Spring 2015 Class Schedule

Spring 2015 Class Schedule - updated December 19, 2014 at 10:56 am

This is a snapshot of the class schedule and enrollment information, updated only once daily. For the most current information on class schedule and enrollment, Macalester students, faculty and staff should log in to 1600grand and use the "Search Class Schedule" link.

American Studies
Anthropology
Art and Art History
Asian Languages and Cultures
Biology
Chemistry
Chinese
Classics
Computer Science
Economics
Educational Studies
English
Environmental Studies
French and Francophone Studies
Geography
Geology
German Studies
Hispanic and Latin American Studies
History
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Studies
Japanese
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Media and Cultural Studies
Music
Neuroscience Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics and Astronomy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Sociology
Theatre and Dance
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

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Supplemental Course Information icon Indicates link to supplemental information about this course provided by the instructor

American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
AMST 101-01 Explorations of Race and Racism MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 212 Juliana Pegues 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
AMST 112-01 Intro to LGBTQ Studies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Corie Hammers 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 110-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 194-01 The Culture and Theory of Women of Color Feminisms W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 212 Juliana Pegues 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 194-01* This course examines women of color feminisms as historical, intellectual, cultural, and political formations in the U.S. from the 1960s to the present. We will focus on the specific ways that women of color feminism arose from and posed serious challenges to second-wave feminism and nationalist movements, and its importance to social change organizing and the development of what is now known as queer of color critique. We will address the ways that women of color feminists critiqued the racism and classism of white, middle class feminist spaces while simultaneously critiquing the heteropatriarchy within Black, Chicana/o and Latina/o, American Indian, and Asian American nationalist movements and fields of study. In addressing these important interventions we will focus on three major theoretical frameworks of women of color feminism: intersectionality, hybridity, and coalition through difference. We will read original texts from the women of color feminism movement (political analysis, personal narrative, poetry, literary analysis) alongside contemporary documents from queer of color scholarship and queer people of color movement organizing (social theory, independent film/multimedia, blogs, etc).
AMST 222-01 Imagining the American West TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Ryan Edgington 8 / 25 Materials icon
AMST 237-01 Environmental Justice MW 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 STAFF 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 237-01 and HIST 237-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of Class with the permission of the instructor*

AMST 244-01 Urban Latino Power TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 213 Paul Dosh 0 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 244-01 and POLI 244-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 260-01 Race, Cultural Politics and Social Movements TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 Michael Hanson 17 / 20 Materials icon
This course will focus on the cultural dimension of social movements for racial equality and political change in the United States. The cultural realm has historically provided communities of color an arena for political self-representation, protest, and collective mobilization. The course will examine the political possibilities of cultural expression including protest art, music, performance, visual culture, literature, and sport as well as new platforms for political mobilization enabled by new technologies and media.
AMST 265-01 The Schools-to-Prison Pipeline TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 228 Karin Aguilar-San Juan 2 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with EDUC 294-01; prior exposure to American Studies or Urban Studies is recommended.*
AMST 294-01 Black Women and Politics of Representation M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 212 Tia-Simone Gardner 8 / 20 Materials icon
AMST 294-02 American Philosophy MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Geoffrey Gorham 0 / 22 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 202-01*
AMST 294-03 Page to the Stage: Analyzing American Indian Performances of Race, Authenticity, and Indigeneity TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Katrina Phillips 10 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-05*
AMST 294-04 Community-Based Theatres TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 113 Harry Waters Jr. 2 / 27 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with THDA 210-01; counts for fine arts distribution*
AMST 294-05 Music in the United States: 1700s to Present TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Elissa Harbert 0 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MUSI 294-02; counts for fine arts distribution*
AMST 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 213 Alicia Munoz 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 315-01 Transnational Studies: US Imperialism: From the Philippines to Viet Nam TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 217 Karin Aguilar-San Juan 16 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* In this discussion-based seminar, we will examine U.S. global presence through the lenses of empire, diaspora, and transnationalism. We will look specifically at U.S. involvement in the Philippines and Vietnam from 1898 to 1975 as moments of military occupation and cultural domination, as well as turning points for U.S. nation-building. What is "imperialism" and how is imperialism different from "hegemony"? How did U.S. imperial adventures in Asia help to recreate a Western geographic imaginary of the “East”? How did they reshape or reconfigure “American” positions and identities? Under what circumstances were former imperial subjects allowed to generate racialized communities? To what extent are memories of U.S. conflicts in Asia cultivated, proliferated, twisted, or suppressed? What lessons can be garnered for the contemporary historical moment? Other topics for exploration include: internment, transracial adoption, commemorations of war, and anti-imperialist/anti-war movements.
AMST 330-01 Mellon Seminar W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 113 Duchess Harris 7 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required- 2 credit course*
AMST 341-01 Urban Social Geography: City Life and Landscapes TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Daniel Trudeau 3 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 341-01*
AMST 354-01 Blackness in the Media W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 402 Leola Johnson 12 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MCST 354-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 384-01 and INTL 384-01; first day attendance required*
AMST 394-01 Race, Gender, and Science TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 402 Amy Sullivan 1 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 350-01*
AMST 400-01 Senior Seminar MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 111 Duchess Harris 4 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*

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Anthropology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ANTH 101-01 General Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 06A Ron Barrett 0 / 30 Materials icon
ANTH 111-01 Cultural Anthropology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 06A Anna Jacobsen 0 / 30 Materials icon
ANTH 115-01 Biological Anthropology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 06B Anna Hardin 0 / 24 Materials icon
ANTH 123-01 Introduction to Archaeology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 215 Vanessa Rousseau 4 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CLAS 123-01*
ANTH 243-01 Psychological Anthropology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 243-01*
ANTH 294-03 Field Methods and Research Design MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 05 Ron Barrett 6 / 16 Materials icon
This course combines civic engagement with the fundamentals of ethnographic research needed for successful completion of a one to two-month field-based project. Learning modules will include: a) the ethics of social science research and human subjects review; b) research design and proposal; c) observation methods and field notes; d) interview methods and transcription; and, e) qualitative data analysis. All students will conduct a joint research project in partnership with local community members to address a relevant social problem. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or ANTH 111.
ANTH 294-04 Archaeology of the Midwestern United States TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06B Edward Fleming 10 / 20 Materials icon
This course traces the developments, adaptations, and transformations of indigenous cultures in the Midcontinent of North America from the first arrivals at the end of the last ice age up to European colonization. From nomadic large game hunters to the establishment of large population centers, the American Midwest has been the heartland of over 10,000 years of political, economic, and religious movements.
Through lectures, readings (textbook, journal articles, and archaeological reports), discussions, group activities, and visits to the labs and collections storage at the Science Museum of Minnesota to examine representative artifacts, this course will take an evidence-based approach to examining the dynamics of the rich cultural heritage of the region from the Appalachian Mountains in the east to the Great Plains in the west. We will consider how technology, settlement patterns, subsistence, social organization, and systems of interaction varied over time, the role of environmental change in cultural adaptations, and how shifts in American archaeological thought have influenced our understanding of the archaeological record.
ANTH 294-05 Urban Anthropology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 101 Anna Jacobsen 1 / 20 Materials icon
Today more than 50% of the world’s population resides in cities and the United Nations predicts that by the year 2050, 70% of the world’s population will live in cities. This means that cities might be considered among the most important locations for building an understanding of the human experience. This course examines the many ways that people around the world make urban life meaningful. We will focus on the intersections among anthropology, urban studies, social theory and human geography to explore the theoretical, social, and methodological approaches to understanding the culture(s) created in cities. Drawing on ethnographic case studies from cities around the world, we will explore issues pertaining to race and ethnicity, gender, youth, poverty, diversity and “super-diversity,” gentrification, urbanization, and illusions and realities of modernity. Prerequisite: ANTH 111 or permission of instructor.
ANTH 394-01 Gender, Power, and Sexualities in Africa TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 0 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 394-01* This course uses gender, one of the most dynamic areas of Africanist research today, as a lens to examine struggles over power and human rights in Africa. It engages some of the most recent discussions on sexualities by examining the body as a site of political, legal, and social contestation. In particular, we will interrogate the local and global dimensions of the recent and highly controversial anti-homosexuality legislation in Uganda and the implications for discussions of human rights and sexualities throughout the continent. Through reading ethnographic and life history texts and researching their own projects, students will grapple with themes such as “the status” of women in hierarchical vs. complementary conceptualizations of social power, the making of men, the meaning of “tradition” in historical perspective, the relationship between kinship, politics, and civil order in Africa, the challenges of forming coalitions around gender-based human rights issues, the intersection of gender and patterns of production and reproduction, and the ways in which conflict and post-conflict settings bring intersections of gender, power, sexualities, and human rights to the fore.
ANTH 394-02 Politics of Truth and Memory in Latin America MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 06A Olga Gonzalez 4 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 394-01* This course examines and critically analyzes various approaches to the study of how different individuals and communities in particular historical and cultural scenarios in contemporary Latin America create meanings about their past experience with political violence. The course addresses questions related to the tension between remembering and forgetting, the presence of conflicting memories and truths and how these are negotiated or not through distinct forms of representation. The cultural analysis of different means of representation: human rights and truth commissions’ reports, testimonials, film, art and memorials will be the basis for class discussions on different notions of truth and different forms of truth-telling. A close examination of these forms of representation will reveal the extent to which they can conflict with each other while at the same time feed on each other, creating “effects of truth” and leaving room for secrecy as a mode of truth-telling. Finally, the course will also compel students to think about what consequences the politics of memory have for the future. This course will combine lectures and class discussions. It will have a strong writing component with a series of short papers and one longer final research paper. There will be one final exam. Grades will be based on written assignments in addition to oral presentations and participation in class discussions
ANTH 394-03 Language and Politics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 05 Anna Jacobsen 13 / 20 Materials icon
In this course, students will explore the role language plays in politics and socio-political spheres more broadly. It will offer students an opportunity to look critically and analytically at how power operates in linguistic practices and political interaction by drawing on seminal linguistic anthropological theories and methods. We will unpack how language is used to articulate, maintain and subvert relations of power in society, and explore in particular how language and rhetoric have been used and manipulated in myriad contexts including related to war and the construction of “truth.” Topics may also include political oratory and rhetoric, the colonization/decolonization of the mind, the politics of pronouns, the English-only movement in the US, and Language revitalization and survival. To do this, we will draw on a combination of pop and mainstream media, ethnography, and theory to build an understanding of how social actors use and (re)interpret language. Prerequisite: ANTH 111 or permission of instructor.
ANTH 490-01 Senior Seminar TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 06A Dianna Shandy 5 / 18 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon

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Art and Art History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ART 130-01 Drawing I MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 302 Megan Vossler 0 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 130-02 Drawing I MW 01:10 pm-04:20 pm ART 302 Megan Vossler 0 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 131-01 Introduction to Ceramics MWF 01:10 pm-03:10 pm ART 113 Gary Erickson 0 / 10 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Required: permission of the instructor, first day attendance, and $100 material fee. Instructor is keeping a wait list. Please contact him directly to be included on that list should the class close and subsequent openings become available.*
ART 149-01 Introduction to Visual Culture MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 4 / 30 Materials icon
ART 161-01 Art of the West II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am ARTCOM 102 Lauren DeLand 0 / 25 Materials icon
ART 171-01 Art of the East II: Japan MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 2 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 171-01*
ART 233-01 Introduction to Photography MWF 12:00 pm-02:10 pm ART 301 Eric Carroll 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required' $75 materials fee required*
ART 234-01 Painting I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 308 Christine Willcox 0 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 235-01 Sculpture I TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 118 Stanton Sears 4 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; $150 materials fee required*
ART 236-01 Printmaking I TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 214 Ruthann Godollei 0 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ART 270-01 Making Sacred: Religious Images and Spaces in Asia TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-02 and RELI 294-03* This course focuses on religious visual culture in Asia, examining how intangible concepts of the divine have become tangible in material practices. In the course of examining the formal development of devotional objects, images, and spaces associated with religious doctrines such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Shintoism, we will discuss the multifaceted ways the sacred has been visualized and how these manifestations exemplified systems of cultural exchange in Asia.
ART 294-01 Color Theory TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 202 Christine Willcox 0 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; no prerequisites* This course introduces, through studio projects, the basic principles regarding the use of color in the visual arts. Students explore a range of topics, including the historical uses of color, the interactions between colors, and the psychology of color. The class will be comprised of a series of small color studies with more involved studies to follow. Some projects will be completed using paint while others will use media chosen by the student. The class will include painting/color demonstrations, color assignments, image presentations, readings, museum visits, individual and group critiques.
ART 294-03 Art and Psychoanalysis MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM 102 Lauren DeLand 0 / 20 Materials icon
This course provides an overview of the broad application of psychoanalysis as a method of reading works of art, while training students in the very analytical methods that are our object of study. We will utilize a body of literature ranging from psychoanalytic studies to works of art, historical and critical theory to contemporary graphic novels, and survey select works of art spanning several centuries and across the globe. Students will become familiar with historical trajectories of psychoanalytic readings of art, including artistic movements and individual artists engaged with psychoanalytic theories. Themes will include theories of object relations, fetishism and the gaze, the sex and death drives in art, memory and memoir, film and psychoanalysis, feminism and the challenges and problems posed by the binary gender tropes that psychoanalysis presupposes.
ART 371-01 Painting II MW 08:30 am-11:40 am ART 202 Christine Willcox 3 / 10 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
ART 372-01 Sculpture II: Metal Fabrication and Welding TR TBA ART 118 Stanton Sears 5 / 8 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; $150 materials fee required* In this course, students build upon and expand the basic technical skills acquired in Sculpture I, and work to develop more sophisticated, individually-designed projects in a variety of media. Basic welding is taught, allowing students to develop strength and scale in their projects. The new foundry provides the means for an individual or a small group to cast bronze components which can become part of larger sculptural pieces. The foundry process includes working with dangerous materials, requires the wearing of funny outfits, and offers the potential for dramatic moments. Students in Sculpture II will create a piece for transport and installation at the farm/studio. A typical project which could be shown at the farm might be a wind-powered kinetic sculpture.
ART 373-01 Printmaking II TR TBA ART 214 Ruthann Godollei 1 / 8 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
ART 374-01 Ceramic Art II MWF 09:40 am-11:40 am ART 113 Gary Erickson 7 / 10 Materials icon
*Required: permission of the instructor, first day attendance, and $100 material fee. Instructor is keeping a wait list. Please contact him directly to be included on that list should the class close and subsequent openings become available.*
ART 394-01 Figure Drawing TR 08:00 am-11:10 am ART 206 Megan Vossler 1 / 10 Materials icon
This course explores both the structural/anatomical and expressive aspects of figure drawing. Students will be introduced to the elements of form and structure of the human body through working with nude and clothed models, the skeleton, anatomical texts, and other source material. Confidence, the ability to improvise, and an expressive connection with the figure will be developed through exercises that encourage experimentation with gesture and materials. In an in-depth, independent final project (approx. 1/3 of semester), students will develop their own personal content, using the materials and methods of their choice. Discussion of the various issues brought up by representation of the body will be part of our ongoing exploration. Prerequisite: Drawing 1, or instructor permission.
ART 394-02 Architectural Drawing and Model Building TR 01:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 118 Stanton Sears 4 / 10 Materials icon
This course introduces students to a range of systems for architectural design, investigation, and presentation. These include multiview drawings, paraline drawings and projection perspective drawings. There are beautiful and dramatic historic architectural renderings and studies which we will examine and discuss, looking at how the drawings carry information, and in some cases become art. We will learn the fundamentals of Sketchup, a contemporary computer drawing program. In addition to drawing on paper and drawing with computers, we will make use of our new shop to build models. We will look at both how and why different types of models might be used to design a project and communicate information. Along the way this includes study of scale, materials and color. Embedded in the class is a bit of architectural history. The class includes some field trips to look at wonderful architecture both on and near our Macalester College campus
ART 394-03 Photography II MWF 02:20 pm-04:30 pm ART 301 Eric Carroll 0 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; $75 materials fee required* Building on the tools and techniques learned in the Introduction to Photography course, Photo II highlights the material aspect of photography in contemporary art and is designed for self-driven students wanting to pursue a photography-based art project. Alternative processes, advanced lighting, and digital distribution will be explored at length. Students will work toward the production of printed and digital portfolios and create work for a group exhibition. Class time will consist of critiques, readings, lectures, material demonstrations, field trips, and lab time.
ART 488-01 Senior Studio Seminar MW 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ART 203 Ruthann Godollei 11 / 16 Materials icon

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Asian Languages and Cultures

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ASIA 171-01 Art of the East II: Japan MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 2 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ART 171-01*
ASIA 211-01 Indian Philosophies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 112 Joy Laine 11 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 211-01*
ASIA 260-01 Narratives of Alienation: 20th Century Japanese Fiction and Film TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 110 Arthur Mitchell 6 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with JAPA 260-01*
ASIA 294-01 Buddhist Fascists TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Erik Davis 0 / 12 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RELI 294-01; this class is part of a Spring 2015 cluster in the department focusing on the theme of religion and conflict. Classes will meet at the assigned time, but there will also be a few joint meetings for outside speakers and dinners.**
ASIA 294-02 Making Sacred: Religious Images and Spaces in Asia TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ART 270-01 and RELI 294-03; counts as fine arts distribution*

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Biology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
BIOL 116-01 Community and Global Health: Biological Paradigms MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 301 Steven Sundby 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 117-01 Women, Health and Reproduction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Elizabeth Jansen 2 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 117-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 255-01 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Steven Sundby 7 / 21 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-02 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Steven Sundby 0 / 21 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-03 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 285 Michael Anderson 9 / 21 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor; 2 credit course*
BIOL 255-04 Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 285 Susan Bush 7 / 21 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor; 2 credit course*
BIOL 260-01 Genetics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 243 Susan Bush 0 / 30 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 260-02 Genetics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 226 Susan Bush 0 / 30 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 265-01 Cell Biology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 250 Marcos Ortega 0 / 30 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 265-02 Cell Biology MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 243 Devavani Chatterjea 0 / 30 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 270-01 Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 150 Sarah Boyer 4 / 46 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 270-L1 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 273 Michael Anderson 4 / 23 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 270-L2 Biodiversity and Evolution Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 273 Michael Anderson 0 / 23 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 285-01 Ecology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 226 Jerald Dosch 0 / 44 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch 0 / 22 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson 0 / 22 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 285-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 342-01 Animal Behavior/Ecology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 0 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 342-L1 Animal Behavior/Ecology Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Mark Davis 0 / 12 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Marcos Ortega 1 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 352-L1 Biochemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Marcos Ortega 1 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with CHEM 352-L1; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 365-01 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 270 Kristina Curry Rogers 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 365-L1 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy R 01:10 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Kristina Curry Rogers 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 367-01 Human Physiology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 250 Lin Aanonsen 3 / 32 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 367-L1 Human Physiology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen 1 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 367-L2 Human Physiology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 275 Lin Aanonsen 2 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 394-01 Seminar in Genome Editing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 270 Mary Montgomery 0 / 16 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor* Recent advances in molecular biology have lead to the ability to manipulate genomes in ways unimagined even a few years ago. “High-precision” genome editing using a bacterial-derived system called “Cas9” is allowing us to add, replace, or delete specific DNA sequences in almost any organism. The possible applications of this methodology are far-reaching and have already been used to correct disease-causing mutations in mouse models and human cells and to alter gene sequences in primate embryos. The birth of such “designer monkeys” opens the technological door to genetic manipulation of human embryos. We will discuss the primary literature from this emerging field as well as ethical and socio-cultural issues surrounding genome modification. Pre-requisites: BIOL 260 Genetics, BIOL 265 Cell Biology, and junior or senior standing.
BIOL 394-02 Topics in Infectious Diseases W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 270 Gregory Park 0 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor* Throughout your life, infectious diseases will influence your life and the lives of those you care for. This course aims to provide an overview of common human, animal, and plant infectious diseases, and to introduce you to the infectious diseases that impact biosecurity, travel, economic prosperity, and global health. The course will utilize review articles and current literature to explore molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis involving the intersection of host and pathogen interactions. Finally, this course will introduce you to the use of infectious agents as tools in modern research. Prerequisites: BIOL 260 (Genetics), BIOL 265 (Cell Biology), and Biol 255 (Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory Methods) and junior or senior standing.
BIOL 473-01 Research in Immunology W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 170 Devavani Chatterjea 1 / 8 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 473-L1 Research in Immunology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 277 Devavani Chatterjea 1 / 8 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 476-01 Research in Biodiversity and Evolution MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 247 Sarah Boyer 0 / 6 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 476-L1 Research in Biodiversity and Evolution R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 280 Sarah Boyer 0 / 6 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 486-01 Seminar in Neuropharmacology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 Lin Aanonsen 0 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 386-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
BIOL 489-01 Biology Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 250 Curry Rogers, Montgomery 10 / 60 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*

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Chemistry

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHEM 112-01 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan 0 / 36 Materials icon
*Students must register for CHEM 112-L9*
CHEM 112-02 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 350 Christopher Dewberry 7 / 36 Materials icon
*Students must register for CHEM 112-L9*
CHEM 112-03 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 350 Susan Green 0 / 36 Materials icon
*Students must register for CHEM 112-L9*
CHEM 112-04 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 350 Susan Green 1 / 36 Materials icon
*Students must register for CHEM 112-L9*
CHEM 112-L9 General Chemistry II: Energetics and Reactivity TBA TBA STAFF 10 / 144 Materials icon
*Students registered for this lab section will be placed into a scheduled 3-hour lab time that does not conflict with their course schedule as of the end of registration. For more details please see macalester.edu/chemistry/labregistration. A $7 lab materials fee will be charged and first day attendance will be required.*
CHEM 212-01 Organic Chemistry II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 150 Ronald Brisbois 8 / 38 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-02 Organic Chemistry II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 350 Rebecca Hoye 2 / 38 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CHEM 212-L1 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois 1 / 19 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 212-L2 Organic Chemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Ronald Brisbois 1 / 19 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 212-L3 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye 7 / 19 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 212-L4 Organic Chemistry II Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 383 Rebecca Hoye 2 / 19 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 222-01 Analytical Chemistry MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 301 Keith Kuwata 6 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHEM 222-L1 Analytical Chemistry Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Keith Kuwata 5 / 15 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 222-L2 Analytical Chemistry Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Keith Kuwata 1 / 15 Materials icon
*Attendance at first lab meeting required*
CHEM 300-01 Chemistry Seminar W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 350 Kathryn Splan 8 / 50 Materials icon
*1 credit course*
CHEM 312-01 Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg 2 / 26 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHEM 312-L1 Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 301 Thomas Varberg 2 / 26 Materials icon
CHEM 352-01 Biochemistry II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 301 Marcos Ortega 1 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
CHEM 352-L1 Biochemistry II Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 289 Marcos Ortega 1 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 352-L1; attendance at first lab meeting required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
CHEM 394-01 Polymer and Macromolecular Chemistry W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 205 Ronald Brisbois 12 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* Polymer and macromolecular chemistry combine to form a highly interdisciplinary field that cuts across all areas of modern chemistry. In particular, the preparation of polymeric and macromolecular materials can be used to illustrate many of the fundamental concepts of synthetic chemistry. Like small molecules as applied in medicines, polymeric and macromolecular materials occupy a central role in maintaining overall societal well-being. However, unlike small molecules, which are typically synthesized and used as discreet, homogeneous compounds, polymeric and macromolecular materials are usually synthesized and used as a heterogeneous distribution of compounds of the same structural motif but varying size. This course will explore: (a) key historical developments (and people) giving rise to modern polymer and macromolecular chemistry, (b) classical and contemporary protocols for polymer and macromolecular synthesis, (c) compare and contrast physical properties of small, mono-disperse molecules with those of large, poly-disperse polymer and macromolecular substances, (d) applications of polymer and macromolecular materials to societal needs. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 and 212, each earned with grades of C or higher.


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Chinese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CHIN 102-01 First Year Chinese II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 112 Jin Stone 15 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 102-02 First Year Chinese II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 112 Jin Stone 4 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 102-L1 First Year Chinese II Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm Sijia Lan 10 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 102-L2 First Year Chinese II Lab W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 102 Sijia Lan 5 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 102-L3 First Year Chinese II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm Sijia Lan 9 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 194-01 Masterpieces of Chinese Literature TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 227 Rivi Handler-Spitz 0 / 20 Materials icon
CHIN 204-01 Second Year Chinese II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 112 Patricia Anderson 0 / 20 Materials icon
CHIN 204-02 Second Year Chinese II MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 112 Patricia Anderson 9 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CHIN 204-L1 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am Sijia Lan 5 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 204-L2 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm Sijia Lan 5 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 204-L3 Second Year Chinese II Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm Sijia Lan 4 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 304-01 Third Year Chinese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 111 Sijia Lan 1 / 20 Materials icon
CHIN 304-L1 Third Year Chinese II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am Sijia Lan 4 / 12 Materials icon
CHIN 304-L2 Third Year Chinese II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm Sijia Lan 1 / 12 Materials icon
CHIN 408-01 Fourth Year Chinese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 112 Fang Wang 8 / 15 Materials icon
CHIN 452-01 Translating Chinese: Theory and Practice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 110 Rivi Handler-Spitz 10 / 15 Materials icon
To translate means to transfer texts across languages, cultures, and often media and time. Through translation, authors render texts available to new generations of audiences. But in the process, they risk distorting authorial intentions. Thus the act of translation raises ethical questions involving social responsibility and empathy: should translations strive for literal accuracy even when the cultural concepts in the original are incomprehensible to readers in the target language? Should translations accentuate their own foreignness? Or should they accommodate the aesthetic tastes of contemporary readers? Where does the boundary between translation and interpretation lie? Are translators mere ventriloquists, or are they creators in their own right? Is all communication ultimately translation? This course examines both the theory and practice of translation from and into Chinese

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Classics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
CLAS 123-01 Introduction to Archaeology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 215 Vanessa Rousseau 4 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 123-01*
CLAS 129-01 Greek Myths MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 204 Brian Lush 0 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
CLAS 194-01 Frenemies: Calaphate and Byzantine Empire in Late Antiquity TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 001 El Meligi, Overman 9 / 25 Materials icon
This course examines the interaction, commerce, and conflict between Islam and the Byzantine-Christian empire from the origins of Islam in the seventh century to 1453 and the collapse of the Byzantine Empire. These two empires were bound together by shared space, common interests, and episodic distrust. They were Frenemies. The sources for this study are Byzantine and Islamic histories from the period, together with critical analysis of those sources. But in addition and importantly the Literature and the Art these two empires produced provide vital and illuminating sight into these bodies, including their view of one another. Counts for the Middle Eastern and Islamic Civilization concentration.
CLAS 212-01 Elementary Latin II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 011 Nanette Goldman 16 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CLAS 212-L1 Elementary Latin II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am MAIN 010 Nanette Goldman 16 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 214-01 Elementary Arabic II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 002 Wessam El Meligi 6 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 214-L1 Elementary Arabic II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am Wessam El Meligi 15 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab to meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 214-L2 Elementary Arabic II Lab TBA TBA Wessam El Meligi 16 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 218-01 Elementary Hebrew II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 011 Nanette Goldman 17 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
CLAS 218-L1 Elementary Hebrew II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm Nanette Goldman 21 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab to meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 218-L2 Elementary Hebrew II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm Nanette Goldman 21 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab to meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 235-01 Elementary Greek II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 002 Brian Lush 15 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 235-L1 Elementary Greek II Lab R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm Brian Lush 19 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab to meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 235-L2 Elementary Greek II Lab R 01:50 pm-02:50 pm Brian Lush 21 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab to meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 332-01 Intermediate Latin: Poetry MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 003 Mark Gustafson 14 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 342-01 Intermediate Arabic II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 002 Wessam El Meligi 17 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 342-L1 Intermediate Arabic II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am Wessam El Meligi 22 / 25 Materials icon
*Lab to meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 342-L2 Intermediate Arabic II Lab TBA TBA Wessam El Meligi 20 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 362-01 Intermediate Greek: Poetry MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Brian Lush 19 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 392-01 Conflict in Middle East Seminar: Peace and Conflict in Israel, Palestine and Syria T 08:00 am-09:30 am MAIN 111 Andrew Overman 4 / 15 Materials icon
*2 credits; permission of instructor required; This upper-level seminar is a cross-cultural dialogue with an upper level seminar on the same topic at Tel-Hai College. The dialogue focuses on Mideast conflicts and is intended for those with in-depth knowledge of the region. The seminar requires one substantial research project. This project may utilize a range of media; research, an extended paper, an arts-focused project, video, interviews, or others. Members of the seminar will also give a presentation for the seminar on a subject, topic, or contemporary issue they have researched. The seminar features discussions with people from the region who have been or are currently involved with peace and conflict issues. These on-the-ground experts represent a range of perspectives and points of view. Many of these discussions take place through Skype. So the 8:00 AM time allows for connectivity and discussions with leaders from the Middle East. Counts for the Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies concentration.
CLAS 483-01 Advanced Reading in Latin MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm Nanette Goldman 23 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Class to meet in Old Main 410*
CLAS 485-01 Advanced Arabic MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 003 Wessam El Meligi 20 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 485-L1 Advanced Arabic Lab T 03:00 pm-04:00 pm MAIN 011 Wessam El Meligi 20 / 25 Materials icon
CLAS 485-L2 Advanced Arabic Lab TBA TBA Wessam El Meligi 25 / 25 Materials icon

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Computer Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
COMP 110-01 Data/Computing Fundamentals W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 241 Daniel Kaplan 28 / 48 Materials icon
*1 credit course*
COMP 123-01 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 258 Katherine Kinnaird 5 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
COMP 123-02 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 258 Susan Fox 0 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
COMP 123-03 Core Concepts in Computer Science MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 258 Susan Fox 0 / 30 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
COMP 124-01 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 256 Bret Jackson 1 / 16 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
COMP 124-02 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 256 Bret Jackson 2 / 16 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
COMP 124-03 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 256 Elizabeth Shoop 2 / 16 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
COMP 124-L1 Object-Oriented Programming Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 256 Bret Jackson 0 / 16 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
COMP 124-L2 Object-Oriented Programming Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Bret Jackson 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
COMP 124-L3 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 256 Elizabeth Shoop 2 / 16 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*
COMP 225-01 Software Design and Development MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 245 Paul Cantrell 0 / 16 Materials icon
*Permission of Susan Fox required; first day attendance required*
COMP 225-02 Software Design and Development MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 245 Paul Cantrell 0 / 16 Materials icon
*Permission of Susan Fox required; first day attendance required*
COMP 261-01 Theory of Computation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 Susan Fox 1 / 42 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; cross-listed with MATH 361-01*
COMP 302-01 Introduction to Database Management Systems TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 245 Elizabeth Shoop 0 / 24 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; open access to Math (Applied) majors and Computer Science majors; all others require permission of instructor*
COMP 365-01 Computational Linear Algebra TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 245 David Shuman 3 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MATH 365-01; first day attendance required*
COMP 365-02 Computational Linear Algebra TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 245 David Shuman 0 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MATH 365-02; first day attendance required*
COMP 394-01 Interactive Graphics MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 256 Bret Jackson 0 / 24 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; open access to Computer Science majors who've taken COMP 124 and 240; all others require permission of instructor* This course will investigate the theory and practice of computer graphics programming using C++ and OpenGL. Through hands-on projects, supported by lecture and discussion, you will learn the fundamentals of creating interactive 2D and 3D images with applications in art, design, games, movies, science, and medicine. Topics covered will include event loops, polygonal models, rendering techniques, texturing, lighting, and physical simulation.
COMP 469-01 Discrete Applied Mathematics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Andrew Beveridge 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MATH 469-01*
COMP 490-01 Senior Capstone Seminar MW 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 205 Fox, Shoop 5 / 24 Materials icon
*2 credit course; first day attendance required*

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Economics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ECON 113-01 Financial Accounting TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 304 Jeff Evans 0 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 115-01 Introduction to American Economy MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 305 Karine Moe 4 / 20 Materials icon
*Not open to students who have already taken 119*
ECON 119-01 Principles of Economics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 305 Amy Damon 10 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 119-02 Principles of Economics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 305 Amy Damon -1 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 119-03 Principles of Economics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 216 Samantha Cakir 10 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 119-04 Principles of Economics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 216 Samantha Cakir 10 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 119-05 Principles of Economics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 150 Liang Ding 1 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 194-01 Organizational Leadership TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 102 Jeff Evans 0 / 17 Materials icon
This course will combine a theoretical background with hands-on experience that will permit a student to begin their career-long development of their leadership talent. We will learn from Aristotle, Winston Churchill, and Steve Jobs, Topics include leadership styles, group decision making , cultural differences in leadership, self-assessment, and traits common to outstanding leaders. The emphasis will be on case studies and discussion. No prerequisite. This course counts as a Group B elective for the major. It does not count for the Social Science General Distribution Requirement.
ECON 225-01 Comparative Economic Systems TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 250 Gary Krueger 2 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 225-01*
ECON 242-01 Economics of Gender MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 105 Karine Moe 0 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with WGSS 242-01*
ECON 252-01 Economics of Not-For-Profit TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 304 Paul Aslanian 2 / 25 Materials icon
This course focuses on the economics of not-for-profit institutions. The course will deal with both underlying theoretical concepts and their applicability to actual nonprofits. The course will be broken down into three components: (1) A rather deep overview of the nonprofit sectors of the US economy. Their history, evolution, trends, and possible future; (2) Macalester College (and other selective LA colleges) as a nonprofit; and lastly (3) How to actually start your own nonprofit. After our introduction, the college will actually provide the basic framework for the course. Using the tools of economic analysis acquired in the Principles course, we will examine the mission/purpose/aims of the college and how they relate to governance (the interplay between the Board of Trustees, the
President and his/her staff, the various faculty/staff committees, students, and other constituencies); planning and goal setting; resource allocation (both operating and capital budgets); the interplay between human capital, financial capital, and physical capital; agency matters and incentives; and the issues that must be confronted in deciding whether to spend more from the endowment now vs later. We will also study how not-for-profits tend to self-evaluate their progress and how external evaluating methodologies (eg U.S.News) might influence all of the above. During the portion of the course wherein we focus on Macalester, we will often analyze the same matter found at other selective, national liberal arts colleges, including Swarthmore, Carleton, Grinnell and Pomona. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361.
ECON 294-01 Introduction to Entrepreneurship M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 305 Kate Reiling 1 / 20 Materials icon
*This course counts towards the Group B elective and is not a prerequisite for ECON 361* Students in the Entrpreneurship will learn the fundamentals of how to launch a business, including market sizing, competitive analysis and developing financial pro-formas. Using the methodologies from the Lean Start-up movement, students will focus on "validated learning" to test and iterate on their theories and ideas. The course will end with a pitch session community-wide. Prerequisite: ECON 119.
ECON 294-02 The Art and Science of Valuation: From Stocks to Alternative Assets TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 401 Thomas Simonson 5 / 20 Materials icon
*This course counts towards the Group B elective and is not a prerequisite for ECON 361* This course will familiarize students with valuation methods used by investment professionals, corporations and investment bankers. Topics covered will include corporate valuations (public companies, private companies, start-ups) as well as a range of other assets such as real estate (office buildings, raw land, development projects, hotel/resort properties, etc.), bonds/corporate debt (including defaulted/distressed debt). Students with an interest in investment banking, business development, “buy-side” investing or the world of finance in general will be exposed to the concepts and practices actually used by professionals in these industries. The class will make extensive use of guest lecturers whose careers involve analyzing value. This course will count towards the Group B elective for the major. Prerequisites: ECON 119 and ECON 113 or instructor approval
ECON 323-01 Economic Restructuring in Latin America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Raymond Robertson 3 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 323-01 and LATI 323-01*
ECON 356-01 Capital Markets TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 304 Liang Ding 0 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 361-01 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 304 Sarah West 0 / 25 Materials icon
*Special note about Prerequisite(s) for ECON 361: Students wishing to take ECON 361 must know the mathematics of partial differentiation and constrained optimization. In particular, MATH 135 or MATH 237 taken prior to fall 2014 or MATH 135 or MATH 137 taken in fall 2014 meet the math prerequisite for this course. MATH 137 taken before fall 2014 does not meet the math prerequisite. In addition, students must have a C- or higher in one 200-level Economics course from Group A electives. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor.*
ECON 361-02 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 304 Sarah West 0 / 25 Materials icon
*Special note about Prerequisite(s) for ECON 361: Students wishing to take ECON 361 must know the mathematics of partial differentiation and constrained optimization. In particular, MATH 135 or MATH 237 taken prior to fall 2014 or MATH 135 or MATH 137 taken in fall 2014 meet the math prerequisite for this course. MATH 137 taken before fall 2014 does not meet the math prerequisite. In addition, students must have a C- or higher in one 200-level Economics course from Group A electives. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor.*
ECON 371-01 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 304 Pete Ferderer 0 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 381-01 Introduction to Econometrics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 309 Raymond Robertson 0 / 20 Materials icon
ECON 381-02 Introduction to Econometrics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 309 Gary Krueger 7 / 20 Materials icon
ECON 381-L1 Intro to Econometrics Lab R 09:00 am-09:30 am CARN 309 Raymond Robertson 2 / 22 Materials icon
ECON 381-L2 Intro to Econometrics Lab W 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 309 Gary Krueger 9 / 22 Materials icon
ECON 426-01 International Economic Development MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 305 Amy Damon 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
ECON 431-01 Public Finance MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 304 Sarah West 14 / 25 Materials icon
ECON 490-01 Behavioral Economics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 305 Pete Ferderer 0 / 25 Materials icon

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Educational Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
EDUC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 215 Tina Kruse 1 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 220-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 230-01 Community Youth Development in Multicultural America TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 215 Tina Kruse 8 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
EDUC 294-01 The Schools-to-Prison Pipeline TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 228 Karin Aguilar-San Juan 2 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with AMST 265-01; prior exposure to American Studies or Urban Studies is recommended*
EDUC 360-01 Education and Emerging Technologies W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm ARTCOM 202 Brad Belbas 2 / 12 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
EDUC 370-01 Education and the Challenge of Globalization MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 215 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 18 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 370-01; first day attendance required*
EDUC 390-01 Teaching and Learning in Urban Schools M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 217 Rachel Wannarka 7 / 12 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
EDUC 394-01 Social and Emotional Learning MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 216 Tina Kruse 16 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
Many educational researchers and practitioners believe that social-emotional learning is a critical “missing piece” for student success in today’s education system. This course will provide an overview of social-emotional learning (SEL), considering relevant theory, implementation and outcomes. We will critically examine the role of social-emotional learning for children and youth across age levels and in both classroom and out-of-school-time settings. Focal topics include self-awareness, personal well being, caring communities, conflict mediation, and developmental relationships. We will also consider the origins of SEL, policy implications, and many, many examples of SEL in practice.
EDUC 460-01 Education and Social Change MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 113 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 5 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*

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English

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENGL 101-01 College Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 228 Jake Mohan 0 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 105-01 American Voices MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 010 Daylanne English 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* In this introductory English course, we will listen to a wide range of American voices in a number of genres, from short stories to novels, to graphic narratives, to a play. The texts in this course, although all are “American,” explore what it means to give voice to many differences within such a national identity. Our authors express and represent, and in some cases perform, complex and layered identities that have been shaped by: national origins, regions, class, languages, races and ethnicities, sexualities, genders, experiences of war and other forms of violence, and time periods (including the future). In the process, they often test or expand the limits of literary, as well as visual and musical, form. We will study works by Sandra Cisneros, Junot Díaz, Tim O’Brien, Alison Bechdel, and Janelle Monàe, among others. Course requirements include: an in-class oral presentation, a brief written response to each primary reading, and three essays of about 5-7 pages each (one of which must be revised). This course will fulfill either the foundation course in literature requirement or the literature by U.S. writers of color requirement for the English major.
ENGL 115-01 Shakespeare TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 216 Jennifer Baltzer-Lovato 0 / 20 Materials icon
William Shakespeare remains the undisputed central figure of theater and literature in English, even today, more than 400 years since the premiere of his last play (Henry VIII, 1613). His plays are still the most regularly performed in the world, his poetry is the most often quoted, and he can be counted among the most popular screenwriters as well. What continues to draw us to Shakespeare’s writing? How did the plays connect to the time and place in which they were first performed, and how has the cultural understanding of these works changed through time? Whose Shakespeare do we read--or watch--when we engage with it today? In an effort to answer some of these queries, our goals will be to 1--Achieve a greater understanding of the historical context of Shakespeare’s era, 2--Consider how his plays engaged in the construction of social behaviors of the time period, and 3--Contemplate the various ways that Shakespeare and his writings live on today on screen and through social media. We will read six plays, focusing on themes such as the construction of gender identities and the role of the hero in society, among others. The course will include screening of film versions as well as at least one “field trip” to see a live play. This is an intro level course, and as such it will be accessible and welcoming to students of all disciplines.
ENGL 137-01 Novel MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 170 James Dawes 0 / 20 Materials icon
ENGL 137-02 Novel: Art and Violence MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 011 Casey Jarrin 0 / 20 Materials icon
*True class limit is 20; 10 spots for juniors and seniors, and 10 spots for sophomores and freshmen.* Introduction to aesthetic, historical, and ideological transformations in the novel. From the charismatic and ethically complex antiheroes of Dorian Gray, Sula, and Clockwork Orange to the “nonfiction” experiments of In Cold Blood, Vietnam war memoir Dispatches, and graphic novel Persepolis, from modernist stream-of-consciousness in Mrs. Dalloway and aesthetic anarchy in V for Vendetta to the contested profanities of The Satanic Verses, from celebrated to censored texts, we’ll explore the relationship between the novel as a literary form and its representation of violence in language, thought, embodied action. We’ll encounter modernist, postmodern, postcolonial, feminist and queer revolutions in the novel, spend time with authors from a range of historical moments and national contexts whose work challenges what a novel looks and sounds like, often in shocking and subversive ways. Attention to formal and stylistic elements will underscore connections between the novel form and its violent content. We’ll ask: What’s the relation between aesthetic creation and (self)destruction? How might narrative perform gruesome acts of violence, insatiable consumption, or cannibalism? How do particular novels embody violent, criminal, and/or national psychopathologies? What’s the relationship between hyperviolence, pornography, and censorship? How do class, race, gender, and sexual desire manifest themselves in these texts? How have the gothic, magical realist, horror, and war genres shaped our cultural understanding of violence in literature, film, and image - and its translation of "real" bodily/political violence? Discussion of novels will be complemented by close analysis of selected films.

Likely Novels (8-9 of the following): Oscar Wilde, Picture of Dorian Gray; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Nathanael West, Day of the Locust; Truman Capote, In Cold Blood; William S. Burroughs, Naked Lunch; Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire; Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange; Michael Herr, Dispatches; Toni Morrison, Sula; Salman Rushdie, Shame; Isabel Allende, Eva Luna; Manuel Puig, Kiss of the Spider Woman; Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian; Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis; Alan Moore, V for Vendetta; Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body Likely Films: Battle of Algiers (Dir. Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966); A Clockwork Orange (Dir. Stanley Kubrick, 1971); Apocalypse Now (Dir. Francis Ford Coppola, 1979); War Requiem (Dir. Derek Jarman, 1989); The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover (Dir. Peter Greenaway, 1989); Capote (Dir. Bennett Miller, 2005); No Country For Old Men (Dir. Joel & Ethan Coen, 2007); American Psycho (Dir. Mary Harron, 2000); Pan's Labyrinth (Dir. Guillermo del Toro, 2006)

*Course fulfills 100-level/introductory English major requirement
ENGL 150-01 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 003 James Dawes 1 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 150-02 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 003 Peter Bognanni 0 / 16 Materials icon
In this course we will dive right into the study of creative writing by reading and writing poetry, flash fiction, short stories, and personal essays. We will study how published authors craft their pieces, how they convey sensation and emotion, and how they artfully tell a story. Along the way, you’ll try your hand at each literary form we study. This is the basic template you can expect on a day-to-day basis. But, beyond this relatively simple pattern, what I hope will happen this semester is that you’ll lose yourself entirely to the daring act of creating literature. I hope you’ll disappear into what John Gardener calls the “vivid and continuous dream.” I hope you’ll use your growing knowledge of writing technique and literary history to say something fearless and artful about the world around you. And I hope you will see that what you write matters. Great creative writing aspires to more than just a pleasant diversion from life. At its best, it directly engages with life and even tries to change it. I hope this class will be a doorway into that experience for you.
ENGL 150-03 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 217 Ping Wang 7 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 150-04 Introduction to Creative Writing MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 217 Ping Wang 4 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 150-05 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 011 Matthew Burgess 1 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 150-06 Introduction to Creative Writing TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 204 Matthew Burgess 0 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 200-01 Major Medieval and Renaissance British Writers TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 228 Theresa Krier 9 / 20 Materials icon
This course surveys writers and genres of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, with a focus on questions of the natural world and environmental issues. The British Isles, a northerly, sea-girt cluster of islands are part of the archipelagic North Sea world as well as part of the larger European continent. During pre-modern centuries, writers who inhabited thee multiple cultures of the Isles take up all kinds of questions about ethical dwelling, environmental preservation, ethnic and tribal conflicts in confined territory, gender issues, the nature of conquest, the formation of nation-states, the clash of religious traditions as Christianity encounters local, indigenous religions. We'll survey works in many genres, forms, and modes of representation. In the process we'll also develop a rich picture of literary cultures and artistic achievements in these centuries. All works will be studied in modern English
ENGL 220-01 Eighteenth-Century British Literature TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 370 Patricia Baehler 1 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
“The birth and development of the novel as a genre takes place in the full light of the historical day.” – Mikhail Bakhtin
The novel is arguably the dominant literary genre of the modern era, but its success obscures its recent and somewhat scandalous origins. What we now see as an established and conventional form was, in the eighteenth century, unfamiliar and new, or “novel.” The concerns of a rapidly changing world played out on the pages of books written by women as well as men, by Grub Street hacks as well as the intellectual elite. Authors experimented with representation, perspective and structure even as they grappled with concepts as diverse as subjectivity, social order, gender roles, and aesthetics. In this course we will study some of the significant texts in the evolution of the novel, texts that demonstrate the inventive, playful, and sometimes bawdy nature of a genre without rules: Aphra Behn’s short fiction; Eliza Haywood’s Love in Excess; Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe; Samuel Richardson’s Pamela and the parodies it inspired; Horace Walpole’s Castle of Otranto; and Francis Burney’s Evelina. In addition to these primary texts we will also read critical essays that consider the many influences on the genre and the social and political context in which it developed.
ENGL 272-01 Love and Madness in 19th Century American Literature W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 James Dawes 2 / 20 Materials icon
ENGL 276-01 African American Literature 1900 to Present MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 111 Daylanne English 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* In this survey course, we will trace an African American literary tradition from 1900 to the present. We will read a wide range of genres, including drama, jazz poetry, prose poems, short stories, and novels. Our journey across this rich literary tradition will be guided by place and performance, as we investigate the temporal and geographic locations of our texts and listen to the music of our authors’ times. Our texts show performance to be central within this tradition—performance not only of music, but of race, gender, sexuality, class, region, nation, and even time and narration itself. Our authors will include: W. E. B. Du Bois, Jean Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, Langston Hughes, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Tracy K. Smith, and Toni Morrison. Requirements include: two 7-10 page essays, an in-class presentation, brief response papers on the readings, and a final exam. It also fulfills the English major requirement of a course focused on literature by U.S. writers of color.
ENGL 280-01 Crafts of Writing: Poetry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 111 Kristin Naca 2 / 16 Materials icon
ENGL 281-01 Crafts of Writing: Fiction MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 204 Marlon James 7 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 281-02 Crafts of Writing: Fiction MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 204 Marlon James 4 / 16 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
ENGL 294-01 Heroic Narrative TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 009 Theresa Krier 0 / 23 Materials icon
This course focuses on literary developments of heroism in medieval Britain and Scandinavia, archipelagoes whose ethnically hybrid cultures give rise to complex analyses of the power, contradictoriness, and sometimes comedy of warrior ethics. Our texts are alert to gender politics, to the warrior hero’s sense of the natural world, to the monstrous. Our characters will include not only heroes but also dragons, demons, magicians, shape-shifters, nature spirits, fairies, giants, cannibals, grotesques, bear-men, wolf-men, goddesses, and women. (In fact, some of the heroes, and some of the writers, are women.) Big works will be drawn from among these: Beowulf, The Dream of the Rood, The Heliand, The Volsung Saga, The Saga of King Hrolf Kraki, Sir Orfeo, the Anglo-Norman Lais of Marie de France, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Arthurian tales from Thomas Malory’s Morte Darthur, Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene. There will be shorter, often mysterious lyrics from Old English and Welsh traditions. Students will have opportunities to investigate treatments of Arthurian legend, or the paths by which the medieval became medievalism, the Gothic, and contemporary fantasy.
ENGL 294-03 Literary Humor Writing TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 111 Peter Bognanni 0 / 16 Materials icon
Humor,” E.B. White said, “can be dissected as a frog can, but the thing dies in the process and the innards are discouraging to any but the pure scientific mind.” This class then will be a class about innards—specifically, the inner workings of humor writing—and we will be the scientists. We’ll begin with the humble aphorism and make our way through satire, parody, the comedy of manners, the epistolary, the humorous memoir, fake news, the comic novel, and even a little standup comedy. Writers past and present have used these forms not only to amuse and delight, but to level incisive commentary at the world around them. From Jonathan Swift to Jon Stewart, Dorothy Parker to Tina Fey, humorists of each age have sought more than just laughs. They have attempted to shift political and cultural landscapes, to sway public opinion, and to make room for the absurd in an often solemn world. In this course, we will study the work of master humorists with an eye toward craft. Along the way, you’ll be writing your own pieces, and working to develop your comedic voice as the semester progresses. For each joke we dissect, we will create new life with one of our own.
ENGL 294-04 Narrative Journalism M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 010 Stephen Smith 0 / 16 Materials icon
Taught by writer and journalist Stephen Smith (Executive Editor and Host of American RadioWorks, the national documentary series from American Public Media). This course will focus on creating vivid, economical prose as a foundation for many types of expository writing. The fundamental elements of narrative journalism will be explored. Students will do research and interviews for print journalism pieces. Students will write frequently, will edit each other, and will receive detailed suggestions on their writing from the instructor.
ENGL 294-05 Acting Shakespeare MWF 12:00 pm-01:30 pm THEATR 010 Barbra Berlovitz 0 / 10 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with THDA 294-05; counts as fine arts general distribution*
ENGL 294-06 Writing Performance M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 205 James, Waters Jr. 0 / 12 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with THDA 294-06; counts for fine arts distribution credit*
ENGL 331-01 Nineteenth Century British Novel MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 010 Lesley Goodman 12 / 20 Materials icon
In the nineteenth century, the novel became the predominant art form. It was popular, a primary source of entertainment and pleasure for many, not unlike the role of television today, but it was also a serious form of cultural commentary and criticism that competed with the most influential intellectual discourses of the day. This course will explore four major novels of the nineteenth century: Jane Austen’s Persuasion, W. M. Thackeray’s Vanity Fair, George Eliot’s Middlemarch, and Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles. These novels represent the sweeping ambition of the novel in the nineteenth century, as well as its twin and sometimes opposing goals: detailed psychological analysis and comprehensive social representation. Topics considered include class mobility, sexual politics, the role of women in society, and the changing structure of English communities in the nineteenth century. In particular, we will focus on the representation of dissatisfied and ambitious women.
ENGL 362-01 Gendered, Feminist and Womanist Writings: 19th Century Women Writers MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 010 Lesley Goodman 17 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 310-01; first day attendance required* The woman writer occupied an unusual space in nineteenth-century Britain. On the one hand, women had a history of dominating the novel market, and theories of gender difference suggested that women’s apparent strengths—compassion, sensitivity, and an attention to detail—were peculiarly suited to writing novels. On the other hand, the act of publishing a novel was one way of leaving the private sphere of the home and entering the public sphere, dominated by men. Moreover, while nineteenth-century plots often hinged on young women’s marital decisions, critics were quick to point out that there were many topics that a woman writer could not or should not address, as a result of her own ignorance and the vulnerability of her reputation. The works of nineteenth-century women writers address both of these difficulties—the gendered aspects of reading and writing as well as the unforgiving sexual politics of the culture—while the writers themselves struggled to succeed within these codes. Texts include Austen’s Northanger Abbey, Elizabeth Gaskell’s Ruth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Aurora Leigh, George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss, and Mary Cholmondeley’s Red Pottage, among others.
ENGL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 384-01 and INTL 384-01; first day attendance required*
ENGL 394-02 Re-writing the Victorians MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 010 Lesley Goodman 15 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* Why do we re-tell stories that have already been told? Why do Victorian texts in particular seem to have such a strong hold on our imaginations, over a century later? In this course we will read three Victorian novels (Jane Eyre, Great Expectations, and Strange Case of Jekyll and Hyde) as well as several twentieth- and twenty-first-century literary adaptations. These responses constitute aesthetic and political interventions into the cultural myths established by the Victorians. While some want to write back to the Victorians in a corrective spirit, addressing those identities and experiences characteristically excluded from Victorian literature, others seem deeply attracted to aspects of Victorian culture. The modern perspective on Victorian literature can clearly identify the limitations of this culture, but it remains a source of fascination, an imaginative space the modern reader wants to experience. How do Victorian narratives make sense to the modern reader, one who is historically distanced from the ideas that animated those narratives? How do Victorian narratives continue to make meaning in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries?
ENGL 394-04 Latino Poetics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 011 Kristin Naca 12 / 20 Materials icon
The terms Latina/o and Latinidad encompass myriad cultural practices, language performance, and migrations by and about Hispano American subjects. These terms propose alternative geographic, temporal, and corporeal histories of the West. These terms allude to the desire, of multi-raced, multi-national, and/or multi-lingual subjects for self-identification and self-determination. In this course, we theorize Latina/o aesthetics’ potential to engender spaces of resistance. More specifically, we examine how poetry and prose forms might enact, replicate, or inspire social justice activism. We read examples of poetry from the ancients, 19th century occupations of the Southwest, through the contemporary era. Latina/o theorists Arteaga, Mesa-Baines, Prieto and Ybarra-Frausto help us navigate a program of conciencia. We consider the poetics of nostalgia and reclamation in Puertorriqueños Judith Ortiz Cofer, Clemente Soto Vélez and Martín Espada. We flip over the stone to uncover indigenous histories and histories of the dead in California & Texas with Lorna Dee Cervantes and Tino Villanueva. The experimental, avant-guard anthology, Angels of the Americlyse: New Latino Writing will anchor our discussion. As a W course, we practice thinking through writing; experimentation will groom precision and depth. We write fragments, queries, poems, and book reviews. Poets may also research and produce creative work, to incorporate into their final projects. Our aim is to perform scholar-activism through writing.
ENGL 394-05 Short Forms: Novella, Essay, Aphorism from Boccaccio to Brecht TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 David Martyn 9 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-02; What can a short text do that a long text can’t? This course will look for answers to this question by reading and discussing short prose works from the Renaissance to the 20th century. We will pursue the history of the novella – which is not a short novel but a literary form in its own right – from its emergence in the Italian Renaissance (Boccaccio) to its modern adaptations in German romanticism (Tieck) and French realism (Flaubert). We will explore the complexities of the essay from Michel de Montaigne, who created the genre in the 16th century, through Francis Bacon, whose scientific method relied on it, to its use as a hybrid form between science and literature in the early twentieth century (Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Sigmund Freud). And we will focus on the form that epitomizes the rhetorical virtue of brevitas: the aphorism, from the 17th century moralists (La Rochefoucauld), through the secular pietism of the 18th century (Lichtenberg), romanticism (Goethe), the 19th century’s answers to nihilism (Schopenhauer, Nietzsche), to the crypticism of Kafka, the irony of Brecht, and the uncompromising pessimism of Adorno. Discussion questions will include: what are the literary and rhetorical effects of brevity? How can words gain by being few? What happens when texts get longer? How is literature a form of knowledge and science a form of literature? Requirements: 3 mid-length papers with revisions; one class presentation. Taught in English, but texts will be made available to those who can and would like to read them in the original.
ENGL 394-06 The Empathy Machine: Feeling 20th Century Literature and Film MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 011 Casey Jarrin 3 / 20 Materials icon
A 2013 study at the New School for Social Research found that reading literary fiction enhances our ability to understand others’ emotional, psychological, even physiological states and “increases our capacity for empathy.” In this interdisciplinary seminar, we’ll expand on this concept and explore how words and images heighten our senses, make us aware that “we all have pink and vulnerable guts”(says film theorist Vivian Sobchack), and invite us to feel in our bodies what we we read/see on the page/screen. Through encounters with novels, plays, poems, photographs, films, and immersive visual art that activate us as readers/viewers, we’ll explore the complex relationship between aesthetic representation and our affective, sensory, and physiological experience of texts/images. Using phenomenological models of “embodied perception” and “lived-body experience” to examine our empathetic response to literary, (audio)visual, and digital/virtual worlds, and with a particular interest in encounters with scenes of historical trauma and violence, we’ll ask a series of interlocking questions: How do aesthetic representations evoke response in the reading or viewing audience, trigger our bodily understanding of what we read/hear/see, resurrect past events to make them present, felt, embodied? How do specific works of art involve the audience in a complex participatory experience, shake spectators from detached viewing, make us complicit in violence represented, and/or provoke embodied empathy? How do narrative and visual art revisit, reanimate, and reenact lived histories of violence and war? How do we feel through reading, listening, seeing? Ultimately we’ll consider the ethical, even utopian possibilities of shared physiological experience, collective sensory involvement and enthrallment in our interactions post-trauma art/film/literature -- and look at these alongside specific technologies of immersive virtual reality, audience participation, and empathetic engagement from 1950s movie theater gimmicks (Percept-O, Smell-O-Vision) and “Sensory Fiction” digital books with wearable electronic vests (developed at MIT in 2014) to war memorials and museums. Likely Texts: Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas and/or Mrs. Dalloway; Truman Capote, In Cold Blood; Peter Weiss, Marat/Sade or The Investigation; Slavenka Drakulic, S: A Novel About the Balkans(also published as As If I Am Not There); Caryl Phillips, The Final Passage; Marlon James, The Book of Night Women; Martin Amis, Time’s Arrow; Edwidge Danticat, Farming of the Bones; Salman Rushdie, Shame; Jean Dominique Bauby, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly; Alison Bechdel, Fun Home; Susan Sontag, Regarding the Pain of Others; Elaine Scarry, The Body in Pain; Vivian Sobchack, Carnal Thoughts. Likely Films: Videodrome (Dir. David Cronenberg, 1983); Wings of Desire/Der Himmel Uber Berlin (Dir. Wim Wenders, 1987) and/or Pina (Dir. Wenders, 2011); The Lives of Others (Dir. Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, 2006); Bloody Sun
ENGL 400-01 "Dangerous" (Post)Modernisms: Rewriting Histories, Rethinking Bodies, Reinventing the Novel M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 011 Casey Jarrin 2 / 12 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* What can literary texts do, challenge, make anew? In this seminar, we’ll explore the subversive potential of the novel as a contested genre and site of aesthetic transformation and ideological resistance over the last hundred years. We’ll encounter modernist, postmodern, postcolonial, queer, and feminist revisions of the novel, at turns irreverent, iconoclastic, satirical, enigmatic, experimental, polyvocal, self-reflexive, riotous, and wildly entertaining. How do these texts and their authors disrupt narrative conventions, challenge how a novel can look and sound, reanimate language and generate new ways of speaking, thinking, creating? How do they rethink bodies, inspire revolutions in how we understand gender and desire, unmask cultural and psychosexual taboos, revisit and rewrite painful histories, mirror dystopian worlds we already inhabit, imagine utopian futures? How does the postmodern novel harness revolutionary energies at large – and conversely, inspire social transformations, ethical interventions, linguistic revolutions? Likely texts: We’ll look at novels that refuse the fiction/nonfiction divide to merge invented worlds with history and (auto)biography (Virginia Woolf/Orlando, Gertrude Stein/Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, Marguerite Duras/The Lover + The North China Lover, E.L. Doctorow/The Book of Daniel); postmodern works censored for obscenity and banned for blasphemy (Mikhail Bulgakov/Master and Margarita, William S. Burroughs/Naked Lunch, Anthony Burgess/A Clockwork Orange, Norman Mailer/Why Are We in Vietnam?, Salman Rushdie/Satanic Verses); magical realist, surrealist, and satirical responses to political violence (Flann O’Brien/The Third Policeman, Gabriel Garcia Marquez/Autumn of the Patriarch, Salman Rushdie/Shame, Guillermo del Toro/Pan’s Labyrinth); feminist reinventions that redraw histories/bodies, reinvent language, tell new stories (Jeanette Winterson/Gut Symmetries or Sexing the Cherry, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha/Dictee, Margaret Atwood/The Handmaid’s Tale, Zadie Smith/White Teeth); graphic novels that explode the literary fiction/pulp/comics divide to reanimate historical and bodily traumas (Art Spiegelman/MAUS, Marjane Satrapi/Persepolis, Julie Maroh/Blue is the Warmest Color, Zak Davis/Gravity’s Rainbow Illustrated). Requirements: Weekly journals, project abstract, 15-25 page final project.
ENGL 406-01 Projects in Creative Writing MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 102 Ping Wang 8 / 12 Materials icon

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Environmental Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
ENVI 133-01 Environmental Science MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 370 Daniel Hornbach 1 / 18 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 133-L1 Environmental Science Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Dosch, Hornbach 1 / 18 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 150-01 Climate and Society MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 301 Louisa Bradtmiller 0 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 221-01 Environmental Ethics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Martin Gunderson 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 221-01; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 225-01 100 Words for Snow: Language and Nature MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Marianne Milligan 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 225-01; first day attendance is required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 232-01 People, Agriculture and the Environment TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 William Moseley 0 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 232-01; first day attendance required*
ENVI 237-01 Environmental Justice MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 204 STAFF 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 237-01 and HIST 237-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 241-01 Food, Environment, and Society in 20th Century America TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Ryan Edgington 13 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 241-01*
ENVI 280-01 Environmental Classics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 301 Christina Manning 0 / 18 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 285-01 Ecology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 226 Jerald Dosch 0 / 44 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
ENVI 285-L1 Ecology Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 284 Jerald Dosch 0 / 22 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L1; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
ENVI 285-L2 Ecology Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 284 Michael Anderson 0 / 22 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 285-L2; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
ENVI 294-01 The Politics of Architecture and the Built Environment TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 Schmidt, Wells 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 294-01; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor* *First day attendance required; cross-listed with POLI 294-01; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor* Are buildings political? What does the built environment--from buildings to roads and the entire layout of communities--say about us and to us? This collaboratively-taught course will explore the ways that architecture embodies the ideals and political tensions of the individuals and societies that create them, as well as how the physical landscape also shapes the political landscape. Beginning with a survey of themes in architectural history, we will explore both the expressive meaning and the behavioral significance of the human-built world. Topics will range from Greek temples to Occupy protests, from 19th century Paris to the American suburbs.
ENVI 294-02 Farm and Forest: African Environmental History TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Jamie Monson 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 239-01*
ENVI 294-04 Architecture, Sustainability, and Place-Making TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 102 David Wagner 7 / 15 Materials icon
Explore the art and science of sustainable architecture in this in-depth field study and re-visioning of the Ordway Field Station, located on the 278-acre Katharine Ordway Natural History Study Area. This nature preserve, owned by Macalester College, is located 17 miles from campus on the bluffs of the Mississippi River. Students will explore the authentic architectural process of identifying client needs; researching site history; evaluating climate, habitat, and land forms; exploring sustainable technologies; and researching sustainable materials and design techniques. These explorations will culminate in the development of team- based schematic designs for the Field Station. Focus will be on understanding and balancing the needs of building, landscape, and people in order to create a solution that is beautiful, livable, and sustainable. Classwork will include site visits and observations, sketching, research, discussion, analysis, and synthesis. Drafting experience is not required, but modest fine-art drawing skills are preferred. David O’Brien Wagner, AIA, LEED AP is a local architect and partner at SALA Architects. He has won numerous state and national awards for his sustainable buildings, and recently received the “Young Architect” award from the Minnesota Chapter of the American Institute of Architects
ENVI 335-01 Science and Citizenship TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke 3 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 335-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 368-01 Sustainable Development and Global Future TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Roopali Phadke 5 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 368-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
ENVI 370-01 Education and the Challenge of Globalization MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 215 Ruthanne Kurth-Schai 18 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with EDUC 370-01; first day attendance required*
ENVI 488-01 Sr Seminar in Environmental St TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 270 Chris Wells 6 / 18 Materials icon

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French and Francophone Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
FREN 102-01 French II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 409 Annick Fritz 6 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-02 French II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 409 Annick Fritz 5 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L1 French II Lab T 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 247 Julien Berthelon 6 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L2 French II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Julien Berthelon 2 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L3 French II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 247 Julien Berthelon 0 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 102-L4 French II Lab R 09:10 am-10:10 am NEILL 404 Julien Berthelon 3 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-01 Accelerated French I-II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 404 Juliette Rogers 8 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L1 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 250 Rokhaya Dieng 3 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 111-L2 Accelerated French I-II Lab TR 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 409 Rokhaya Dieng 6 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-01 French III MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 402 Juliette Rogers 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L1 French III Lab T 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng 0 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 203-L2 French III Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 113 Rokhaya Dieng 0 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-01 Text, Film and Media MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm ARTCOM 202 Martine Sauret 8 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-02 Text, Film and Media MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 202 Martine Sauret 12 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-03 Text, Film and Media MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm ARTCOM 202 Andrew Billing 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L1 Text, Film and Media Lab T 09:10 am-10:10 am NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng 0 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L2 Text, Film and Media Lab R 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 409 Rokhaya Dieng 3 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L3 Text, Film and Media Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 350 Julien Berthelon 5 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L4 Text, Film and Media Lab R 08:00 am-09:00 am NEILL 404 Julien Berthelon 7 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L5 Text, Film and Media Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 409 Julien Berthelon 2 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 204-L6 Text, Film and Media Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 404 Rokhaya Dieng 3 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-01 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools TR 09:40 am-11:10 am ARTCOM 202 Joelle Vitiello 10 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L1 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools M 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon 8 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 305-L2 Advanced Expression: Communication Tools W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Julien Berthelon 2 / 10 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 306-01 Introduction to Literary Analysis MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm ARTCOM 102 Andrew Billing 8 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
FREN 416-01 French Interdisciplinary Studies: Haiti: Culture, Human Rights and Humanitarianism TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 404 Joelle Vitiello 13 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required* The January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti, that killed more than 250.000 people, brought a lot of attention to the country traditionally described as "the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere." In October 2014, the former dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier (Baby Doc 1971-1986) passed away before being brought to justice for his human rights crimes against the citizens of Haiti.

This course aims to provide students interested in humanitarianism, human rights, the Caribbean, cultural studies, and French and Francophone Studies an introduction to Haiti and Haitian culture throughout its history, including pre- and post-earthquake culture. It also aims at providing a thoughtful critical frame to the extraordinary humanitarian situation after the earthquake and the responses it generated at the Haitian and international levels.

Throughout the course, students will become more familiar with Haitian history, its rich cultural production, and the relevance of culture to human rights representations, abuses, and responses to abuses as well as its relevance to various humanitarian crises in Haiti, especially the post-earthquake daily situation. Students will also gain knowledge about Haitian society, local organizations working in human rights and humanitarianism, the geography of Human Rights, local IDP environment, and humanitarian distribution of resources, and they will acquire the critical tools necessary to understand, assess, and participate in the current debates about human rights and humanitarianism practices in Haiti (including issues related to health, gender, economic rights, education, and access to resources of any kind).

Materials for the course include interdisciplinary readings and reports (including various human rights reports, humanitarian assistance reports and updates, C.L.R. James, Paul Farmer, Michael Dash, Peter Hallward, Elizabeth McAlister, Edwidge Danticat, Myriam Chancy, Beverly Bell, Jacqueline Regis, and Anne-Christine d'Adesky among others) and films (by Raoul Peck, Anne Lescot and Laurence Magloire, Rachel Magloire, Jonathan Demme). Speakers will include human rights activists, writers, and humanitarian aid specialists about and from Haiti. Technology permitting, students will meet members of the Haitian community involved in relief work via Skype.

This course will be taught in English. Students taking it for credit counting toward the French major or Minor will be able to read some of the material and conduct their research in French. Students interested in doing an internship with one of the many organizations in the Twin Cities linked with Haiti should speak to the instructor.
FREN 494-01 L'image du monde: influences de la cartographie sur la littérature française MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 404 Martine Sauret 9 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; taught in French* Maps tell us much more than merely how to get from here to there. One of the oldest forms of human communications, they ultimately express the many ways we attempt to understand the world and be part of it. The explorers, their itineraries, and their diaries offer a complex view of this world, too. This course will expose the different interactions between maps, explorers, and writers from Antiquity to present. During the Renaissance and later explorations, colonization also ushered a significant challenge to Christian and Muslim accounts of their travels. The indigenous peoples of Africa and the Americas offered ways for the explorers and cartographers to express their consternation or their enthusiasm and to subvert what was ordered by kings or queens.

Our class will explore the ways that Egyptians and Greeks (Aristotle, Plato, Ptolémée) influenced the thought of travelers of the Middle Ages (Marco Polo). We will discuss French Renaissance exploration and travel writing (Verrazano, Cartier, Thevet, Léry, Lescarbot, Christine de Pizan, Montaigne) and artists/cartographers (Leonard de Vinci, Michel Angelo Dürer, Alberti). We will read about the influences of 17th and 18th century mapmakers (Champlain, Finé, Roccoco and Baroque art/maps) through diaries of Hennepin, Nicollet, Champlain, la Carte du tendre.

The 19th century will bring many diaries and maps from utopian discourse (Villemart, Gustave Raulin, Charles-Albert Gauthier) to romantic travels (Victor Hugo, Jules Vernes). Contemporary diaries (Ruffin, Le Clezio, Amélie Nothomb and Sophie Calle) and their maps of the world will be studied through discussion and will show the changing dynamics of identity and the other in the Modern world.

These concepts and ideas will be debated through the study of journals, maps, and philosophical and literary texts of the time. Students will visit the Ford Library, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and the Walker Art Center for studies of maps, their philosophical concepts (Aristotle, Plato, Erasmus, Machievelli, Descartes, Kant, Foucault, Didi-Huberman, Jean Luc Nancy, Greenblatt, Onfray) and their conceptualizations from late Sixteenth century to present. Prerequisite(s): FREN 306 or permission of instructor. (4 credits)

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Geography

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOG 111-01 Human Geography of Global Issues MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 107 David Lanegran 0 / 30 Materials icon
GEOG 225-01 Intro to Geog Info Systems MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 107 Holly Barcus 5 / 34 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of the instructor required; $25 course fee required*
GEOG 225-L1 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab W 10:50 am-12:20 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp 6 / 18 Materials icon
GEOG 225-L2 Intro to Geog Info Systems Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp 1 / 18 Materials icon
GEOG 232-01 People, Agriculture and the Environment TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 107 William Moseley 0 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01; first day attendance required*
GEOG 248-01 The Political Geography of Nations and Nationalism TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 06A Daniel Trudeau 1 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GEOG 249-01 Regional Geog of Latin America MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 05 Eric Carter 10 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 249-01*
GEOG 256-01 Medical Geography: The Geography of Health and Health Care MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 107 Eric Carter 0 / 25 Materials icon
*Counts for the Community and Global Health concentration*
GEOG 263-01 Geography of Development and Underdevelopment TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 105 William Moseley 1 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
GEOG 292-01 Engaging Seattle: Urban Innovation on the Pacific Rim W 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MARKIM 303 Paul Schadewald 12 / 12 Materials icon
*2 credits; S/N grading only; permission of instructor required* Priority application due date is December 10th; email instructor for application (schadewald@macalester.edu). This course examines contemporary urban issues in Seattle, Washington as a way to understand the possibilities and challenges of cities in the 21st century. Seattle offers a particularly compelling vantage point for urban learning. The Seattle region is a hub for innovative neighborhood engagement programs, sustainability initiatives, a thriving start-up culture, and communities that have been formed through interaction with the Pacific Rim. We will examine Seattle’s unique approaches to urban and community development, reflect on how Seattle compares to the Twin Cities, and discuss what Seattle can teach us about cities, innovation, and civic engagement more broadly. The course meets weekly for 1 ½ hours during the semester. It includes a mandatory, fully funded immersive learning experience in Seattle over spring break.
GEOG 294-01 Geographies of Consumption:Power, Identity, and Space in Consumer Culture M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 05 Nicole Simms 7 / 20 Materials icon
In this discussion-based class, we will explore historical and contemporary practices of consumption and their variations across different sites, including malls, garage sales, homes, and online exchange platforms such as eBay and Craigslist. We will consider the consumption, use, production, distribution, and marketing of a variety of goods as we seek to understand not only individual and societal questions of need, choice, and citizenship, but also the ways in which everyday practices of consumption are related to wider issues of power and inequality. Together, we will interrogate: How (and where) desire, status, and identity are constructed in consumer culture, and how these constructions intersect with traditional identity markers such as gender, race, and class; How the everyday practices of consumption are embedded in much larger globalized networks of production and distribution, and; The political possibilities of consumption, including participation in second-hand, virtual, and counterfeit economies, supporting organic and fair trade products, and engaging in consumer boycotts.
GEOG 341-01 Urban Social Geography: City Life and Landscapes TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 241 Daniel Trudeau 3 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 341-01*
GEOG 365-01 Urban GIS TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 105 Laura Smith 6 / 15 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; $25 course fee required*
GEOG 365-L1 Urban GIS Lab TBA TBA Ashley Nepp 6 / 15 Materials icon
GEOG 370-01 Advanced Cartography and Geovisualization MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 105 Ashley Nepp 0 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*$25 course fee required*
GEOG 370-L1 Advanced Cartography and Geovisualization W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 108 Ashley Nepp 0 / 15 Materials icon
GEOG 378-01 Statistical Research Methods in Geography MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 107 Laura Smith 0 / 25 Materials icon
GEOG 394-01 Minnehaha Creek - Planning for an Urban Watershed M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 David Lanegran 8 / 15 Materials icon
In this seminar we will analyze the urbanization and economic development of the watershed of Minnehaha Creek. We will examine the landscape changes that came with urbanization, the dynamics of floods, changing perceptions and plans for public spaces, and the revisualization of the creek that have occurred over the past century. We will use the techniques of the “Landscape School” of geography as well as engage in applied urban geography. Students will select individual or group research projects that will document the development of the land in the watershed, the various plans developed by the several municipalities through which the creek flows and present patterns of land use and development. We will also try to assess the iconographic role the watershed plays in the imaging of Minneapolis and Hennepin County. The class product will be a series of case studies of how cities in the watershed have dealt with their segments of the creek. Each student or team will develop two case studies and then at the end of the class we will produce a document that compares and evaluates these approaches. A second potential product will be an atlas of the watershed made up of a variety of thematic maps of the cultural landscape. Because we are engaged in a field seminar the vast amount of the work for this class will occur outside of class in the field and in research centers in the region. Field research logistics will be an important feature of the class. Students will work as individuals or in teams to the greatest degree possible. However we will make some reconnaissance trips as a class. We will also organize several research days during which a van will drop individuals and teams at research locations and collect them later. No prerequisites.
GEOG 394-02 Advanced GIS for Health TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 108 Eric Carter 6 / 15 Materials icon
This course builds on skills learned in the Introductory Geographic Information Systems (GIS) course by focusing explicitly on geospatial techniques used for analyzing problems in public health. Through lectures, discussions, hands-on labs, and collaborative group work, students will learn how to access, process, and map health outcomes data. Using advanced spatial-statistical and epidemiological tools, we will analyze health disparities, neighborhood effects on health, and spatial clustering of disease events, such as rare cancers. We will use similar techniques to examine environmental health and environmental justice questions in a spatial framework; analyze the spread of infectious diseases; model the spatial ecology of vector-borne diseases, such as Lyme disease and malaria; and optimize spatial access of populations to health care services. Students will be required to complete a final independent project. Lab section registration is required. Three lecture/laboratory hours per week required. $25 materials fee is charged. Prerequisite: GEOG 225.
GEOG 394-L1 Advanced GIS for Health Lab TBA TBA Ashley Nepp 6 / 15 Materials icon
GEOG 488-01 Transportation Geography W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 105 Laura Smith 7 / 15 Materials icon
GEOG 488-02 Migrants, Migration and the Global Landscape of Population Change TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 105 Holly Barcus 7 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon

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Geology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GEOL 102-01 Exploring the Solar System MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 100 Karl Wirth 10 / 48 Materials icon
GEOL 165-01 History/Evolution of Earth MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 100 Raymond Rogers 16 / 48 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GEOL 165-L1 History/Evolution of Earth Lab M 07:00 pm-09:10 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 4 / 24 Materials icon
GEOL 165-L2 History/Evolution of Earth Lab T 09:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 12 / 24 Materials icon
GEOL 255-01 Structural Geology MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 179 Erkan Toraman 12 / 24 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
GEOL 255-L1 Structural Geology Lab T 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 179 Erkan Toraman 12 / 24 Materials icon
GEOL 265-01 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers 1 / 18 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GEOL 265-L1 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy Lab R 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 175 Raymond Rogers 1 / 18 Materials icon
GEOL 302-01 Petrology and Geochemistry MWF 08:30 am-10:30 am OLRI 179 Karl Wirth 15 / 18 Materials icon
GEOL 303-01 Surface/Groundwater Hydrology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 175 STAFF 4 / 22 Materials icon
*$75 field trip fee required*
GEOL 303-L1 Surface/Groundwater Hydro Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 175 STAFF 4 / 22 Materials icon
GEOL 394-01 Paleoclimate MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 270 Louisa Bradtmiller 8 / 18 Materials icon
*First day attendance required* Earth's climate has evolved with the planet itself, as changing boundary conditions in the ocean, atmosphere, cryosphere and lithosphere have caused global icehouses, greenhouses and mass extinctions. Information about these events is recorded in the geologic record in the form of fossils and rock sequences, but also in lake and ocean sediment cores, ice cores, cave deposits and tree rings. This course will provide an overview of changes in climate throughout Earth history while also examining the proxies and archives used to reconstruct those changes. We will also construct our own record of paleoclimate using cores from a local lake and a variety of laboratory techniques. Prerequisites: an introductory course on either climate or Earth history. Prerequisite: one of the following: any GEOL course or ENVI 140 or ENVI 150.
GEOL 394-L1 Paleoclimate Lab R 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 187 Louisa Bradtmiller 8 / 18 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
GEOL 400-01 Capstone Research Methods in Geology TR 01:20 pm-04:20 pm OLRI 187 Jeffrey Thole 10 / 10 Materials icon
*Permission of the instructor required; 1 credit course*
GEOL 450-01 Senior Seminar M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 170 MacGregor, Wirth 7 / 18 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*1 credit course*

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German Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
GERM 102-01 Elementary German II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 214 Rachael Huener 4 / 20 Materials icon
GERM 102-L1 Elementary German II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Birgit Heinrich 3 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 102-L2 Elementary German II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am NEILL 113 Birgit Heinrich 2 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 102-L3 Elementary German II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 227 Birgit Heinrich 2 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 102-L4 Elementary German II Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 0 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 110-01 Accelerated Elementary German MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 214 Rachael Huener 14 / 20 Materials icon
*5 credits*
GERM 110-L1 Accel Elementary German Lab MW 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 247 Birgit Heinrich 2 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 110-L2 Accel Elementary German Lab TR 09:00 am-10:00 am OLRI 247 Birgit Heinrich 5 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 110-L3 Accel Elementary German Lab TR 02:45 pm-03:45 pm NEILL 227 Birgit Heinrich 3 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 110-L4 Accel Elementary German Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 4 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 203-01 Intermediate German I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 215 Linda Schulte-Sasse 6 / 20 Materials icon
GERM 203-L1 Intermediate German I Lab M 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 113 Birgit Heinrich 5 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 203-L2 Intermediate German I Lab M 02:30 pm-03:30 pm NEILL 113 Birgit Heinrich 0 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 203-L3 Intermediate German I Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 Birgit Heinrich 1 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 203-L4 Intermediate German I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 0 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 204-01 Intermediate German II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 215 Linda Schulte-Sasse 3 / 20 Materials icon
GERM 204-L1 Intermediate German II Lab W 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 113 Birgit Heinrich 0 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 204-L2 Intermediate German II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 247 Birgit Heinrich 3 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 204-L3 Intermediate German II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm NEILL 227 Birgit Heinrich 0 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 204-L4 Intermediate German II Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 0 / 5 Materials icon
GERM 305-01 German Through the Media MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 216 Brigetta Abel 16 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
GERM 305-L1 German Through the Media Lab W 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 113 Birgit Heinrich 7 / 10 Materials icon
GERM 305-L2 German Through the Media Lab TBA TBA Birgit Heinrich 9 / 10 Materials icon
GERM 309-01 German Cultural History II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 214 Rachael Huener 8 / 20 Materials icon
*Taught in German*
GERM 366-01 Literature and Film TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela 14 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
In this course we read closely a selection of German literary texts and compare them to their film adaptations. The literature may range from German "classics" to popular "best sellers," and the films from critically acclaimed cases to box office successes, as a way of gauging social diversity in interests and taste. Beyond focusing on literary analysis, the course will address questions such as: how the written word is translated to the screen; what happens when the film adaptation occurs in another language and culture; what difference it makes if the work was written in the 1920s and filmed in the 2000s. Taught in German. Prerequisites: German 308, 309, or equivalent.
GERM 394-01 Metaphysics in Secular Thought TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela 4 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-01 and POLI 294-03* A widespread tendency in contemporary Western societies is to associate metaphysics with religion, if not with what is often dismissively called “irrationality.” This course will dismantle this myth by turning to the tradition of European philosophy and political theory, mostly since the seventeenth century, in their relation to theology and their reception by twentieth-century critical theory, in order to examine the ways in which secular thought emerges not as an alternative to metaphysics, something which thought cannot supersede anyway, but simply as an alternative way—and one that by no means is more rationally grounded than religion—of dealing with the very same metaphysical questions and issues that concern religion, from the meaning of life to the imminence of death, and from (real or imagined) guilt to the hope for redemption. Readings will include: Giorgio Agamben, Aristotle, Talal Asad, Augustine of Hippo, George Bataille, Kenneth Burke, Emile Durkheim, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, Karl Marx, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Marcel Mauss, Carl Schmitt, Baruch Spinoza, Alberto Toscano, Max Weber. Readings and class in English. No pre-knowledge required.
GERM 394-02 Short Forms: Novella, Essay, Aphorism from Boccaccio to Brecht TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 105 David Martyn 9 / 20 Materials icon
*Taught in English; cross-listed with ENGL 394-05* What can a short text do that a long text can’t? This course will look for answers to this question by reading and discussing short prose works from the Renaissance to the 20th century. We will pursue the history of the novella – which is not a short novel but a literary form in its own right – from its emergence in the Italian Renaissance (Boccaccio) to its modern adaptations in German romanticism (Tieck) and French realism (Flaubert). We will explore the complexities of the essay from Michel de Montaigne, who created the genre in the 16th century, through Francis Bacon, whose scientific method relied on it, to its use as a hybrid form between science and literature in the early twentieth century (Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Sigmund Freud). And we will focus on the form that epitomizes the rhetorical virtue of brevitas: the aphorism, from the 17th century moralists (La Rochefoucauld), through the secular pietism of the 18th century (Lichtenberg), romanticism (Goethe), the 19th century’s answers to nihilism (Schopenhauer, Nietzsche), to the crypticism of Kafka, the irony of Brecht, and the uncompromising pessimism of Adorno. Discussion questions will include: what are the literary and rhetorical effects of brevity? How can words gain by being few? What happens when texts get longer? How is literature a form of knowledge and science a form of literature? Requirements: 3 mid-length papers with revisions; one class presentation. Taught in English, but texts will be made available to those who can and would like to read them in the original.
GERM 488-01 Senior Seminar: The Politics of Translation TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 205 David Martyn 12 / 20 Materials icon
The common notion of translation is based on a number of seemingly self-evident axioms: that texts are written in a specific language; that languages exist; that the content of a text can be transported from one language into another. This course will upset all of these assumptions. In the process, translation will emerge not as something that occurs *between* languages or cultures, but as a practice that constitutes them – with effects as political as they are poetic. After exploring the history of translation theory, current debates in the field of translation studies, and specific examples of translation (works by Franz Kafka), students will work on a research project related to the politics and/or poetics of translation. Possible topics include: an analysis of existing translations of a specific text with an original translation of one’s own; texts written in “weird” German by non-native speakers; translation as a political practice for establishing cultural dominance; film adaptations as “translations” of literary works. Open to Sophomores and Juniors who have completed German 363, 364, 365, or 366; will not preclude the possibility of taking future iterations of the Senior Seminar. Also open to other interested students with the prerequisite knowledge of German and permission of the instructor.

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Hispanic and Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HISP 101-01 Elementary Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 401 Abby Bajuniemi 5 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 101-L1 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 217 Anna Pomata Garcia 1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 101-L2 Elementary Spanish I Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 150 Anna Pomata Garcia 4 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 101-L3 Elementary Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 10 / 10 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 102-01 Elementary Spanish II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 213 Justin Butler 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-02 Elementary Spanish II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 213 Justin Butler 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 102-03 Elementary Spanish II MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 213 Abby Bajuniemi 20 / 20 Materials icon
HISP 102-L1 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 08:30 am-09:30 am MUSIC 219 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 3 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L2 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 02:25 pm-03:25 pm OLRI 101 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L3 Elementary Spanish II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 101 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L4 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 219 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 2 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L5 Elementary Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 101 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 4 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 102-L6 Elementary Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 9 / 10 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 110-01 Accelerated Beginning Spanish TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 212 Margaret Olsen 7 / 15 Materials icon
*5 credits; permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 111-01 Accel Elementary Portuguese MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 212 Fernanda Bartolomei 5 / 15 Materials icon
*5 credits; first day attendance required*
HISP 203-01 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 212 Rosa Rull-Montoya 7 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-02 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 212 Rosa Rull-Montoya 11 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-03 Intermediate Spanish I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 111 Claudia Giannini 10 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 203-L1 Intermediate Spanish I Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 217 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 2 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L2 Intermediate Spanish I Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 301 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L3 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am MUSIC 219 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 3 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L4 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 150 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 5 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L5 Intermediate Spanish I Lab R 02:25 pm-03:25 pm OLRI 101 Maria Auxi Castillo Soto 8 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 203-L6 Intermediate Spanish I Lab TBA TBA STAFF 10 / 10 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 204-01 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 214 Galo Gonzalez 11 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-02 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 213 Alicia Munoz 0 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-03 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 112 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 2 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-04 Intermediate Spanish II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 112 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 1 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 204-L1 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 217 Anna Pomata Garcia 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L2 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:20 pm OLRI 150 Anna Pomata Garcia 1 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L3 Intermediate Spanish II Lab T 02:25 pm-03:25 pm OLRI 150 Anna Pomata Garcia 6 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L4 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 08:30 am-09:30 am NEILL 217 Anna Pomata Garcia 7 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L5 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 217 Anna Pomata Garcia 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L6 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm MUSIC 219 Anna Pomata Garcia 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L7 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 02:25 pm-03:25 pm MUSIC 219 Anna Pomata Garcia 6 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L8 Intermediate Spanish II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 219 Anna Pomata Garcia 0 / 10 Materials icon
HISP 204-L9 Intermediate Spanish II Lab TBA TBA STAFF 7 / 10 Materials icon
*This TBA section is reserved for students whose schedules conflict with all lab sessions offered. If you register for this section you will need to contact Susana Blanco-Iglesias (NEILL 200A), Practicum Coordinator, to make arrangements with a tutor in the Department of Hispanic Studies. Should you have any questions or concerns please send an email to blancoiglesi@macalester.edu or call x6791.*
HISP 220-01 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 216 Leah Sand 0 / 15 Materials icon
*5 credits; permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 220-02 Accel Intermediate Spanish MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 212 Blanca Gimeno Escudero 9 / 15 Materials icon
*5 credits; permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*
HISP 305-01 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 212 Antonio Dorca 0 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-02 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 110 Leah Sand 1 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-03 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 212 Rosa Rull-Montoya 0 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 305-04 Introduction to Hispanic Studies: Oral and Written Expression MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 213 Justin Butler 8 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 214 Galo Gonzalez 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 307-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 213 Alicia Munoz 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and LATI 308-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 0 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with LING 309-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 331-01 Luso-Brazilian Voices: Conversations and Composition MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 215 Fernanda Bartolomei 1 / 15 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 416-01 Mapping the New World: Exploration, Encounters, and Disasters TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 112 Margaret Olsen 2 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 416-01 and LATI 416-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 425-01 Dictators, Revolutions and Insurrections TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 212 Antonio Dorca 0 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required*
HISP 437-01 Spanish 2nd Lang Acquisition MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 214 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 13 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with LING 437-01; first day attendance required*
HISP 488-01 Senior Seminar M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 213 Alicia Munoz 12 / 20 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*

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History

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
HIST 180-01 Going Global: The Experiment of World History TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 002 Ethan Hawkley 13 / 25 Materials icon
World History is a relatively young discipline and is the brainchild of bold “Big Picture” thinkers. In this course, we follow these trail-blazers to every corner of the globe and across the grandest expanses of time, all the way from the emergence of Homo sapiens to the year 2014. Such a sweeping survey of human history invites us to look beyond chronological, national, cultural, and geographic boundaries; it forces us to rethink the methodology of traditional historians; and it prepares us to be better informed and more dedicated global citizens.
HIST 194-01 Localizing the World of Modern European History MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm MAIN 011 Julia Fein 9 / 21 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
This course offers an introductory exploration of cultural, political, and geographical natures of "the local" in European history from the French Revolution to the present. Course materials will comprise textual and visual primary sources, interpretive and theoretical articles and book extracts. We will also read artistic literature by Gustave Flaubert, Nikolai Gogol', and W. G. Sebald. On the premise that all local history is also locally produced historiography (i.e. an argument about meaning), the final assignment for this course will be a student-produced study of any aspect of locality.

Questions raised in this course will include: How do practices and institutions in the provinces shape or constrain the larger body politic in the making - and sometimes unmaking - of states in modern Europe? How are ideas about the nation and about the global refracted through the specificities of subnational places and the meanings that people have made of them? In what ways can thinking about gender, race, sexuality, and class as intellectual categories help us to make sense of the importance of regions and other localities in history, and where does human difference fit within local identities?
HIST 194-03 Southeast Asia: Crossroads of the World, 1400-the present TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 002 Ethan Hawkley 9 / 25 Materials icon
In recent decades, the global importance of Southeast Asia has become more widely recognized around the world. But very few people understand the region's diversity, its complexity, and its long history of global integration. This course will provide students with a survey of modern Southeast Asian history by focusing on the interplay of global and local forces in the region. It will examine Southeast Asia's historic and ongoing relationship with East Asia, India, European empires, diverse religions, the United States, nationalism, the Cold War, and more
HIST 201-01 History of U.S. Feminisms TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Amy Sullivan 16 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 201-01*
HIST 222-01 Imagining the American West TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Ryan Edgington 8 / 25 Materials icon
In the fall of 1881 Wyatt Earp, two of his brothers, and Doc Holliday engaged four “outlaws” in a gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona. The fight lasted less than a minute, but it became one of the most iconic myths of the North American West. In fact, Americans did not know the story until the 1930s when an almost completely fabricated (and heroic) account of the shootout was published. Wyatt, who had died two years earlier, had spent the years before his death trying to rewrite his own vigilante life. While the O.K. Corral is perhaps the most iconic farce in western history, other writers, artists, filmmakers, and musicians revised the complex history of the North American West for their own purposes and profit. This course recovers the silenced history under the “Old West” fable. We will begin in the pre-1800 U.S.-Mexico borderlands and follow the complex relationships between diverse peoples and places that shaped the course of the U.S.’s first imperial project. Themes include indigenous empires, the industrialization of the West, gender and the making of 19th century western communities, wilderness and the role of the federal government in the property dispossession of both Hispanos and indigenous peoples, rationalization of water and agriculture in reclaiming the arid West, tourism and place-making, urbanization, Cold War militarization in the post-1945 West, and, of course, the influence of film, music, and literature on the region.
HIST 228-01 Gender and Sexuality in Colonial America and the Early Republic TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 402 Andrea Robertson 17 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 228-01*
HIST 237-01 Environmental Justice MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 STAFF 3 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 237-01 and ENVI 237-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of Class with the permission of the instructor*
HIST 239-01 Farm and Forest: African Environmental History TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MAIN 010 Jamie Monson 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02*
HIST 241-01 Food, Environment, and Society in 20th Century America TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 101 Ryan Edgington 7 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 241-01*
HIST 252-01 Conversion and Inquisition: Religious Change and Resistance, 1550-1750 M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 002 Ethan Hawkley 17 / 25 Materials icon
What causes people to change their religious beliefs? How did early modern societies react to those who altered their spiritual attitudes? How do we of the twenty-first century approach such individuals, and why? In order to answer these questions, this course focuses on several dramatic case studies of men and women who self-consciously changed their religion during the turbulent period of imperial encounters between the mid-1500 and the 1700s. Among others, we will examine and interrogate reports of converts to Christianity including Maya, Jewish and Muslim prisoners of the Inquisition; captives of Mediterranean pirates; the nearly canonized Mohawk convert, Catherine Tekakwitha; and the imprisoned Chinese convert, John Hu. We will consider how violence, national loyalties, gender, charisma, local power dynamics, environmental upheaval, and serendipity affected the choices and fates of these converts.
HIST 257-01 Empires MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 001 Julia Fein 9 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
HIST 258-01 Europe Since 1945 MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 001 Julia Fein 5 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
HIST 263-01 Global Encounters in History: China and Africa TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Jamie Monson 12 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 294-02*
HIST 283-01 Amazon: A Cultural History MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Ernesto Capello 17 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 283-01*
HIST 294-05 Page to the Stage: Analyzing American Indian Performances of Race, Authenticity, and Indigeneity TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 002 Katrina Phillips 10 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-03* This course examines the history of American Indian performance in comparison with and in contrast to non-Native conceptions of authentic indigeneity. Through a chronological analysis of historical sources and popular culture (including film, television, art, literature, and live performance), this course investigates how American Indian authenticity and identity were/are constructed and consumed. Historically speaking, these performances often sought to promote and capitalize on narratives of disappearance, removal, and "savagery" vs. "civilization" that reinforced colonial or imperial ambitions and convictions. This course questions how these presentations – and Native performers – simultaneously reiterate(d) and refute(d) historical narratives by examining the goals and motivations of producers, promoters, and performers alongside audiences’ historic and cultural expectations.
HIST 294-06 Performing History: Interpreting the James J. Hill House TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 100 Eric Colleary 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with THDA 294-01* Please note: A few of the classes and the final presentation will be held off-campus. Contact the instructor with questions.
HIST 350-01 Race, Gender, and Science TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 402 Amy Sullivan 1 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 394-01* This seminar-style class will examine the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality in the history of medicine and health in the U.S. Our diverse topics for study will include the history of eugenics, sexuality, midwifery, cultural/spiritual healing methods vis-a-vis allopathic medicine, socially and medically constructed ideas of health and illness, race- and gender-based ailments and medical experiments (such as the birth control pill and the Tuskegee syphilis experiment), gender reassignment surgery and sex-testing in the Olympics. The wide range of topics will prepare students to explore a topic of their choosing for a final research paper.
HIST 379-01 The Study of History W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 001 Ernesto Capello 15 / 25 Materials icon

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Interdisciplinary Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTD 411-01 Sr Seminar in Community and Global Health W 08:30 am-09:30 am ARTCOM 102 Devavani Chatterjea 2 / 15 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; see instructor for CGH projection form; 1 credit*
INTD 411-02 Sr Seminar in Community and Global Health W 08:30 am-09:30 am ARTCOM 202 Ron Barrett 9 / 15 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; see instructor for CGH projection form; 1 credit*

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International Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
INTL 112-01 Intro to International Studies: Globalization, Media, and Cultural Identities MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Open to all students*
INTL 112-02 Intro to International Studies: Globalization, Media, and Cultural Identities MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 404 Zeynep Gursel 1 / 20 Materials icon
*Open to all students*
INTL 114-01 Intro to International Studies: International Codes of Conduct MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 404 James von Geldern 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Open to all students*
INTL 225-01 Comparative Economic Systems TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 250 Gary Krueger 2 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ECON 225-01*
INTL 245-01 Intro to Intl Human Rights MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am CARN 05 Wendy Weber 0 / 25 Materials icon
INTL 272-01 The Post-Soviet Sphere MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 James von Geldern 0 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RUSS 364-01*
INTL 282-01 Introduction to International Public Health MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 206 Christy Hanson 0 / 25 Materials icon
INTL 294-01 World to Table: Global Food Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 404 David Moore 1 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of instructor required* Food has been a global issue for over half a millennium. The intercontinental movement of potatoes, sugar, rice, tobacco and more have historically reshaped populations, economies, empires, environments, and cultures, while food today shapes the worldwide experience of nationality, ethnicity, religion, health, gender, race, class, rights, and more. Thus this spring 2015 course, which was co-designed with the spring 2014 INTL-488 senior seminar, explores global food from many disciplinary, geographical, and thematic perspectives. We will also interact with local food institutions, address in a limited way our own food practices, and cook and eat a bit too. Occasional excursions will extend through the lunch hour.
INTL 294-02 Global Encounters in History: China and Africa TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 001 Jamie Monson 12 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 263-01*
INTL 300-01 Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker 11 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 300-01*
INTL 323-01 Economic Restructuring in Latin America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Raymond Robertson 3 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ECON 323-01 and LATI 323-01*
INTL 352-01 Transitional Justice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 352-01*
INTL 364-01 Culture and Revolution MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A James von Geldern 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RUSS 364-01*
INTL 368-01 Sustainable Development and Global Future TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 301 Roopali Phadke 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 368-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
INTL 380-01 Global Leadership MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Ahmed Samatar 14 / 20 Materials icon
INTL 384-01 Langston Hughes: Global Writer TR 08:00 am-09:30 am CARN 404 David Moore 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 384-01 and ENGL 384-1; first day attendance required*
INTL 416-01 Mapping the New World: Exploration, Encounters, and Disasters TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 112 Margaret Olsen 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 416-01 and INTL 416-01; first day attendance required*
INTL 485-01 Senior Seminar: Confronting Global Hatred W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Nadya Nedelsky 0 / 12 Materials icon
*Course to meet in Carnegie 411*
INTL 489-01 Senior Seminar: Paradigms of World Order M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm Ahmed Samatar 2 / 12 Materials icon
*Course to meet in Carnegie 411*

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Japanese

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
JAPA 102-01 First Year Japanese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 110 Satoko Suzuki 9 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 102-02 First Year Japanese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 102 Satoko Suzuki 6 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 102-L1 First Year Japanese II Lab M 03:30 pm-04:30 pm Izumi Koyama 1 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 102-L2 First Year Japanese II Lab T 09:00 am-10:00 am Izumi Koyama 11 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 102-L3 First Year Japanese II Lab T 10:10 am-11:10 am Izumi Koyama 8 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 204-01 Second Year Japanese II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 110 Ritsuko Narita 8 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 204-02 Second Year Japanese II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 110 Ritsuko Narita 6 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 204-L1 Second Year Japanese II Lab R 10:10 am-11:10 am Izumi Koyama 3 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 204-L2 Second Year Japanese II Lab R 01:20 pm-02:20 pm Izumi Koyama 7 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 204-L3 Second Year Japanese II Lab R 03:30 pm-04:30 pm Izumi Koyama 9 / 15 Materials icon
JAPA 260-01 Narratives of Alienation: 20th Century Japanese Fiction and Film TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 110 Arthur Mitchell 6 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 260-01*
JAPA 306-01 Third Year Japanese II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 228 Sachiko Dorsey 11 / 20 Materials icon
JAPA 306-L1 Third Year Japanese II Lab T 03:30 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 102 Izumi Koyama 8 / 12 Materials icon
JAPA 306-L2 Third Year Japanese II Lab W 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 102 Izumi Koyama 7 / 12 Materials icon
JAPA 488-01 Translating Japanese: Theory and Practice TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 110 Arthur Mitchell 10 / 15 Materials icon

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Latin American Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LATI 244-01 Urban Latino Power TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 213 Paul Dosh 0 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 244-01 and POLI 244-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 249-01 Regional Geog of Latin America MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 05 Eric Carter 10 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GEOG 249-01*
LATI 283-01 Amazon: A Cultural History MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 001 Ernesto Capello 17 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 283-01*
LATI 307-01 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 214 Galo Gonzalez 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 307-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 308-01 Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Studies MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 213 Alicia Munoz 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 308-01 and HISP 308-01; first day attendance required*
LATI 323-01 Economic Restructuring in Latin America TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 305 Raymond Robertson 3 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ECON 323-01 and INTL 323-01*
LATI 341-01 Comparative Social Movements TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Paul Dosh 10 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 341-01*
LATI 394-01 Politics of Truth and Memory in Latin America MW 07:00 pm-08:30 pm CARN 06A Olga Gonzalez 4 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-02*
LATI 416-01 Mapping the New World: Exploration, Encounters, and Disasters TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 112 Margaret Olsen 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 416-01 and HISP 416-01; first day attendance required*

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Linguistics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
LING 104-01 The Sounds of Language TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 216 Christina Esposito 0 / 15 Materials icon
LING 175-01 Sociolinguistics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 270 Marianne Milligan 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with SOCI 175-01; First day attendance required; Instructor is looking for class breakdown to be 4 seats Jr/Sr 11 seats for Soph/FY students*
LING 200-01 English Syntax MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 227 John Haiman 3 / 15 Materials icon
LING 204-01 Experimental Linguistics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 302 Christina Esposito 1 / 10 Materials icon
LING 225-01 100 Words for Snow: Language and Nature MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 270 Marianne Milligan 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 225-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
LING 294-01 Grammaticalization MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 102 John Haiman 4 / 6 Materials icon
Broadly speaking, frequently repeated actions become conventionalized and performed with greater fluency. Grammaticalization is the name for the linguistic facet of this kind of change, which is familiar in other disciplines as ritualization or routinization. It has been a subject of study since the 18th century, but is experiencing a particular vogue now. It is observed in the documented historical record of all languages, but something very similar to it is probably implicated in the evolution of language from prelinguistic ideophones. Prequisites: Either or both of the following: LING 201, Historical Linguistics, LING 202, Origins and Evolution of Language.
LING 309-01 Intro to Hispanic Linguistics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 370 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 309-01; first day attendance required*
LING 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea 7 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 378-01*
LING 400-01 Field Methods in Linguistics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 113 John Haiman 0 / 8 Materials icon
*6 credit course*
LING 437-01 Spanish 2nd Lang Acquisition MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 214 Susana Blanco-Iglesias 13 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HISP 437-01; first day attendance required*

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Mathematics

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MATH 125-01 Epidemiology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 101 Vittorio Addona 0 / 28 Materials icon
MATH 135-01 Applied Multivariable Calculus I TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 Daniel Flath 3 / 32 Materials icon
MATH 135-02 Applied Multivariable Calculus I TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 243 Daniel Flath 2 / 32 Materials icon
MATH 136-01 Discrete Mathematics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am ARTCOM 202 David Bressoud 0 / 32 Materials icon
MATH 137-01 Applied Multivariable Calculus II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 241 Karen Saxe 1 / 32 Materials icon
MATH 137-03 Applied Multivariable Calculus II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 241 Thomas Halverson 1 / 38 Materials icon
MATH 155-01 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 243 Katherine Kinnaird 2 / 32 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
MATH 155-02 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 243 Katherine Kinnaird 2 / 32 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
MATH 155-03 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 226 Alicia Johnson 0 / 32 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
MATH 155-04 Intro to Statistical Modeling TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 241 Alicia Johnson 0 / 32 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
MATH 155-05 Intro to Statistical Modeling MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 243 David Ehren 2 / 32 Materials icon
*First day attendance required*
MATH 212-01 Philosophy of Mathematics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Janet Folina 6 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 312-01*
MATH 236-01 Linear Algebra MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 243 Lori Ziegelmeier 16 / 32 Materials icon
MATH 236-02 Linear Algebra MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 243 Lori Ziegelmeier 1 / 32 Materials icon
MATH 237-01 Applied Multivariable Calculus III MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 101 Karen Saxe 3 / 24 Materials icon
MATH 237-02 Applied Multivariable Calculus III TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 243 Chad Higdon-Topaz 2 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
MATH 237-03 Applied Multivariable Calculus III MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 241 Karen Saxe 10 / 24 Materials icon
MATH 254-01 Probability and Mathematical Statistics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm NEILL 401 Vittorio Addona 0 / 24 Materials icon
*Not available to students who've previously taken MATH 354 (Probability)*
MATH 312-01 Differential Equations TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 258 Chad Higdon-Topaz 0 / 28 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
MATH 355-01 Bayesian Statistics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 241 Alicia Johnson 6 / 28 Materials icon
MATH 361-01 Theory of Computation MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 241 Susan Fox 1 / 42 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; cross-listed with COMP 261-01*
MATH 365-01 Computational Linear Algebra TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 245 David Shuman 3 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with COMP 365-01; first day attendance required*
MATH 365-02 Computational Linear Algebra TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 245 David Shuman 0 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with COMP 365-02; first day attendance required*
MATH 376-01 Algebraic Structures MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 205 Thomas Halverson 5 / 24 Materials icon
MATH 469-01 Discrete Applied Mathematics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 205 Andrew Beveridge 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed as COMP 469-01*
MATH 477-01 Topics in Analysis TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 100 David Bressoud 15 / 20 Materials icon

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Media and Cultural Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MCST 110-02 Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 216 John Kim 0 / 16 Materials icon
MCST 110-03 Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 217 John Kim 0 / 16 Materials icon
MCST 114-01 News Reporting and Writing TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 402 Mary Turck 5 / 19 Materials icon
MCST 128-01 Film Analysis/Visual Culture TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 401 Morgan Adamson 0 / 21 Materials icon
MCST 234-01 New Media Theories/Practices: From the Counterculture to Digital Culture W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 217 John Kim 1 / 16 Materials icon
From the Counterculture to Digital Culture: An intensive practicum with the Walker Art Center for their Fall 2015 show, Hippie Modernism. So many of the technologies, ideas and practices associated with today’s digital culture find their origin in the 1960 - 1970’s counterculture. A time of tremendous upheaval, this period witnessed a variety of radical experiments that challenged societal and professional expectations, overturned traditional hierarchies, explored new media, materials, and technologies, and formed alternative communities and new ways of living and working together. This tumult has fed directly into the development of contemporary ideas and technologies, including the internet, food co-ops, the environmental movement, consumer drug use, the post-1960’s counter-revolution, de-urbanization and re-urbanization, and the unresolved legacy of racism. This course will be an intensive practicum with the Walker Art Center, which is organizing a show for Fall 2015 entitled, Hippie Modernism, an examination of the art, architecture, and design of the counterculture of the 1960s and early 1970s. During the first half of the course, we will be working with Walker staff to forge our own original research and documentation on the linkages between the counterculture and today’s digital culture. These materials will contribute to the Walker’s programming for the show.
MCST 249-01 History of Film Since 1941 TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 226 Michael Griffin 11 / 20 Materials icon
MCST 294-01 Community Video: Theory and Practice TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm ART 301 Morgan Adamson 1 / 16 Materials icon
This course examines the history, theory, and practice of community-oriented media production, particularly video production. We will explore the ways that video has been employed as tool for social change, the politics of public access, and the ethical dimensions of using video to promote social causes. Students will have the opportunity to work on a video project in collaboration with community partners and will learn basic digital video production techniques. Prerequisite: MCST 128 (Film Analysis/Visual Culture) or MCST 247 (Documentary Film and Video).
MCST 354-01 Blackness in the Media W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 402 Leola Johnson 12 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 354-01; first day attendance required*
MCST 364-01 Afrofuturism in Media and Popular Culture TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 214 Leola Johnson 9 / 16 Materials icon
MCST 488-01 Advanced Topics: Gender, Labor, and the Media M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MARKIM 201 Morgan Adamson 12 / 20 Materials icon

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Music

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
MUSI 114-01 Theory II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 6 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
MUSI 114-L1 Theory II Lab T 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MUSIC 219 Victoria Malawey 6 / 25 Materials icon
MUSI 264-01 History of Jazz MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 219 Randall Bauer 0 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
MUSI 294-01 Passion Music: Renderings of Jesus's Final Hours MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MUSIC 228 Michael McGaghie 13 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
This course will explore music of the Passion tradition (the story of Jesus' arrest, trial, and death). This genre includes what many have deemed the most ambitious, innovative, and seminal vocal works of the past five hundred years. We will begin the semester by looking at the Passion form’s roots in medieval plainchant and its growth into the grand archetypal settings of Johann Sebastian Bach. Our study then will shift to consider several modern expansions upon this musical legacy. We will discuss the narrative/dramatic sense of all these works, their evolving roles in liturgical and/or concert performance, the inclusion of non-canonical (and non-Christological) texts, the myriad social and political implications of these works, and of course, the novelties of their musical language. This course will help students learn to write critically about music. Previous coursework in music theory is not required, but a familiarity with basic musical notation is necessary and will be assumed.
MUSI 294-02 Music in the United States, 1700s to Present TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MUSIC 228 Elissa Harbert 0 / 16 Materials icon
Music has always been a central player in identity construction for the diverse cultures of the United States. Music acts as a force that binds social groups together, but it also highlights and enforces perceived differences. This class explores a wide variety of musics in their social contexts from the 1770s to the present, asking the question, Is there an American music? We will explore the ways musical innovation in the United States has responded to cultural needs, social shifts, and European musical standards in selected case studies from the 1770s to the present. Topics include how Americans self-consciously created their musical culture in the years surrounding the Revolution; the rise and fall of blackface minstrelsy; how music influenced and was influenced by the Civil War; how African American music gradually became accepted as central to American music; the use and abuse of Native American music as a marker of nationalism; how twentieth-century art music composers (including Charles Ives, William Grant Still, Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein, and John Adams) strove to define and practice an American compositional style; the racial, gendered, and generational factors at play in the birth and rise of rock and roll; the many musics of the Civil Rights struggle; and how Americans have fashioned themselves musically since the cultural explosion of Web 2.0.
MUSI 294-03 Staging the Nation in the American Musical MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Colleary 23 / 40 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with THDA 294-02*
MUSI 314-01 Theory IV, Contemporary Theory and Literature MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MUSIC 228 Randall Bauer 12 / 20 Materials icon
MUSI 343-01 Western Music-19th Century MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mazullo 5 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
MUSI 425-01 Seminar in Composers/Genres MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MUSIC 228 Mark Mazullo 13 / 16 Materials icon
MUSI 73-01 African Music Ensemble MW 05:00 pm-07:00 pm MUSIC 121 Sowah Mensah 50 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required. Additional required meeting time on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30-9:30pm in Music 116.*
MUSI 75-01 Macalester Concert Choir MWR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie 50 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 77-01 Highland Camerata T 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 113 Michael McGaghie 50 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required. Additional required meeting time on Thursdays from 6:30-7:30pm in Music 113 (Hewitt Hall).*
MUSI 81-01 Mac Jazz Band MW 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Joan Griffith 50 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 83-01 Jazz/Popular Music Combos M 07:00 pm-09:00 pm MUSIC 113 Peter Hennig 50 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 85-01 Pipe Band W 06:30 pm-10:00 pm MUSIC 116 Michael Breidenbach 50 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 87-01 Chamber Ensemble TBA TBA Mark Mandarano 50 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 89-01 Orchestra TR 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Mark Mandarano 50 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 91-01 Mac Early Music Ensembles F 04:45 pm-06:15 pm MUSIC 116 Clea Galhano 50 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required. There may be some occasional Sunday afternoon rehearsals.*
MUSI 93-01 Wind Ensemble M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm MUSIC 116 Mark Mandarano 50 / 50 Materials icon
*Register in person with the ensemble director. Check Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*
MUSI 95-01 Private Studio Instruction TBA TBA STAFF 0 / 0 Materials icon
*Studio instruction may be taken by any Macalester student in voice, piano, harpsichord, organ, guitar, recorder, a variety of other standard orchestral instruments, as well as some non-Western instruments. Please refer to the Music Department web page for specific lesson and fee arrangements. Registration must be done in person (in Office 201 of the Music Building) at the beginning of the semester. Please contact Rachel Hest, Department Coordinator (rhest@macalester.edu), for more information.*

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Neuroscience Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
NEUR 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 113 Eric Wiertelak 0 / 50 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 180-01*
NEUR 240-01 Principles-Learning/Behavior MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 205 Julia Manor 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 240-01*
NEUR 240-L1 Princ-Learning/Behavior Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 371 Julia Manor 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 240-L1*
NEUR 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Eric Wiertelak 0 / 24 Materials icon
NEUR 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 354 Eric Wiertelak 0 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 248-01*
NEUR 300-01 Directed Research MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 371 Manor, Wiertelak 8 / 16 Materials icon
NEUR 385-01 Mind Reading: Understanding Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 370 Darcy Burgund 10 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 385-01*
NEUR 394-01 Brain and Emotion MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 300 Julia Manor 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 394-01* This course is an introduction to how the brain produces emotion/motivated behavior in humans and animals. Theories of emotion and the historical context of the study of emotion (particularly in animals) will be explored. This course will cover the brain systems of basic emotions including fear, rage, attachment, and pleasure. Connections and implications for emotional development and psychiatric disorders will be discussed. Prerequisites: PSYC/NEUR 180 and either MATH 155 or PSYC 201.
NEUR 488-01 Senior Seminar TBA TBA Eric Wiertelak 1 / 15 Materials icon
*2 credits*

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Philosophy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHIL 100-01 Introduction to Philosophy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 213 Joy Laine 2 / 20 Materials icon
PHIL 111-01 Introduction to Symbolic Logic MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 206 Janet Folina 10 / 20 Materials icon
PHIL 111-02 Introduction to Symbolic Logic MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 206 Janet Folina 11 / 20 Materials icon
PHIL 121-01 Ethics TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 305 Martin Gunderson 0 / 20 Materials icon
PHIL 121-02 Ethics TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 204 Martin Gunderson 0 / 20 Materials icon
PHIL 121-03 Ethics MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 212 Diane Michelfelder 1 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PHIL 201-01 Modern Philosophy MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 111 Geoffrey Gorham 1 / 22 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PHIL 202-01 American Philosophy MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 111 Geoffrey Gorham 0 / 22 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-02*
PHIL 211-01 Indian Philosophies TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 112 Joy Laine 11 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 211-01*
PHIL 221-01 Environmental Ethics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 404 Martin Gunderson 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 221-01; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
PHIL 312-01 Philosophy of Mathematics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 001 Janet Folina 6 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with MATH 212-01*
PHIL 321-01 Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 William Wilcox 2 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 294-04*
PHIL 394-01 Philosophical Worlds: Martin Heidegger and Ludwig Wittgenstein W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 003 Diane Michelfelder 6 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
If the history of philosophy in the West were turned into a Hollywood major motion picture, it is likely the director would cast Martin Heidegger and Ludwig Wittgenstein as heroes of two contrasting philosophical worlds—Heidegger as a key figure and instigator of the European traditions of existentialism and phenomenology, and Wittgenstein as helping to spark the Anglo-American tradition of analytic philosophy. But what if an “indie” filmmaker were to wonder if Heidegger and Wittgenstein had more in common than is usually thought? What if the “and” in the phrase “Heidegger and Wittgenstein” were taken to mean they were philosophical buddies, not only because of the skepticism toward conventional ways of doing philosophy that both of them shared?
In recent years a number of scholars have begun to explore these questions, and we’ll be doing that in this course as well. In the first half, we will toggle back and forth between readings by Heidegger and Wittgenstein; in the course’s second half, we will look at contemporary philosophical reflection on these two thinkers. Selections from works such as Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations, On Certainty, Culture and Value, and The Big Typescript, along with Heidegger’s Being and Time; Poetry, Language, Thought; On the Way to Language and the Zollikon Seminars, will inform our seminar-style class discussions. A particular focus of the class will be on the relationships among philosophical truth, ordinary language, and ordinary experience in the world. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or permission of the professor.

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Physical Education

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PE 01-01 Swimming I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 13 / 20 Materials icon
PE 03-01 Beginning Social Dance M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson 0 / 25 Materials icon
PE 04-01 Karate I MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Anita Bendickson 9 / 25 Materials icon
PE 06-01 Yoga I MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 0 / 25 Materials icon
PE 06-02 Yoga I TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 0 / 25 Materials icon
PE 06-03 Yoga I MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Emily Stuber 0 / 25 Materials icon
PE 08-01 Step Aerobics TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Vanessa Seljeskog 0 / 30 Materials icon
PE 09-01 Conditioning TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 8 / 25 Materials icon
PE 10-01 Racquetball I TR 01:20 pm-02:30 pm LEOCTR R-COURTS Betsy Emerson 0 / 8 Materials icon
PE 11-01 Swimming II TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 16 / 20 Materials icon
PE 13-01 Intermediate Social Dance M 08:30 pm-10:00 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Julie Jacobson 6 / 25 Materials icon
PE 14-01 Karate II MW 03:30 pm-04:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Anita Bendickson 24 / 25 Materials icon
PE 16-01 Yoga II TR 10:00 am-11:10 am LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kelsey Lumpkin 15 / 25 Materials icon
PE 18-01 Pilates MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Kristine Spangard 0 / 25 Materials icon
PE 19-01 Conditioning II TR 08:00 am-09:00 am LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 24 / 25 Materials icon
PE 21-01 Swim for Fitness TR 03:00 pm-04:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Elizabeth Whittle 16 / 20 Materials icon
PE 26-01 Tai Chi Chuan MW 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Phyllis Calph 16 / 25 Materials icon
PE 27-01 Cardio Fitness MW 02:20 pm-03:20 pm LEOCTR FITNESS RM Stephen Murray 5 / 20 Materials icon
PE 28-01 Pilates II TR 04:45 pm-05:45 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 2 Kristine Spangard 0 / 25 Materials icon
PE 33-01 Salsa Dance T 07:00 pm-08:30 pm LEOCTR STUDIO 1 Gary Erickson 1 / 25 Materials icon
PE 51-01 Aqua Aerobics MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm LEOCTR POOL Jennie Charlesworth 20 / 25 Materials icon

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Physics and Astronomy

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PHYS 111-01 Contemporary Concepts MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 29 / 63 Materials icon
PHYS 111-02 Contemporary Concepts MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 42 / 63 Materials icon
PHYS 112-01 Cosmos: Perspectives and Reflections M 07:00 pm-08:30 pm OLRI 150 Sung Kyu Kim 18 / 63 Materials icon
*2 credit course*
PHYS 194-01 Modern Astronomy II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 150 John Cannon 43 / 63 Materials icon
The popular survey course "Modern Astronomy" will be offered as a two-semester sequence for the first time in the 2014-2015 academic year (PHYS 113 in the fall semester and PHYS 194 in the spring semester). These courses will cover various topics of interest in astronomy, including:

- Planets (both within the Solar System and the exploding field of extrasolar planets)
- The birth, life, and death of stars
- Exotic remnant objects (e.g., white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes)
- Galaxies (including our own Milky Way and external systems)
- Cosmology and the fate of the universe
- The "unseen 95%": dark matter and dark energy
- Astrobiology and the question of life in the universe

The dramatic change between stellar and galactic physical scales will mark the boundary between the material in the two courses.

These courses are ideal for students who are curious about the nature of the universe and their place within it. Enrollment in the second semester course (PHYS 194) requires either successful completion of PHYS 113 in the previous semester or approval of the instructor. Contact Professor John M. Cannon (jcannon@mac) with questions.
PHYS 227-01 Principles of Physics II MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 150 Sean Bartz 23 / 63 Materials icon
PHYS 227-L1 Principles of Physics II Lab T 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 0 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 227-L2 Principles of Physics II Lab T 01:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 152 Brian Adams 3 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 227-L3 Principles of Physics II Lab R 09:10 am-11:10 am OLRI 152 Brian Adams 11 / 18 Materials icon
PHYS 348-01 Laboratory Instrumentation MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 170 James Doyle 10 / 24 Materials icon
PHYS 348-L1 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab T 08:00 am-11:10 am OLRI 154 James Doyle 8 / 12 Materials icon
PHYS 348-L2 Laboratory Instrumentation Lab T 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 154 James Doyle 2 / 12 Materials icon
PHYS 444-01 Electromagnetic Radiation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 7 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PHYS 460-01 Astrophysics MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 404 John Cannon 12 / 16 Materials icon
PHYS 461-01 Mechanics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 170 Tonnis ter Veldhuis 10 / 24 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PHYS 468-01 Statistical Mechanics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 101 Sean Bartz 17 / 24 Materials icon
PHYS 489-01 Physics Seminar R 03:00 pm-04:00 pm OLRI 150 John Cannon 14 / 24 Materials icon
*1 credit course*

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Political Science

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
POLI 100-01 US Politics MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 204 Michael Zis 1 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 120-01 International Politics MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 05 Wendy Weber 1 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 160-01 Foundations of Political Theory MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 107 Franklin Adler 3 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 170-01 Theories of Rhetoric MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 208 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 10 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 200-01 Women and American Politics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Julie Dolan 13 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 216-01 Legislative Politics W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Julie Dolan 14 / 25 Materials icon
*Instructor permission required*
POLI 222-01 Regional Conflict/Security MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 205 Andrew Latham 0 / 26 Materials icon
POLI 242-01 Development Politics TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 112 David Blaney 0 / 20 Materials icon
POLI 244-01 Urban Latino Power TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 213 Paul Dosh 0 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 244-01 and LATI 244-01; first day attendance required*
POLI 260-01 Contemporary Political Theory TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm CARN 206 Franklin Adler 20 / 25 Materials icon
POLI 261-01 Feminist Political Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 401 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 261-01*
POLI 269-01 Empirical Research Methods MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 204 Lesley Lavery 0 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
POLI 272-01 Researching Political Communication TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 206 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 6 / 20 Materials icon
POLI 294-01 Politics of Architecture and the Built Environment TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 202 Schmidt, Wells 1 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendance required; cross-listed with ENVI 294-01; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor* Are buildings political? What does the built environment--from buildings to roads and the entire layout of communities--say about us and to us? This collaboratively-taught course will explore the ways that architecture embodies the ideals and political tensions of the individuals and societies that create them, as well as how the physical landscape also shapes the political landscape. Beginning with a survey of themes in architectural history, we will explore both the expressive meaning and the behavioral significance of the human-built world. Topics will range from Greek temples to Occupy protests, from 19th century Paris to the American suburbs.
POLI 294-02 Political Psychology of Mass Behavior TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Philip Chen 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 294-01* How does psychology help us understand the attitudes and behaviors of voters? Given these insights, what does this tell us about the quality of democracy in America? Are American voters living up to their civic duty as voters?

This course introduces the interdisciplinary field of political psychology. This field uses research and theory from social and personality psychology as well as mass communication to understand aspects of politics. Throughout the semester, we will examine the mass public (voters) and gain a better understanding of the ways ordinary people make political decisions and interact with the political world. This course is organized around four broad themes. After an introduction to the study of political psychology, we will explore voter’s attitudes, specifically the content of these beliefs and where they come from. The course then turns to a study of personality and emotions, followed by a section on political communication and the media. We end with a discussion of stereotyping and voting with a focus on the post-2008 political world.
POLI 294-03 Metaphysics in Secular Thought TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela 4 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01 and RELI 394-01; counts as humanities general distribution credit*
POLI 294-04 Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 003 William Wilcox 2 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PHIL 321-01; counts as humanities general distribution credit*
POLI 316-01 Info Policy/Politics/Law MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 208 Patrick Schmidt 10 / 20 Materials icon
POLI 321-01 International Security TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 208 Andrew Latham 0 / 20 Materials icon
POLI 322-01 Advanced International Theory TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 208 David Blaney 8 / 20 Materials icon
POLI 323-01 Humanitarianism in World Politics M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm CARN 204 Wendy Weber 1 / 20 Materials icon
POLI 335-01 Science and Citizenship TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 270 Roopali Phadke 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENVI 335-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on the first day of class with the permission of the instructor*
POLI 341-01 Comparative Social Movements TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 010 Paul Dosh 10 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with LATI 341-01*
POLI 352-01 Transitional Justice TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 404 Nadya Nedelsky 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 352-01*
POLI 390-01 Chuck Green Civic Engagement Fellowship MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 105 Lesley Lavery 0 / 12 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Permission of instructor required*
POLI 394-01 Sustainability for Global Citizenship Seminar TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm THEATR 205 Michael Zis 8 / 20 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required* The seminar invites students in their sophomore or junior year to deepen their understanding of sustainability through real-world problem solving. The seminar uses a sustainability framework for considering the political, economic, environmental, and social dimensions of these problems and their potential solutions. All seminar participants commit to a 6-month learning endeavor, comprised of (1) a spring semester course and (2) a paid summer practicum. In the paid practicum, students will be working with an organization to address a problem related to sustainability. The application deadline for participation in the 2015 Sustainability for Global Citizenship cohort is Oct. 27, 2014. Please see instructor for application information.
POLI 404-01 Honors Colloquium MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm CARN 208 Andrew Latham 6 / 16 Materials icon
*2 credit course*

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Psychology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
PSYC 100-01 Introduction to Psychology MWF 08:30 am-09:30 am OLRI 352 Joan Ostrove 0 / 35 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PSYC 100-02 Introduction to Psychology MWF 03:30 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 STAFF 1 / 35 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L1 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Jamie Atkins 1 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L2 Introduction to Psychology Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 301 Jamie Atkins 0 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L3 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 370 Jamie Atkins 4 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 100-L4 Introduction to Psychology Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 352 Jamie Atkins 0 / 18 Materials icon
PSYC 180-01 Brain, Mind, and Behavior MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MUSIC 113 Eric Wiertelak 0 / 50 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 180-01*
PSYC 201-01 Research in Psychology I MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 352 Brooke Lea 0 / 24 Materials icon
PSYC 201-L1 Research in Psychology I Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI Brooke Lea 1 / 12 Materials icon
PSYC 201-L2 Research in Psychology I Lab R 01:20 pm-02:50 pm Brooke Lea 0 / 12 Materials icon
PSYC 202-01 Research in Psychology II MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 352 Darcy Burgund 0 / 24 Materials icon
PSYC 220-01 Educational Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 215 Tina Kruse 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with EDUC 220-01; first day attendance required*
PSYC 240-01 Principles of Learning and Behavior MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm OLRI 205 Julia Manor 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 240-01*
PSYC 240-L1 Principles of Learning and Behavior R 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 371 Julia Manor 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 240-L1*
PSYC 243-01 Psychological Anthropology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 05 Olga Gonzalez 5 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 243-01*
PSYC 248-01 Behavioral Neuroscience MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 352 Eric Wiertelak 0 / 24 Materials icon
PSYC 248-L1 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab R 01:20 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 371 Eric Wiertelak 0 / 24 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 248-01*
PSYC 252-01 Distress, Dysfunction, and Disorder: Perspectives on the DSM MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 250 Jaine Strauss 0 / 70 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PSYC 254-01 Social Psychology TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 352 Steve Guglielmo 2 / 32 Materials icon
PSYC 264-01 The Psychology of Gender TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Joan Ostrove 1 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 264-01*
PSYC 294-01 Political Psychology of Mass Behavior TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 270 Philip Chen 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 294-02*
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 370 Burgund, Gillen-O'Neel, Guglielmo, Strauss 7 / 30 Materials icon
PSYC 300-01 Directed Research in Psych MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am OLRI 300 Burgund, Gillen-O'Neel, Guglielmo, Strauss 7 / 30 Materials icon
PSYC 374-01 Clinical and Counseling Psych TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 300 Jaine Strauss 0 / 18 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
PSYC 378-01 Psychology of Language W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm OLRI 352 Brooke Lea 7 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 378-01*
PSYC 385-01 Mind Reading: Understanding Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 370 Darcy Burgund 10 / 18 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 385-01*
PSYC 386-01 Seminar in Neuropharmacology MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 205 Lin Aanonsen 0 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 486-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
PSYC 394-01 Moral Psychology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 300 Steve Guglielmo 0 / 16 Materials icon
This course will explore how and why we make moral judgments about people and their behavior. How are our moral judgments shaped by intuition, emotion, and reasoning? Which kinds of behaviors do we view as immoral? How do we balance our own self-interest with the interests of our broader group or community? What are the evolutionary and developmental origins of moral judgments? What are the moral implications of important policy decisions about capital punishment and the insanity defense? Could a robot have moral rights and responsibilities? In this course, we will examine these questions by considering theories and findings from social, developmental, evolutionary, and political psychology, as well as from
related fields like philosophy and artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 or permission of instructor.
PSYC 394-02 Social Identity Development TR 08:00 am-09:30 am OLRI 300 Cari Gillen-O'Neel 0 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
This course examines the development of social identities, with a special focus on gender and ethnic identity in the United States. Through empirical articles, class discussions, and several written assignments, we will address questions such as: When do children become aware that the social categories of gender and ethnicity exist? What do these group identities mean to children, and how do these identities change as children grow older? Do children understand the gender and ethnic inequalities and stereotypes that are present in current U.S. society? What effects do these social inequalities and stereotypes have on children’s self-concepts, friendships, and academic achievement? What role do parents, teachers, peers, and the media play in shaping children’s social identities? Counts as a UP3 course. Pre-requisites: PSYC 100, PSYC 201 (or MATH 155), and PSYC 250 (or permission of instructor).
PSYC 394-03 Brain and Emotion MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 300 Julia Manor 3 / 16 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with NEUR 394-01* This course is an introduction to how the brain produces emotion/motivated behavior in humans and animals. Theories of emotion and the historical context of the study of emotion (particularly in animals) will be explored. This course will cover the brain systems of basic emotions including fear, rage, attachment, and pleasure. Connections and implications for emotional development and psychiatric disorders will be discussed. Prerequisites: PSYC/NEUR 180 and either MATH 155 or PSYC 201.

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Religious Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RELI 102-01 Modern Islam MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 111 Gregory Lipton 0 / 15 Materials icon
In the modern period, Muslim-majority societies have faced daunting social, political, and intellectual challenges. Muslims have sought to find solutions to such challenges by rejecting Islam, transforming Islam, or returning to Islam. Through surveying a broad spectrum of Muslim voices in diverse socio-historical contexts—including traditional religious scholars, modernist intellectuals, Islamist ideologues, and progressive activists and feminists—this class explores some key ways Muslims have defined (and re-defined) themselves in response to the changes wrought by the colonial and post-colonial eras.
RELI 111-01 Introduction to Buddhism MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 009 Erik Davis 0 / 20 Materials icon
RELI 130-01 Folklore and Religion W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 111 STAFF 5 / 20 Materials icon
RELI 194-02 Jews and Christians: The First Two Thousand Years MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am MAIN 011 Cytron, Drake 6 / 30 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*This class is part of a Spring 2015 cluster in the department focusing on the theme of religion and conflict. Classes will meet at the assigned time, but there will also be a few joint meetings for outside speakers and dinners.* For twenty centuries, Jews and Christians have mostly argued with one another, as each community formed its respective identity in relation to the other. In the aftermath of World War II, academics and interfaith activists attempted to understand and overturn this history of hostility and set the relationship onto a new path. More recently, however, political events, newer church teachings, and media events have threatened to upend these attempts at harmony and interfaith understanding. In this course we will examine the diverse relations between Jews and Christians from the ancient world to today, and we will explore the complex theological and social history between the two "religions," tracing the repercussions into this new century
RELI 194-03 World Religions and World Religions Discourse MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 010 James Laine 9 / 20 Materials icon
Our goal will be to make an effort to comprehend just what cultural literacy would mean when studying the major religious traditions of the world, while at the same time developing an appreciation of some of the blind spots and problems in this enterprise. To a large extent, we will do some serious construction before we feel ready for de-construction. Ever couple of weeks, we will cover one of five major areas (South Asia, East Asia, Judaism, Christianity, Islam) and each student will read a different author's treatment of this material.
RELI 194-04 Sufism: The Islamic Quest for Intimacy with the Beloved TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm OLRI 170 Gregory Lipton 3 / 15 Materials icon
With attention to both classical texts and contemporary contexts, this course examines the formative development of Islamic mysticism, or Sufism, and its rich legacy of embodied piety and mystical intimacy. Drawing on the teachings of key Muslim mystics, we will explore the sacred sources, unitive doctrines, and metaphysical cosmology of Sufism, as well as its devotional practices, celebrated poetry, and contested tradition of ecstatic discourse.
RELI 200-01 The Qur'an (Koran) TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 170 Gregory Lipton 8 / 15 Materials icon
This course is an introduction to the Qur’an as the textual crystallization of the Prophet Muhammad’s religio-historical legacy and the principal source of divine guidance for Muslims since the inception of Islam. Students will read the Qur'an in translation, explore traditions of Qur'anic interpretation, and engage recent academic approaches to understanding the text in terms of its history, structure, main themes, and prophetology.
RELI 294-01 Buddhist Fascists TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 111 Erik Davis 0 / 12 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ASIA 294-01; this class is part of a Spring 2015 cluster in the department focusing on the theme of religion and conflict. Classes will meet at the assigned time, but there will also be a few joint meetings for outside speakers and dinners.* This mid-level seminar explores modern expressions of what might be called "Buddhist Fascism:" a form of social activism and organization which explicitly places Buddhist and national institutions together, and opposes them - usually violently - to non-nationals and non-Buddhists. This course will examine the development of Fascism as a broad set of modernist ideologies, usually from the point of view of sociological studies of fascist movements.
Beginning with the early Orientalist and race-theories emerging from Europe and South Asia in the Nineteenth Century, this class proceeds to mid-Twentieth Century Imperial Japan, and then to examples in Southeast and South Asian Buddhist countries, including contemporary Buddhist Fascism Movements in Burma/Myanmar and Sri Lanka
RELI 294-02 Banned Books in South Asia MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 001 James Laine 15 / 20 Materials icon
*This class is part of a Spring 2015 cluster in the department focusing on the theme of religion and conflict. Classes will meet at the assigned time, but there will also be a few joint meetings for outside speakers and dinners.* Since Salman Rushdie’s novel, The Satanic Verses, was banned in India and Pakistan as blasphemous in 1989, the banning of books in South Asia has become a regular part of politics and the discourses of tolerance, respect, post-colonialism, and freedom of expression. In this course, we will read several such books, first to understand what their opponents saw as threatening and misguided in them, and then to understand what the authors themselves were attempting to communicate. Among the primary books under review will be: Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Verses; Wendy Doniger’s The Hindus; James Laine’s Shivaji: Hindu King in Islamic India; and Harjot Oberoi’s The Construction of Religious Boundaries. We will also look at the question of censorship and view some censored or banned films.
RELI 294-03 Making Sacred: Religious Images and Spaces in Asia TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm ARTCOM 102 Kari Shepherdson-Scott 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ART 270-01 and ASIA 294-02; counts as fine arts distribution*
RELI 325-01 Conquering the Flesh: Renunciation of Food/Sex in the Christian Tradition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 111 Susanna Drake 17 / 25 Materials icon
RELI 394-01 Metaphysics in Secular Thought TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 214 Kiarina Kordela 4 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with GERM 394-01 and POLI 294-03; for description see German Studies listing*
RELI 469-01 Approaches to the Study of Religion TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 003 Susanna Drake 12 / 20 Materials icon

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Russian

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
RUSS 102-01 Elementary Russian II MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am NEILL 111 Julia Chadaga 7 / 25 Materials icon
RUSS 102-L1 Elementary Russian II Lab T 09:40 am-11:10 am Ekaterina Efimenko 3 / 13 Materials icon
RUSS 102-L2 Elementary Russian II Lab T 03:00 pm-04:30 pm Ekaterina Efimenko 5 / 12 Materials icon
RUSS 204-01 Intermediate Russian II MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm NEILL 228 Anastasia Kayiatos 13 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
RUSS 204-L1 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 09:40 am-11:10 am Ekaterina Efimenko 7 / 13 Materials icon
RUSS 204-L2 Intermediate Russian II Lab R 03:00 pm-04:30 pm Ekaterina Efimenko 6 / 12 Materials icon
RUSS 272-01 The Post-Soviet Sphere MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 404 James von Geldern 0 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 272-01*
RUSS 294-01 Socialisms and Sexualities W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 228 Anastasia Kayiatos 14 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-01* Socialisms and Sexualities sputniki (or fellow-travelers) will read texts about sex and gender in abstract and actually-existing socialist contexts in order to unsettle the unmarked capitalist horizon of most feminist and queer theory and praxis, while also off-setting a second-world/Russian studies axis with an itinerant, omnivorous and multimedia syllabus. Students should expect an interactive, hyperconnective classroom setting (there will be blogs and real-time interviews with relevant figures); as well as dynamic, dialogic course content, which may shift a bit as befits the disciplinary backgrounds and undisciplined desires of the actual student-collective that assembles this spring.
RUSS 294-02 Silent Subjects MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 228 Anastasia Kayiatos 19 / 25 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with WGSS 294-02* Addressing both the subjects about which literature does not or cannot speak, and those subjects who themselves do not or cannot speak in the literary works on its syllabus, this course poses the implicit flipside to the famous pair of theory questions cited above, namely: Who isn’t speaking? and What matter who isn’t speaking? Further, it asks: About what aren’t they speaking? and Why? It gently mobilizes various methodologies—including feminism, deaf and disability studies, queer theory and critical race studies—to ground these interrogations.

Over the semester, students grapple with instances in which absent speech is eminently significant, no matter the motivation for the silences they encounter—which range in the readings from the pathological to the political, the natural to the supernatural. The course contemplates the formal implications of muteness for the verbal work of art (as stylistic device and aesthetic consequence). At the same time, it pursues the social and structural implications of breaking speech and biting tongues. Students are encouraged to read between the lines relentlessly as they explore the poetics and politics of silence in our textual universes and beyond them.

The class features authors from Russian, American and other traditions, including Ivan Turgenev, Maxim Gorky, Vladimir Nabokov, Andrey Sinyavsky, Evgenii Kharitonov, Ruth Zernova, Isak Dinesen, Tennessee Williams, Tillie Olsen, Carson McCullers, Audre Lorde and Toni Morrison.
RUSS 364-01 Culture and Revolution MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 06A James von Geldern 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 364-01*
RUSS 367-01 Dostoevsky and Gogol MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 113 Julia Chadaga 15 / 25 Materials icon
In this course, we read and study the fiction of Fyodor Dostoevsky (Crime and Punishment) and Nikolai Gogol (Dead Souls), two titans of world literature.

At age 28 Dostoevsky faced a firing squad for reading out loud a banned letter to Gogol. It turned out to be a mock-execution, and he was sent to a labor camp instead. This experience left an indelible imprint on the masterpieces that Dostoevsky wrote after emerging from prison. Gogol—whom critics called a Realist even though he wrote about zombies snatching overcoats and noses turning into government officials—depicted transgression in a surreal and exhilarating style that readers had never seen before. We will read fiction by both authors, noting the stylistic features that made them literary pioneers, the border-crossing that takes place on stylistic and thematic levels in our texts, and the volatile national, sexual, and legal borders that both authors had to negotiate in their own lives. We will explore the topics with which Gogol and Dostoevsky engage: gender- and class-based inequality; imperial expansion; religion vs. atheism; the spectrum of wrongdoing from corruption to murder; the possibilities of dissent in a police state; individual freedom vs. collective belonging.

Relations between the US and Russia are now growing colder in response to worldwide anxieties about Russia’s territorial ambitions and hostility toward the West. Gogol and Dostoevsky formulated a vision of Russian exceptionalism that has seen a revival under Putin’s regime. We will examine the way in which these two authors helped to create Russia’s current self-image as we draw connections between our authors’ tsarist-era context and contemporary Russia. The course will analyze artwork inspired by Gogol and Dostoevsky, from visual media to the philosophy of Nietzsche and the Existentialist school, the writings of Freud, and stories by Kafka, Nabokov, and Lahiri. Students who can read Russian will have the option to meet with the instructor every week to discuss brief selections from the Russian texts in the original. Taught in English. No prerequisites.

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Sociology

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
SOCI 110-01 Introduction to Sociology TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm NEILL 111 Mahnaz Kousha 2 / 20 Materials icon
SOCI 110-02 Introduction to Sociology TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 111 Mahnaz Kousha 1 / 20 Materials icon
SOCI 175-01 Sociolinguistics MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm OLRI 270 Marianne Milligan 0 / 15 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with LING 175-01;First day attendance required; Instructor is looking for class breakdown to be 4 seats Jr./Sr. 11 seats for Soph/FY students*
SOCI 205-01 Public Schooling in America MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm CARN 05 Terry Boychuk 1 / 20 Materials icon
SOCI 220-01 Sociology of Race/Ethnicity TR 09:40 am-11:10 am CARN 204 Mahnaz Kousha 5 / 20 Materials icon
SOCI 222-01 The Medical Industry MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am CARN 204 Terry Boychuk 16 / 20 Materials icon
SOCI 269-01 Social Science Inquiry TR 09:40 am-11:10 am OLRI 205 Erik Larson 0 / 20 Materials icon
SOCI 272-01 Social Theories MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm CARN 204 Khaldoun Samman 4 / 18 Materials icon
SOCI 283-01 Economic Sociology MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 05 Erik Larson 8 / 20 Materials icon
SOCI 294-02 Global Capitalism MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm CARN 204 Khaldoun Samman 8 / 18 Materials icon
There has been a very significant body of sknowledge that analyzes the historical emergence of the global political economy we have lived under for the past few centuries, how it evolved, expanded, and incorporated the entire spatiality of our planet. In this course we will trace first the mystification of capitalism as a historical system, looking critically at how academics have studied it in fields like economics, political science, and sociology. We will then turn our attention to how we may indeed particularize it as having both a temporal and spatial origin, and that its territorial expansion has had class, racial, and gender implications. We will look at other consequences of global capitalism, with particular focus on how capitalism has much to do with the present ecological disasters, declining food nutrition, and the continued appropriation of indigenous land and subsistence. No prerequisites.

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Theatre and Dance

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
THDA 210-01 Community-Based Theatres TR 09:40 am-11:10 am MUSIC 113 Harry Waters Jr. 2 / 27 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 294-04*
THDA 220-01 Voice and Speech MWF 02:20 pm-04:00 pm THEATR 205 Cheryl Brinkley 1 / 16 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*First day attendance required; course also utilizes Theatre 03*
THDA 250-01 Experiential Anatomy and the Mind Body Connection MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am THEATR 6 Wynn Fricke 1 / 20 Materials icon
THDA 255-01 Lighting Design TR 09:40 am-11:10 am THEATR 205 Thomas Barrett 3 / 12 Materials icon
*$20 lighting design fee*
THDA 294-01 Performing History: Interpreting the James J. Hill House TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 100 Eric Colleary 0 / 15 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 294-06* In recent years, more and more museums have turned to performance as a way of telling their particular story – nationally at places like Colonial Williamsburg and Plimouth Plantation, or locally at places like Historic Fort Snelling and the James J. Hill House.

In this course, we will be working directly with the James J. Hill House and Minnesota Historical Society to develop an interpretative program that will be presented by the class participants at the end of the term. Just down the street from the Macalester campus, the Hill mansion housed the great railroad barron and his family at the turn of the last century. As the “Downton Abbey” of Saint Paul, the large family lived comfortably upstairs entertaining the highest members of society including the President of the United States, while their team of servants downstairs – cooks, gardeners, maids, housekeepers, etc. – worked to keep the estate running.

Students will immerse themselves in the history, culture, and politics of turn-of-the-century Saint Paul, grappling with contemporary issues of gender, class, race and sexuality. Through class discussions, guest historians, site visits and archival research, students will construct ‘characters’ they will then perform to interpret an aspect of the life and times of this historic house. While the work of this class is located within a particular historic time period and physical site, the skills developed will be useful to any student interested in history, performance, museum studies, American studies, and civic engagement.

Please note: A few of the classes and the final presentation will be held off-campus. Contact the instructor with questions.
THDA 294-02 Staging the Nation in the American Musical MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm OLRI 100 Eric Colleary 23 / 40 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with MUSi 294-03* For nearly 150 years, the American musical has been one of this country's most popular performance genre's both at home and abroad. From minstrelsy and vaudeville revues to Rent and Avenue Q, from Bert Williams and Fanny Brice to Nathan Lane and Audra McDonald, the musical has both imagined and reflected American national identities. These representations – sometimes highly problematic – have enormous consequences as they continue to circulate through revivals, local theatre productions, and film adaptations.

The musical has also been a forum where the social issues of the day are given voice, sometimes using the guise of popular entertainment as a strategy of subversion. This course surveys the rich history of musical theatre in America in all its complexities using scripts, archival materials, critical essays, audio recordings and film.
THDA 294-04 New Performance Lab MWF 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR STUDIO Kanta Kochhar 0 / 10 Materials icon
This course focuses on a practice-based approach to the generation of new performance work. Three consecutive sections will frame our work together in order to develop processes and skills in 1) tracking/documenting/analyzing performance events in unexpected places, 2) investigating a range of compositional, research, and devising methods for new performance work, including texts, movement systems, materials and objects, architectures, and digital media, and 3) performing work—in a range of online and live venues.

The format of the class will include lecture-demos, workshops and on-site activities across the campus. This course will be of particular interest for students interested in learning more about performance as it intersects with global and local cultures; research and problem-solving; media technology, engineering, and urban design; and community engagement.
THDA 294-05 Acting Shakespeare MWF 12:00 pm-01:30 pm THEATR 010 Barbra Berlovitz 0 / 10 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 294-05; meets in the Black Box, Theatre 010* In this class each student will work to discover her/his own voice. Habits that have formed in the body will be worked on to free the voice and allow its true potential to exist. Breathing and tension releasing exercises, developing a sense of body awareness and presence will all be a part of the journey of the class. Improvisation and games will be used as tools to help define the ideas of openness, balance and creativity. The student will learn to speak the text on the breath of the character and discover what it feels like to walk into a text “clean”, to be free from judgment and open for discovery. For this class there will be various books to consult and texts from Shakespeare's plays to memorize. Students will be asked to review one play during the semester and write journals about their work. A minimal amount of time will be spent reviewing the fundamentals of speaking a heightened text and developing this part of the craft.
THDA 294-06 Writing Performance M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm THEATR 205 James, Waters Jr. 0 / 12 Materials icon
*Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENGL 294-06: There are many way that a writer/actor can find their voices either on the page or on the stage. Thisis an opportunity to explore both. This course will be revealing and writing the stories you wish, know, heard, learned as you hone your craft through intentional guidance by Marlon James. You will find the deeper meaning of the presentation, sharing and performance of those ideas.
THDA 394-01 Disability/Deaf Performance MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm THEATR 205 Kanta Kochhar 11 / 20 Materials icon
Disability/deaf performance investigates the history of disability, the distinctions between disability and deaf cultures/histories, the emergence of a range of disability and deaf theatres and dance companies, and the relation of these expressive forms to disability and deaf rights, law, and activism. Performance cases studies will range from a close reading of specific plays on disability as well as a look at the work of production companies and solo artists working in this arena. Examples will include Axis Dance, Lynn Manning, Olimpias, National Theatre of the Deaf, Deaf West, Theatre Breaking through the Barriers, and more locally, Interact Theatre and Mixed Blood’s collaborations with Nicole Zapko in the US; Aaron Williamson, Candoco, and Graeae Theatre in the UK; and Ability Unlimited in India.

In addition to including an overview of the theoretical frame for how disability/deaf studies and performance studies intersect, we will also consider the aesthetics of disability, the implications of this work for developing more inclusive performance practices based on emerging trends in universal design and the links between performance practices and accessible staging practices, including, for example, the use of audio description, captioning, and/or sign language interpreters in the performances.
THDA 22-01 West African-Based Movement II MW 02:20 pm-03:50 pm THEATR 6 Patricia Brown 13 / 20 Materials icon
THDA 31-01 Dance Improvisation MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am THEATR 6 Krista Langberg 0 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 42-01 Modern Dance II TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm THEATR 6 Rebecca Heist 2 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 44-01 Modern Dance IV MW 04:00 pm-05:20 pm THEATR STUDIO Rebecca Heist 9 / 16 Materials icon
THDA 53-01 Ballet III TR 04:40 pm-06:10 pm THEATR 6 Jill Lile 0 / 16 Materials icon

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Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Number/Section/Name Days Time Room Instructor Avail./Max.
WGSS 101-01 Feminist Sex Wars MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am MAIN 009 Corie Hammers 2 / 25 Materials icon
WGSS 110-01 Intro to LGBTQ Studies MWF 01:10 pm-02:10 pm MAIN 009 Corie Hammers 1 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 112-01; first day attendance required*
WGSS 117-01 Women, Health, Reproduction MWF 09:40 am-10:40 am OLRI 100 Elizabeth Jansen 2 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with BIOL 117-01; first day attendance required; ACTC students may register on December 5th with permission of the instructor*
WGSS 194-01 The Culture and Theory of Women of Color Feminisms W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 212 Juliana Pegues 2 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with AMST 194-01*
WGSS 201-01 History of U.S. Feminisms TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 010 Amy Sullivan 16 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 201-01*
WGSS 228-01 Gender and Sexuality in Colonial America and the Early Republic TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm NEILL 402 Andrea Robertson 17 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with HIST 228-01*
WGSS 242-01 Economics of Gender MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am CARN 105 Karine Moe 0 / 25 Materials icon
*First day attendanc required; cross-listed with ECON 242-01*
WGSS 261-01 Feminist Political Theory MWF 10:50 am-11:50 am NEILL 401 Zornitsa Keremidchieva 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with POLI 261-01*
WGSS 264-01 The Psychology of Gender TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm OLRI 352 Joan Ostrove 1 / 30 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with PSYC 264-01*
WGSS 294-01 Socialisms and Sexualities W 07:00 pm-10:00 pm NEILL 228 Anastasia Kayiatos 14 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RUSS 294-01*
WGSS 294-02 Silent Subjects MWF 02:20 pm-03:20 pm NEILL 228 Anastasia Kayiatos 19 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RUSS 294-02*
WGSS 300-01 Advanced Feminist/Queer Theories and Methodologies TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker 11 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
*Cross-listed with INTL 300-01* This course will focus on feminist and queer postmodern and postcolonial literature and film. We will study how the terms 'feminist' and 'queer' meet and separate in 20th century culture and politics. We will seek to understand and work with definitions of the 'postmodern' and the ‘postcolonial.’ Some themes that bring them into the same conversation are: negotiating prescribed and constructed identities, playing with the notion of 'post,' critiquing existing frameworks and fashioning unprecedented ones, and addressing the material conditions of modernity and postmodernity. Some authors included are Reinaldo Arenas, Theresa Cha, Trinh Minh-Ha, and Gayatri Spivak. Films by Ursula Biemann (Switzerland) and Alka Sadat (Afghanistan) are included
WGSS 310-01 Gendered/Feminist Writing: 19th Century Women Writers MWF 12:00 pm-01:00 pm MAIN 010 Lesley Goodman 17 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ENGL 362-01; first day attendance required*
WGSS 330-01 Democracies, Feminisms, Capitalisms TR 03:00 pm-04:30 pm MAIN 009 Sonita Sarker 17 / 20 Materials icon   Supplemental Course Information icon
Through the organizing notion of Object, we will study the intertwining of democracy and capitalism, with a brief historical overview of both but looking primarily at formations in the 20th and 21st centuries—from liberal nation-state versions through postsocialisms to neoliberal-neocolonial globalization. In this transnational comparative context, we will focus on how various feminisms have negotiated these intertwined political/economic theories, at once emerging from them, claiming a place in them, as well as self-defining against their different formations. We will explore how liberal, second- and third-wave, socialist, women of color, radical transnational, and indigenous feminisms deploy the notion of Object in addressing issues of citizenship, violence, labor, the environment, cultural representation, etc. as ways of tackling this complicated relationship with diverse forms of capitalism and democracy.
WGSS 394-01 Gender, Power, and Sexualities in Africa TR 01:20 pm-02:50 pm CARN 05 Dianna Shandy 0 / 20 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with ANTH 394-01*
WGSS 394-02 Conquering the Flesh: Renunciation of Food and Sex in the Christian Tradition TR 09:40 am-11:10 am NEILL 111 Susanna Drake 17 / 25 Materials icon
*Cross-listed with RELI 394-02*
WGSS 400-01 Senior Seminar: Linking Theory and Practice M 07:00 pm-10:00 pm MAIN 009 Corie Hammers 19 / 25 Materials icon

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