imagination, and humor.

Class activities include oral presentations, grammar explanations and practice, critical analysis of written and visual texts, writing strategies, and self-correction exercises. Other course requirements are weekly readings appropriate to the level and a final paper.

Class interactions are conducted exclusively in Spanish.
The course has a residential component.
Prerequisites: A score of 620 or higher on the SAT II test, with listening component; or a score of 4-5 on the Spanish Language and Culture Advanced Placement Test; or a score of 550 or higher on the Webcape exam.
HISP 305-02 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Leah Sand -3 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-03 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 212 Margaret Olsen 0 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-04 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 212 Margaret Olsen -2 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-05 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Abby Bajuniemi 0 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Antonio Dorca 2 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 213 Alicia Munoz 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 215 Cynthia Kauffeld 9 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 309-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 430-01 Adv Spanish Grammar: Meaning and Communication TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 215 Cynthia Kauffeld 6 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 446-01 Constructions of a Female Killer MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Alicia Munoz 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 446-01 and WGSS 346-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 494-01 Journeys through Brazil MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 5 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required* Located in an often overlooked region, Brazil remains a mystery to many. Brazil's large size and geography impart it with a distinctive historical, cultural, artistic, and political life, which has often been overshadowed or completely ignored. In this course we will undertake knowledge journeys to learn about the unique creations and contributions of Brazil and its diverse peoples. Join us on these journeys of discovery!
Class will be conducted in Spanish, though students may choose to produce their work in Portuguese.

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HIST 110-01 Introduction to European History TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Julia Fein 8 / 25 Materials icon
HIST 135-01 American Violence to 1800: Age of Contact to the American Revolution TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Andrea Robertson 10 / 25 Materials icon
HIST 181-01 Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Ernesto Capello 4 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only, cross-listed with LATI 181-01* The idea of “Latin America” was concocted by French and Brazilian intellectuals in mid-19th-century Paris as a means to establish cultural links with Spanish America. Does such an invented term properly describe the complex region that ranges from the US Southwest to Tierra del Fuego? What are the implications of conjoining the histories of the heterogeneous peoples and societies encompassed in “Latin America”? And just how does the whole process of colonialism and neocolonialism fit into this picture?

These are some of the questions we will address in this course, which presents a roughly chronological survey of Latin American history. Given this broad scope, the course emphasizes three critical moments. The first concerns the great upheaval of the Conquest with an emphasis on the sixteenth-century establishment of a “colonial” order. The second traces the dissolution of this society and the transition to national states with an emphasis on the twin conceits of “science” and “progress.” The third emphasizes the twentieth century with special attention to the rise and fall (and rise) of corporate populism and the role of the United States as patron, interventionist, and foil. As a special project dovetailing with this year’s International Roundtable, the theme of migration to, from, and within “Latin America” will provide an additional through-line to this course.
HIST 194-01 The Birth of Globalization: Silk, Spices, Sugar, Slaves and Silver 1400-1800 MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Ethan Hawkley 10 / 25 Materials icon
What is globalization? Why did it begin? How has it transformed our world? This course explores several answers to these questions by focusing on the early exchange of global commodities. In the course, we will examine how silk, spices, sugar, slaves, silver, and other goods gave birth to the world's first full-circle network of global exchange. A comprehensive overview of this process will require us to approach these commodities from various angles. We will explore the diverse economic origins of global capitalism; we will investigate the relationship between early modern trade and imperial power; and we will also explore the cultural forces that underlay the movement of early global goods. Through an in-depth study of commodities, the course will highlight the importance of prestige, taste, religion, labor, race, identity, etc., to the beginnings of world-wide global interconnectivity.
HIST 194-02 Asian America: A Social History W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 212 Juliana Pegues -1 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with AMST 194-02*
HIST 225-01 Native American History TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 Katrina Phillips 15 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 225-01* The history of American Indians is wonderfully complex, but this history is simultaneously fraught with misconceptions and misinterpretations. Europeans (and, later, white Americans) alternated among fascination, fear, and frustration toward American Indians, while American Indians sought to maintain tribal sovereignty and control over their lands and lifestyles amidst continuing encroachment and settlement. This course examines American Indian history to 1900 by considering the complex and multifaceted history of the nation's indigenous people. By looking at American Indian interactions with Spanish, French, British, and American explorers, settlers, missionaries, militaries, and government officials, this course argues that the history of American Indians is essential to understanding past as well as present issues. Furthermore, this course looks to move beyond the notion that American Indian history is one of inevitable decline by creating a more nuanced understanding of the American Indian experience.
HIST 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Chris Wells 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 234-01* People have always had to contend with the natural world, but only recently have historians begun to explore the changing relationships between people and their environments over time. In this course, we will examine the variety of ways that people in North America have shaped the environment, as well as how they have used, labored in, abused, conserved, protected, rearranged, polluted, cleaned, and thought about it. In addition, we will explore how various characteristics of the natural world have affected the broad patterns of human society, sometimes harming or hindering life and other times enabling rapid development and expansion. By bringing nature into the study of human history, and the human past into the study of nature, we will begin to see the connections and interdependencies between the two that are often overlooked.
HIST 234-02 American Environmental History MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Chris Wells -1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 234-02; first day attendance required*
HIST 244-01 US Since 1945 MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Ryan Edgington 8 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
This course examines the post-1945 United States through the lens of the American counterculture. From the 1950s to the 1970s, the counterculture was far more than a hodgepodge of dropouts and pleasure seekers with no direction in life. Instead the counterculture was a meaningful movement that pursued what one historian has called “right livelihoods.” That process was informed by the major shifts in American society after World War II: suburbanization, mass consumerism, the Cold War, nuclear weapons, and the social change movements that both influenced and consumed the ideology of countercultural authenticity. We will study how the movement was neither utopian nor futile, but instead a process of negotiating postwar America that would subsequently transform American society in the post-1980 years.
HIST 256-01 Transatlantic Slave Trade TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Lynn Hudson 12 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 256-01*
HIST 274-01 The Great Tradition in China before 1840 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam 9 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 274-01*
HIST 277-01 The Rise of Modern Japan TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam 16 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 277-01*
HIST 294-03 Lines in the Sand: The U.S.—Mexico Borderlands MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Ryan Edgington 4 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-01* This course argues that rather than construct the borderlands as a rigid national “frontier” outpost between two nations, we should instead understand it as an interzone of diverse cultures. We will cross many borders over the course of the semester. In order to understand this history we will begin with an examination of the region before the Treaty of Guadalupe—Hidalgo formalized a national border between the United States and Mexico in 1848. One-half of the course will examine the region when it was controlled by the indigenous empires of Comanchería and Apachería, a time when the Spanish and the French, and later Mexico and the United States, struggled to maintain a foothold across the vast desert landscape. We will then follow the borderlands into the twentieth-century when the region was policed and militarized on both sides of the border. Several themes, including captivity and the struggle for empire, gender and community power, racism and racialized notions of national belonging, immigration and border patrols, and violence and cultural negotiation, will frame the course. In addition to these topics, expect music, film, and literature.
HIST 294-04 Migrations of the Gods: Global Religious Movements before 1800 MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Ethan Hawkley 13 / 25 Materials icon
Before industrialization, the rise of secularism, and the era of rapid transit/communications, how did religions spread? What were the social, spiritual, and political functions of the sacred? Why and how did some Gods begin to dominate the world's religious landscape? This course will help students to answer these and other questions by examining the global expansion of various religions before 1800. We will discuss the migrations of various gods and theologies into different parts of the world, and into diverse cultures, through conquests, commerce, miracles, missionaries, and converts.
HIST 294-05 Environmental History of Modern Europe TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Julia Fein 19 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-04* From Chernobyl radiation to London smog, it is easy to tell the environmental history of modern Europe as a history of disasters wrought by capitalist and command economies. It is also possible to tell a counter-history of sometimes surprising environmental protection legislation by states, and environmentalist movements by citizens. This course will contextualize the histories of environmental problems, protests, and protection within a deeper history of the materiality of earthly infrastructures and the diversity of human interactions with these infrastructures in modern Europe. We will be reading about water, germs, and trash within and outside of the built environments of cities; animals as laborers in human economies in war and peace; ways in which rivers, forests, sands, and soils shape human geographies as well as being altered or appropriated – along with oil, gas, and gold – in the interest of human progress; and about changing scientific and spiritual attitudes towards humans’ place in the material world in the last two centuries of European history. Though most of our discussions will be based in “Europe” proper, we will also address Europeans’ interactions with environments in the building and management of empires, with particular emphasis on the former Russian Empire/Soviet Union.
HIST 294-07 Politics of the Great War MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Andrew Latham 0 / 26 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 294-01* The First World War – referred to simply as “The Great War” by contemporaries who had no idea that it would be followed by an even more catastrophic Second World War a mere two decades later – set the stage for global political life in the twentieth century. Indeed, it is impossible to understand the political, social, cultural and economic developments of the period stretching from 1918 until today without grasping the world-historical impact of the conflict unleashed by the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand on June 28, 1914 (one hundred years ago this upcoming summer). In this course, we explore the causes, character and consequences of the First World War. Among the questions we address are:

1. Why did the war break out, and what does this tell us about the causes of war more generally?
2. Who was to blame for the war, and what does this tell us about the morality of war?
3. What was the character of the war? How was it fought? How did it end? And what does this tell us about the relationship between economics, culture, technology and war?
4. How did the war transform the societies that fought it? And what does this tell us about the relationship between war and political development?
5. How did the war transform the international system? How did the First World War set the stage not only for the Second World War, but also the various conflicts in the Middle East (the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Gulf War, etc.) and Europe (the wars in Bosnia and Kosovo)? And what does this tell us about the impact of war on global political life?

Although this course will explore some of the ways in which the war was represented in popular culture (art, film, literature, poetry), those themes are addressed more fully in some Art topics courses, also offered in Fall 2014.

As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable to all students seeking to satisfy an interest in the relationship between The First World War and political life in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.
HIST 394-01 Science, Empire, and Visual Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Ernesto Capello 11 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 394-01* This advanced seminar investigates the ongoing feedback loop between mathematical and scientific measurement, techniques of visualization, and global empires in the early modern and modern world. Beginning with the expansion of optical science in the late medieval era and the development of “linear” perspective in the Renaissance, the ability to measure, describe and visualize distant geographical realms became a crucial ally to the knowledge and administration of empire. The course will focus particularly on the interaction of these forces during imperial and scientific exploration, especially during the 18th and 19th centuries. Case studies will include astronomical, botanical, and geographic studies in the early modern French and Spanish Atlantic empires, the Napoleonic survey of Egypt, the American journeys of Alexander von Humboldt, the Great Surveys of the US West and 19th-century polar expeditions. In each case, we will consider the relationship between measurement, visualization, collection, display, aesthetics, technology and coloniality. Prerequisite: one history course or permission of instructor.
HIST 490-01 Special Advanced Topics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Ryan Edgington 0 / 9 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
HIST 490-02 Special Advanced Topics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Lynn Hudson 1 / 9 Materials icon

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Interdisciplinary Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTD 100-01 Supplementary Writing Workshop W 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 003 Martin Gunderson 0 / 10 Materials icon
*1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-02 Supplementary Writing Workshop F 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 James Dawes 2 / 10 Materials icon
*1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-03 Supplementary Writing Workshop F 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 2 / 10 Materials icon
*1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-04 Supplementary Writing Workshop M 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 227 Brigetta Abel 0 / 10 Materials icon
*1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-05 Supplementary Writing Workshop W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 05 Erik Larson 2 / 10 Materials icon
*1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-06 Supplementary Writing Workshop T 08:00 am-09:00 am OLRI 205 Devavani Chatterjea 2 / 10 Materials icon
*1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-07 Supplementary Writing Workshop R 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Jake Mohan 2 / 10 Materials icon
*1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-08 Supplementary Writing Workshop R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm OLRI 270 Sarah Boyer -1 / 10 Materials icon
*1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-09 Supplementary Writing Workshop T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm Devavani Chatterjea 2 / 10 Materials icon
*To meet in Olin Rice 277. 1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-10 Supplementary Writing Workshop T 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Brigetta Abel 1 / 10 Materials icon
*1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-11 Supplementary Writing Workshop M 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 003 Ernesto Capello 2 / 10 Materials icon
*1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-12 Supplementary Writing Workshop M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Ernesto Capello 1 / 10 Materials icon
*1 credit. Limited to First Year students, by invitation only. S/N grading.*
INTD 100-13 Supplementary Writing Workshop T 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Rebecca Graham 0 / 10 Materials icon
INTD 191-01 Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Pluralism and Unity TBA TBA Kendrick Brown 13 / 30 Materials icon
*1 credit. This course is open only to First Year students admitted to the Pluralism and Unity Program* What does multiculturalism mean? What is social justice? Why do identities matter? These questions are important not just during one's time at Macalester, but also in the larger community of which we are all a part. An extension of the Pluralism and Unity program open to first-year students, this course will deepen student's understanding of how social identity works for them personally, provide perspective on effectively interacting across cultural differences, and encourage students to reflect on their position within community structures and institutions.
INTD 401-01 Urban Studies Colloquium W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 204 Laura Smith 6 / 15 Materials icon
*2 credits*
INTD 421-01 Human Rights and Humanitarianism Colloquium W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm Wendy Weber 7 / 16 Materials icon
*2 credits; to meet in Carnegie 411*

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTL 110-01 Introduction to Intl Studies: Globalization - Homogeneity and Heterogeneity TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Ahmed Samatar 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* Globalization is upon us, resulting in unprecedented cultural interpenetrations and civilizational encounters. Most of what animates this condition is old. However, the contemporary velocity, reach, and mutations of these forces suggest a new “world time,” full of contradictions, perils, and promises. This course introduces students to globalization by posing the following questions: What is globalization, and how does one study it? What are the paramount ecological, cultural, economic, and political factors that shaped and propel it? What are the consequences, and how do we respond?
INTL 111-01 Intro to International Studies: Literature and Global Culture MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 David Moore 4 / 20 Materials icon
*Open only to First Year students and rising sophomores*
INTL 111-02 Intro to International Studies: Literature and Global Culture MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 David Moore 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Open only to First Year students and rising sophomores*
INTL 113-01 Intro to International Studies: Identities, Interests, and Community MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 2 / 25 Materials icon
*Open only to First Year students and rising sophomores*
INTL 202-01 Global Media Industries TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 Zeynep Gursel 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MCST 202-01*
INTL 245-01 Intro to Intl Human Rights TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 James von Geldern 2 / 25 Materials icon
INTL 285-01 Ethnicity and Nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with Political Science 285-01*
INTL 294-01 Photography: Histories and Practices of an International Medium TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel 4 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MCST 294-01; first day attendance required*
INTL 294-02 Terrorism and Art: The Spectacle of Destruction MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 202 Julia Chadaga -2 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RUSS 294-01*
INTL 301-01 Power and Development in Africa TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN Ahmed Samatar 9 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 333-01; course to meet in Carnegie 411*
INTL 320-01 Global Political Economy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 David Blaney 4 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 320-01*
INTL 333-01 Economics of Global Food Problems TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Amy Damon 14 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ECON 333-01 and ENVI 333-01*
INTL 362-01 Culture and Globalization W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 362-01*
INTL 367-01 Postcolonial Theory MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 105 David Moore 6 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01*
INTL 394-01 Cultures of Neoliberalism W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Adamson, Gursel 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MCST 394-01; first day attendance required* Neoliberal theory posits the relative autonomy of the economic sphere from both culture and politics. Rejecting this assumption, the course will give students the ability to understand the interconnection of economic, political and cultural practices as well as the ways that economic theories are shaped by cultural assumptions about what constitutes a person, a life, a society, etc. We will read some of the foundational texts from the neoliberal school of economic thought (Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman) alongside more contemporary reflections on the culture and politics of neoliberalism from the fields of Anthropology, Geography, Philosophy, Cultural Studies, and Critical Race Studies. Additionally, we will look at both the global institutions that craft and enforce economic policies as well as their impacts in multiple international contexts. This course will emphasize interdisciplinarity and original research. Finally, in addition to key texts we will examine recent documentaries that attempt to render economic structures visible.
INTL 477-01 Comparative Environment and Development Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 William Moseley 7 / 15 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and GEOG 488-01; first day attendance required; this is a Geography Senior seminar*
INTL 487-01 Senior Seminar: Rule of Law and the Chaos of Globalization TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN James von Geldern -3 / 12 Materials icon
*Course to meet in Carnegie 411*

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
JAPA 101-01 First Year Japanese I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 110 Arthur Mitchell 0 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 101-02 First Year Japanese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 110 Arthur Mitchell 1 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 101-L1 First Year Japanese I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Izumi Koyama -1 / 14 Materials icon
JAPA 101-L2 First Year Japanese I Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm NEILL 110 Izumi Koyama 1 / 12 Materials icon
JAPA 101-L3 First Year Japanese I Lab M 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 404 Izumi Koyama 3 / 12 Materials icon
JAPA 150-01 Language and Gender in Japanese Society TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 110 Satoko Suzuki 1 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ASIA 150-01, LING 150-01 and WGSS 150-01*
Japanese is considered to be a gendered language in the sense that certain linguistic forms are associated with gender. Male characters in Japanese animation often use boku or ore to refer to themselves, while female characters often use watashi or atashi. When translated into Japanese, Hermione Granger (a female character in Harry Potter series) ends sentences with soft-sounding forms, while Harry Potter and his best friend Ron use more assertive forms. Do these fictional representations reflect reality? How did gendered language come about? Are Japanese women and men always expected to sound feminine/masculine? How do people who do not align their identity with femininity or masculinity deal with gendered forms? These are some of the questions discussed in this course. Students will have opportunities to learn about historical background of gendered language and find out about current discourse on language and gender. No Japanese language ability is required.
JAPA 203-01 Second Year Japanese I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 110 Ritsuko Narita 5 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 203-02 Second Year Japanese I MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 110 Ritsuko Narita 5 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 203-L2 Second Year Japanese I Lab F 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 404 Izumi Koyama 1 / 12 Materials icon
JAPA 203-L3 Second Year Japanese I Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 112 Izumi Koyama 4 / 12 Materials icon
JAPA 254-01 Japanese Film and Animation: From the Salaryman to the Shojo MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 204 Arthur Mitchell 9 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 294-01 Dialects, Multilingualism and the Politics of Speaking Japanese TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 110 Satoko Suzuki 12 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-02 and LING 294-01* This course will examine linguistic diversity in Japan as well as issues of identity and politics involved in the act of speaking Japanese in Japan and other parts of the world. Students will be engaged with questions such as the following: How do dialects become revitalized? How does the media portray dialect speakers? Does the Japanese government promote multilingualism? How do multilingual/multicultural individuals deal with their identities? How is Japanese taught to heritage learners in Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Peru, and the United States? What does it mean to speak Japanese as a non-native speaker? The course will fulfill the Internationalism General Education Requirement as well as requirements for Asian Studies, Japanese, and Linguistics majors. No Japanese language ability is required.
JAPA 305-01 Third Year Japanese I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 110 Ritsuko Narita 9 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 305-L1 Third Year Japanese I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 112 Izumi Koyama 4 / 10 Materials icon
JAPA 305-L2 Third Year Japanese I Lab M 08:00 pm-09:00 pm NEILL 110 Izumi Koyama 5 / 10 Materials icon
JAPA 407-01 Fourth Year Japanese I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 214 Miaki Habuka 2 / 15 Materials icon

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LATI 141-01 Latin America Through Women's Eyes TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 212 Paul Dosh 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 141-01 and WGSS 141-01; S/D/NC with Written evaluation only*
LATI 181-01 Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Ernesto Capello 4 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with HIST 181-01* The idea of “Latin America” was concocted by French and Brazilian intellectuals in mid-19th-century Paris as a means to establish cultural links with Spanish America. Does such an invented term properly describe the complex region that ranges from the US Southwest to Tierra del Fuego? What are the implications of conjoining the histories of the heterogeneous peoples and societies encompassed in “Latin America”? And just how does the whole process of colonialism and neocolonialism fit into this picture?

These are some of the questions we will address in this course, which presents a roughly chronological survey of Latin American history. Given this broad scope, the course emphasizes three critical moments. The first concerns the great upheaval of the Conquest with an emphasis on the sixteenth-century establishment of a “colonial” order. The second traces the dissolution of this society and the transition to national states with an emphasis on the twin conceits of “science” and “progress.” The third emphasizes the twentieth century with special attention to the rise and fall (and rise) of corporate populism and the role of the United States as patron, interventionist, and foil. As a special project dovetailing with this year’s International Roundtable, the theme of migration to, from, and within “Latin America” will provide an additional through-line to this course.
LATI 245-01 Latin American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 212 Paul Dosh -2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 245-01; S/D/NC with Written evaluation only*
LATI 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Antonio Dorca 2 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 213 Alicia Munoz 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 394-01 Science, Empire, and Visual Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Ernesto Capello 11 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-01*
LATI 446-01 Constructions of a Female Killer MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Alicia Munoz 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 446-01 and WGSS 346-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 488-01 Senior Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 011 Ernesto Capello 5 / 10 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 216 Suzanne vanDuym 5 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
LING 104-01 The Sounds of Language TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 216 Sharon Gerlach 0 / 15 Materials icon
LING 150-01 Language and Gender in Japanese Society TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 110 Satoko Suzuki 1 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ASIA 150-01, JAPA 150-01 and, WGSS 150-01*
Japanese is considered to be a gendered language in the sense that certain linguistic forms are associated with gender. Male characters in Japanese animation often use boku or ore to refer to themselves, while female characters often use watashi or atashi. When translated into Japanese, Hermione Granger (a female character in Harry Potter series) ends sentences with soft-sounding forms, while Harry Potter and his best friend Ron use more assertive forms. Do these fictional representations reflect reality? How did gendered language come about? Are Japanese women and men always expected to sound feminine/masculine? How do people who do not align their identity with femininity or masculinity deal with gendered forms? These are some of the questions discussed in this course. Students will have opportunities to learn about historical background of gendered language and find out about current discourse on language and gender. No Japanese language ability is required.
LING 202-01 Origins/Evolution of Language MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 111 John Haiman 0 / 10 Materials icon
LING 205-01 Phonology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 228 Marianne Milligan -1 / 10 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
LING 206-01 Endangered/Minority Languages TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 217 Marianne Milligan 1 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 206-01; total class limit is set for 15 instructor is looking for a mix of 5 seats Jr/Sr and 10 seats for Soph/FY*
LING 280-01 Topics in Linguistic Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 212 Marianne Milligan 15 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 280-01; no prerequisites*
LING 294-01 Dialects, Multilingualism and the Politics of Speaking Japanese TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 110 Satoko Suzuki 12 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-02 and JAPA 294-01*
LING 300-01 Linguistic Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 102 John Haiman 1 / 10 Materials icon
LING 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 215 Cynthia Kauffeld 9 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 309-01; first day attendance*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MATH 116-01 Math and Society: Politics and Mathematics of Elections MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Dolan, Saxe 0 / 32 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with POLI 194-01* It’s fall 2014 and so it’s time for midterm elections! Will the Republicans take control of the US Senate? How many governorships and state legislatures will change party hands?
How do elections work in the U.S. and in other democracies? What is meant by a ‘representative’ democracy? How is it decided how many Congressional representatives each state has? What are the costs and benefits of political participation?

We will focus on the various ways that mathematics and political science interact. Topics covered will include the role of elections and representative government in the United States, comparison of electoral systems used around the world, the apportionment problem, redistricting and gerrymandering, weighted voting systems and voting power, the costs and benefits associated with political participation, and how to predict electoral outcomes.

Work during the semester will include some ‘math’ problems (associated, for example, with weighted voting); student predictions on the outcome of numerous competitive congressional and gubernatorial elections across the country; and several short written assignments.

This First Year Seminar will be taught jointly by Julie Dolan (Professor of Political Science) and Karen Saxe (Professor of Mathematics). Important facts about the course:
• It has no prerequisites, either in math or in political science.
• It satisfies either the Social Science (if you sign up for POLI 194) OR the Natural Science/Math (if you sign up for MATH 116) distribution requirement. But, it is the same course no matter which way you sign up!
MATH 135-01 Applied Multivariable Calculus I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Lori Ziegelmeier 6 / 28 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 135-02 Applied Multivariable Calculus I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Lori Ziegelmeier -1 / 28 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 135-03 Applied Multivariable Calculus I TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Chad Higdon-Topaz 0 / 28 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 135-04 Applied Multivariable Calculus I TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Chad Higdon-Topaz 1 / 28 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud 13 / 28 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 136-02 Discrete Mathematics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud 5 / 28 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 137-01 Applied Multivariable Calculus II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 226 Thomas Halverson -4 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 137-02 Applied Multivariable Calculus II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Karen Saxe 0 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 137-03 Applied Multivariable Calculus II TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Daniel Flath 15 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 226 David Ehren -2 / 28 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Vittorio Addona -7 / 28 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-03 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 241 Vittorio Addona -10 / 28 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-04 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 401 David Ehren 2 / 28 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-05 Intro Stats Modeling: sixfiveone.org: A Twin Cities Statistics Collaborative TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Alicia Johnson 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* Websites such as fivethirtyeight.com have highlighted the power of statistical modeling at the national level. As sixfiveone.org we will bring this local, examining a broad range of issues impacting the surrounding Twin Cities community. In doing so, we will provide a statistical consulting service for partnering organizations, from the Frogtown neighborhood to the West Side. Course activities will include community site visits and material will cover topics in multivariate statistical modeling including hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, and data visualization. No previous statistics experience necessary.
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 David Shuman 0 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Daniel Flath 2 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*

For Fall 2014 this course will be offered as Multivariable Calculus, with the following description:
Differentiation and integration of functions of two and three variables. Applications of these, including optimization techniques. Also includes introduction to vector calculus, with treatment of vector fields, line and surface integrals, and Green’s Theorem. (4 credits)

For Spring 2015 this course will be offered as Applied Multivariable Calculus III, with the following description:
This course focuses on calculus useful for the mathematical and physical sciences. Topics include: scalar and vector-valued functions and derivatives; parameterization and integration over regions, curves, and surfaces; the divergence theorem; and Taylor series. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Applications drawn from the natural sciences, probability, and other areas of mathematics. (4 credits)
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Daniel Flath 0 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*

For Fall 2014 this course will be offered as Multivariable Calculus, with the following description:
Differentiation and integration of functions of two and three variables. Applications of these, including optimization techniques. Also includes introduction to vector calculus, with treatment of vector fields, line and surface integrals, and Green’s Theorem. (4 credits)

For Spring 2015 this course will be offered as Applied Multivariable Calculus III, with the following description:
This course focuses on calculus useful for the mathematical and physical sciences. Topics include: scalar and vector-valued functions and derivatives; parameterization and integration over regions, curves, and surfaces; the divergence theorem; and Taylor series. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Applications drawn from the natural sciences, probability, and other areas of mathematics. Every semester. (4 credits)
MATH 254-01 Probability and Mathematical Statistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 101 Alicia Johnson -3 / 24 Materials icon
*Not available to students who've previously taken MATH 354 (Probability)*
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 258 Chad Higdon-Topaz -8 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 353-01 Survival Analysis MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 245 Vittorio Addona -2 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Not available to students who've previously taken MATH 353 (Modern Statistics) as "Survival Analysis"; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 373-01 Number Theory TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud 5 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
MATH 377-01 Real Analysis TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 150 Elizabeth Strouse 5 / 24 Materials icon
MATH 437-01 Continuous Applied Mathematics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 245 David Shuman 6 / 20 Materials icon
MATH 471-01 Topics in Topology/Geometry MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 245 Lori Ziegelmeier 10 / 20 Materials icon

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MCST 110-01 Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 402 Leola Johnson 4 / 16 Materials icon
MCST 114-01 News Reporting and Writing M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 214 Howard Sinker 8 / 21 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
MCST 126-01 Local News Media Institutions TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 250 Michael Griffin 1 / 28 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Suitable for first year students* n this course students analyze the social, cultural, economic, political, and regulatory factors shaping the nature of U.S. communications media, and then investigate how this affects local media organizations and their role in recognizing, serving and facilitating (or not) local populations, communities, interaction, identity, and civic engagement. Considering the history and practices of American journalism, and current shifts in media technology and economics, the class examines the degree to which media function to provide effective access to news and information, foster diversity of content, encourage civic engagement, and serve the interest of citizens and diverse communities in a democratic society. Individual student projects for the course begin by identifying particular geographic, ethnic, or cultural neighborhoods and communities in the Mpls.-St. Paul metropolitan area, and proceed to explore the degree to which these communities are recognized, defined or served by existing media institutions and journalism practice. Students explore various attempts to revitalize local communication, news delivery and civic discourse through experiments in community media, citizen journalism, community-based news aggregation, media arts, community service and other media innovations and reforms across neighborhood, ethnic, immigrant, gender, sexuality, and other public issues and community participation. No prerequisites.
MCST 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 401 Morgan Adamson 3 / 21 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
MCST 194-01 Screens TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 402 John Kim 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* We spend our lives staring at the screens of computers, phones, movies and televisions. And the amount of time we spend before them is anything but insignificant. According to a recent study by the Kaiser Family Foundation, 8-18 year-olds devote an average of 7 hours and 38 minutes using entertainment media across a typical day (more than 53 hours a week)! Because they spend so much of that time "media multitasking" (using more than one medium at a time), they actually manage to pack a total of 10 hours and 45 minutes worth of media content into those 7½ hours.

The screen is one of the most important technological innovations of recent memory, for it has such a wide range of influences on our experience of the everyday. From social networking to television news, email and SMS to Hollywood movies, our knowledge of the world is largely mediated by screens. Screens substitute real world experience for a world created in a display of colored lights and accompanying sounds. Given this dependence, what influence do they have on our perception of the world, of others, of ourselves, of news, of reality? Do screens, in fact, contribute to what Anne Friedberg has called a "dematerializing of reality"? Should we be worried about their pervasiveness?

In this First Year Course, we will ask these and related questions. We will begin to develop our own answers to them by reading and writing about, analyzing and critiquing various aspects of the media. This course is designed for students who have a strong interest in critical and philosophical type analysis of society and will introduce you to the field of Media Studies in order to help you come to an understanding of the importance of screens in mediating our experience of and interactions with the world.

MCST 202-01 Global Media Industries TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 Zeynep Gursel 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 202-01*
MCST 294-01 Photography: Histories and Practices of an International Medium TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel 4 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-01; first day attendance required*
MCST 294-02 Art and Technology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM 102 Lauren DeLand 12 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ART 294-02*
MCST 334-01 Cultural Studies and the Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 402 Leola Johnson 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 334-01*
MCST 337-01 Dead White Men MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GERM 337-01, ENGL 394-03, and PHIL 294-03* Today we often hear people dismiss the Western (mostly European) philosophical tradition as a bunch of “dead white men.” In other words, the argument goes, these thinkers harbored such passe notions as universal truths, a universal subject, and an individual in total control of itself and endowed with a pure reason unadulterated by rhetoric, imagination, fiction, and politics. Why should we bother with “dead white men” now that we understand that truth depends on historical context, that the self is decentered by the unconscious, that identity is constituted by gender, race, class, and other cultural factors, that truth is linked to power, and that ideology is omnipresent? Unfortunately, this all-too-familiar attitude overlooks its own faulty presupposition: it presumes a clear-cut break between philosophical tradition and contemporary thought, as if contemporary thought had no tradition out of which it emerged and could, therefore, merely discard what preceded it. Hence the popularity of phrases like “philosophy is dead.” It is all the more ironic to see this attitude prevail in the West at the very moment that multiculturalism has become our cause celebre : all cultural traditions are supposed to be “respected,” except the West’s own tradition. (Perhaps as a new way for the West to reinstate surreptitiously its superiority as the sole culture with no tradition?) This course pursues a close reading of texts by various “dead white men” as the unconscious (i.e., repressed and, for that matter, all the more powerful) undercurrent of contemporary thought. Assigned texts will include: Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Pascal, Spinoza, Kant, Hegel, Marx, as well as texts by twentieth-century thinkers that stress the dependence of contemporary thought on philosophy. No pre-knowledge required; all readings in English. With different reading lists this course may be taken more than once for credit . Alternate years. (4 credits)
MCST 394-01 Cultures of Neoliberalism W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Adamson, Gursel 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 394-01; first day attendance required*
MCST 488-01 Adv Topics in New Media M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 217 John Kim 9 / 12 Materials icon

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MUSI 110-01 Music Appreciation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 113 Mark Mandarano 4 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
MUSI 113-01 Theory I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 3 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
MUSI 113-L1 Theory I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 6 / 30 Materials icon
MUSI 155-01 Music and Freedom MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mazullo 0 / 11 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only* The concept of freedom both lies at the heart of human rights discourse and provides the spark that ignites any number of musical movements. Intended for students with strong interests in the intersection between the performing arts and the humanities, this course serves as an introduction both to the concept of freedom as it has developed in Western societies since the late eighteenth century and to the history of music in the cultures that have fostered such ideals. It intends to introduce students to the study of music (and, by association, the arts in general) from social, cultural, and critical perspectives, using the framework of freedom as a common theme. It also aims to contextualize the discourse of human rights within the history of arts and ideas, providing students with a sense of the term's changing meanings and emphases over time and across space. We will explore traditions in both Western art music (also known as "classical music") and American popular (recorded) music in a search for the ways in which music has served social-political ideologies -- overtly through the aims of its composers and performers, and unintentionally through the conditions of its reception. Historical readings on the concept of freedom from a variety of disciplinary perspectives (history, philosophy, political science, critical theory) will introduce students to several of the most influential thinkers on the subject and the central concerns and questions that animate the discourse on freedom. No prior background in music is required for the course, although it is assumed that students will have a true interest not only in popular music of the twentieth century but also other traditions and genres, such as opera and symphonic music. "Freedom" signifies a number of ideals, which operate in real-political and abstract-aesthetic realms. Music can represent, convey, and "mean" freedom in infinite ways, and it is the intention of this course to introduce students to this diversity.
MUSI 155-02 Music and Freedom MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mazullo 1 / 16 Materials icon
MUSI 194-01 Cover Songs MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only* This course will examine cover versions of previously recorded songs and how the intersection of gender, sexuality, race, class, and genre through changing socio-historical and cultural contexts shape different meanings listeners ascribe to the songs. We will explore how artists covering other people’s songs can emulate, pay homage to, comment upon, subvert meaning, and create parodies of previously recorded works. We will examine critically the concept of authenticity and its role in music criticism. Musical analysis and transcription will aid the understanding of musical processes at play in various cover songs. Assignments will involve reading, listening, and writing on a daily basis, and the class meetings will emphasize discussion. As this course contributes to the College’s writing program, several class periods will be devoted to research skills and the writing process, and accordingly you will be required to write a substantial argumentative paper. The class will culminate in a collaborative final project in which students will create and record their own cover songs. Some experience with music (as a performer or avid enthusiast) is ideal. Some readings will require a basic knowledge of Western music notation.
MUSI 213-01 Theory III, Form and Analysis MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 228 Randall Bauer 13 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 294-01 World Music Theory and Analysis TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Chuen-Fung Wong 15 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
MUSI 342-01 Medieval to Mozart MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 219 Elissa Harbert 17 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
MUSI 361-01 Composition MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 228 Randall Bauer 7 / 12 Materials icon
MUSI 394-01 The Art and Practice of Improvisation: Jazz Theory Workshop MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 219 Randall Bauer 3 / 16 Materials icon
This course will investigate theoretical parameters of jazz through a synergy of written exercises, in-class playing, and composition; it is designed to develop and strengthen skills related to jazz performance. We will also survey scholarly literature on aspects of improvisation with respect to cognition, behavioral science, anthropology, and improvisation's manifestation throughout the arts. Performance and composition topics to include chord voicings and nomenclature, ear training, scales and modes, stylistic development, transcription, harmonic progression and substitutions, form, arranging. Genres include mainstream, bop/hard bop, and modal jazz (post-60s). Students must read music and play an instrument (not necessarily a traditional jazz instrument). Some theory background helpful. Vocalists welcome; secondary instrumental experience desirable (e.g. piano).
MUSI 72-01 African Music Ensemble TR 06:30 pm-08:00 pm MUSIC 121 Sowah Mensah 26 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required. Additional required meeting time on Mondays and Wednesdays from 5:00-7:00pm in Music 116.*
MUSI 74-01 Macalester Concert Choir MWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie 15 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 76-01 Highland Camerata T 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie -3 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required. Additional required meeting time on Thursdays from 6:30-7:30pm in Music 113 (Hewitt Hall).*
MUSI 78-01 Asian Music Ensemble F 04:45 pm-05:45 pm MUSIC 113 Chuen-Fung Wong 39 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 80-01 Mac Jazz Band MW 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Joan Griffith 30 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 82-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 113 Peter Hennig 23 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 84-01 Pipe Band W 06:30 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 116 Michael Breidenbach 4 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 86-01 Chamber Ensemble TBA TBA Mark Mandarano 39 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 88-01 Orchestra TR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Mark Mandarano -1 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 90-01 Mac Early Music Ensemble F 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Clea Galhano 45 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required. There may be some occasional Sunday afternoon rehearsals.*
MUSI 92-01 Wind Ensemble M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MUSIC 116 Mark Mandarano 23 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 94-01 Private Studio Instruction TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 7 / 10 Materials icon
Studio instruction may be taken by any Macalester student in voice, piano, harpsichord, organ, guitar, recorder, a variety of other standard orchestral instruments, as well as some non-Western instruments. Please refer to the Music Department web page for specific lesson and fee arrangements. Registration must be done in person (in Office 201 of the Music Building) at the beginning of the semester. Please contact Rachel Hest, Department Coordinator (rhest@macalester.edu), for more information.
MUSI 94-02 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-03 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl 4 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-05 Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-06 Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich 7 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-09 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-0H Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-10 Piano TBA TBA Laura Nichols 7 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-11 Voice TBA TBA William Reed 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-12 Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-16 Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-17 Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson 7 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-1H Trombone TBA TBA Richard Gaynor 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-23 Violin TBA TBA James Garlick 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-24 Viola TBA TBA Rebecca Albers 10 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-26 Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-29 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-36 Jazz Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-37 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-3M Percussion TBA TBA David Schmalenberger 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-41 Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-42 African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 7 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-43 Private Studio Instruction TBA TBA David Schmalenberger 7 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-44 Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-4M Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-6M African Percussion TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-7M Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-7W Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-CH Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-CI Piano TBA TBA Laura Nichols 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-CM Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-CV Pipa TBA TBA Hong Gao 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-CW Viola TBA TBA Rebecca Albers 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-H Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-HH Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-HI Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-HY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-M Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-M1 Oboe TBA TBA Julie Williams 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-M2 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-M7 Bassoon TBA TBA Carole Smith 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-M9 Jazz Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-MD Piano TBA TBA Mark Mazullo 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-ME Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 6 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 3 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-MJ Voice TBA TBA William Reed 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-ML African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-MO Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 7 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-MU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 7 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-MV Violin TBA TBA James Garlick 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-MW Viola TBA TBA Rebecca Albers 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-MX Jazz Bass TBA TBA Adam Linz 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-W8 Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen 10 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-WE Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-WH Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 8 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-WO Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-WU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-WV Violin TBA TBA James Garlick 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-WX Jazz Bass TBA TBA Adam Linz 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 94-WZ Bass TBA TBA Joan Griffith 9 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 96-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 0 / 10 Materials icon
MUSI 96-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl 2 / 10 Materials icon

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Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
NEUR 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 113 Eric Wiertelak -4 / 50 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 180-01*
NEUR 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund -2 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-01; permission of the instructor required for
ACTC students*
NEUR 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Darcy Burgund -1 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 244-L1*
NEUR 246-01 Exploring Sensation/Perception MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Julia Manor 11 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 246-01*
NEUR 246-L1 Explor Sensation/Percept Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Julia Manor 11 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 246-L1*
NEUR 300-01 Directed Research MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 371 Manor, Wiertelak 9 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
NEUR 313-01 Philosophy of Mind TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Joy Laine 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 213-01*
NEUR 313-02 Philosophy of Mind M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Joy Laine -10 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 213-02*
NEUR 484-01 Intro Artificial Intelligence MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Susan Fox -2 / 30 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with COMP 484-01; ACTC students may register on September 2 with permission of the instructor*
NEUR 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak 2 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*2 credit course; S/NC grading only*

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHIL 100-01 Introduction to Philosophy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Janet Folina 2 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PHIL 100-02 Introduction to Philosophy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 113 Janet Folina 4 / 20 Materials icon
PHIL 110-01 Critical Thinking MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Diane Michelfelder 2 / 25 Materials icon
PHIL 110-02 Critical Thinking MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Diane Michelfelder -2 / 25 Materials icon
PHIL 121-01 Ethics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 William Wilcox 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* Ethics addresses three sorts of questions. The first sort asks about the status of moral judgments, e.g. judgments about right and wrong, or good and bad. Is it possible for moral judgments to be true? Can they be objective? Can they be universal? The second branch of ethics, normative moral theory, aims to discover and develop the most general and basic elements of moral thought. For example, two quite different approaches to normative moral theory differ over the old issue about ends justifying means. Consequentialism maintains the right thing to do is whatever will bring about the best consequences. In other words, the ends justify the means. Kantian ethical theory denies this, maintaining that morality is not just about trying to bring about the best consequences. The final area of ethics, practical or applied ethics, is less abstract than the other two, focusing on particular practices or moral problems and trying to figure out what moral judgments it is reasonable to make about those practices or problems. Examples would include debates about abortion, euthanasia, and just wars. All three areas of ethics will be considered during the semester, but much of our focus, especially in the second half of the semester, will be on distinctive political values such as justice and equality.
PHIL 200-01 Ancient and Medieval Philosophies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 226 Geoffrey Gorham -6 / 26 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CLAS 200-01* A study of the major philosophies of ancient Greece, Rome and the medieval period, including the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoics, Augustine, Avicenna (Ibn Sina) and Aquinas. Major topics include: the origin and structure of the universe; reality vs. appearance; being and becoming; time, space and matter; happiness and the good life; love, sex and friendship; death; freedom and fatalism; the ideal state; the relation between reason and faith; the nature and existence of God; the relation between church and state.
PHIL 213-01 Philosophy of Mind TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Joy Laine 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 313-01*
PHIL 213-02 Philosophy of Mind M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Joy Laine -10 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 313-02*
PHIL 222-01 Philosophy of Human Rights TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Martin Gunderson 5 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PHIL 224-01 Philosophy of Law TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 William Wilcox 4 / 18 Materials icon
PHIL 225-01 Ethics and the Internet MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Diane Michelfelder 1 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with COMP 154-01* In this course, we will spend time with ethical questions connected with the Internet as we know it today: an online environment where content is generated and shared through user activities such as blogging, media sharing, social networking, tagging, tweeting, virtual world gaming, wiki developing, and the like.

The course will roughly be divided into two parts. In the first half, we will take a close look at ethical issues predating the Internet but which, because of its development, have taken on new dimensions. We will consider how the Internet opens up new forms of censorship (think the censorship of social networking services themselves); new forms of surveillance (think dataveillance), and new issues related to privacy (think the controversial “right to be forgotten”). We will also look at the moral values undergirding, and the contentious debates surrounding, current copyright law in the US. In the second half of the course, we will consider some ethical questions connected to the integration of the Internet into devices other than the personal computer and mobile phone, developments that open up the prospect of a world of “ubiquitous computing” or integrated networked systems. What are some of the impacts of such integration on our everyday ethical relations with others and on the overall quality of our lives? How might being networked affect the meaning of being human?

This course is also designed to give you a broad exposure into different ways of “doing philosophy,” from blogging, podcasting, and writing essays for public media to more traditional forms of expressions such as journal articles and books. On occasion we will join forces with another First Year Course--Information Policy, Politics, and Law--taught by Political Science professor Patrick Schmidt. You’ll have many opportunities to write, including a major paper in which you imagine yourself as a philosophical consultant providing ethical perspectives and advice to designers interested in developing a new “smart” device or social media platform.
PHIL 294-01 Of a Beautiful Mind: Literature and Philosophy at Crossroads W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 9 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with FREN 416-01*
PHIL 294-02 Medieval Political Thought MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Andrew Latham 1 / 26 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-02 and POLI 266-01* Interested in the roots of contemporary political life (including issues such as state sovereignty, separation of church and state, constitutionalism, just war, property rights, “the people”, nationalism, democracy, rule-of-law, and human rights)? Then this course is for you. Through a careful examination of the political thought of Latin Christendom (Western Europe) during the later Middle Ages (c. 1050-c. 1550) we explore the deep roots of the contemporary world order, demonstrating the ways in which medieval thinkers such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of Salisbury, John of Paris, Giles of Rome, Marsilius of Padua, Dante, Las Casas, ibn Sina, Moshe ben Maimon, and ibn Rushd “invented” many of the ideas that we – presumptuously and erroneously – have come to associate with the modern era. As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields (such as Philosophy or Classics) who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in political theory/philosophy or the medieval roots of contemporary political life. This course fulfills the Political Science Department’s Theory Requirement.
PHIL 294-03 Dead White Men MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-01, GERM 337-01 and MCST 337-01; taught in English* The shift away from feudal theocracy (when divinity grounded truth and political authority) to secular capitalist modernity has entailed unforeseen re-conceptualizations of both time and of the distinction between truth and fiction—the latter approaching extinction, as truth is increasingly perceived as a culturally arbitrary (hence fictional) construct. To examine these modern mutations of the central categories of time and truth-fiction, the course will pursue two parallel itineraries. On the one hand, the two competing modes of the secularization of time, as (a) human history progressing toward a certain telos (end or aim), and (b) as a machinic time within which inter-relations within an autonomous structure (one not controlled by humans) determine its participants. And, on the other hand, the replacement of faith with modern philosophy, ideology, and biopolitics. No prerequisites.
PHIL 489-01 Senior Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Martin Gunderson 11 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson 5 / 25 Materials icon
PE 04-01 Karate I MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 16 / 25 Materials icon
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 7 / 25 Materials icon
PE 06-02 Yoga I TR 10:00 am-11:10 am LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin 12 / 25 Materials icon
PE 06-03 Yoga I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 6 / 25 Materials icon
PE 06-04 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Emily Stuber -1 / 25 Materials icon
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Vanessa Seljeskog 15 / 30 Materials icon
PE 09-01 Conditioning TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 15 / 25 Materials icon
PE 10-01 Racquetball I MW 01:10 pm-02:10 pm LEOCTR R-COURTS Matthew Parrington 2 / 8 Materials icon
PE 14-01 Karate II MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 23 / 25 Materials icon
PE 18-01 Pilates MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard 4 / 25 Materials icon
PE 19-01 Conditioning II TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 25 / 25 Materials icon
PE 20-01 Weight Training MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 14 / 25 Materials icon
PE 26-01 Tai Chi Chuan MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Phyllis Calph 9 / 25 Materials icon
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Kristine Spangard 13 / 25 Materials icon
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance T 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson 2 / 25 Materials icon
PE 40-01 Self Defense TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 5 / 25 Materials icon
PE 51-01 Aqua Aerobics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth 25 / 25 Materials icon
PE 61-01 Water Polo MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth 13 / 25 Materials icon

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 28 / 63 Materials icon
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim -1 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* This course is specifically designed for the liberal arts student who desires an essentially non-mathematical, yet wholly faithful, acquaintance with the fundamental concepts of contemporary physics. Topics include special relativity, curved space-time and black holes, the Big Bang universe, light, quantum theory, and elementary particles. These are presented so as to demonstrate the power of “pure thought” and scientific creativity at its best. The underlying assumption of the course is that physics approached as a way of thinking can be vitally relevant and challenging to students of all intellectual persuasions.
PHYS 112-01 Cosmos: Perspectives and Reflections M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 33 / 63 Materials icon
*2 credit course*
PHYS 113-01 Modern Astronomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 150 John Cannon 21 / 63 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
The popular survey course "Modern Astronomy" will be offered as a two-semester sequence for the first time in the 2014-2015 academic year (PHYS 113 in the fall semester and PHYS 194 in the spring semester). These courses will cover various topics of interest in astronomy, including:

- Planets (both within the Solar System and the exploding field of extrasolar planets)
- The birth, life, and death of stars
- Exotic remnant objects (e.g., white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes)
- Galaxies (including our own Milky Way and external systems)
- Cosmology and the fate of the universe
- The "unseen 95%": dark matter and dark energy
- Astrobiology and the question of life in the universe

The dramatic change between stellar and galactic physical scales will mark the boundary between the material in the two courses.

These courses are ideal for students who are curious about the nature of the universe and their place within it. Enrollment in the second semester course (PHYS 194) requires either successful completion of PHYS 113 in the previous semester or approval of the instructor. Contact Professor John M. Cannon (jcannon@mac) with questions.
PHYS 120-01 Astronomical Techniques M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 404 John Cannon 9 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*2 credit course*
PHYS 130-01 Science of Renewable Energy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 350 James Doyle 2 / 55 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 130-01*
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 Sean Bartz 38 / 63 Materials icon
PHYS 226-02 Principles of Physics I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 Sean Bartz 46 / 63 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab M 02:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 5 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 7 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 226-L3 Principles of Physics I Lab T 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 8 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 226-L4 Principles of Physics I Lab T 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 10 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 John Cannon 38 / 50 Materials icon
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab R 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 12 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab R 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 12 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 331-01 Modern Physics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 150 Sean Bartz 6 / 24 Materials icon
PHYS 331-L1 Modern Physics Lab M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 154 James Doyle 3 / 12 Materials icon
PHYS 331-L2 Modern Physics Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Doyle 4 / 12 Materials icon
PHYS 394-01 Biophysics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 404 James Doyle 5 / 16 Materials icon
*Prerequisite: Physics 227 or permission of instructor.* In this course we will apply the basic ideas of transport theory and statistical mechanics to select biological processes, in order to understand the nature of non-equilibrium processes in living things. Topics include diffusion, entropy and free energy, entropic forces, low Reynolds number transport, cooperativity, and applications to membrane self-assembly, structural and mechanical properties of macromolecules, molecular machines, active transport, and the propagation of nerve impulses. Implications for biogenesis will also be discussed if time permits. A basic theme is how highly ordered living processed can occur in the face of spontaneous entropic tendencies to disorder. The emphasis will be on the construction of simplified quantitative models based on the fundamental principles that attempt to capture the essence of these phenomena.
PHYS 443-01 Electromagnetic Theory MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 100 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 10 / 24 Materials icon
PHYS 481-01 Quantum Mechanics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 10 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
POLI 100-01 US Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Michael Zis 0 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
POLI 101-01 Argument and Advocacy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* With a focus on the role of advocacy in the policy making process, this course expands your understanding of how arguments operate in our political culture and to cultivate your ability to read critically and creatively, make pertinent and well-substantiated claims, assess opposing arguments charitably, and communicate your judgments appropriately and effectively both orally and in writing.
POLI 120-01 International Politics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 David Blaney 0 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 140-01 Comparative Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Franklin Adler 19 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 141-01 Latin America Through Women's Eyes TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 212 Paul Dosh 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 141-01 and WGSS 141-01; S/D/NC with Written evaluation only*
POLI 160-01 Foundations of Political Theory MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler 1 / 15 Materials icon
POLI 194-01 Math and Society: Politics and Mathematics of Elections MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Dolan, Saxe 0 / 32 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with MATH 116-01* It’s fall 2014 and so it’s time for midterm elections! Will the Republicans take control of the US Senate? How many governorships and state legislatures will change party hands?
How do elections work in the U.S. and in other democracies? What is meant by a ‘representative’ democracy? How is it decided how many Congressional representatives each state has? What are the costs and benefits of political participation?

We will focus on the various ways that mathematics and political science interact. Topics covered will include the role of elections and representative government in the United States, comparison of electoral systems used around the world, the apportionment problem, redistricting and gerrymandering, weighted voting systems and voting power, the costs and benefits associated with political participation, and how to predict electoral outcomes.

Work during the semester will include some ‘math’ problems (associated, for example, with weighted voting); student predictions on the outcome of numerous competitive congressional and gubernatorial elections across the country; and several short written assignments.

This First Year Seminar will be taught jointly by Julie Dolan (Professor of Political Science) and Karen Saxe (Professor of Mathematics). Important facts about the course:
• It has no prerequisites, either in math or in political science.
• It satisfies either the Social Science (if you sign up for POLI 194) OR the Natural Science/Math (if you sign up for MATH 116) distribution requirement. But, it is the same course no matter which way you sign up!
POLI 205-01 Politics and Policymaking TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Lesley Lavery 2 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
POLI 208-01 Immigration and Citizenship in American Political Development MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02*
POLI 215-01 Environmental Politics/Policy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Roopali Phadke -3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 215-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
POLI 221-01 Global Governance TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 214 Wendy Weber 2 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
POLI 245-01 Latin American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 212 Paul Dosh -2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 245-01; S/D/NC with Written evaluation only*
POLI 250-01 Comparative-Historical Sociology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Terry Boychuk -2 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with SOCI 275-01*
POLI 250-02 Comparative-Historical Sociology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with SOCI 275-02*
POLI 252-01 Water and Power TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Roopali Phadke 4 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 252-01 and GEOG 252-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor; ENVI/GEOL 120 or ENVI 133 or ENVI/GEOG 232 are useful background but not required*
POLI 266-01 Medieval Political Thought MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Andrew Latham 1 / 26 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-02 and PHIL 294-02* Interested in the roots of contemporary political life (including issues such as state sovereignty, separation of church and state, constitutionalism, just war, property rights, “the people”, nationalism, democracy, rule-of-law, and human rights)? Then this course is for you. Through a careful examination of the political thought of Latin Christendom (Western Europe) during the later Middle Ages (c. 1050-c. 1550) we explore the deep roots of the contemporary world order, demonstrating the ways in which medieval thinkers such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, John of Salisbury, John of Paris, Giles of Rome, Marsilius of Padua, Dante, Las Casas, ibn Sina, Moshe ben Maimon, and ibn Rushd “invented” many of the ideas that we – presumptuously and erroneously – have come to associate with the modern era. As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields (such as Philosophy or Classics) who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in political theory/philosophy or the medieval roots of contemporary political life. This course fulfills the Political Science Department’s Theory Requirement.
POLI 269-01 Empirical Research Methods MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Julie Dolan 3 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
POLI 285-01 Ethnicity and Nationalism in Central and Eastern Europe MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 285-01*
POLI 294-01 Politics of the Great War MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Andrew Latham 0 / 26 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-07* The First World War – referred to simply as “The Great War” by contemporaries who had no idea that it would be followed by an even more catastrophic Second World War a mere two decades later – set the stage for global political life in the twentieth century. Indeed, it is impossible to understand the political, social, cultural and economic developments of the period stretching from 1918 until today without grasping the world-historical impact of the conflict unleashed by the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand on June 28, 1914 (one hundred years ago this upcoming summer). In this course, we explore the causes, character and consequences of the First World War. Among the questions we address are:

1. Why did the war break out, and what does this tell us about the causes of war more generally?
2. Who was to blame for the war, and what does this tell us about the morality of war?
3. What was the character of the war? How was it fought? How did it end? And what does this tell us about the relationship between economics, culture, technology and war?
4. How did the war transform the societies that fought it? And what does this tell us about the relationship between war and political development?
5. How did the war transform the international system? How did the First World War set the stage not only for the Second World War, but also the various conflicts in the Middle East (the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Gulf War, etc.) and Europe (the wars in Bosnia and Kosovo)? And what does this tell us about the impact of war on global political life?

Although this course will explore some of the ways in which the war was represented in popular culture (art, film, literature, poetry), those themes are addressed more fully in some Art topics courses, also offered in Fall 2014.

As an intermediate-level offering, this course is designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields who have some experience in the discipline. The course has no pre-requisites, however, and is therefore suitable to all students seeking to satisfy an interest in the relationship between The First World War and political life in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.
POLI 294-02 Art and Power: World War I and Inflicted traumas TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 202 Vicky Karaiskou -2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ART 294-03. This course counts for social science general distribution if registered as POLI and fine arts general distribution if registered as ART* The course will examine art as a potent means to establish political power and shape social notions. In particular it will approach modernity in the beginning of the 20th century as a revolt against the values established by the ‘old regime’ and its arts. In order to set the frame for the relationships between art and power, the course will call upon distinct artworks and artistic expressions from Greek-roman antiquity, the medieval era, renaissance, baroque and neoclassicism and will analyse their role in propagating political and social order. Having set that frame, the course will highlight especially artistic trends of the first thirty years of the 20th century that include the years of World War I. Visual artworks and writings will be explored as the result of an urgent need to reject the pre-existing cultural memory which was regarded as the cause for modern society’s traumatic experiences. The course will examine expressionism, dada and surrealism as illustrations of individual and social traumas resulting both from the despair of WW I and the disintegration of the pre-existing social and moral/social value-system. We will approach futurism as an attempt to erase past memory and create a new individual and social awareness. The course ends with an examination of art’s political and social context as expressed through Russian avant-garde.
POLI 300-01 American Government Institutions TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 213 Julie Dolan 10 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
POLI 316-01 Info Policy/Politics/Law MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Patrick Schmidt 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* It is easy to be amazed by changes in information technology, that is, the ways that information is produced, distributed, and consumed. If you love your cellphone, share music with your friends, are addicted to social media, enjoy digital books, or worry about your privacy, you might be familiar with some of the issues. In this course, we go much deeper: how do governments and institutions (such as corporations) shape the flow of information? What's at stake in the design of the policies and law governing information? We explore those questions across a range of topics, including surveillance and searches, privacy, transparency, copyrights, patents, and the regulation of the internet.

Students can come to this course from many different starting points. Some students are interested in policy-making and politics but haven't thought much about information policy, which is simply one area, like environmental policy, health policy or anything else. Other students follow technology closely, but haven't given much thought to government, politics and regulation. Still others are interested in the broadest historical and sociological questions: is the world different today because of how information technology has changed? If so, how? And, isn't my iPhone the most amazing invention in human history...or not? However often the class discusses the latest technological developments, we will never be far from the questions, "so what?" and "what does it all mean?".

This course will offer a variety of learning experiences. Class time will include introductory lectures, guest speakers, and "seminar style" discussions. On occasion we will join forces with another First Year Course: Ethics and the Internet, taught by Philosophy professor Diane Michelfelder. Other weeks, students will write essays for discussion in tutorials (small group meetings in my office). The class also will work on a project assisting Macalester College in the development of its own information policies.


POLI 320-01 Global Political Economy MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 David Blaney 4 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 320-01*
POLI 333-01 Power and Development in Africa TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN Ahmed Samatar 9 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 301-01; course to meet in Carnegie 411*
POLI 394-01 Gender Base Violence in Refugee Settings:A Macalester-ARC Collaborative Project TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 Wendy Weber 5 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
Addressing the problem of gender-based violence in refugee settings is a difficult and ongoing challenge for humanitarian organizations. While there is considerable research on approaches to gender-based violence (especially sexual violence) within the humanitarian sector, there is a need for more evidence about what actually works. In this course, students will work together with Professor Weber on a community-based research project for the American Refugee Committee. In this project, we will work to understand the problem of gender-based violence in refugee settings. Our specific focus will be on domestic or intimate partner violence. After this, we will research ‘best practices’ in addressing intimate partner violence in the domestic context (using the literature and engaging local organizations) in order the identify practices that might be adopted by humanitarian organizations.
POLI 400-01 Senior Research Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 David Blaney -2 / 12 Materials icon
POLI 400-02 Senior Research Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Paul Dosh 3 / 12 Materials icon
POLI 400-03 Senior Research Seminar MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Lesley Lavery 2 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Andrew Latham 6 / 16 Materials icon
*2 credit course*

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Catherine Cronemeyer 2 / 35 Materials icon
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Jhon Wlaschin 3 / 35 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 1 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 2 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 0 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L4 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 4 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 113 Eric Wiertelak -4 / 50 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 180-01*
PSYC 182-01 Drugs and Society MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Eric Wiertelak 37 / 80 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PSYC 194-01 The Origin of Consciousness TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 370 Darcy Burgund 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only* In the book The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind psychologist Julian Jaynes argues that humans became self-conscious only about 3000 years ago, and before that operated as virtual automatons obeying hallucinated voices that they attributed to gods. Described as both “consummate genius” and “complete rubbish”, the book provides a vehicle for exploring the psychology of language, religion, decision-making, creativity, mental illness, and of course, consciousness. This course will discuss these topics while reading Jaynes’ book as well as supplemental texts from psychology, neuroscience, anthropology, and philosophy. The class will be writing intensive, and students will write (and re-write) commentaries; personal, analytic, and argumentative essays; and a research paper. No prior knowledge is required; however, a strong interest in psychology and/or the human mind will help. This course approved for social science general distribution credit.
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Steve Guglielmo -1 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Steve Guglielmo 0 / 12 Materials icon
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Steve Guglielmo -1 / 12 Materials icon
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Cari Gillen-O'Neel 0 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 215 Rachel Wannarka -4 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; first day attendance required*
PSYC 242-01 Cognitive Psychology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea 2 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PSYC 242-L1 Cognitive Psychology Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 354 Brooke Lea 2 / 24 Materials icon
PSYC 244-01 Cognitive Neuroscience MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund -2 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 244-01; permission of the instructor required for ACTC student*
PSYC 244-L1 Cognitive Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Darcy Burgund -1 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 244-L1*
PSYC 246-01 Exploring Sensation/Perception MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Julia Manor 11 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 246-01*
PSYC 246-L1 Explor Sensation/Percept Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Julia Manor 11 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 246-L1*
PSYC 250-01 Developmental Psychology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Cari Gillen-O'Neel 6 / 32 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PSYC 254-01 Social Psychology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 215 Vera Shuman 13 / 32 Materials icon
PSYC 270-01 Psychology of Sustainable Behavior TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Christina Manning 9 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 270-01; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Guglielmo, Lea, Strauss 0 / 21 Materials icon
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Guglielmo, Lea, Strauss 0 / 21 Materials icon
PSYC 370-01 Understanding and Confronting Racism T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 301 Kendrick Brown 5 / 18 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 370-01*
PSYC 374-01 Clinical and Counseling Psych TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss 2 / 18 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PSYC 380-01 Community Psychology and Public Health TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss 0 / 19 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of instructor required*
PSYC 394-01 Memory W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Katrina Schleisman 8 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
Memory is fundamental to our lives. It underlies our ability to share experiences and culture; it defines how we are unique. In this course we will explore various types of memory that have been identified through research into human and non-human animal behavior. We will explore questions such as: how can we have vivid, movie-like memories for events that never happened? We will see how this mis-match between experience and memory can be viewed both as a problem that can result in memory errors, and as a positive form of cognitive flexibility. How are memories stored and retrieved in the brain? We will discuss research that relates behavior to brain function, and gain a better understanding of how the structure of our nervous system enables key insights into how our memory systems work.
Prerequisites: PSYC 242: Cognitive Psychology OR PSYC 244: Cognitive Neuroscience OR PSYC 180: Brain, Mind and Behavior, OR instructor's approval.
PSYC 488-01 Lives in Context: Psychology and Social Structure TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 300 Joan Ostrove 3 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RELI 100-01 Introduction to Islam: Formation and Expansion MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 105 Gregory Lipton 1 / 15 Materials icon
RELI 111-01 Introduction to Buddhism MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Erik Davis 1 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Open only to First Year students, rising sophomores, and rising juniors*
RELI 121-01 New Testament TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 216 Susanna Drake 12 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
RELI 135-01 India and Rome TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Laine, Overman 2 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CLAS 135-01*
RELI 194-01 After the Holocaust MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am ARTCOM 202 Barry Cytron 0 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
The systematic murder of millions during World War II has challenged most every relationship – between neighbors, faiths, peoples. The language of genocide and ghetto has come to inform how one speaks of faith, morality, even our common humanity. After an introductory study of the events, we turn to a study of the Holocaust’s impact on religious life, and on interreligious and intergroup relations. We will examine questions of collective memory and the search for justice, interrogate the meaning of this event in the “age of decolonization,” and explore the problems raised to personal and communal life by the call to forgiveness and the command to “never forget.” Class meets Mondays and Wednesdays during the week, and Sunday evenings for special events, guest speakers and films.
RELI 232-01 Religion and Food W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Peter Harle 11 / 20 Materials icon
RELI 235-01 Theory and Method in the Study of Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Erik Davis 14 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
RELI 245-01 Arabic Reading and Translation MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm Gregory Lipton 9 / 15 Materials icon
*Course meets in Old Main 410; cross-listed with CLAS 345-01* This course aims to improve your Arabic reading and translation skills while introducing you to selected genres of Arabic and Islamic literature. The course will proceed in a workshop format and focus on the comprehension and translation of texts in question. Students will learn to use an Arabic dictionary, expand their vocabulary, deepen their understanding of grammar and syntax, and develop skills in reading manuscripts, navigating Arabic texts, and producing English translations. Prerequisite: 3 previous semesters of Arabic language.
RELI 294-01 Literary Bible MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 102 Theresa Krier 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-01*
RELI 311-01 Ritual TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Erik Davis 2 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Priority given to declared Major/Minors of Religious Studies and Critical Theory Concentration, permission of the instructor required for all others*
RELI 394-01 The Veil: Christianity, Judaism, Islam TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Susanna Drake 7 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-01* In this course, we will examine the role of the veil in societies from the ancient Near East to the present. We will pay special attention to veiling as a cultural and religious practice that reflects ideas about piety, gender, and status. Along with learning about the history of the veil and its use in some of the major religious traditions, we will consider the function of the veil in contemporary political debates, and we will explore women's veiling, in particular, as a topic in feminist discourse.

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RUSS 101-01 Elementary Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 212 Julia Chadaga 6 / 25 Materials icon
RUSS 101-L1 Elementary Russian I Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 226 Ekaterina Efimenko 1 / 13 Materials icon
RUSS 101-L2 Elementary Russian I Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 Ekaterina Efimenko 5 / 12 Materials icon
RUSS 203-01 Intermediate Russian I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 228 Anastasia Kayiatos 11 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
RUSS 203-L1 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 226 Ekaterina Efimenko 5 / 13 Materials icon
RUSS 203-L2 Intermediate Russian I Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 Ekaterina Efimenko 6 / 12 Materials icon
RUSS 251-01 Superfluous Men and Necessary Women: Russian Literary Classics in Translation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 228 Anastasia Kayiatos 12 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-02* This survey course in Russian culture choreographs a sustained encounter with the most celebrated authors of the national canon, including Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy and Chekhov. It does so by following the footsteps of the “superfluous man” throughout the nineteenth century, alongside his less spectacular partner, the necessary woman, and the other “types” who populate the pages of Russian romantic and realist literature--the dandies, doubles, petty devils, small men, new women, Byronic and Napoleonic pretenders, and so on. By staying close on the heels of our contemplative heroes, these men of thought—and women of action—offer students countless opportunities to obsess with them about the so-called accursed questions bedeviling Russian society in their day. Collectively, they dramatize contemporaneous debates about the fate of the nation, the lot of the people, the moral duty of the intelligentsia, and the role of art in realizing Russia’s special destiny in the world. In order to further contextualize the state and stakes of the Russian novel in these debates, students will also sample from works of literary criticism by Vissarion Belinsky, Mikhail Bakhtin, Vladimir Nabokov, Carson McCullers, Lydia Ginzburg, Iurii Lotman, Gary Shteyngart, and Elif Batuman. As the title suggests, our readings will revolve around the theme of gender, and our analyses will turn on a feminist and queer theory axis from the start, when we ask about the absence of women-authored works (and the abundance of women protagonists) among the Russian classics.
RUSS 294-01 Terrorism and Art: The Spectacle of Destruction MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 202 Julia Chadaga -2 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-02; taught in English* Russia presents an excellent case study for the topic of political violence. Terrorism as a means of political persuasion originated in the land of the tsars; Russian history features an incendiary cycle of repressions, revolts, and reprisals. Studying the origins and depictions of these events in works of art reveals how culture mediates between the world of ideas and the sphere of action. We will consider the tactics and motives of revolutionary conspirators as well as the role that gender and religion played in specific acts of terror. We will strive to understand the emphasis that Russian terrorists placed on the aesthetics of violence as we explore the ways in which Russian revolutionary thought and action served as a model for radicals around the world. The Russian case will provide a framework for in-depth study of examples of terrorism from Algeria, Ireland, Germany, the U.S., and the Middle East. Texts will include novels, poems, manifestos, letters, diaries, historical and journalistic accounts, paintings, and films, as well as readings in cultural history and political theory.
RUSS 394-01 Advanced Russian MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Ekaterina Efimenko 5 / 12 Materials icon

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Khaldoun Samman 3 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
SOCI 110-02 Introduction to Sociology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Khaldoun Samman 1 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
SOCI 190-01 Criminal Behavior/Social Control MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Erik Larson -13 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
SOCI 194-01 Moral Panics and the Other TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Khaldoun Samman 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First Year Course only* This course will focus primarily on how fears spread and become moral panics of our time. We will deal with a number of issues like pedophilia, gangs, and drug scares, but fear of Muslims and Islam will be the most visible example of the course. Through the works of Foucault (discursive formations and incitement), Laclau and Mouffe (hegemony and articulation), and others, this course will attempt to restore the most significant contribution Moral Panic theory offers: the constitutive nature of moral panics in the production of new racial and political identities. A major sub theme of the course will be to trace the incitement process through certain networks and what sociologists call “claims makers” and “moral entrepreneurs” (think tanks, groups like Jihad Watch, the Military Industrial complex), especially right wing groups but also liberals, mainstream feminists, academics, and other experts. We will also look at the construction of crime waves, but of a particular sort, the kind that reconstitutes the way we understand cultural differences, human rights, immigration, culture and crime, gender inequality, patriarchy, domestic abuse, military occupation, and so on.

SOCI 210-01 Sociology of Sexuality MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 Laura Fischer 0 / 20 Materials icon
SOCI 275-01 Comparative-Historical Sociology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Terry Boychuk -2 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 250-01*
SOCI 275-02 Comparative-Historical Sociology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 250-02*
SOCI 287-01 Immigrant Voices MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 105 Mahnaz Kousha 4 / 16 Materials icon
SOCI 294-01 Urban Democratic Engagement and Social Justice M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Lesley Kandaras 9 / 20 Materials icon
“Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.” ― Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities
As Jane Jacobs noted, cities hold a democratic potential because people from a variety of backgrounds live and work in them. Yet, persistent and growing inequalities have left this potential more of an unfulfilled promise. What structures and practices inhibit efforts to achieve social justice in cities? How can contemporary cities in the United States plan for their future in truly democratic, participatory ways?
This course addresses these questions by exploring the intersections of political processes and urban life. The course will draw from urban sociology and closely-related disciplines to understand how urban planning and decision-making are intertwined with power dynamics and inequality. Specifically, this course will examine the conditions needed for effective, inclusive and democratic processes through which governments make plans for a region’s future.
A significant focus of this class is an extended case study and applied research project connected to the Metropolitan Council’s regional planning public engagement efforts in the Twin Cities metropolitan area.
No formal prerequisite. At least one course completed in sociology, urban studies, geography, anthropology, or political science will be helpful. Prior research experience is not required, although basic familiarity with research methods will enhance students' experience with the course.
Information about the instructor: Lesley Kandaras is a PhD candidate in sociology at the University of Chicago, specializing in economic development, political sociology and American Indian studies. Additionally, she works as senior project coordinator in the Metropolitan Council’s communications and government affairs departments.
SOCI 480-01 Senior Seminar W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk 2 / 12 Materials icon

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Theatre and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
THDA 105-01 Theatre in the Twin Cities: Making the Musical MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 010 Colleary, Waters 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required; meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010* For nearly 150 years, the American musical has been one of this country’s most popular performance genres both at home and abroad. From minstrelsy and vaudeville revues to Rent and Avenue Q, from Bert Williams and Fanny Brice to Nathan Lane and Audra McDonald, the musical has both imagined and reflected American national identities. The musical has also been a forum where the social issues of the day are given voice, sometimes using the guise of popular entertainment as a strategy of subversion.
In this course, we will explore the musical’s rich historical tradition, digging deeply and critically into several performance texts. Students will participate in acting, dance, and design workshops, and have the opportunity to attend theatre performances in the Twin Cities. All students will also participate in the creation of Macalester’s fall semester production of The Cradle Will Rock, either as performers or stage technicians.
Throughout the semester, students will be taught to engage in critical thinking and writing about performance – skills which apply directly to future studies in the arts, humanities, and sciences.

Previous theatre or performance experience is not required. Prospective majors are allowed to take this course. Due to the production schedule of The Cradle Will Rock, students enrolled in this course will not be able to take night courses during the Fall semester.
THDA 105-01 Theatre in the Twin Cities: Making the Musical MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 205 Colleary, Waters 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; first day attendance required; meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010* For nearly 150 years, the American musical has been one of this country’s most popular performance genres both at home and abroad. From minstrelsy and vaudeville revues to Rent and Avenue Q, from Bert Williams and Fanny Brice to Nathan Lane and Audra McDonald, the musical has both imagined and reflected American national identities. The musical has also been a forum where the social issues of the day are given voice, sometimes using the guise of popular entertainment as a strategy of subversion.
In this course, we will explore the musical’s rich historical tradition, digging deeply and critically into several performance texts. Students will participate in acting, dance, and design workshops, and have the opportunity to attend theatre performances in the Twin Cities. All students will also participate in the creation of Macalester’s fall semester production of The Cradle Will Rock, either as performers or stage technicians.
Throughout the semester, students will be taught to engage in critical thinking and writing about performance – skills which apply directly to future studies in the arts, humanities, and sciences.

Previous theatre or performance experience is not required. Prospective majors are allowed to take this course. Due to the production schedule of The Cradle Will Rock, students enrolled in this course will not be able to take night courses during the Fall semester.
THDA 110-01 Introduction to Theatre Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Eric Colleary 9 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
THDA 115-01 Cultures of Dance MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 205 Wynn Fricke -4 / 20 Materials icon
THDA 115-01 Cultures of Dance MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke -4 / 20 Materials icon
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory and Performance I MWF 12:00 pm-01:30 pm THEATR 010 Cheryl Brinkley 7 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010*
THDA 121-01 Beginning Dance Composition MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke 4 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
This course is the study of dance-making. Students learn basic elements of movement – time, space, texture – and how they can be shaped to give the body expressive power. The relationships between form, content, and technique are explored. Students choreograph short studies, improvise, discuss, and view dance on film and in live performance. The course values risk-taking and collaboration. It culminates with the creation of a complete dance. No experience or dance training necessary. All are welcome!
THDA 141-01 Film and the Moving Body MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 11 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
Explore the world of movement on screen. This course looks at the development of this burgeoning art form. The infinite ways in which movement forms perception in the two dimensional format will be investigated. The semester begins with an historical perspective on the merging of film and dance followed by extensive studies of work ranging from insights into the human condition through pedestrian gesture to abstract choreography uniquely portrayed via the camera lens. The analytical examinations are supplemented with devised projects. In creating individual screendances students learn editing and camera techniques. Kinesthesia, rhythm, and spatial awareness are a few of the movement for the camera aspects that are applied to the film work. Previous experience in either dance or film is not required.
THDA 194-01 Technologies of Performance: Crafting the Tangible MW 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett 9 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*This course counts in place of THDA 125* As our society shifts away from a human connection to the tangible, this course seeks to reconnect the student to the tangible object. Our focus will be on the process of “thinking through making.” Through a series of project based learning opportunities, students will develop an understanding of themselves, the process of “critical making,” and current performance production technologies. This course will meet in a seminar format 1-2 times a week and a studio format 1 time a week. This topics course fulfills the Technical Theater requirement of the Theater and Dance major.
THDA 194-L1 Technologies of Performance Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 010 Thomas Barrett 9 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010*
THDA 230-01 Physical Approaches MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 010 Robert Rosen 7 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010*
THDA 235-01 Fundamentals of Scene Design T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR Daniel Keyser 11 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*$40 materials fee charged; course to meet in Theater 207*
THDA 310-01 Theatre Methods: Shakespeare to Viewpoints MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 Beth Cleary 5 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
THDA 310-L1 Theatre Methods: Shakespeare to Viewpoints R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 010 Beth Cleary 5 / 12 Materials icon
*Meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010*
THDA 341-01 Intermediate Dance Composition MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke 8 / 10 Materials icon
THDA 475-01 Advanced Scene Design TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser 16 / 16 Materials icon
*$40 materials fee charged*
THDA 489-01 Seminar in Performance Theory and Practice TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 Eric Colleary 4 / 10 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
THDA 21-01 West African-Based Movement I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 6 Patricia Brown 1 / 20 Materials icon
THDA 41-01 Modern Dance I TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 5 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
THDA 43-01 Modern Dance III MW 03:50 pm-05:20 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 12 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
THDA 51-01 Ballet I MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile 4 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 52-01 Ballet II MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile 14 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile -3 / 16 Materials icon

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
WGSS 102-01 Gender and Sport TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Corie Hammers 1 / 25 Materials icon
WGSS 105-01 Transnational Perspectives on Gender, Race, Class and Sexuality MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only* Could it be possible that your own gender, race, class, and sexuality as well as your questions about them, are intimately related to global politics and culture? How does your life connect to a corporate executive’s in Thailand, a migrant laborer’s in Italy, a sweatshop worker’s in Colombia, and immigrant professionals’ in Silicon Valley? And how do different histories of women’s and gender studies intersect to expand this matrix of identities?

Through feminist analyses of actual events and phenomena such as globalization and transnationalism, this course offers surprising and exciting discoveries surrounding these questions that reveal how our past and present are linked. It uses historical documents, film, fiction, ethnographies, and autobiographies to show how we accept, negotiate, resist, and recreate where we belong in the world and how we interact with others, through texts such as Women’s Lives: Multicultural Perspectives and Gender Through the Prism of Difference. Some writers included are bell hooks, Adrienne Rich, R.W. Connell, Alice Walker, Nawal el Saadawi, Richard Falk, Barbara Smith, and Gloria Anzaldua.

We will debate and critique diverse identities from activism and academia—from Latina to Norse, from Black to Indigenous, from the First to the Fourth World. We will study how feminists and their allies have fought economic exploitation, challenged racial discrimination, protested gender oppression, redefined environmental and industrial relations, and gained strength from political and cultural coalitions. The Madres de la Plaza de Mayo, the Love Canal protesters, voting and reproductive rights activists, the Narmada Dam resisters, the Nike shoemakers, the diasporic Asian gay filmmaker, Hurricane Katrina and BP Oil Spill and Occupy activists, male feminists—these are some of the peoples whose inspiring stories have contributed to the vibrant histories in women’s, gender, and sexuality studies.

No prior acquaintance with WGSS ideas is required. Come and explore! If you’re eager about, and even if you’re resistant to, feminist/women’s/gender/sexuality studies, this course welcomes and invites you to analyze and situate your identity, your commitments, and your responsibilities in relation to the academic and other bodies of knowledge that form the foundation of a liberal arts education.

There are so many ways to engage each other—reading, group discussions, writing, interviewing. The major assignments in this course are two research essays, class presentations, periodic journals, and discussion-based participation. The emphasis is on discussion and lectures are included wherever appropriate or necessary.
WGSS 117-01 Women, Health, Reproduction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Elizabeth Jansen 1 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 117-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on May 2 with permission of the instructor*
WGSS 141-01 Latin America Through Women's Eyes TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 212 Paul Dosh 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 141-01 and POLI 141-01; S/D/NC with Written evaluation only*
WGSS 150-01 Language and Gender in Japanese Society TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 110 Satoko Suzuki 1 / 16 Materials icon
*First Year Course only; cross-listed with ASIA 150-01, JAPA 150-01 and LING 150-01*
Japanese is considered to be a gendered language in the sense that certain linguistic forms are associated with gender. Male characters in Japanese animation often use boku or ore to refer to themselves, while female characters often use watashi or atashi. When translated into Japanese, Hermione Granger (a female character in Harry Potter series) ends sentences with soft-sounding forms, while Harry Potter and his best friend Ron use more assertive forms. Do these fictional representations reflect reality? How did gendered language come about? Are Japanese women and men always expected to sound feminine/masculine? How do people who do not align their identity with femininity or masculinity deal with gendered forms? These are some of the questions discussed in this course. Students will have opportunities to learn about historical background of gendered language and find out about current discourse on language and gender. No Japanese language ability is required.
WGSS 200-01 Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Corie Hammers 12 / 25 Materials icon
WGSS 220-01 Feminist Re-constructions: Gender, Race, and Nation in the Sciences MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm Sonita Sarker 22 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Course meets in Old Main 410* Feminst Re-constructions: Gender, Race, and Nation in the Sciences
This course is an inquiry into the cultural, social, and philosophical contexts of gender, nation, and race in the domains of some sciences and technologies. How have gendered and racialized minorities been represented in established frameworks historically and how have they responded to these depictions? We will analyze the prevailing perceptions of the Ideas of science and technology; the Icons, prominent scientists and symbols of these domains; and the Instruments, the tools and apparatuses, that are defined and redefined. Our focus will be on the roles that women and indigenous peoples (separate and also overlapping identities) have played in reconstructing the foundations and transforming the meanings in some sciences and technologies today.
WGSS 240-01 Comparative Feminisms: Whiteness and Postcolonialisms MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker 7 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-02* This course brings together discourses that have remained somewhat parallel and unrelated--Whiteness Studies and Postcolonial Studies. It is based on the premise that 'whiteness' as an academic/social framework stems from and is intertwined with social and political identity-based movements (feminist, critical race, etc.). In other words, studies of the intersection of gender, race, class, and nation initiated in the post-colonizing imagination seeks to shake up paradigms of power, and whiteness studies shares in this effort. This course explores where and how the notion of 'whiteness' converges and diverges from post-colonialism.
WGSS 294-02 Superfluous Men and Necessary Women:Russian Literary Classics in Translation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 228 Anastasia Kayiatos 12 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RUSS 251-01*
WGSS 294-03 Art and the American Culture Wars TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 102 Lauren DeLand 15 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ART 294-01*
WGSS 308-01 Literature and Sexuality: Wilde, Warhol, Waters: Queer Aesthetes and Outlaws TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Casey Jarrin 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 308-01; permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
WGSS 346-01 Constructions of a Female Killer MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Alicia Munoz 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 446-01 and LATI 446-01; first day attendance required*
WGSS 394-01 The Veil: Christianity, Judaism, Islam TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Susanna Drake 7 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-01*

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