Spring 2014 Class Schedule

Spring 2014 Class Schedule - updated April 1, 2014 at 01:56 pm

This is a snapshot of the class schedule and enrollment information, updated only once daily. For the most current information on class schedule and enrollment, Macalester students, faculty and staff should log in to 1600grand and use the "Search Class Schedule" link.

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Chinese
Classics
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Neuroscience Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theatre and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

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Supplemental Course Information icon Indicates link to supplemental information about this course provided by the instructor

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
AMST 101-01 Explorations of Race and Racism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 SooJin Pate 2 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* This is an introductory course on the social construction of race and how the category of “race” has been wielded to justify all kinds of inequality. This course will provide you with a new vocabulary as we explore the following: the difference between prejudice and racism, different kinds of racism, white privilege, and the problems with celebratory approaches to race such as "multiculturalism," "diversity," "colorblindness," and "post-race." Through a critical engagement with the readings, this course will illuminate structures of power and expose the contradictions of concepts such as equality, democracy, citizenship, and the American dream. And by engaging with critical race theory, women of color feminism, and cultural criticism, you will gain the tools to think more critically about the interlocking relationship between race and other categories of difference (e.g., gender, class, sexuality, and religion), as well as the role that culture plays in both producing and challenging dominant narratives of white and nonwhite peoples.
AMST 222-01 Imagining the American West TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 402 Lynn Hudson 4 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed wtih HIST 222-01*
AMST 237-01 Environmental Justice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Chris Wells 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 237-01 and HIST 237-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
AMST 254-01 Peoples/Cultures Native Amer MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Diana Dean -4 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed wtih ANTH 254-01*
AMST 265-01 The Schools-to-Prison Pipeline MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 111 Juliana Pegues -4 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* This course offers an introductory exploration of the "school-to-prison pipeline," a trend that funnels youth out of U.S. public schools and into the juvenile corrections system. We will study how this pipeline is the result of a confluence of historical, political, and cultural factors; first and foremost, how the pipeline acts as a manifestation of structural racism. We will look to frameworks of human rights, legal rights, and social justice organizing as models of articulating and resisting the pipeline. Prerequisite: an introductory American Studies course.
AMST 270-01 Black Public Intellectuals M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 215 Brittany Lewis 9 / 20 Materials icon
This course asks the following questions: who and what is a Black Public intellectual? What has been the place of intellectuals in struggles against injustice from the 19th century to the current moment? And what role have Black women in particular played in that rich intellectual tradition? We will explore these questions and others by examining the lives and the writings of men and women whose public service and intellectual works defined and reframed the political issues of their times. Emphasis will be placed on the leading voices of resistance and social change that have influenced black public consciousness, social and political action, and intellectual activities, including the formulation of social criticism and theory—both formal (or academic) and vernacular varieties. We will end the course by discussing a noticeable shift in the Black public intellectual tradition with the rise of new media and the shifting public sphere with what I call cyberspace intellectualism.
AMST 275-01 African American Literature to 1900 TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 214 Daylanne English 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 275-01*
AMST 288-01 Race and Ethnicity in Japan TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 110 Arthur Mitchell 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed wtih JAPA 288-01 and INTL 288-01*
AMST 294-01 Imagine Otherwise: Alternative Visons of Love, Family, and Nation TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 213 SooJin Pate 1 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* This course is centered around rethinking and redefining what love, family, and nation is from the perspective of marginalized communities--specifically women of color and Third World women. We will start by deconstructing the category of “normal” and then examine works (literature, film, visual art, articles) from artists and scholars who are reimagining love/family/nation in ways that resist the norm.
AMST 294-02 Transgender History, Identity, and Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Catherine Jacquet 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-03 and WGSS 294-02*
AMST 294-04 African American Women's History TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Lynn Hudson 20 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-06 and WGSS 294-06*
AMST 294-05 Community Youth Development TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 215 Tina Kruse 1 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with EDUC 230-01*
AMST 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 214 Alicia Munoz 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 330-01 Mellon Seminar W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 112 Jane Rhodes 4 / 10 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; 2 credit course*
AMST 341-01 Urban Social Geography: City Life and Landscapes TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A Daniel Trudeau 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 341-01*
AMST 354-01 Blackness in the Media W 01:10 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 226 Leola Johnson 5 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MCST 354-01*
AMST 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 384-01 and INTL 384-01*
AMST 400-01 Senior Seminar TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 212 Jane Rhodes 9 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ANTH 101-01 General Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Scott Legge 8 / 35 Materials icon
ANTH 101-02 General Anthropology MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A Ron Barrett 10 / 35 Materials icon
ANTH 123-01 Introduction to Archaeology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau 4 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CLAS 123-01*
ANTH 230-01 Ethnographic Interviewing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06B Arjun Guneratne 5 / 16 Materials icon
*First Day attendance required*
ANTH 254-01 Peoples and Cultures of Native America MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Diana Dean -4 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 254-01*
ANTH 256-01 Peoples and Cultures of South Asia M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Ron Barrett 11 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 256-01*
ANTH 258-01 Peoples and Cultures of Africa MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06A Sonia Patten 5 / 20 Materials icon
ANTH 381-01 Emerging Infectious Diseases TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Ron Barrett 10 / 20 Materials icon
ANTH 387-01 Darwin/Evolutionary Thought MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06B Scott Legge 13 / 20 Materials icon
ANTH 394-01 Writing Human Rights TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Dawes, Shandy 0 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 394-03; first day attendance required; signature of instructor required* This writing intensive seminar will explore the relationship between human rights and life narratives. Life stories are of increasing importance across a range of academic disciplines, but nowhere more so than in the interdisciplinary work of human rights. Human rights advocacy has always relied upon the use of peoples' stories—to give voice to those cruelly silenced by violence, to generate sympathy in global bystanders, to shame perpetrator governments. The special challenges of this sort of storytelling have recently become topics of special attention in academic scholarship. Many of the questions are ethical: How can you move audiences without being sensational? How can you speak for others without displacing them? How can you put incommunicable trauma into words without somehow altering the truth of it? This interdisciplinary course, co-taught by faculty in Anthropology and English, will train students in the methods and ethics of life history interviewing and the craft of narrative writing. Priority for registration will be given to students who can count the course for one or more of the following: English, Anthropology, Human Rights and Humanitarianism. We also aim to achieve a mix of sophomores, juniors, and seniors in the course.
ANTH 490-01 Senior Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 1 / 10 Materials icon
ANTH 490-02 Senior Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 06A Arjun Guneratne 0 / 10 Materials icon

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ART 130-01 Drawing I MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 302 Megan Vossler 8 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 130-02 Drawing I MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm ART 302 Megan Vossler 2 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 131-01 Introduction to Ceramics MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm ART 113 Gary Erickson 1 / 12 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; permission of the instructor required; $100 material fee required*
ART 149-01 Introduction to Visual Culture MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 11 / 30 Materials icon
ART 161-01 Art of the West II MW 10:50 am-12:20 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot 7 / 25 Materials icon
ART 171-01 Art of the East II: Japan MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 7 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 171-01*
ART 233-01 Introduction to Digital Photography MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm ART 301 Eric Carroll -1 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* This course introduces conceptual, technical, and historical aspects of digital photography within a fine-arts context. The emphasis throughout is on photography as creative medium and will introduce strategies and methods related to this goal through assignments and class critiques. Additinoally, the course introduces foundational aspects of the technical process of digital photography, from manual camera operation, to the editing of images through Adobe Photoshop. Along the way students will learn about different file types, color management, and how to take their images from screen to print. Also, the course offers an introductory historical overview of fine-art practice as it has evolved from conventional silver photography to current digial practice. Classroom discussions and assigned readings will help students develop the critical skills needed to understand how photographs function aesthetically and conceptually as well as how they are used in contemporary society and culture.
ART 234-01 Painting I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 308 Christine Willcox 1 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 118 Stanton Sears 0 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 214 Ruthann Godollei 1 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; permission of the instructor required*
ART 263-01 Modern Art MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Joanna Inglot 6 / 20 Materials icon
This course interrogates meanings of modern art and the so-called “avant-garde,” with attention to the developments in France, Germany, Austria, Russia, Mexico, and the United States. The course will expose students to multiple reading of key avant-garde movements, including Fauvism, Cubism, Surrealism, Dada, Futurism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art etc. The class will include trips to museums and galleries in the Twin Cities and meetings with curators and art experts. This course has no prerequisite and is appropriate for sophomores and first years.
ART 294-01 Topics: Color TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 202 Christine Willcox 5 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* This course introduces, through studio projects, the basic principles regarding the use of color in the visual arts. Students explore a range of topics, including the historical uses of color, the interactions between colors, and the psychology of color. The class will be comprised of a series of small color studies with more involved studies to follow. Some projects will be completed using acrylic paint while others will use media chosen by the student. The class will include painting/color demonstrations, image presentations, readings and group critiques.
ART 294-03 Digging into Greek Art TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau 6 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01*
ART 372-01 Sculpture II TBA TBA ART 118 Stanton Sears 1 / 5 Materials icon
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TBA TBA ART 214 Ruthann Godollei 2 / 8 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; permission of the instructor required*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 113 Gary Erickson 0 / 5 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; permission of the instructor required; $100 material fee required*
ART 394-02 Topics: Figure Drawing TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 206 Megan Vossler 0 / 10 Materials icon
This course explores both the structural/anatomical and expressive aspects of figure drawing. Students will be introduced to the elements of form and structure of the human body through working with nude and clothed models, the skeleton, anatomical texts, and other source material. Confidence, the ability to improvise, and an expressive connection with the figure will be developed through exercises that encourage experimentation with gesture and materials. In an in-depth, independent final project (approx. 1/3 of semester), students will develop their own personal content, using the materials and methods of their choice. Discussion of the various issues brought up by representation of the body will be part of our study of both contemporary and historical works of art. We will use a variety of media, including non-traditional materials. Prerequisite: Art 130 or permission of instructor.
ART 394-03 Value: The Bad, the Ugly and the Cheap TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 226 Kiarina Kordela 8 / 45 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01 and MCST 394-03*
ART 394-04 Installation Art TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 118 Stanton Sears 7 / 15 Materials icon
Installation art brings together elements of many other forms of creation, expanding beyond the visual to include sound, smell, change/time, and an encompassing theatricality. While Installation Art can be created in gallery and museum settings, it frequently includes work which steps away from these institutions into other, non-traditional exhibition environments. Installation art is generally meant for short term presentation at its site, so that if the work lives on in time, it does so in some form of second hand record (images, video, or other documentation), and therefore is a very different experience from the original event. It is frequently ephemeral and temporary, at least in its original form. In many cases the work is shaped by a particular site. Sometimes the work travels from site to site, altering the site and viewers’ perception of it. In this class we will explore contemporary international installation art and create projects in and around Macalester. Part of the course will include a project built for installation at the Myklebust+Sears studio in rural Wisconsin, where students have created a variety of installation artworks, including audio works in the woods, modifications to vintage trailer homes, wind- and hand-driven kinetic pieces , fire artworks and a range of light-based artworks integrated in the landscape. The class will meet in the newly renovated Art Department, with superb new tools and facilities at our disposal.
ART 488-01 Senior Studio Seminar MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 205 Ruthann Godollei 4 / 16 Materials icon
ART 490-08 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Ruthann Godollei 0 / 1 Materials icon
ART 490-16 Art Apprenticeship TBA TBA Stanton Sears 0 / 1 Materials icon

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ASIA 171-01 Art of the East II: Japan MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 7 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ART 171-01*
ASIA 256-01 Peoples and Cultures of South Asia M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Ron Barrett 11 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 256-01*
ASIA 275-01 The Rise of Modern China MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam 12 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 275-01*
ASIA 378-01 War Crimes and Memory in East Asia MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam 12 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 378-01*
ASIA 394-01 The Pacific World since 1800 W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Ryan Edgington 11 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 394-02*

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
BIOL 116-01 Community and Global Health: Biological Paradigms W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 243 Katherine Lechner 3 / 30 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 117-01 Women, Health and Reproduction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Elizabeth Jansen -6 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 117-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 117-02 Women, Health and Reproduction MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Elizabeth Jansen -5 / 30 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day atttendance required; cross-listed with WGSS 117-02*
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby 6 / 21 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Steven Sundby -3 / 21 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby 1 / 21 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; 2 credit course*
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Mary Montgomery -2 / 35 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 260-02 Genetics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Mary Montgomery -1 / 35 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 250 Marcos Ortega -2 / 48 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 250 Michael Anderson 9 / 48 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson 2 / 24 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson 9 / 24 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 226 Jerald Dosch 0 / 44 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch -1 / 22 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson 1 / 22 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
BIOL 342-01 Animal Behavior/Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 6 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 342-L1 Animal Behavior/Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 6 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Marcos Ortega 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-01; first day attendance required*
BIOL 352-L1 Biochemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Marcos Ortega 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-L1; attendance at first lab meeting required*
BIOL 353-01 Advanced Genetics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am ARTCOM 202 Paul Overvoorde -2 / 12 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 356-01 Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Daniel Schuster 1 / 13 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 356-L1 Cell/Molecular Neuroscience Lab W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 275 Daniel Schuster 2 / 13 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 365-01 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 270 Kristina Curry Rogers 4 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 365-L1 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Kristina Curry Rogers 4 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 367-01 Human Physiology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Lin Aanonsen -10 / 32 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 367-L1 Human Physiology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen -3 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 367-L2 Human Physiology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen -7 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 394-01 Projects in Global Health M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Chatterjea, Hoye 3 / 12 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; cross-listed with CHEM 394-03* Students will conduct multi-disciplinary collaborative research on current problems in global health (special focus on East Africa) in partnership with research faculty and clinical professionals in the US and Uganda. Potential partner organizations include Makerere University, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Ugandan Wildlife Authority, and Uganda Ministry of Agriculture. Admission to this course is by application only.
STUDY TRIP: After completing the course, students will present their research reports to scientists and health care professionals in Uganda. Following the trip, teams will also present to audiences in the Twin Cities. (May, 2014)
BIOL 473-01 Research in Immunology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Devavani Chatterjea 0 / 8 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 473-L1 Research in Immunology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 277 Devavani Chatterjea 0 / 8 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
BIOL 481-01 Seminar in Evolution MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Matthew Dufort 3 / 14 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
BIOL 489-01 Biology Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Curry Rogers, Montgomery 1 / 60 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHEM 112-01 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Paul Fischer 14 / 40 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 112-02 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Paul Fischer -1 / 41 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 112-03 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Susan Green 0 / 40 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 112-04 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Susan Green 13 / 41 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 112-L2 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice 0 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L3 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 1 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L4 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity W 01:40 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Katherine Soo 7 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L5 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Katherine Soo 7 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L6 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 343 Amy Rice 0 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L7 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 0 / 18 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required; $7 lab fee required*
CHEM 112-L8 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Katherine Soo 0 / 18 Materials icon
CHEM 112-L9 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity F 01:40 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 343 Thomas Varberg 9 / 18 Materials icon
CHEM 112-L10 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity T 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 343 Amy Rice 2 / 18 Materials icon
CHEM 212-01 Organic Chemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 100 Ronald Brisbois 18 / 38 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-02 Organic Chemistry II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye 0 / 38 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L1 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye -2 / 19 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 212-L2 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye 5 / 19 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 212-L3 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois 8 / 19 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 212-L4 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois 7 / 19 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 222-01 Analytical Chemistry MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata 21 / 30 Materials icon
CHEM 222-L1 Analytical Chemistry Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Keith Kuwata 11 / 15 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 222-L2 Analytical Chemistry Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Keith Kuwata 10 / 15 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan 17 / 50 Materials icon
*1 credit course*
CHEM 312-01 Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg 9 / 24 Materials icon
CHEM 312-L1 Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Thomas Varberg 9 / 24 Materials icon
CHEM 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Marcos Ortega 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-01; first day attendance required*
CHEM 352-L1 Biochemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Marcos Ortega 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-L1; attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 394-03 Projects in Global Health M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Chatterjea, Hoye 3 / 12 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; cross-listed with BIOL 394-01* Students will conduct multi-disciplinary collaborative research on current problems in global health (special focus on East Africa) in partnership with research faculty and clinical professionals in the US and Uganda. Potential partner organizations include Makerere University, Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Ugandan Wildlife Authority, and Uganda Ministry of Agriculture. Admission to this course is by application only.
STUDY TRIP: After completing the course, students will present their research reports to scientists and health care professionals in Uganda. Following the trip, teams will also present to audiences in the Twin Cities. (May, 2014)

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Chinese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHIN 102-01 First Year Chinese II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 112 Jin Stone 10 / 25 Materials icon
CHIN 102-02 First Year Chinese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 112 Jin Stone 1 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 102-L1 First Year Chinese II Lab T 02:30 pm-03:30 pm NEILL 102 Sijia Lan 4 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 102-L2 First Year Chinese II Lab W 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 102 Sijia Lan 7 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 102-L3 First Year Chinese II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 102 Sijia Lan 7 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 194-01 Masterpieces of Chinese Literature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 217 Rivi Handler-Spitz 0 / 20 Materials icon
CHIN 204-01 Second Year Chinese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 112 Xin Yang 8 / 20 Materials icon
CHIN 204-02 Second Year Chinese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 112 Xin Yang 4 / 20 Materials icon
CHIN 204-L1 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 228 Sijia Lan 6 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 204-L2 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 102 Sijia Lan 2 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 204-L3 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm NEILL 215 Sijia Lan 9 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 304-01 Third Year Chinese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Patricia Anderson 9 / 20 Materials icon
CHIN 304-L1 Third Year Chinese II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 228 Sijia Lan 7 / 12 Materials icon
CHIN 304-L2 Third Year Chinese II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 102 Sijia Lan 6 / 12 Materials icon
CHIN 408-01 Fourth Year Chinese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 102 Xin Yang 8 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 452-01 Translating Chinese: Theory and Practice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 217 Rivi Handler-Spitz 10 / 15 Materials icon

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CLAS 122-01 The Roman World TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Andrew Overman -1 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 122-01*
CLAS 123-01 Introduction to Archaeology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau 4 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 123-01*
CLAS 127-01 Women, Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 111 Beth Severy-Hoven 14 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 127-01*
CLAS 212-01 Elementary Latin II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 Beth Severy-Hoven 19 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 212-L1 Elementary Latin II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Beth Severy-Hoven 19 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 214-01 Elementary Arabic II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Wessam El Meligi 3 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 214-L1 Elementary Arabic II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 3 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 235-01 Elementary Greek II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 002 Nanette Goldman 14 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 235-L1 Elementary Greek II Lab T 10:00 am-11:00 am MAIN Nanette Goldman 22 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab will meet in 4th floor Old Main lounge*
CLAS 235-L2 Elementary Greek II Lab T 01:30 pm-02:30 pm MAIN Nanette Goldman 17 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab will meet in 4th floor Old Main lounge*
CLAS 294-01 Digging into Greek Art TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 102 Vanessa Rousseau 6 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ART 294-03* This course will provide an introduction to the history of Greek art and archaeology and its appropriation in the Roman era with a special focus on looted antiquities. We will learn about the diverse contexts and purposes for which art was used in the ancient world and explore what this material culture reveals about Greco-Roman cultural ideologies, including religion, politics, economics and gender and class structures. We will also look beyond the original stories of artworks to explore their contemporary histories, including the various debates on all sides of the antiquities trade as well as the effects of social and political events on the world’s cultural heritage. Research projects will involve provenance research, including working with primary source documents confiscated during investigations into the illegal trafficking of antiquities, allowing students to do original research and participate in the process of finding solutions to this global problem.
CLAS 301-01 Research Forum: The Archaeology of Galilee TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 Andrew Overman 7 / 20 Materials icon
Galilee emerged as a pivotal and productive region of the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East from the Classical period through Late Antiquity. The Galilee produced two of the world’s monotheistic religions. Early Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism developed in this small but fertile region. The Byzantine period also was a productive time in Galilee in term of Art and Architecture, and by the mid 7th c. much of Galilee was an Islamic center. These important and rapid changes make the Galilee a productive laboratory for Historian and Archaeologist.
In this Seminar we will study key sites and discoveries in the Galilee focusing on excavations from the last fifty years. Our focus is on the Hellenistic through Islamic periods. We will cover topics like what these excavations can tell us about the economy of Galilee in this period. We will analyze the religious buildings and architecture of these periods. Public space, domestic buildings and villages, and larger cities were all part of the landscape of Galilee in these periods. Archaeology has contributed a great deal to our knowledge of this fertile stretch of land over the last fifty years.
CLAS 332-01 Intermediate Latin: Poetry MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 001 Mark Gustafson 12 / 20 Materials icon
CLAS 338-01 Intermediate Hebrew II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 002 Nanette Goldman 13 / 20 Materials icon
CLAS 342-01 Intermediate Arabic II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Wessam El Meligi 5 / 20 Materials icon
CLAS 342-L1 Intermediate Arabic II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 10 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 362-01 Intermediate Greek: Poetry MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Nanette Goldman 12 / 20 Materials icon
CLAS 485-01 Advanced Arabic MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Wessam El Meligi 10 / 20 Materials icon

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 258 Elizabeth Ernst 0 / 24 Materials icon
COMP 123-02 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 258 Elizabeth Ernst 1 / 24 Materials icon
COMP 123-03 Core Concepts in Computer Science TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 258 Susan Fox -5 / 24 Materials icon
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 256 Shilad Sen -1 / 16 Materials icon
*Students registered for Section 01 of COMP 124 MUST register for Lab 1*
COMP 124-02 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 256 Baylor Wetzel 1 / 16 Materials icon
*Students registered for Section 02 of COMP 124 MUST register for Lab 2*
COMP 124-03 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 256 Shilad Sen -1 / 16 Materials icon
*Students registered for Section 03 of COMP 124 MUST register for Lab 3*
COMP 124-L1 Object-Oriented Programming Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 256 Shilad Sen 0 / 16 Materials icon
*Students registered for Lab 1 of COMP 124 MUST register for Section 01 of the course*
COMP 124-L2 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 256 Baylor Wetzel 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Students registered for Lab 2 of COMP 124 MUST register for Section 02 of the course*
COMP 124-L3 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Shilad Sen -3 / 16 Materials icon
*Students registered for Lab 3 of COMP 124 MUST register for Section 03 of the course*
COMP 225-01 Software Design and Development MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 245 Paul Cantrell 0 / 16 Materials icon
COMP 225-02 Software Design and Development MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 245 Paul Cantrell 0 / 16 Materials icon
COMP 261-01 Theory of Computation MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 245 Susan Fox 3 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MATH 361-01; ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 294-01 Cyber Politics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 401 Christiansen, Sen -3 / 20 Materials icon
*Satisfies the Writing general education requirement; cross-listed with POLI 214-01*
COMP 302-01 Introduction to Database Management Systems M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 241 Paul Wagner 0 / 30 Materials icon
COMP 365-01 Computational Linear Algebra MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 245 David Shuman -2 / 28 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MATH 365-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
COMP 380-01 Bodies/Minds: AI Robotics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 245 Susan Fox -3 / 24 Materials icon
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar MW 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 205 Susan Fox 14 / 24 Materials icon
*2 credit course*

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans 2 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 115-01 Introduction to American Economy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Paul Aslanian 20 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Mario Solis-Garcia -4 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Raymond Robertson 3 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Amy Damon -3 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Amy Damon 2 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Samantha Cakir 6 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 194-02 Organizational Leadership TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Jeff Evans 1 / 13 Materials icon
ECON 194-03 Health Economics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 305 Samantha Cakir 2 / 25 Materials icon
The field of health economics applies microeconomic theory to the study of health care, drawing on concepts from public, labor, and development economics and industrial organization. The healthcare industry is one of the largest in the US, representing nearly 18% of GDP and comprising a large share of the typical household budget. The role of government regulation in healthcare is significant and unique to the industry. This class will review topics relevant to the healthcare and health insurance industries in the US, other developed countries, and developing nations including the determinants of demand, pricing of healthcare services, the role of insurance and its reforms, incentives and hurdles for health technology innovations, and the role of health in economic development. We will also examine the traditional methods for evaluating healthcare services including cost benefit and cost effectiveness analysis. This course will count as a 200A elective. Prerequisite: ECON 119
ECON 225-01 Comparative Economic Systems TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Gary Krueger -1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 225-01*
ECON 242-01 Economics of Gender MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Karine Moe 2 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with WGSS 242-01*
ECON 333-01 Economics of Global Food Problems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Amy Damon 3 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 333-01 and INTL 333-01*
ECON 356-01 Capital Markets TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Liang Ding -5 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 361-01 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Gary Krueger -2 / 45 Materials icon
ECON 371-01 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Pete Ferderer 1 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 309 Raymond Robertson -4 / 20 Materials icon
ECON 381-L1 Intro to Econometrics Lab M 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 309 Raymond Robertson -2 / 20 Materials icon
ECON 394-01 Deals TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 150 Aslanian, Egge 1 / 30 Materials icon
*The two emeritus professors from Macalester teaching this class require that the enrolled students be somewhat representative of the student body by credits earned, but tilted towards seniors and juniors. The class size is 25, and the target is 12 seniors, 9 juniors and 4 sophomores. If the class is oversubscribed at registration, then the professors will keep a wait list. They might choose several from the wait list to join the 25 registered*
ECON 420-01 Quantitative Macroeconomic Analysis TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Mario Solis-Garcia 21 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 485-01 Empirical Finance TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 Liang Ding 16 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 490-01 Behavioral Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Pete Ferderer -1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 494-01*
ECON 494-01 Entrepreneurship TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 Joyce Minor -1 / 25 Materials icon
This course focuses on starting new businesses. From how to write a business plan to analyzing marketing and financing alternatives, the emphasis is on discovering the common elements in successful, new ventures. Guest speakers, student team projects and presentations, and analyses of case studies also are used. Prerequisites: Economics 113 and Economics 361 or permission of the instructor. This course does not count towards the capstone.

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
EDUC 200-01 Experiences in Education T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 216 Steven Jongewaard 3 / 12 Materials icon
*See Jaine Strauss, Department Chair, for permission/signature; first day attendance required; 2 credit course; S/NC grading only*
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 215 Tina Kruse -2 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 230-01 Community Youth Development in Multicultural America TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 215 Tina Kruse 1 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with AMST 294-05*
EDUC 330-01 Philosophy of Education TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 216 Steven Jongewaard 7 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
EDUC 360-01 Education and Emerging Technologies M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 202 Brad Belbas 1 / 12 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
EDUC 460-01 Education and Social Change MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 113 Sonia Mehta 0 / 10 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENGL 101-01 College Writing TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Jake Mohan 2 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 105-01 American Voices TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Daylanne English 4 / 20 Materials icon
In this introductory English course, we will listen to a wide range of American voices in a number of genres, from short stories to graphic narratives to a musical play. The texts in this course, although all are “American,” explore what it means to cross many kinds of borders, including those between: nations, races, ethnicities, languages, sexualities, genders, genres, and time periods—and even those between humans and non-humans. Our texts imagine, give voice to, and perform the crossing of such borders. In the process, they often test or expand the limits of literary (as well as visual and musical) form. Course requirements include: an in-class oral presentation, a brief written response to each primary reading, and three essays of about 5-7 pages each (one of which must be revised). This course will fulfill the gateway requirement or the literature by U.S. writers of color requirement for the English major. It also fulfills the college’s U.S. Multiculturalism and Writing general education requirements.
ENGL 136-01 Drama: Staging Violence MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Casey Jarrin 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Fulfills the 100-level/gateway requirement for the English major* Introduction to drama, with attention to genealogies of literary/dramatic form, performance practice, modes of stage/screen adaptation, and particular focus on the staging of physical, psychological, and political violence. From prison cells and interrogation rooms to battlefields and bedrooms, we’ll examine the spectacle and choreography of on-stage violence, the ethics of violent action and its representation, violence in language, and the relation between acts of storytelling and bloodletting, silence and speech/action. We’ll look at iconoclastic plays that push the limits of what can happen on stage and involve the audience in staged acts of violence: Shakespeare (Titus Andronicus), Oscar Wilde (Salome), Samuel Beckett (Happy Days, short plays), Peter Weiss (Marat/Sade or The Investigation), John Osborne (Look Back in Anger), Edward Albee (Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf), Ariel Dorfman (Death and the Maiden), Frank McGuinness (Someone Who’ll Watch Over Me), Tony Kushner (Angels in America: Millennium Approaches), Moises Kaufman and Tectonic Theater Project (The Laramie Project), Enda Walsh (The Walworth Farce), Sarah Kane (Blasted, Phaedra’s Love, 4:48 Psychosis), Martin McDonagh (The Pillowman, Lieutenant of Inishmore), along with classical Greek intertexts (Aeschylus, Oresteia; Euripides, Hippolytus), critical essays, and dramatic theory by Antonin Artaud (Theatre and Its Double) and Peter Brook (The Empty Space). Weekly film screenings may include: Titus (Dir. Julie Taymor, 1999), Salome’s Last Dance (Dir. Ken Russell, 1988), Beckett on Film series, Twilight Zone/“Deaths-Head Revisited”(Dir. Don Medford, 1961), Marat/Sade (Dir. Peter Brook, 1967), Death and the Maiden (Dir. Roman Polanski, 1988), Tony Manero (Dir. Pablo Larraín, 2008) / Post Mortem (Dir. Larraín, 2010), Inglourious Basterds (Dir. Quentin Tarantino, 2009), Hunger (Dir. Steve McQueen, 2008), Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (Dir. Mike Nichols, 1966), In Bruges (Dir. Martin McDonagh, 2008), Dogtooth/Kynodontas (Dir. Giorgos Lanthimos, 2009), The Act of Killing (Dir. Joshua Oppenheimer, 2012); at least one live performance at Frank Theatre, Penumbra, Guthrie, Walker.

ENGL 150-01 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 217 Ping Wang 5 / 16 Materials icon
This workshop explores the artistic modes of expression in poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction writing. Students will learn how other writers create their imagery, figurative language, sound, rhythmic structures, voice, plot, character, point of view, etc., and how they use these techniques as carriers to reach their artistic goals. In other words, techniques, no matter how basic and important, are not their own ends in writing, but should be cultivated and used as tools to find our voices, and to best express our original ideas. Written exercises are designed to help students get familiar with such necessary writing skills and explore the art of finding the right forms for the contents. Students will also learn how to read their work aloud in class. Reading aloud is not only to complete the writing process, but also to train the ear for sound, rhythm, image, and the flow of a poem or story. It also teaches both the reader and listeners the art of criticism, helps them overcome their weaknesses and cultivate their strengths in writing. There are about 6-9 hours of reading and writing assignments outside of class per week. Students are expected to enter this course with skills in close reading of literature and familiarity with literary terms and concepts, and most importantly, with a passion and devotion for reading and writing.
ENGL 150-02 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 217 Ping Wang 3 / 16 Materials icon
This workshop explores the artistic modes of expression in poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction writing. Students will learn how other writers create their imagery, figurative language, sound, rhythmic structures, voice, plot, character, point of view, etc., and how they use these techniques as carriers to reach their artistic goals. In other words, techniques, no matter how basic and important, are not their own ends in writing, but should be cultivated and used as tools to find our voices, and to best express our original ideas. Written exercises are designed to help students get familiar with such necessary writing skills and explore the art of finding the right forms for the contents. Students will also learn how to read their work aloud in class. Reading aloud is not only to complete the writing process, but also to train the ear for sound, rhythm, image, and the flow of a poem or story. It also teaches both the reader and listeners the art of criticism, helps them overcome their weaknesses and cultivate their strengths in writing. There are about 6-9 hours of reading and writing assignments outside of class per week. Students are expected to enter this course with skills in close reading of literature and familiarity with literary terms and concepts, and most importantly, with a passion and devotion for reading and writing.
ENGL 150-03 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 003 Matthew Burgess 0 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 150-04 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Matthew Burgess 0 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 150-05 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Kristin Naca 4 / 16 Materials icon
This course is an introduction to the methods writers practice to produce publishable, literary texts. We develop skills of reading reflexively, so students learn to absorb, borrow, play with techniques of great writers. Published prose and poetry, critical texts by published authors, as well as pieces of student writing, will serve as our texts for examination and discussion. Students generate multiple drafts of very short stories and poems, as well as plan and execute parts of a longer piece of prose. We’ll attend talks and readings by published authors. And we’ll work together as a community to practice a common critical language, in workshop, and inspire in each other greater risks and experimentation in our writing.
ENGL 150-06 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 227 Nick Dybek 2 / 16 Materials icon
This course offers an introduction to the techniques and vocabulary of poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction writing. We’ll read examples of published work in all three genres with an eye towards understanding how a piece of creative writing is constructed from the ground up—how the choices a writer makes in crafting imagery, plot, characterization, language, etc., come to serve his or her expressive vision, and help a reader connect with it. This class will primarily follow the workshop model. Be prepared to discuss the creative work of your peers, and to have your own writing discussed. First day attendance is required.
ENGL 220-01 Eighteenth-Century British Literature MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Neil Chudgar 0 / 20 Materials icon
This course is an introduction to eighteenth-century British literature, a set of texts and technologies that helped to build the modern world from scratch. Eighteenth-century England was not unlike the world we live in today: an environment of rapid scientific discovery, rampant global capitalism, unprecedented access to media technology, bewildering social upheaval and constant novelty. But eighteenth-century English readers and writers were still questioning the facts of modern life that we, in late America, have come to take for granted. Learning how to ask those questions again is our common goal in this course. To that end, we will encounter a challenging series of texts, in a wide variety of shapes, from a startling range of voices. Our texts may include works by, among others, Thomas Hobbes, Margaret Cavendish, John Bunyan, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Eliza Haywood, David Hume, Samuel Richardson, Dr. Johnson, Adam Smith, Frances Burney, and Olaudah Equiano. We’ll spend most of our time in the long eighteenth century, but we will sometimes make use of more recent thinking to help us think about the questions we discover. English majors may count this course as one of three required courses in literary history; it also satisfies general-education requirements in Internationalism, Writing, and the Humanities. Students from all majors and of all intellectual orientations will find questions here to interest and challenge them: the British eighteenth century is nothing if not comprehensive.
ENGL 230-01 Nineteenth-Century British Literature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Lesley Goodman 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* What happens when the needs and desires of the individual conflict with the needs of society? What does society owe the individual, and what does the individual owe society at large? These were animating questions in Britain in the nineteenth century; it was a culture frightened by the apparent excesses of the French Revolution right across the channel and determined to avoid a similar revolution by maintaining social stability and carefully managing the needs of its citizens. In this course, we will examine the developing literary landscape of the period, focusing on Romantic and Victorian poetry and fiction by Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Robert Louis Stevenson, in order to discover how these nineteenth-century thinkers and artists understood, depicted, and shaped the relationship between self and society.
ENGL 240-01 20th Century British Literature: Modern/Postmodern Apocalypse MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 305 Casey Jarrin -2 / 20 Materials icon
From fin-de-siècle nightmare visions to postmodern apocalyptic fictions, the Book of Revelation to 28 Days Later, we'll explore the origins, transformations, and aftershocks of British and Irish modernism in fiction, poetry, drama, film/visual art, and music. Starting with notorious prose experiments by Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and Samuel Beckett, we'll read modernism as an aesthetic of innovation and alienation with transatlantic and transnational sources. What distinguishes modernism from 19th-century romanticism, naturalism, realism, sensation fiction? Why are so many practitioners of “British” modernism American expatriates (Eliot, Pound, Stein), Irish authors/exiles (Yeats, Joyce, Beckett, Bowen), immigrants (Conrad)? How do authors and artists from Francis Bacon to Zadie Smith respond to the historical-apocalyptic forces of the World Wars, colonial occupations and independence movements, Imperial decline and rise of the Cold War, global catastrophes of genocide and epidemic disease, and military-industrial technologies of death (the atomic bomb, concentration camp, prison, highway car crash)? We’ll also encounter post-WWII aesthetic movements and cultural moments: “Angry Young Man” drama, British New Wave film, youth cultures and violence, postcolonial and postmodern fiction, the brutalities of “In-Yer-Face” theatre. We’ll look at how texts and films represent postwar generational conflict and post-trauma experience, reflect crises in masculinity, pose feminist interventions, give voice to diasporic communities, manipulate readerly and spectatorial desire, and respond to anxieties of the End of Culture, the Death of the Author, the End of Days.
ENGL 260-01 Science Fiction: From Matrix Baby Cannibals to Brave New Worlds W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 402 James Dawes 0 / 20 Materials icon
In the past fifty years science fiction has emerged as the primary cultural form in the Anglophone literary tradition for thinking about the eco-apocalypse: overpopulation, plague, resource depletion, natural and man-made disasters. It has also emerged as the primary cultural form for imagining a sustainable human future, through technological innovation, a balanced human ecosystem, and human flourishing through utopian principles of social justice. In this course we will examine works of science fiction as complex aesthetic achievements, as philosophical inquiries into the nature of being and time, and as theoretical examinations of the challenge of human sustainability. We will engage in intensive readings of contemporary texts, including works by Philip K. Dick, Margaret Atwood, Paolo Bacigalupi, P. D. James, Octavia Bulter, Yevgeny Zamyatin, Charles Stross, Walter Miller, Stanislaw Lem, China Mieville, Cormac McCarthy, and Kazuo Ishiguro. A companion film series will include the Matrix trilogy and other films in the genre.
ENGL 262-01 Studies in Literature and the Natural World MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Neil Chudgar 8 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 262-01* This is a course about how literary language enables human encounters with the objects and worlds that environ us. In our work together, we will describe the ways humans have used language to configure natural worlds in the past; we’ll search out the ways in which natural worlds are being written into being around us; and we will invent new literary language for the natural worlds of the future—worlds we fear, worlds we expect, and worlds we hope to live in. To accomplish these goals, we’ll make vigorous use of conceptual tools devised by current theorists, among them Bruno Latour, Jane Bennett, and Timothy Morton. To learn the natural worlds language has built in the past, we’ll read Anglophone texts that think seriously about objects in environments—particularly poetic ones, by (among others) Margaret Cavendish, James Thomson, William Wordsworth, and Gerard Manley Hopkins. You and your colleagues will select more recent texts to bring in for our inspection yourselves. Your own concerns, abilities, and preoccupations will give form to your work in rich and deep ways: assignments will be maximally challenging in content and minimally prescriptive in form. This course is appropriate for Environmental Studies students (of all 21 varieties), English students (in literature and in creative writing), scientists both natural and social, builders and inhabitants of environments, object-oriented programmers, poets, city mice and country mice, etc.
ENGL 275-01 African American Literature to 1900 TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 214 Daylanne English 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 275-01* In this survey course, we will trace the development of an African American literary tradition from the end of the 18th century to the turn of the 20th century, from Phillis Wheatley to Charles Chesnutt. We will explore the longstanding project of writing an African American self as both a literary and a political subject. We will read closely, critically, and appreciatively from multiple genres, including poetry, slave narratives, short stories, essays, and novels. We will supplement our exploration of those texts with critical and theoretical readings. Among the themes that will organize the course are: writing as a political act; generic innovation and subversion; literary representations of gendered and classed experiences of blackness in the United States; aesthetic innovation in relation to political and social change; an ongoing vernacular and/or oral tradition within African American arts and letters; the politics of audience; and the limits of literary representation itself. Requirements include: two papers of about 10 pages each, brief response papers to each new reading, an in-class presentation, class participation, and a final exam. This course fulfills either the literature by U.S. writers of color or the pre-1900 American literature requirement for the English major.
Prerequisite: A 100-level English course other than ENGL 150, Introduction to Creative Writing
ENGL 277-01 Angels and Demons of the American Renaissance (1835-1880) TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 James Dawes 0 / 20 Materials icon
As the United states lurched toward murderous civil war, a group of passionate, visionary, and bizarre artists set out to discover the soul of America. From 1850 to 1855, in one of the most astonishing creative convergences in literary history, the artists of what would come to be known as the American Renaissance wrote stories and poems that would enlighten, thrill, and terrify generations of readers. With aesthetic wonder and philosophical insight, they revealed both the angels and demons of human nature, inventing a uniquely American spiritual movement of unprecedented optimism at the same time that they damned it all to hell. Their works were spiritual and blasphemous, elegant and profane, beatific and pornographic, irreverently comic and heartwrenchingly sentimental. Everything that was written in America after this period would, in one way or another, have to come to terms with the brilliant and disturbing achievements of this small cluster of artists. In this course we will read texts by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson.
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 227 Nick Dybek 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* Tim O’Brien writes that a story, if truly told, makes the “stomach believe.” But how do you convince a reader to believe, or even to care about, something that, by definition, never happened? In this class, we will attempt to answer this question—and many others—by reading and critiquing works of fiction (those of published writers and those written by you and your classmates), and completing short exercises that aim to illuminate the craft by calling attention to choices and effects of imagery, perspective, character, etc. This course will follow the workshop model of peer critique, so be prepared to write and read quite a bit and have at least two pieces of fiction workshopped in class.
ENGL 281-02 Crafts of Writing: Fiction TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm ARTCOM 202 Marlon James 1 / 16 Materials icon
In English 150 Introduction To Creative Writing you encountered the fundamentals of creative writing: plot, setting imagery, voice and character. Building on that foundation, Crafts is where you put those fundamentals to striking use—where you really begin to write. Crafts Of Fiction expands on your previous learning and reshapes it in more complex and unconventional ways, a lecture on Text as Seduction or Energy and Tension, instead of the usual nuts and bolts of creative prose. The course will conducted for the most part in workshop format with the emphasis on continuing to develop writing skills, but it will also involve extensive readings and discussion of several examples of short fiction, as well as four works assigned for group study. You will think like a writer. And write like a born storyteller.
ENGL 285-01 Playwrighting and Textual Analysis MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 204 Beth Cleary 4 / 12 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with THDA 242-01* Students will read a variety of plays that exemplify structural and genric concerns of writing for live performance: tragedy; comedy; the courtroom drama; farce; experimental, others. Students will elaborate their own interests in these forms through a series of time-bound conventions: the 3-minute, 10-minute and ultimately one-act form. In-class exercises and prompts, and small-group workshopping and reading will challenge writers' development. A mid-term and final playreading series will allow students to hear their work read in a supportive public setting.
ENGL 294-01 Narrative Journalism M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Stephen Smith 1 / 16 Materials icon
Taught by acclaimed writer and journalist Stephen Smith (Executive Editor and Host of American RadioWorks, the highly respected documentary series from American Public Media). This course will focus on creating vivid, economical prose as a foundation for many types of expository writing. Students will do research and interviews for print journalism pieces. Writing for audio/radio presentation will also be covered. Students will write frequently, will edit each other, and will receive detailed suggestions on their writing from the instructor.
ENGL 294-02 The New Woman: Fictions of Feminism in the 1890s TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Lesley Goodman 2 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-05* In the late nineteenth century, a new kind of woman was invented. She rode a bicycle, educated herself, often at a university, and sometimes refused to marry or had sexual relationships outside of marriage. She might work for a living or even wear men’s clothes. She was a figure of controversy and debate in novels, stories, plays, and essays in both England and the United States. This course explores the fiction of the New Woman, a central genre in the first wave of Anglo-American feminism, in the context of nineteenth-century women’s history and literature and later developments in feminist theory. We will consider how fictions of the New Woman attempt to navigate the dominant late Victorian ideologies of gender and social structure, to use style and form to make cases for and against different aspects of women’s liberation, and to depict crucial feminist and social issues of marriage, sex, gender, and civil rights.
ENGL 315-01 Milton MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 111 Theresa Krier 13 / 20 Materials icon
John Milton’s epic Paradise Lost will be at the center of this course about seventeenth-century English literature, which arose amidst great religious tensions, the emergence of modern science, an English Civil War, even the beheading of a monarch. Throughout the course we’ll be inquiring how notions of liberty and revolution fueled not only political thinking but also religious debates, scientific thinking, and controversies about gender; we’ll also study how a desire to restore Eden informs the writing of the seventeenth century.
ENGL 366-01 Nabokov MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 228 Julia Chadaga 20 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RUSS 366-01; no prerequisites*
ENGL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 384-01 and INTL 384-01*
ENGL 394-01 Advanced Crafts of Fiction Workshop: Narrative Mechanics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Marlon James 5 / 16 Materials icon
*Prerequisite: one of the following: ENGL 280, 281, 282, 283 or 284* Before your first birthday, you have caught on to the fact that the louder you cry (expression) the quicker you’re picked up (response). In little over a year you have grasped language complexity and tone (stop it vs. stop it now). By age four, you’ve mastered metaphor (my toes are little piggies). Before your fifth birthday you have learned without anyone telling you that it’s a pretty red book, not a red pretty book, and by seven you have seen more drama than the total creative output of the Renaissance. So what’s left to teach in creative writing? Quite a bit. There is a universe of difference between a competent sentence and a dazzling one. Words that connect grammatically and words that fire the imagination. Otherwise there would be no difference between a training manual and a novel. In this course you will tackle creative writing from the ground up, breaking it down to the mechanics of literature: from word to phrase, sentence, paragraph, page and story. Why a romance word for love here and a Germanic word for hate there? When is a verb not an action word? Is ‘I’ necessary in first person? ‘You’ in second? How can we know a house is burning without describing house or fire? Why is his perfectly acceptable sentence more acceptable that your equally perfect one? After excellent grammar, and wonderful vocabulary, what comes next? Narrative Mechanics, is where we get down to the nuts and bolts of creative writing. Over the course of the semester we will go from merely correct, to striking prose. We will write 200 word sentences that never run out of breath, five page stories covering 500 years, and two word sentences that capture what other writers take pages to capture. We will pinpoint the 16 things that cause bad dialogue, and uncover what really happens, word for word when the reader says, “It felt like I was there.” And yes, you will be writing as if you’ve never written before.
ENGL 394-02 Advanced Crafts of Fiction Workshop: Beginning the Novel W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 204 Marlon James 9 / 16 Materials icon
*Prerequisite: one of the following: ENGL 280, 281, 282, 283 or 284*
ENGL 394-03 Writing Human Rights TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Dawes, Shandy 0 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-01; signature of instructor required; first day attendance required* This writing intensive seminar will explore the relationship between human rights and life narratives. Life stories are of increasing importance across a range of academic disciplines, but nowhere more so than in the interdisciplinary work of human rights. Human rights advocacy has always relied upon the use of peoples' stories—to give voice to those cruelly silenced by violence, to generate sympathy in global bystanders, to shame perpetrator governments. The special challenges of this sort of storytelling have recently become topics of special attention in academic scholarship. Many of the questions are ethical: How can you move audiences without being sensational? How can you speak for others without displacing them? How can you put incommunicable trauma into words without somehow altering the truth of it? This interdisciplinary course, co-taught by faculty in Anthropology and English, will train students in the methods and ethics of life history interviewing and the craft of narrative writing. Priority for registration will be given to students who can count the course for one or more of the following: English, Anthropology, Human Rights and Humanitarianism. We also aim to achieve a mix of sophomores, juniors, and seniors in the course.
ENGL 394-05 Poetry: Form and Argument TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 212 Kristin Naca 7 / 16 Materials icon
This course is an advanced workshop in poetry writing. We focus on the ways poets put poems together, the ways they read, and the books, art, relationships and tales that surround them. Students will also try out their editor’s eye, by compiling an anthology of poems and writing an introduction. Advanced students will read several collections and put together an extensive bibliography. Poets will work on revisions from prior poetry courses, as well as develop a series of poems connected to an axis of subject matter/imagination: particular techniques in poetry or art, belief or philosophy, science, etc.
ENGL 400-01 Special Topics in Lit Studies: Shakespeare: Gender and Race MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 003 Theresa Krier 10 / 12 Materials icon
This senior seminar will study Shakespeare's Othello, The Merchant of Venice, Antony & Cleopatra, Macbeth, The Tempest, and the Sonnets, along with a wide range of thinkers in varied disciplines, to explore specific histories of racialization and gendering that Shakespeare's work brings into view, and to consider what his dramatic, narrative, and poetic arts bring to the issues. We will seek concepts that address both the social structures in which Shakespeare's characters dwell and their complex personhood and imaginative lives. The course will include research skills and the development of each student's large project.
ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 217 Ping Wang 4 / 12 Materials icon
This advanced writing workshop is designed to help you to start your own writing projects (poetry, story, creative non-fiction, or mixed genres). The reading materials chosen for the workshop will help you understand how writers and poets started their projects with an idea, how they researched and collected materials, and how they processed the raw materials and transformed them into a book, all of which will help you shape your own ideas and materials into workable projects, and hopefully, a coherent polished manuscript of your own at the end of the semester. It’s important to have individual meetings with the instructor at the beginning of the semester to set the framework for your project, and in the middle of the semester to make sure your progress is going at the right pace and in the right direction.
85% of the class time will focus on workshopping YOUR writing as a group. 10% percent of the class time will focus on discussing the reading materials as a guide to your writing on how to gather raw materials, how to find the right voice and perspective, how to build the characters, how to move the plots, and how to match the form with the content, and finally, how to put together a manuscript as a whole. 5% of the class time will be for students’ presentations and other organization business. Each class will begin with a 2-minute meditation as a way to connect our internal and external worlds, mind and body, individual and universal. It’s not a prayer, but a tool to help us focused, connected, alert, and relaxed.

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENVI 133-01 Environmental Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Brian Krohn 3 / 18 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch 3 / 18 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 194-01 Dirt and Development: The Relationship Between Humans and Soil MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 243 Charlotte Riggs 9 / 20 Materials icon
A living, breathing, dynamic ecosystem exists beneath our feet. Soils play an important role in natural and human systems. They regulate water quality and agricultural production, and support large amounts of biodiversity. However, the effects of human activities – like soil erosion, land use, and climate change – also alter soil function. In this course we will explore the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils, as well as how these properties influence soil formation and function. Throughout the course we will consider the close, complex relationship between humans and soil from scientific, historical, and policy perspectives.
ENVI 194-02 Environmental Sociology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Terry Boychuk -4 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with SOCI 194-01*
ENVI 225-01 100 Words for Snow: Language and Nature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Marianne Milligan 1 / 17 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 225-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 232-01 People, Agriculture and the Environment TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 William Moseley 0 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 232-01*
ENVI 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Chris Wells 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 234-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 237-01 Environmental Justice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Chris Wells 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 237-01 and HIST 237-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 258-01 Geog of Environmental Hazards MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Eric Carter 9 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 258-01*
ENVI 262-01 Studies in Literature and the Natural World MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Neil Chudgar 8 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 262-01* This is a course about how literary language enables human encounters with the objects and worlds that environ us. In our work together, we will describe the ways humans have used language to configure natural worlds in the past; we’ll search out the ways in which natural worlds are being written into being around us; and we will invent new literary language for the natural worlds of the future—worlds we fear, worlds we expect, and worlds we hope to live in. To accomplish these goals, we’ll make vigorous use of conceptual tools devised by current theorists, among them Bruno Latour, Jane Bennett, and Timothy Morton. To learn the natural worlds language has built in the past, we’ll read Anglophone texts that think seriously about objects in environments—particularly poetic ones, by (among others) Margaret Cavendish, James Thomson, William Wordsworth, and Gerard Manley Hopkins. You and your colleagues will select more recent texts to bring in for our inspection yourselves. Your own concerns, abilities, and preoccupations will give form to your work in rich and deep ways: assignments will be maximally challenging in content and minimally prescriptive in form. This course is appropriate for Environmental Studies students (of all 21 varieties), English students (in literature and in creative writing), scientists both natural and social, builders and inhabitants of environments, object-oriented programmers, poets, city mice and country mice, etc.
ENVI 280-01 Environmental Classics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Christina Manning -1 / 18 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 226 Jerald Dosch 0 / 44 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch -1 / 22 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson 1 / 22 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required*
ENVI 294-01 Food, Environment, and Society in 20th Century America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Ryan Edgington 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-08*
ENVI 294-02 Rights of Non Human Animals MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Diane Michelfelder 10 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 294-02*
ENVI 333-01 Economics of Global Food Problems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Amy Damon 3 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ECON 333-01 and INTL 333-01*
ENVI 335-01 Science and Citizenship TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke 7 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 335-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 368-01 Sustainable Development and Global Future TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Roopali Phadke 12 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 368-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 488-01 Sr Seminar in Environmental St TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Chris Wells 8 / 18 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 217 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 3 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 102-02 French II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 217 Jean-Pierre Karegeye 10 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 102-L2 French II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Benjamin Cornet 0 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 102-L3 French II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng -1 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 102-L4 French II Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng 5 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 111 Juliette Rogers 7 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 Benjamin Cornet 5 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 111-L2 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 247 Benjamin Cornet 4 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 203-01 French III MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 212 Juliette Rogers 7 / 30 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 102 Rokhaya Dieng 3 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 111 Rokhaya Dieng 9 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 203-L3 French III Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng 10 / 15 Materials icon
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 214 Martine Sauret 7 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 204-03 Text, Film and Media MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 111 Martine Sauret 4 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab T 09:10 am-10:10 am NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng 4 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng 3 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 102 Rokhaya Dieng 3 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 204-L6 Text, Film and Media Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 228 Rokhaya Dieng 1 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 204 Andrew Billing 9 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools M 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 404 Benjamin Cornet 7 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 111 Benjamin Cornet 3 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 306-01 Introduction to Literary Analysis TR 08:00 am-09:30 am NEILL 111 Joelle Vitiello 2 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required*
FREN 408-01 French Cultural Studies: Immigration TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 401 Joelle Vitiello 5 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required* This course explores the diversity of France through its immigrant population. After studying and discussing the history and composition of immigration in France, students look at cultural productions, especially literature, films, music and art as well as documentation about contemporary issues in French society associated with immigration. The course includes a study of various cities in France (Marseilles, Lyon, and Paris as well as their suburbs), and contextualizes the current situation regarding French and European laws, as well as various types of housing in connection with immigration. The course takes into account gender, class, religion, culture, and race issues as well as language issues. Materials include statistics, essays, video-conferences, images, film, music, fiction literature, maps, and internet and web-based resources. Readings include materials about the first immigrants to France, the colonial immigrants such as the Tirailleurs Sénégalais and their descendants, how the French colonies in North Africa and the French-Algerian war affected immigration in France, and what are the legacies of French imperialism for French multiculturalism. The course also includes literature by Sub-Saharan, Algerian, Vietnamese, and Caribbean writers. Films include documentaries on immigration and fiction films from Thé au harem d'Archi Ahmed, to Entre les murs. Music includes rap, slam, and raï. The course is taught in French. Prerequisite(s): One 300-level course or placement test or permission of instructor.
FREN 416-01 French Interdisciplinary Studies: Existentialist Metaphysics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 235-01* “All living is one’s own living, feeling oneself live, knowing oneself to be existing, where knowing does not imply intellectual knowledge or any special wisdom but is that surprising presence which one’s life has for every one of us” (Jose Ortega y Gasset). For those thinkers whose work is associated with the philosophical tradition of existentialism, the understanding of human existence represents a singular gateway to the understanding of being, the general object of the study of metaphysics. But just what does it mean to exist? In this course, we will reflectively consider responses to this and other questions that play a key role within existentialist metaphysics. Typically, readings will be drawn from works by philosophers such as Martin Heidegger, Karl Jaspers, Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Jose Ortega y Gassett. While there is no prerequisite for this course, some familiarity with the history of European philosophy would be helpful. Note: Class discussions will be in English, but advanced French majors and minors will have the option to do the readings in French and to complete the written assignments in French, upon approval by the instructor.
FREN 494-01 Science Fiction and Technology in French Literature and Film TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 Andrew Billing 15 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance is required* In this course we will analyze French fiction, graphic novels and film associated with the genre of science fiction and taking as their principal themes speculation on technology, travel in time and space and utopian or dystopian representations of the future. The primary question guiding our discussions will be whether science fiction should be understood as a form of projection, wish-fulfillment or a "journey into fear" that only reflects the anxieties of the dominant ideologies of the society and historical situation in which it is produced; or instead, whether it can amount to a real form of thinking on the limits of politics and history and on the possibilities for radical social transformation. We will also consider whether it is possible to identify any cultural specificity of French science fiction writing or a French attitude to technology in the works we discuss. Our discussions will be informed by readings of theorists including Frederic Jameson, Donna Haraway, Bruno Latour, and Pierre Macherey. Texts and films studied will include a small number of early works such as Cyrano de Bergerac's L'Autre Monde (1657) and Mercier's 1771 novel L'An 2440; the fiction of Jules Verne; and films including Melies's 1902 Le Voyage dans la lune; La Jetee (1962); Godard's Alphaville (1965); Laloux's La Planete sauvage (1973); and Franju's classic take on plastic surgery and mutilation Les Yeux sans visage (1960). This course, including class discussions and readings, will be taught in French. Prerequisite: either French 306 or French 394 (Stylistique, grammaire et traduction (Style, Grammar, and Translation), with permission of instructor.

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOG 111-01 Human Geography of Global Issues MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran 0 / 35 Materials icon
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Sanchayeeta Adhikari -3 / 30 Materials icon
*$25 course fee required*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab W 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp 0 / 17 Materials icon
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 108 Ashley Nepp 1 / 17 Materials icon
GEOG 232-01 People, Agriculture and the Environment TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 William Moseley 0 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01*
GEOG 248-01 The Political Geography of Nations and Nationalism TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 216 Daniel Trudeau 2 / 20 Materials icon
GEOG 249-01 Regional Geog of Latin America MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 06A Eric Carter 9 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 249-01*
GEOG 258-01 Geography of Environmental Hazards MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 107 Eric Carter 9 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 258-01*
GEOG 261-01 Geography of World Urbanization MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 David Lanegran 18 / 30 Materials icon
GEOG 263-01 Geography of Development and Underdevelopment TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 105 William Moseley 3 / 20 Materials icon
GEOG 294-01 Mountains, Tigers, and People: Environmental Geography of South Asia MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Sanchayeeta Adhikari 22 / 30 Materials icon
This course is designed to introduce students to the contemporary South Asia through the broad theme of human-environment interactions. The course will be divided into three parts. In first part, we will examine the highly diverse physical environment of South Asia which includes countries of India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Pakistan. In part two of this course, we will briefly examine human geography (demographic, economic and political scenario) of South Asia. The third part of this course will examine various environmental challenges facing South Asia from a human-environment interactions perspective. This part will be a case study approach where environmental themes such as biodiversity conservation (tiger crisis in India), climate change (sinking land of Bangladesh and Sri Lanka), soil erosion and land degradation (mountain escapades in Karakoram and Himalayan ranges of Nepal, Bhutan and Pakistan), urbanization and air pollution in cities of India and Pakistan, etc. will be dealt with. Part I and Part II of this course will be covered in three weeks block each and would be lecture based. The environmental case studies of different countries within South Asia will be a seminar based approach.
GEOG 341-01 Urban Social Geography: City Life and Landscapes TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A Daniel Trudeau 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 341-01*
GEOG 365-01 Urban GIS TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 Laura Smith -2 / 15 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; $25 course fee required*
GEOG 365-L1 Urban GIS Lab TBA TBA Ashley Nepp 0 / 15 Materials icon
GEOG 378-01 Statistical Research Methods in Geography MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Laura Smith -4 / 25 Materials icon
GEOG 394-01 Advanced GIS for Health TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Eric Carter 1 / 15 Materials icon
*$25 materials fee is required* This course builds on skills learned in the Introductory Geographic Information Systems (GIS) course by focusing explicitly on geospatial techniques used for analyzing problems in public health. Through lectures, discussions, hands-on labs, and collaborative group work, students will learn how to access, process, and map health outcomes data. Using advanced spatial-statistical and epidemiological tools, we will analyze health disparities, neighborhood effects on health, and spatial clustering of disease events, such as rare cancers. We will use similar techniques to examine environmental health
and environmental justice questions in a spatial framework; analyze the spread of infectious diseases; model the spatial ecology of vector-borne diseases, such as Lyme disease and malaria; and optimize spatial access of populations to health care services. Students will
be required to complete a final independent project. Lab section registration is required. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week required. Materials fee is required. Prerequisite: GEOG-225 and permission of instructor.
GEOG 394-L1 Adv GIS for Health Lab TBA TBA Ashley Nepp 2 / 15 Materials icon
GEOG 488-01 Transportation Geography W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Laura Smith 0 / 15 Materials icon

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOL 101-01 Dinosaurs MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 100 Kristina Curry Rogers 0 / 55 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
GEOL 102-01 Exploring the Solar System MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 187 Karl Wirth 4 / 28 Materials icon
GEOL 165-01 History/Evolution of Earth MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 150 Raymond Rogers 4 / 48 Materials icon
GEOL 165-L1 History/Evolution of Earth Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 2 / 24 Materials icon
GEOL 165-L2 History/Evolution of Earth Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 2 / 24 Materials icon
GEOL 255-01 Structural Geology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 179 Erkan Toraman 3 / 24 Materials icon
GEOL 255-L1 Structural Geology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 179 Erkan Toraman 3 / 24 Materials icon
GEOL 265-01 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers 1 / 18 Materials icon
GEOL 265-L1 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers 1 / 18 Materials icon
GEOL 302-01 Petrology and Geochemistry MWF 08:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth 10 / 18 Materials icon
GEOL 303-01 Surface/Groundwater Hydrology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor 3 / 24 Materials icon
*$75 field trip fee will be charged for this course*
GEOL 303-L1 Surface/Groundwater Hydro Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 175 Kelly MacGregor 4 / 24 Materials icon
GEOL 400-01 Capstone Research Methods in Geology TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 7 / 10 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; 1 credit; S/NC grading only* Geology majors and minors conducting research in the geosciences frequently utilize a variety of analytic and other laboratory equipment. This course provides students with guidance, mentorship and hands-on experience using the equipment and analytic tools they require to conduct their capstone and independent research projects. Students may take this course during any semester they are conducting research.
GEOL 450-01 Senior Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 MacGregor, Wirth 5 / 18 Materials icon
*1 credit course*

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GERM 102-01 Elementary German II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 215 Rachael Huener 10 / 20 Materials icon
GERM 102-L1 Elementary German II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 Birgit Heinrich 1 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 102-L2 Elementary German II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Birgit Heinrich 1 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 102-L4 Elementary German II Lab M 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 228 Birgit Heinrich 4 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 214 Rachael Huener 5 / 20 Materials icon
*5 credit course*
GERM 110-L2 Accel Elementary German Lab TR 09:00 am-10:00 am NEILL 228 Birgit Heinrich 0 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 110-L3 Accel Elementary German Lab TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm OLRI 247 Birgit Heinrich -1 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 110-L4 Accel Elementary German Lab W 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 112 Birgit Heinrich 1 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 110-L5 Accel Elem German Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 5 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 214 Brigetta Abel 10 / 20 Materials icon
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm NEILL 214 Birgit Heinrich 0 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 203-L4 Intermediate German I Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 1 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 215 Brigetta Abel 8 / 20 Materials icon
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am OLRI 247 Birgit Heinrich 5 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 204-L2 Intermediate German II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 Birgit Heinrich 1 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 370 Birgit Heinrich 1 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 204-L4 Intermediate German II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 214 Birgit Heinrich 1 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 215 Gisela Peters 14 / 20 Materials icon
GERM 305-L3 German Through Media Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 4 / 10 Materials icon
GERM 309-01 German Cultural History II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 227 Rachael Huener 10 / 20 Materials icon
GERM 365-01 Kafka: Gods, Animals, and Other Species of Modernity TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela 13 / 20 Materials icon
This course approaches Kafka’s work both as a case for literary analysis and as a text that reveals insights into modernity — the historical era characterized by capitalism, secularization, the nation-state, increasing bureaucratization, the commodification of art, the development of technology and media. In addition to reading closely a selection of Kafka’s short stories and excerpts from his novels, we shall also read some influential commentaries on his work, as well as texts that address major phenomena that characterize modernity. Taught in German. Offered spring term of even-numbered years. Prerequisite: GERM 308, 309, or the equivalent.
GERM 394-01 Value: The Bad, the Ugly and the Cheap TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 226 Kiarina Kordela 8 / 45 Materials icon
*Taught in English; cross-listed with ART 394-03 and MCST 394-03* For thousands of years value has been scrutinized in philosophy, art history, and economic analysis, as it cuts across three constitutive aspects of human and social life: ethics, aesthetics, and economy. Not only do we have and impose on the world our moral, aesthetic, and exchange values, but these three fields often become difficult to distinguish, as is evident in the slippery flexibility of words that allow us to say as much “I find this painting bad” as “I think this person is bad,” or “this is a worthless remark” but also “this is a worthless check.” This course will focus primarily on influential accounts of value in aesthetic theory, while also examining the ways in which aesthetic value demarcates itself from or implicates its moral and economic counterparts, and what the interplays among the three fields entail for aesthetic value. Our readings will primarily focus on the impact of German thought on the formation of modern aesthetic theory—from the early eighteenth century through the Enlightenment and Romanticism to high modernism—and secondarily on more contemporary commentaries on aesthetic theory and the formation of the canon. All readings in English. No pre-knowledge required. This course is appropriate for all level students.

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 110 Galo Gonzalez -1 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 100 Cecilia Battauz 1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Cecilia Battauz 1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 8 / 10 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 212 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 202 Rosa Rull-Montoya -2 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 402 Antonella Morales -2 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 370 Antonella Morales 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L3 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 226 Antonella Morales 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Antonella Morales 1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 9 / 10 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 110-01 Accelerated Beginning Spanish MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am ARTCOM 202 Rosa Rull-Montoya -1 / 15 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor is required; first day attendance required; 5 credit course*
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 213 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz 2 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; 5 credit course*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 216 Abby Bajuniemi 3 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-03 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 212 Claudia Giannini 8 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 402 Antonella Morales 3 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Antonella Morales 1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 226 Antonella Morales 4 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L5 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 101 Antonella Morales 5 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L7 Intermediate Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 8 / 10 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 214 Alicia Munoz 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 216 Alicia Munoz 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 216 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 2 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-04 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 228 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 1 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Cecilia Battauz -3 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 404 Cecilia Battauz 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 404 Cecilia Battauz 2 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 402 Cecilia Battauz 2 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 402 Cecilia Battauz 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 228 Cecilia Battauz -2 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L8 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 228 Cecilia Battauz -2 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L9 Intermediate Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 6 / 10 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 402 Leah Sand -2 / 15 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor is required; first day attendance required; 5 credit course*
HISP 220-02 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 213 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor is required; first day attendance required; 5 credit course*
HISP 305-01 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 113 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 10 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-02 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 216 Rosa Rull-Montoya 8 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-03 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 402 Leah Sand 2 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-04 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 213 Leah Sand 2 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 215 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 4 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 307-02 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 113 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 8 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-02; first day attendance required*
HISP 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 214 Alicia Munoz 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Cynthia Kauffeld 8 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 309-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 331-01 Luso-Brazilian Voices: Conversations and Composition MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 213 J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz -1 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 419-01 Neither Saints nor Sinners: Women Writers of the Hispanic World MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 216 Margaret Olsen 9 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* Sixteenth and seventeenth century women writers were in constant dialogue with their male counterparts and dedicated much of their energy to debunking myths of female purity, passivity and ignorance. To this end, they created female protagonists of great strength and integrity. Exploring themes such as life in the convent, the mujer varonil and the mujer vestida de hombre, we will look at many peninsular as well as New World women authors who were busy challenging both social and aesthetic norms in their writing. This course satisfies Area I of the Hispanic Studies curriculum.
HISP 427-01 Dramatic Words: Poesia Erotica MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 212 Galo Gonzalez 7 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 435-01 History of Spanish Language MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 113 Cynthia Kauffeld 15 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 435-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 488-01 Senior Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MARKIM 201 Margaret Olsen 8 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HIST 122-01 The Roman World TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Andrew Overman -1 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CLAS 122-01*
HIST 136-01 American Violence 1800 to 1865: The Early Republic to the Civil War MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 009 Eric Otremba 3 / 25 Materials icon
HIST 194-01 Atomic America TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Ryan Edgington 7 / 25 Materials icon
Beginning with the 1945 test of the first nuclear weapon in the New Mexican desert, Americans have had to deal with the awe inspiring power of the atom. This course introduces students to the complex cultural, political, scientific, and environmental histories of the atomic age. The course begins with the project to build a nuclear weapon and their subsequent use on Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We will then follow the bomb from proving grounds to memory. Topics will include civil defense and the bomb in popular culture. The dispossession of indigenous communities on Bikini and Enewetak where the United States tested in the Pacific Ocean, uranium mining on Navajo lands, monumentalities and the public history of nuclear weapons. We will additionally watch films, read atomic comics and fiction, and watch government propaganda. While the instructor will give brief conceptual lectures, textual analysis and in class discussion will act as the primary mode of inquiry
HIST 194-02 Going Global: The Experiment of World History TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Karin Velez 6 / 25 Materials icon
What broad patterns do we see repeated across human cultures and eras? How do current international concerns shape the way we perceive these patterns, and retell the past? This course is an introduction to the youngest and boldest experimenters in the discipline of history: global historians. We follow these trail-blazers to every corner of the planet and across the grandest expanses of time, all the way from the emergence of Homo sapiens to the year 2013. Such a sweeping survey of human history invites us to look beyond chronological, national, cultural and geographic boundaries. It also forces us to sharply rethink the methodology of traditional historians. Throughout our critical survey of world history, we will assess the usefulness (and potential outdatedness) of the concepts of civilization, empire, revolution, and global networks. *Meets the global/comparative requirement of the history major*
HIST 220-01 Ethics of Service M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 Jamie Monson 14 / 25 Materials icon
HIST 222-01 Imagining the American West TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 402 Lynn Hudson 4 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 222-01*
HIST 234-01 American Environmental History MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Chris Wells 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
HIST 237-01 Environmental Justice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Chris Wells 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 237-01 and ENVI 237-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
HIST 262-01 Soviet Union and Successors MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 Peter Weisensel 22 / 25 Materials icon
HIST 275-01 The Rise of Modern China MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam 12 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 275-01*
HIST 282-01 Latin America: Art and Nation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Ernesto Capello 20 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 282-01*
HIST 294-01 The Global Struggle for American Independence MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 003 Eric Otremba 19 / 25 Materials icon
This class will look at the global dimensions of the American Revolution. While the Revolution may have officially started in Massachusetts, the grievances of the minutemen who lined up that day were largely shaped by the commercial regulations of Great Britain’s international empire. Similarly, while the war was initially an isolated conflict between England and her colonies, it soon became an international affair involving over a half dozen major nation-states, with fighting spread over five continents. Finally, new American ideals on individual liberty spread quickly beyond the original thirteen colonies. In the 50 years after 1776, these ideas would be used in over a dozen revolutions across the globe. Class will cover all of these facets of the American Revolution, examining its effects in places from Virginia to Paris, from Boston to Kingston, from Philadelphia to Angola, and from New York to New South Wales.
HIST 294-02 Technology and Empire in the Americas: A History MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Eric Otremba 21 / 25 Materials icon
This class will survey how the development of European science and technology went hand in hand with European imperial expansion during the early modern period. Class will define science and technology broadly—including physical, chemical, medical, bureaucratic, linguistic, and other knowledge forms—and demonstrate how Europeans developed and employed these knowledges within the context of their desire for dominion over the New World. Class will also focus upon the contributions of non-European actors and actants towards scientific and technological development during this time. This focus will cover contributions by the Atlantic world’s array of non-European peoples and cultures within scientific and technological development, as well as attempts by Europeans to alternatively encourage, control, stymie, and co-opt non-European input into official knowledge canons. Class will examine both theoretical works which define science and technology broadly, and historical case studies which demonstrate these theories in practice.
HIST 294-03 Transgender History, Identity, and Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Catherine Jacquet 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02 and WGSS 294-02* This course explores the experiences of and responses to trans*, gender non-conforming, and intersex (TGI) people in the nineteenth and twentieth century US. We will examine how scientific/medical authorities, legal authorities, and everyday people have understood and responded to various kinds of gender non-conformity. Course texts include social histories, medical and legal perspectives, popular culture, and the work of contemporary TGI activists. A significant portion of the class will focus on the words and experiences of TGI people themselves, emphasizing how TGI people have understood their own experience and how they have been agents of their own lives.
HIST 294-04 Imagining the Modern City MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Ernesto Capello 14 / 25 Materials icon
Between c.1850-1950 the world’s cities transformed as never before. Across the globe, urban spaces were reconstituted as massive stages for the economic and cultural transformations of the day – the sites of indistrialization, central planning, mass transport, and ever shifting millions of migrants and immigrants. Outlying towns were swallowed by these burgeoning metropolises, whereas even the most isolated hamlets soon became embroiled in the new urban world order. This course will trace the broader history of global urbanization during this period with an emphasis on how these processes were imagined by nineteenth and twentieth urbanites. How was the modern city conceived as it transformed beyond all recognition? How did the global scope of the modern city impact these representations? How were new technologies (of vision, of construction, of media) incorporated into this envisioning of the modern city? And how did these imaginings travel across the globe, themselves spurring further urbanization as they went? Counts for Global/Comparative Requirement.
Counts toward Urban Studies concentration.
HIST 294-05 Science, Magic and Belief TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Karin Velez 11 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-01* Events of the distant European past continue to shape our modern attitudes towards religion, magic and science. How did people in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Atlantic world use these frameworks to make sense of the world around them? In this course, we will journey back to the period of the "Scientific Revolution" to investigate how and why people began to distinguish sharply between the three systems. Who lost, and who profited, from this transition ? What similarities between religion, magic and science persisted ? To understand this turning point, we will compare contemporaneous cases of individuals who practiced magic, science and religion and ran afoul of authorities. Their trials highlight how the three spheres began to diverge. Cases we will consider might include the 1633 trial of Galileo, and the 1663 witchcraft trial of Tempel Anneke in Germany.
HIST 294-06 African American Women's History TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Lynn Hudson 20 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-04 and WGSS 294-06* This class will examine the scholarly literature that places black women at the center of debates about the nature of slavery and freedom in the US. We will consider, among other texts, Jennifer Morgan's Laboring Women: Reproduction and Gender in New World Slavery, Tera Hunter’s To 'Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors After the Civil War', and biographies of African American women in the civil rights movement. The course will also evaluate the influence of black feminist scholarship on the field of African American history.
HIST 294-07 War and Society in Europe MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Peter Weisensel 13 / 25 Materials icon
HIST 294-08 Food, Environment, and Society in 20th Century America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Ryan Edgington 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-01* This course will follow the history of 20th century American food from the farm through the factory and then to the table. In other words, students will come to know how Supermarket America came to dominate the landscape. We will explore the transformation of the family farm to industrial endeavor and the role of the federal government, farm lobbyists, and land grant universities in that process. The course will also examine the role of technology and science in making American food systems more efficient and complex through assembly lines, pesticides and herbicides, and the genetic modification of foods. Finally we will explore the political questions surrounding Supermarket America and why many Americans revolted against it by demanding organic foods and macrobiotic diets and more generally food justice. The environmental impact of America's ways of eating will run throughout the course. While the instructor will give brief conceptual lectures, textual analysis and in class discussion will act as the primary mode of inquiry.
HIST 376-01 Public History W 01:10 pm-04:10 pm MAIN 011 Lynn Hudson 19 / 25 Materials icon
HIST 378-01 War Crimes and Memory in East Asia MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Yue-him Tam 12 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 378-01*
HIST 379-01 The Study of History M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Ernesto Capello 12 / 25 Materials icon
HIST 394-01 Violence, Memory and Reconciliation in Southern Africa TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 111 Jamie Monson 22 / 25 Materials icon
In southern Africa, wrote Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the past has been unwilling to lie down and stay quiet – it has "a persistent way of returning and haunting us." From apartheid South Africa to anti-colonial liberation struggles in Namibia, Zimbabwe and Mozambique to civil conflict in Angola, memories of violence have persisted over time in southern Africa alongside processes of forgetting. In our course we will study the history of violence, the way it marked individual and collective memory, and the role of state and non-state projects of reconciliation in historical context. The course will be an upper-level research seminar with a focus on student in-depth individual research projects on a topic of their choice.
HIST 394-02 The Pacific World since 1800 W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Ryan Edgington 11 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 394-01* Over that past twenty years scholars have begun to examine the Pacific World as a distinct region of cultural and economic exchange. This course offers students the opportunity to delve into the recent theories on and history of the Pacific World in two ways. Over the first third of the course we will read selected texts on the region. We will begin by finding the "pacific world" and placing it in its proper global and transnational context. We will then weave the problematic idea of "America’s Century" and the more recent construction of a "Pacific Century" into the rest of the first third of the class. Each student will then produce a semester long research paper and share their findings with colleagues. Research and writing will consume the bulk of this course. Potential topics include early exploration, immigration and cultural exchanges, colonialism and dispossession, and resistance to those trends, warfare, the impact of science and technology in Pacific Island communities, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum, or any other topic that would drive a research paper you were excited in.

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Interdisciplinary Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTD 191-01 Supplementary Writing Workshop T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 304 Adrienne Christiansen 4 / 10 Materials icon
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading; 1 credit; workshop runs February 4 - April 22*
INTD 191-02 Supplementary Writing Workshop R 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 05 Adrienne Christiansen 3 / 10 Materials icon
Limited to First Year Students; by invitation only; S/NC grading; 1 credit; workshop runs February 6 - April 24*
INTD 411-01 Senior Seminar in Community and Global Health W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 205 Vittorio Addona 3 / 26 Materials icon
*1 credit course*
INTD 411-02 Sr Seminar in Community and Global Health W 07:00 pm-08:00 pm CARN 208 Ron Barrett 5 / 20 Materials icon
*1 credit course*

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTL 112-01 Intro to International Studies: Globalization, Media, and Cultural Identities TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel 1 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
INTL 114-01 Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 James von Geldern -2 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
INTL 115-01 Introduction to International Studies: World Travel MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine 14 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
INTL 225-01 Comparative Economic Systems TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Gary Krueger -1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ECON 225-01*
INTL 245-01 Intro to Intl Human Rights MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 404 Wendy Weber 1 / 25 Materials icon
INTL 272-01 The Post-Soviet Sphere MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine 10 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RUSS 272-01*
INTL 288-01 Race and Ethnicity in Japan TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 110 Arthur Mitchell 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 288-01 and JAPA 288-01*
INTL 294-01 Photography: Histories and Practices of an International Medium TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MCST 294-03* This course examines histories, theories and practices of photography, a medium that has transformed significantly since Daguerre’s invention was presented as “a free gift to the world” in 1839. We will survey how scholars have thought about and through photography and explore practices in diverse contexts such as portrait studios in Ghana, a history museum in Vietnam, National Geographic, Soviet family albums and Indonesian amateur photography clubs. Topics for discussion include debates concerning individual and institutional use of photography and its relationship to truth, knowledge, politics, identity, and history.
INTL 294-02 HIV/AIDS: The history, politics and evolution of a pandemic TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Christy Hanson -7 / 20 Materials icon
The course will explore the progression of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, mapping the political and social responses that followed its geographic spread across the world. The ethics and human rights debates that dominated global discussions across time will be explored. Regional and country variance in the disease-patterns as well as government responses to the pandemic will be deconstructed. Students will be introduced to the evolution of scientific understanding of the virus, and how it impacted public health approaches. The role of civil society in making HIV/AIDS a global funding priority will be discussed.
INTL 300-01 Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Corie Hammers 10 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 300-01*
INTL 317-01 Writers and Power: The European East in the 20th Century W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 15 / 20 Materials icon
INTL 333-01 Economics of Global Food Problems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Amy Damon 3 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ECON 333-01 and ENVI 333-01*
INTL 352-01 Transitional Justice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 2 / 20 Materials icon
INTL 368-01 Sustainable Development and Global Future TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Roopali Phadke 12 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 368-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
INTL 380-01 Paradigms of Global Leadership MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN Ahmed Samatar 11 / 20 Materials icon
*Course to meet in Carnegie 411*
INTL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 384-01 and ENGL 384-01*
INTL 394-01 Paradigms of World Order M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN Ahmed Samatar 12 / 20 Materials icon
*Course to meet in Carnegie 411* The most recent phase of globalization has had two features: the end of the Cold War, and the start of a new, seemingly, borderless world. While the first has taken place (yet continues to shape life), the second offers complex disharmonies, inflected by the Internet and numerous electronic devices. Our age is thus pulled in two ways: on one hand, toward transparency, justice, liberty, democratic order, and "universal peace"; and on the other, toward civil conflict, religious strife, sharp inequalities, secrecy, violence, and war. Through readings and student contributions, the course interrogates scholarly interpretations of this supreme contradiction, and their correlative visions. Usually taught as a senior seminar, this semester enrollment will be opened to all students interested in upper-level discussion of these topics.
INTL 488-01 Senior Seminar: Thinking on a World Scale TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN David Moore 1 / 12 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; course to meet in Carnegie 411*

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
JAPA 102-01 First Year Japanese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 110 Sachiko Dorsey 8 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 102-02 First Year Japanese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 111 Sachiko Dorsey 9 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 102-L1 First Year Japanese II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 110 Junko Fukuoka 9 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 102-L2 First Year Japanese II Lab M 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 113 Junko Fukuoka 4 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 102-L3 First Year Japanese II Lab M 07:00 pm-08:00 pm NEILL 110 Junko Fukuoka 9 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 204-01 Second Year Japanese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 110 Ritsuko Narita 7 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 204-02 Second Year Japanese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 110 Ritsuko Narita 4 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 204-L1 Second Year Japanese II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 110 Junko Fukuoka 3 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 204-L2 Second Year Japanese II Lab R 09:00 am-10:00 am OLRI 100 Junko Fukuoka 7 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 204-L3 Second Year Japanese II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 112 Junko Fukuoka 6 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 288-01 Race and Ethnicity in Japan TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 110 Arthur Mitchell 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 288-01 and INTL 288-01* From the Takarazuka revue (all-female Western-style theater) to teenage ganguro ("face-blackening"), Japanese culture is rife with instances of play and performance that reflect a deep complexity in its engagement with issues of identity and foreignness. This course traces the roots of this complexity back to Japan’s beginnings as a modern nation and examines its cultural development into the present day. Works of fiction will be paired with readings in history, anthropology, and cultural theory to explore the meanings of identity, race, and ethnicity as they are expressed and contested in Japanese culture. Topics include representations of the self, gender and sexuality, imperialism, orientalism, and globalization. The course will cover the literature of former colonies (Korea and Taiwan), the experience of domestic minorities, and the contemporary cultures of cos-play ("costume-play") and hip-hop. No prior knowledge of Japanese required.
JAPA 306-01 Third Year Japanese II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 110 Miaki Habuka 4 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 306-L1 Third Year Japanese II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 112 Junko Fukuoka 5 / 12 Materials icon
JAPA 306-L2 Third Year Japanese II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 102 Junko Fukuoka 3 / 12 Materials icon
JAPA 408-01 Fourth Year Japanese II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 111 Sachiko Dorsey 7 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 488-01 Translating Japanese: Theory and Practice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 102 Arthur Mitchell 3 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 488-01*

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LATI 246-01 Comparative Democratization TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 213 Paul Dosh -3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 246-01 and RUSS 246-01*
LATI 249-01 Regional Geog of Latin America MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 06A Eric Carter 9 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 249-01*
LATI 282-01 Latin America: Art and Nation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 009 Ernesto Capello 20 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 282-01*
LATI 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 215 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 4 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 307-02 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 113 Teresa Mesa Adamuz 8 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-02; first day attendance required*
LATI 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 214 Alicia Munoz 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 342-01 Urban Politics of Latin America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Paul Dosh 10 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 342-01*

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LING 100-01 Introduction to Linguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 227 Grace Kuo 12 / 30 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
LING 104-01 The Sounds of Language MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 212 Grace Kuo 1 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
LING 175-01 Sociolinguistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 301 Marianne Milligan -1 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with SOCI 175-01; first day attendance required* Due to the instructor wanting to ensure a proper mix of students get a chance at taking this course seats will be added once registration opens for Sophomore and First Year students.
LING 200-01 English Syntax MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 227 John Haiman -3 / 15 Materials icon
LING 205-01 Phonology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 212 Grace Kuo -2 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
LING 225-01 100 Words for Snow: Language and Nature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Marianne Milligan 1 / 17 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 225-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
LING 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Cynthia Kauffeld 8 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 309-01; first day attendance required*
LING 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea 5 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 378-01*
LING 400-01 Field Methods in Linguistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 113 John Haiman 1 / 8 Materials icon
*6 credit course*
LING 435-01 History of Spanish Language MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 113 Cynthia Kauffeld 15 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 435-01; first day attendance required*
LING 488-01 Translating Japanese: Theory and Practice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 102 Arthur Mitchell 3 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with JAPA 488-01*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MATH 125-01 Epidemiology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 Vittorio Addona -3 / 28 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 135-01 Applied Calculus TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 202 Chad Higdon-Topaz 0 / 28 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 135-02 Applied Calculus MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Lori Ziegelmeier 4 / 28 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 135-03 Applied Calculus MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Lori Ziegelmeier 6 / 28 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Andrew Beveridge -2 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 137-01 Single Variable Calculus MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 David Bressoud 17 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 137-02 Single Variable Calculus MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 David Bressoud 4 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 David Ehren 1 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Robert Thompson -1 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-03 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 David Shuman 0 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-04 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Daniel Flath -2 / 28 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 155-05 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 Alicia Johnson -2 / 28 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Andrew Beveridge 0 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 236-02 Linear Algebra MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 241 Andrew Beveridge -3 / 32 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 237-01 Multivariable Calculus MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 241 Lori Ziegelmeier -3 / 28 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 237-02 Multivariable Calculus MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 100 Robert Thompson -8 / 28 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 253-01 Applied Mulitivariate Stats TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 245 Alicia Johnson -3 / 16 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 253-02 Applied Mulitivariate Stats TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 258 Alicia Johnson -3 / 16 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Chad Higdon-Topaz -4 / 25 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 361-01 Theory of Computation MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 245 Susan Fox 3 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with COMP 261-01; ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 365-01 Computational Linear Algebra MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 245 David Shuman -2 / 28 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with COMP 365-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 369-01 Advanced Symbolic Logic TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 Janet Folina 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 369-01*
MATH 376-01 Algebraic Structures TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Thomas Halverson 7 / 24 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 394-01 Vector Calculus from Celestial Mechanics to Special Relativity MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 205 David Bressoud 6 / 24 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor* This is course in vector analysis with an emphasis on the problems in physics that lay behind its development, beginning with Newton's work in celestial mechanics, continuing through the development of the mathematics of electricity and magnetism, and concluding with Einstein's special relativity. Prerequisite: Math 237.
MATH 455-01 Mathematical Statistics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Vittorio Addona 6 / 24 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*
MATH 478-01 Complex Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 Daniel Flath 17 / 20 Materials icon
*ACTC student may register on December 6 with permission of the instructor*

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MCST 110-01 Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 111 John Kim 0 / 16 Materials icon
MCST 110-02 Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 228 John Kim 4 / 16 Materials icon
MCST 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture MW 01:10 pm-02:40 pm NEILL 401 Morgan Adamson 5 / 31 Materials icon
MCST 248-01 History of Film 1893-1941 M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 401 Michael Griffin 12 / 16 Materials icon
FY students who've taken MCST 128 in their first semester may see instructor for permission
MCST 294-01 Oppositional Cinemas W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 212 Morgan Adamson -1 / 16 Materials icon
*Prerequisite: MCST 128 or permission of instructor; film screenings TBA* What is the power of cinema to stand in opposition to anything—be it political, aesthetic, or otherwise? This course will look at an international selection of documentary and avant-garde cinematic traditions that fall outside the norm of Hollywood. We will examine the diverse political and historical contexts from which oppositional cinematic practices have emerged—addressing issues of gender, race, class, imperialism, vision, and spectatorship. We will also look at the legacy of oppositional cinematic practices in our present moment, attending to the profound impact that the digital age has had in expanding and altering the meaning of oppositional cinema. Students will have the opportunity to carry out “practice-based” research projects, making two short videos drawing on the themes of the course. These projects will be in addition to more traditional essay assignments.
MCST 294-02 Race/Media/African Diaspora TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 113 Leola Johnson 13 / 16 Materials icon
*Prerequisite: Introductory Media and Cultural Studies coures or introductory American Studies course*
MCST 294-03 Photography: Histories and Practices of an International Medium TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-01*
MCST 354-01 Blackness in the Media W 01:10 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 226 Leola Johnson 5 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 354-01*
MCST 394-02 Adv Journalism: New Media TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 226 Mary Turck 15 / 19 Materials icon
MCST 394-03 Value: The Bad, the Ugly and the Cheap TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 226 Kiarina Kordela 8 / 45 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ART 394-03 and GERM 394-01*
MCST 488-01 Senior Seminar: Advanced Topics in New Media M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 402 John Kim 3 / 12 Materials icon

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MUSI 111-01 World Music MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MUSIC 113 Chuen-Fung Wong -1 / 35 Materials icon
MUSI 112-01 Basic Musicianship TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Reinaldo Moya 11 / 25 Materials icon
MUSI 114-01 Theory II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 10 / 25 Materials icon
MUSI 114-L1 Theory II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 10 / 25 Materials icon
MUSI 294-01 'Your Broadway and Mine': Staging the Nation in the American Musical TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 100 Eric Colleary 23 / 40 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with THDA 294-04*
MUSI 314-01 Theory IV, Contemporary Theory and Literature MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 228 Randall Bauer 10 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 343-01 Western Music-19th Century MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 228 Elissa Harbert 12 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 361-01 Composition MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 228 Randall Bauer 3 / 12 Materials icon
MUSI 370-01 Conducting TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 228 Mark Mandarano 5 / 12 Materials icon
"Introductory instrumental conducting:" Students will develop skills and knowledge in two areas: 1) the motions, gestures, patterns and physical cues that comprise basic conducting technique and 2) the knowledge of orchestration, scoring, repertoire and other areas that are essential to score study and interpretation. Issues of rehearsal organization, working with chorus and opera and other areas will also be addressed.
MUSI 394-01 Gender and Music TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 1 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-03*
MUSI 73-01 African Music Ensemble TR 06:30 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 116 Sowah Mensah 20 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 73-01 African Music Ensemble MW 05:00 pm-07:00 pm MUSIC 121 Sowah Mensah 20 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 75-01 Macalester Concert Choir MWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie 11 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 77-01 Highland Camerata R 06:30 pm-07:30 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie 5 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 77-01 Highland Camerata T 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie 5 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 79-01 Asian Music Ensemble F 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Chuen-Fung Wong 42 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 81-01 Mac Jazz Band MW 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Joan Griffith 35 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 83-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 116 Joan Griffith 15 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 83-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 121 Joan Griffith 15 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 85-01 Pipe Band W 06:30 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 116 Michael Breidenbach 24 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 85-01 Pipe Band W 06:00 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 228 Michael Breidenbach 24 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 87-01 Chamber Ensemble: Wind Ensemble M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MUSIC 113 Mark Mandarano 27 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 87-02 Chamber Ensemble TBA TBA Mark Mandarano 37 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 89-01 Orchestra TR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Mark Mandarano -1 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 91-01 Mac Early Music Ensembles F 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Clea Galhano 47 / 50 Materials icon
MUSI 95-01 Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 13 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-03 Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl 17 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-04 Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen 17 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-06 Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich 17 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-07 Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-08 Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-09 Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 17 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-10 Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 15 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-11 Voice TBA TBA William Reed 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-13 African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-14 Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-15 Bass Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-19 Flamenco Guitar TBA TBA Michael Hauser 20 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-20 Bass Guitar TBA TBA Adam Linz 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-22 Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-23 Violin TBA TBA James Garlick 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-29 Flute TBA TBA Martha Jamsa 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-31 African Drums TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 16 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-33 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-37 French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-43 Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-47 Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson 17 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-4M African Drums TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 17 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-5C Piano TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-6W Percussion TBA TBA Steve Kimball 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-9M Guitar TBA TBA Jeffrey Thygeson 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-C6 Accordion TBA TBA Daniel Newton 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-CC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-CM Euphonium TBA TBA Charles Wazanowski 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-CP Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-CV Jazz Piano TBA TBA Michael Vasich 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-CY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-H7 Bassoon TBA TBA Carole Smith 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-HC Piano TBA TBA Claudia Chen 17 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-HI Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-HN Jazz Bass TBA TBA Adam Linz 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-HQ Bass TBA TBA Jennifer Rubin 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-HY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-M4 Oboe TBA TBA Julie Williams 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-M6 Clarinet TBA TBA Shelley Hanson 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-M8 Saxophone TBA TBA Preston Duncan 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-M9 Jazz Saxophone TBA TBA Kathy Jensen 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-MH Voice TBA TBA Benjamin Allen 16 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-MI Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 13 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-ML African Voice TBA TBA Sowah Mensah 17 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-MM Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 16 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-MQ Mandolin TBA TBA Joan Griffith 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-MU Violin TBA TBA Mary Horozaniecki 17 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-MV Violin TBA TBA James Garlick 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-MW Viola TBA TBA Rebecca Albers 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-W2 Harp TBA TBA Ann Benjamin 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-W7 Jazz Trumpet TBA TBA David Jensen 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-WB Piano TBA TBA Christine Dahl 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-WG Jazz Voice TBA TBA Rachel Holder 15 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-WH Voice TBA TBA Laura Nichols 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-WM Guitar TBA TBA Joan Griffith 18 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-WO French Horn TBA TBA Caroline Lemen 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 95-WY Cello TBA TBA Thomas Rosenberg 19 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 97-01 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Laurinda Sager Wright 13 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 97-03 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Christine Dahl 8 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 97-04 Piano for Proficiency TBA TBA Claudia Chen 17 / 20 Materials icon

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Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
NEUR 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 250 Eric Wiertelak -4 / 60 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 180-01*
NEUR 240-01 Principles-Learning/Behavior MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Julia Manor 4 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 240-01*
NEUR 240-L1 Principles of Learning/Behavior Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 371 Julia Manor 4 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 240-L1*
NEUR 246-01 Exploring Sensation/Perception MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Julia Manor 8 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 246-01*
NEUR 246-L1 Exploring Sensation and Perception Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Julia Manor 9 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 246-L1*
NEUR 300-01 Directed Research TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak -2 / 10 Materials icon
NEUR 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak 5 / 15 Materials icon
*2 credit course*

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHIL 115-01 Introduction to Philosophy TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 William Wilcox 5 / 20 Materials icon
PHIL 125-01 Ethics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Martin Gunderson 2 / 20 Materials icon
PHIL 125-02 Ethics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Martin Gunderson 6 / 20 Materials icon
PHIL 231-01 Modern Philosophy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Geoffrey Gorham -4 / 20 Materials icon
PHIL 235-01 Existentialist Metaphysics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Diane Michelfelder 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with FREN 416-01*
PHIL 238-01 Philosophy of Religion TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 112 Joy Laine 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RELI 248-01*
PHIL 251-01 Human Rights and Healthcare MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Martin Gunderson 5 / 15 Materials icon
PHIL 294-01 Philosophy of Sport MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Geoffrey Gorham 2 / 20 Materials icon
Sports and games deserve close philosophical examination since they have always played an important part in human life. We first ask what exactly sports, games and athletics are, and how they are distinct from other modes of life. Next, we consider the main arguments for and against sports. For example, does sport promote virtue and 'fair-play' or, on the contrary, aggression and egoism? It is often said that sport is an essential part of a 'well-rounded' life and a liberal arts education. But why are well-rounded lives, and liberal arts educations, good? We will explore numerous ethical and conceptual issues that arise within sports, such as cheating and ‘sportsmanship’, violence and injury, doping and enhancement, and gender and racial equity. And we will consider whether sports can help us gain insight into more general philosophical concepts, such as virtue, justice, health, embodiment, friendship, consciousness, absurdity, death, and beauty. Our ultimate concern will be: what is the place of sport and games in a good and meaningful human life? Is it possible that life itself is a game? Along with numerous philosophical readings, contemporary and historical, we will also discuss philosophical treatments of sports in literature and film. Grades will be based primarily on a number of short papers, a class presentation, and a final take-home examination.
PHIL 294-02 Rights of Non Human Animals MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 Diane Michelfelder 10 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ENVI 294-02* In this course, we will combine readings, films, presentations by guest speakers, and field trips to aid an exploration of the central philosophical questions and debates associated with extending human rights to nonhuman animals. Just what does it mean to say that we ought to respect the rights of animals? On what grounds might such rights be granted or denied? If at least some human rights ought to be extended to at least some nonhuman animals, to which ones and what rights ought to be extended? What role do the concepts of personhood and property play in these debates? In what ways is the issue of the rights of nonhuman animals also an issue of environmentalism, particularly with respect to climate change? How would granting rights to nonhuman animals impact public policies and everyday habits of living? Might improving animal welfare bring about the same ends as granting rights to animals, while also avoiding thorny philosophical thickets? In considering these questions, it is anticipated that you will not only gain greater critical insight into what it may mean for nonhuman animals to have human rights but for what it means for us as rational animals to have them as well. This course counts as an elective within the Human Rights and Humanitarianism concentration. No prerequisites.
PHIL 360-01 Philosophy of Science TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 Janet Folina 6 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
PHIL 369-01 Advanced Symbolic Logic TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 107 Janet Folina 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MATH 369-01*

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PE 01-01 Swimming I TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 10 / 20 Materials icon
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson 0 / 25 Materials icon
PE 04-01 Karate I MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson 8 / 25 Materials icon
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 2 / 25 Materials icon
PE 06-02 Yoga I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 3 / 25 Materials icon
PE 06-03 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Emily Stuber 0 / 25 Materials icon
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Vanessa Seljeskog 5 / 30 Materials icon
PE 09-01 Conditioning I TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 11 / 25 Materials icon
PE 11-01 Swimming II TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 17 / 20 Materials icon
PE 13-01 Intermediate Social Dance M 08:30 pm-10:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson 6 / 25 Materials icon
PE 14-01 Karate II MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson 21 / 25 Materials icon
PE 16-01 Yoga II TR 10:00 am-11:10 am LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin 6 / 25 Materials icon
PE 18-01 Pilates I MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard 4 / 25 Materials icon
PE 19-01 Conditioning II TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 25 / 25 Materials icon
PE 21-01 Swim for Fitness TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 2 / 20 Materials icon
PE 26-01 Tai Chi Chuan MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Phyllis Calph 8 / 25 Materials icon
PE 27-01 Cardio Fitness MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 8 / 20 Materials icon
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Kristine Spangard 3 / 25 Materials icon
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance T 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson 11 / 25 Materials icon

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 34 / 63 Materials icon
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 24 / 63 Materials icon
PHYS 112-01 Cosmos: Perspectives and Reflections M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 24 / 63 Materials icon
*2 credit course*
PHYS 226-01 Principles of Physics I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 226 Thomas Christensen 8 / 36 Materials icon
PHYS 226-L1 Principles of Physics I Lab R 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 1 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 226-L2 Principles of Physics I Lab R 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 7 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 Brendan Miller 34 / 63 Materials icon
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab M 02:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 9 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab T 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 7 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 227-L3 Principles of Physics II Lab T 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 9 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 348-01 Laboratory Instrumentation MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 170 James Heyman 5 / 20 Materials icon
PHYS 348-L1 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 147 James Heyman 1 / 10 Materials icon
PHYS 348-L2 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 147 James Heyman 4 / 10 Materials icon
PHYS 440-01 Observational Astronomy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 Brendan Miller 12 / 16 Materials icon
PHYS 440-L1 Observational Astronomy Lab TBA TBA Brendan Miller 4 / 8 Materials icon
PHYS 440-L2 Observational Astronomy Lab TBA TBA Brendan Miller 8 / 8 Materials icon
PHYS 461-01 Mechanics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 11 / 24 Materials icon
PHYS 468-01 Statistical Mechanics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 James Heyman 16 / 24 Materials icon
PHYS 489-01 Physics Seminar F 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 150 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 15 / 24 Materials icon
*1 credit course*
PHYS 494-01 Elementary Particle Physics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 18 / 25 Materials icon

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
POLI 100-01 US Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Michael Zis 0 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 160-01 Foundations of Political Theory MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler 3 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 200-01 Women and American Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 212 Julie Dolan 4 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 207-01 US Civil Rights and Civil Liberties MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 105 Clare Ryan 5 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 212-01 Rights and Wrongs: Litigation and Public Policy MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Clare Ryan 2 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 214-01 Cyber Politics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 401 Christiansen, Sen -3 / 20 Materials icon
*Satisfies the Writing general education requirement; cross-listed with COMP 294-01*
POLI 216-01 Legislative Politics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Michael Zis 16 / 25 Materials icon
*Course not available to First Year students*
POLI 220-01 Foreign Policy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Andrew Latham 4 / 25 Materials icon
This is a course dealing with contemporary Chinese foreign policy. It will begin with an overview of the major theoretical approaches to the study of foreign policy in general and Chinese foreign policy in particular. It will then explore some of the major determinants of Chinese foreign policy, with a particular focus on China’s “strategic culture” and “grand strategy”. Finally, it will look at the way in which these determinants have shaped contemporary Chinese foreign policy in the following issue areas:

• multilateralism;
• national and international security;
• trade and economic relations;
• territorial disputes and ambitions; and
• bilateral relations with the United States.

A major thematic focus of the course will be the way in which China’s strategic culture is shaping the grand strategy that is in turn guiding its rise as a global power.

As an intermediate-level offering, this course will be designed primarily for Political Science majors and non-majors in cognate fields who have some experience in the discipline. The course will have no pre-requisites, however, and will therefore be suitable for all students seeking to satisfy an interest in Chinese foreign policy.
POLI 222-01 Regional Conflict/Security MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Andrew Latham 0 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 246-01 Comparative Democratization TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 213 Paul Dosh -3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 246-01 and RUSS 246-01*
POLI 260-01 Contemporary Political Theory TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler 16 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 261-01 Feminist Political Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 261-01*
POLI 262-01 American Political Thought MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 9 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 272-01 Researching Political Communication TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 4 / 16 Materials icon
POLI 315-01 Adv Topics in Policy: US Education Politics and Policy M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 208 Lesley Lavery 5 / 20 Materials icon
POLI 321-01 International Security MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 208 Andrew Latham 4 / 20 Materials icon
POLI 322-01 Advanced International Theory TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 David Blaney 13 / 20 Materials icon
POLI 323-01 Humanitarianism in World Politics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber -4 / 20 Materials icon
POLI 335-01 Science and Citizenship TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke 7 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 335-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
POLI 340-01 Fascism W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler 18 / 20 Materials icon
POLI 342-01 Urban Politics of Latin America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Paul Dosh 10 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 342-01*
POLI 390-01 Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 Julie Dolan 0 / 12 Materials icon
POLI 394-02 European Constitutionalism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 204 Clare Ryan 15 / 20 Materials icon
What are the sources of individual rights in the European system? How do civil or human rights at the national and supra-national level interact in Europe? How do European nations
incorporate or reject rights discourse (not to mention rulings) from higher courts? This course addresses the 20th and 21st century explosion of rights jurisprudence in Europe. Through a series of case studies, we will investigate the growth of constitutional rights in European nations from the Post-WWII Era to the present. We will also explore the powerful role that regional or supra-national courts play in European constitutional development: from the European Court of Justice’s gender equality and pay equity case law to free speech, freedom from torture, access to abortion, and voting rights at the European Court of Human Rights.
Students in this course will be expected to complete significant research and writing on a topic in contemporary European constitutionalism. Previous experience with US constitutional law and/or European history is helpful, but not required.
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Andrew Latham 0 / 6 Materials icon
*2 credit course*

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Katrina Archambault 6 / 35 Materials icon
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Joan Ostrove 2 / 35 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 1 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 3 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 5 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L4 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 1 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 250 Eric Wiertelak -4 / 60 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 180-01*
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea -1 / 24 Materials icon
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Brooke Lea 1 / 12 Materials icon
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 354 Brooke Lea -2 / 12 Materials icon
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 350 Anna Johnson -4 / 24 Materials icon
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 215 Tina Kruse -2 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; first day attendance required*
PSYC 240-01 Principles of Learning and Behavior MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Julia Manor 4 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 240-01*
PSYC 240-L1 Principles of Learning/Behavior Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 371 Julia Manor 4 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 240-L1*
PSYC 246-01 Exploring Sensation/Perception MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Julia Manor 8 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 246-01*
PSYC 246-L1 Explo Sensation/Perception Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 354 Julia Manor 9 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 246-L1*
PSYC 250-01 Developmental Psychology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 352 Anna Johnson 1 / 32 Materials icon
PSYC 252-01 Distress, Dysfunction, and Disorder: Perspectives on the DSM MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Jaine Strauss -2 / 75 Materials icon
PSYC 266-01 History of Psychology M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Rachel Burns 5 / 20 Materials icon
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Manning, Ostrove 0 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Manning, Ostrove 0 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea 5 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 378-01*
PSYC 380-01 Community Psychology and Public Health W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss 1 / 19 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required*
PSYC 394-01 Moral Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Steve Guglielmo 0 / 16 Materials icon
This course will explore how and why we make moral judgments about people and their behavior. How are our moral judgments shaped by intuition, emotion, and reasoning? Which
kinds of behaviors do we view as immoral? How do we balance our own self-interest with the
interests of our broader group or community? What are the evolutionary and developmental
origins of moral judgments? What are the moral implications of important policy decisions about capital punishment and the insanity defense? Could a robot have moral rights and responsibilities? In this course, we will examine these questions by considering theories and
findings from social, developmental, evolutionary, and political psychology, as well as from related fields like philosophy and artificial intelligence. There is a student-led component to this course.
PSYC 394-02 Development Across Cultures M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 301 Kathryn Hecht 2 / 16 Materials icon
This course aims to facilitate an understanding of development across geographic borders and sociocultural contexts through a series of readings and discussions intended to stimulate thought about what “typical development” means on a global scale. Major goals of this course include fostering an understanding of culture as a construct and how it applies to the study of child development, familiarizing students with current methodological techniques and challenges in the study of development outside of the United States, and utilization of a developmental perspective in analyzing psychological and sociocultural issues faced by youth around the globe. Prerequisites: PSYC 201 (or MATH 155) and PSYC 250. Counts as UP3 for major. There is a student-led component to this course.
PSYC 488-01 Senior Seminar: Pain and Suffering MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 300 Eric Wiertelak 7 / 16 Materials icon
PSYC 494-01 Behavioral Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Pete Ferderer -1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ECON 490-01*

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RELI 102-01 Modern Islam TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 110 Brett Wilson 2 / 20 Materials icon
RELI 111-01 Introduction to Buddhism MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Erik Davis 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Open to First Years and sophomores only*
RELI 194-01 Jews and Modernity: The Quest for Identity MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 219 Barry Cytron 2 / 20 Materials icon
Baseball slugger Hank Greenberg and gay activist/orthodox rabbi Stephen Greenberg; composer/conductor Leonard Bernstein and filmmakers Woody Allen, Ethan and Joel Coen; feminists from Gertrude Stein to Gloria Steinem to Alice Shalvi; notable ‘Jews by Choice’ Rabbi Rachel Cowan, Professor Paula Fredriksen, and Rabbi Capers C. Funnye Jr., cousin to Michelle Obama. What is going on? Modernity has enabled a once religiously bound people boundless opportunities to reshape Jewish identity. This course examines the multiple, often contradictory identities both ascribed to, and embraced or resisted by Jews in contemporary Western societies. We will explore the history of Jewish identity-construction, tracing new forms of Jewish cultural, political and spiritual expression into the 21st century. Class meets Mondays and Wednesdays and some Fridays, alternating with evening sessions - most often Sunday - for field trips, movies and guest lecturers.
RELI 194-02 World Religions and World Religions Discourse MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 003 James Laine -1 / 15 Materials icon
Our goal will be to make an effort to comprehend just what cultural literacy would mean when studying the major religious traditions of the world, while at the same time developing an appreciation of some of the blind spots and problems in this enterprise. To a large extent, we will do some serious construction before we feel ready for de-construction. Every couple of weeks, we will cover one of five major areas (South Asia, East Asia, Judaism, Christianity, Islam) and each student will read a different author’s treatment of this material.
RELI 223-01 Orthodoxy and Heresy in Early Christianity TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 110 Susanna Drake 3 / 15 Materials icon
RELI 226-01 Martyrdom Then and Now TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 Cooey, Drake 12 / 20 Materials icon
RELI 238-01 Catholicism MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 208 James Laine 8 / 20 Materials icon
RELI 248-01 Philosophy of Religion TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 112 Joy Laine 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 238-01*
RELI 256-01 Marx: Religion as Ideology, Alienation, and Authority TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Erik Davis 5 / 20 Materials icon
RELI 294-01 Science, Magic and Belief TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Karin Velez 11 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-05*
RELI 294-02 Women and the Bible MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Susanna Drake 12 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-04* In this course we will examine the roles, identities, and representations of women in the Hebrew Bible, New Testament, and Jewish and Christian apocrypha. We will explore how biblical writers used women “to think with”, and we will consider how gender is co-constructed alongside religious, social, and sexual identities. We will ask the following sorts of questions: What opportunities for social advancement and leadership were open to women in early Jewish and Christian communities, and how did these opportunities differ from those open to women in other religious formations in the ancient Mediterranean? How did biblical regulations of sexuality, marriage, and family life shape women’s lives? What are the social and material effects of biblical representations of women? And how might current feminist theories inform our interpretation of biblical texts about women?
RELI 294-04 Religion and Society in Turkey TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Brett Wilson 3 / 15 Materials icon
Turkey is at the center of discussions on secularism and the place of religion in the public sphere in the contemporary Middle East and Islamic World. This course will explore the key debates on religious issues and their role in shaping public and private life in Turkey, including religious freedom, Islamic politics, religious reform, veiling, Sufism, pious social movements, Muslim and non-Muslim minorities, Islamic education and nationalism.
RELI 359-01 Religion and Revolution: Case Studies W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Erik Davis 9 / 15 Materials icon
RELI 469-01 Approaches to the Study of Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Cooey, Laine 9 / 20 Materials icon

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RUSS 102-01 Elementary Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 212 Julia Chadaga 8 / 25 Materials icon
RUSS 102-L1 Elementary Russian II Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Ekaterina Efimenko 4 / 13 Materials icon
RUSS 102-L2 Elementary Russian II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 113 Ekaterina Efimenko 5 / 13 Materials icon
RUSS 204-01 Intermediate Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 228 Anastasia Kayiatos 15 / 25 Materials icon
RUSS 204-L1 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm Ekaterina Efimenko 7 / 13 Materials icon
*Lab will meet in Campus Center, 2nd floor. See Martha Davis for details*
RUSS 204-L2 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 113 Ekaterina Efimenko 9 / 13 Materials icon
RUSS 246-01 Comparative Democratization TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 213 Paul Dosh -3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 246-01 and POLI 246-01*
RUSS 256-01 Mass Culture Under Communism MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 James von Geldern 12 / 15 Materials icon
RUSS 272-01 The Post-Soviet Sphere MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 Igor Tchoukarine 10 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 272-01*
RUSS 294-01 Camp, Kitsch, and Poshlost: The Making of Modern (Bad) Taste TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 112 Anastasia Kayiatos 14 / 25 Materials icon
In the age of American Idol, Facebook "liking," and Yelp, we all seem to be arbiters of taste. But what powers invest us with the authority to judge the things we consume? And what conscious or implicit criteria inform our everyday acts of distinction and discrimination? This course approaches the present aesthetic order of things somewhat awkwardly--by using all the wrong stuff, and reviewing the controversial texts in critical theory, art history, and queer studies that tell us why they're so wrong. Our semester-long venture into philistinism will cross discipline and cultural context, pausing on the abject subcategories of camp, kitsch, and poshlost', a uniquely Russian brand of banality. In the last classes, we will lay a feast of bad objects from the world around us, and chew on them together with our cumulatively cultivated palettes...and mouths wide open, of course.
RUSS 366-01 Nabokov MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 228 Julia Chadaga 20 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 366-01; no prerequisites* There is a risk in studying Vladimir Nabokov, as those who have can attest. At first, you find he is an author who understands the simple pleasures of the novel. He crafts wondrously strange stories—often detective stories—in language often so arresting you may find yourself wanting to read passages aloud to passers-by. Then, you may discover within the novel little hints, here and there, of a hidden structure of motifs. The hints are in the synaesthetic colors of sound, in the patterns on the wings of butterflies, in the tremble of first love, in shadows and reflections, in the etymologies of words. Soon the reader has become a detective as well, linking the recurring motifs, finding clues are everywhere. By then it is too late. The risk in studying Nabokov is that you may not see the world the same way again.

Nabokov’s life is itself remarkable. He was born into Russian nobility, but fled with his family to Western Europe after the 1917 Revolution. His father took a bullet intended for another. After his education in England, Nabokov moved to Berlin, and then to Paris, where advancing Nazi troops triggered another flight, this time to the United States. He was not only an accomplished poet, novelist, and translator, but also a lepidopterist. Nabokov found and conveyed both the precision of poetry and the excitement of discovery in his art, scientific work, and life. In this course, we will read a representative selection of both his Russian (in translation) and English language novels, including Lolita and Pale Fire, two of the finest novels of the twentieth century. We will explore various aspects of Nabokov’s life and art in order to arrive at a fuller understanding of how cultural synthesis inspires artistic creation.
RUSS 488-01 Senior Seminar MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 James von Geldern 16 / 20 Materials icon

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Khaldoun Samman 3 / 25 Materials icon
SOCI 175-01 Sociolinguistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 301 Marianne Milligan -1 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 175-01; first day attendance required* Due to the instructor wanting to ensure a proper mix of students get a chance at taking this course seats will be added once registration opens for Sophomore and First Year students.
SOCI 194-01 Environmental Sociology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 Terry Boychuk -4 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 194-02* This course provides an overview of environmental activism and policy making in the United States in historical and comparative perspective. Select questions addressed in the course readings, assignments, and discussions include: Are human societies invariably destined to environmental collapse? What are the basic obstacles to sustainable environmental policies in democratic societies? Has consumer activism greened US markets and corporations? How do environmental political lobbies emerge? How do they become institutionalized? Which political networks have led the campaign to regulate greenhouse gases in US? Why have these political coalitions failed to overcome congressional opposition to new environmental legislation? Who opposes environmental action on climate change, and why? Why have the US and Europe responded differently to the problem of global warming? What are the prospects for a quick transition from a fossil-fuel economy to one based on clean energy?
SOCI 250-01 Nonprofit Organizations TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Terry Boychuk 6 / 16 Materials icon
SOCI 269-01 Social Science Inquiry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Erik Larson -3 / 20 Materials icon
SOCI 270-01 Interpretive Social Research MW 09:10 am-10:40 am CARN 105 Mahnaz Kousha -1 / 16 Materials icon
*Limited to declared Sociology majors*
SOCI 290-01 Islam and the West MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm CARN 304 Khaldoun Samman 10 / 18 Materials icon
SOCI 294-01 Masculinity, Gender, and Difference MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Daniel Williams 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-01* This course considers masculinity as a dominant and constitutive construct in institutions, interactions and identities. Against the misconception that the study of gender is the study of "women", we will consider masculinity across gender identities. We will examine how masculinities are shaped and formed across the life course, in a range of settings, contexts and institutions such as education and schooling, the workplace, families and relationships, and others. We will also examine how masculinity and notions of manhood inform and frame seemingly “ungendered” phenomena such as foreign policy, nation building and ideas about society itself. In all of these areas, we will examine how masculinity intersects with and is modified by other categories of difference such as race, nationality, class, and sexuality.
SOCI 310-01 Law and Society TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Erik Larson 11 / 20 Materials icon
SOCI 335-01 Family Bonds MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm CARN 105 Mahnaz Kousha 8 / 16 Materials icon

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Theatre and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
THDA 120-01 Acting Theory and Performance I MWF 12:20 pm-02:00 pm THEATR STUDIO Harry Waters 1 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 125-01 Technical Theater MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser 13 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 125-L1 Technical Theater Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Daniel Keyser 5 / 8 Materials icon
THDA 125-L2 Technical Theater Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am THEATR 206 Daniel Keyser 8 / 8 Materials icon
THDA 145-01 Make-Up Design and Application TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett 2 / 16 Materials icon
*$45 materials fee will be charged*
THDA 215-01 Reading the Dancing Body: Topics in Dance History MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 205 Wynn Fricke 9 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 215-01 Reading the Dancing Body: Topics in Dance History MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke 9 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 220-01 Voice and Speech MWF 02:20 pm-04:00 pm THEATR 3 Cheryl Brinkley 3 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 220-01 Voice and Speech MWF 02:20 pm-04:00 pm THEATR 205 Cheryl Brinkley 3 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 242-01 Playwrighting and Textual Analysis MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm THEATR 204 Beth Cleary 4 / 12 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 285-01* Students will read a variety of plays that exemplify structural and genric concerns of writing for live performance: tragedy; comedy; the courtroom drama; farce; experimental, others. Students will elaborate their own interests in these forms through a series of time-bound conventions: the 3-minute, 10-minute and ultimately one-act form. In-class exercises and prompts, and small-group workshopping and reading will challenge writers' development. A mid-term and final playreading series will allow students to hear their work read in a supportive public setting.
THDA 250-01 Experiential Anatomy and the Mind Body Connection MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke 5 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 255-01 Lighting Design TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Daniel Keyser 12 / 12 Materials icon
*$20 material fee required*
THDA 294-01 Burning the Curtain: Queer Performance in the United States TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 100 Eric Colleary 35 / 40 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-03* As performance scholar Robin Berenstein noted recently in her book Cast Out: Queer Lives in Theater, homosexuality has been integral to the development of American theatre – and theatre, in turn, has helped shape homosexual identity. Recognizing that theatre isn’t created in a vacuum, it is possible to look at a performance as an example of how sexuality is being understood at different moments in time. This class explores the relationship between sexuality and performance over the course of 120 years of American history by examining play texts, performance reviews, essays and other documentary evidence – and sites ranging from major Broadway theatres, to bars, bathhouses, dance halls, living rooms and military bases.
THDA 294-04 'Your Broadway and Mine': Staging the Nation in the American Musical TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 100 Eric Colleary 23 / 40 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MUSI 294-01* For nearly 150 years, the American musical has been one of this country's most popular performance genre's both at home and abroad. From minstrelsy and vaudeville revues to Rent and Avenue Q, from Bert Williams and Fanny Brice to Nathan Lane and Audra McDonald, the musical has both imagined and reflected American national identities. The musical has also been a forum where the social issues of the day are given voice, sometimes using the guise of popular entertainment as a strategy of subversion. This course surveys the rich history of musical theatre in America in all its complexities using scripts, archival materials, critical essays, audio recordings and film.
THDA 350-01 Directing and Devising: Making Meaning on the Stage MWF 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR Beth Cleary 4 / 12 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; class to meet the in Blackbox Studio Theater*
THDA 360-01 Acting II MWF 09:40 am-11:50 am THEATR STUDIO Harry Waters 8 / 12 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
THDA 465-01 Advanced Lighting Design M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 205 Daniel Keyser 12 / 12 Materials icon
*$20 material fee required*
THDA 22-01 African Dance II MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Patricia Brown 11 / 20 Materials icon
THDA 31-01 Dance Improvisation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 6 Krista Langberg 8 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 42-01 Modern Dance II TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 13 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 45-01 Modern Dance IV MW 04:00 pm-05:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 8 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile -2 / 16 Materials icon

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
WGSS 110-01 Intro to LGBTQ Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Corie Hammers 6 / 25 Materials icon
WGSS 117-01 Women, Health, Reproduction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Elizabeth Jansen -6 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 117-01; first day attendance required*
WGSS 117-02 Women, Health, Reproduction MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Elizabeth Jansen -5 / 30 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; cross-listed with BIOL 117-02*
WGSS 127-01 Wom/Gend/Sex Greece/Rome MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 111 Beth Severy-Hoven 14 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CLAS 127-01*
WGSS 242-01 Economics of Gender MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Karine Moe 2 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ECON 242-01*
WGSS 261-01 Feminist Political Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 261-01*
WGSS 294-01 Masculinity, Gender, and Differences MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Daniel Williams 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with SOCI 294-01*
WGSS 294-02 Transgender History, Identity, and Politics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Catherine Jacquet 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02 and HIST 294-03*
WGSS 294-03 Burning the Curtain: Queer Performance in the United States TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 100 Eric Colleary 35 / 40 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with THDA 294-01*
WGSS 294-04 Women and the Bible MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Susanna Drake 12 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-02*
WGSS 294-05 The New Woman: Fictions of Feminism in the 1890s TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Lesley Goodman 2 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-02*
WGSS 294-06 African American Women's History TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Lynn Hudson 20 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-06 and AMST 294-04*
WGSS 300-01 Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Corie Hammers 10 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 300-01*
WGSS 394-01 Democracies, Feminisms, Capitalisms TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker 24 / 25 Materials icon
Through the organizing notion of Object, we will study the intertwining of democracy and capitalism, with a brief historical overview of both but looking primarily at formations in the 20th and 21st centuries—from liberal nation-state versions through postsocialisms to neoliberal-neocolonial globalization. In this transnational comparative context, we will focus on how various feminisms have negotiated these intertwined political/economic theories, at once emerging from them, claiming a place in them, as well as self-defining against their different formations. We will explore how liberal, second- and third-wave, socialist, women of color, radical transnational, and indigenous feminisms deploy the notion of Object in addressing issues of citizenship, violence, labor, the environment, cultural representation, etc. as ways of tackling this complicated relationship with diverse forms of capitalism and democracy.
WGSS 394-02 Women's Literature and Sociopolitical Change TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Sonita Sarker 20 / 25 Materials icon
‘U-topia’ means ‘a place (topos) that doesn’t exist’ and ‘Eu-topia’ means 'a good place.' Implicit as well as explicit in much of the 20th century's feminist critical analysis of the state of society and its politics is a desire for a better state yet-to-be (utopia) as well as a fear of catastrophe or nightmare (dystopia). This course investigates how women's literary writing from different parts of the world (Bangladeshi, British, African-American, Canadian, to name a few) produce visions of the present and the future, of the real and the imagined, beliefs about masculinity and femininity, socialist and capitalist philosophies, modernity, the environment (ecotopia), and various technologies including cybergenetics. The collection of texts is intended also to provide us with genealogies to construct as well as analyze our own fantasies and realities of sociopolitical change.
WGSS 394-03 Gender and Music TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 1 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MUSI 394-01*
WGSS 400-01 Senior Seminar: Linking Theory and Practice M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Corie Hammers 8 / 12 Materials icon

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