Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

ENVI 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 232-01; first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on the role of humans in changing the face of the earth and how, in turn, this changing environment influences humans. The course will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Students will explore the fundamentals of environmental science, economics, cultural and political ecology, as well as a number of sectoral issues related to human population growth, agriculture, water resources, biodiversity, forest resources, energy use, climate change, and environmental health. (4 credits)

GEOG 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01;first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on the role of humans in changing the face of the earth and how, in turn, this changing environment influences humans. The course will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Students will explore the fundamentals of environmental science, economics, cultural and political ecology, as well as a number of sectoral issues related to human population growth, agriculture, water resources, biodiversity, forest resources, energy use, climate change, and environmental health. (4 credits)

HISP 494-01

Portugal Meets the "Other":Portuguese Sailors in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia (15th-17thCent)

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 370
  • Instructor: J. Ernesto Ortiz Diaz

Notes: In this course we will read travel accounts and official historiography from the period in which Portugal became the first European overseas empire. Portugal linked continents and cultures as never before traveling by sea; indeed this process can be understood as the first globalization because of the cultural cross-pollination that Portugal’s voyages provoked. We will focus on analyzing the way in which the Portuguese managed to portray the Other by two contrary discourses: Portugal’s providential mission, and the race for economical profit through trade and war. We will also study works of art produced in this era. The course will be taught in Spanish, but students may choose to submit their work in Portuguese. This course counts toward the African Studies concentration.

HIST 115-01

Africa Since 1800

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: This course is designed to introduce students to the history of Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It examines major themes relating to change in the colonial period such as European conquest and imperialism, the development of the colonial economy, African responses to colonialism and the rise of nationalist movements that stimulated the movement towards independence. Students will examine these themes by applying them to case studies of specific geographic regions of the continent. (4 credits)

INTL 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 170
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with SOCI 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

MUSI 73-01

African Music Ensemble

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 06:45 pm-08:15 pm
  • Room: MUSIC 116
  • Instructor: Sowah Mensah

Notes: *Register in person with the ensemble director. Check the Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.*


SOCI 280-01

Indigenous Peoples' Movements in Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 170
  • Instructor: Erik Larson

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 280-01*

During the last three decades, a global indigenous rights movement has taken shape within the United nations and other international bodies, challenging and reformulating international law and global cultural understandings of indigenous rights. The recognition of indigenous peoples' rights in international law invokes the tensions between sovereignty and human rights, but also challenges the dominant international understandings of both principles. In this course, we examine indigenous peoples' movements by placing them in a global context and sociologically informed theoretical framework. By beginning with a set of influential theoretical statements from social science, we will then use indigenous peoples' movements as case studies to examine the extent to which these theoretical perspectives explain and are challenged by case studies. We will then analyze various aspects of indigenous peoples' movements and the extent to which these aspects of the movement are shaped by global processes. (4 credits)

THDA 22-01

African-Based Movement II

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: THEATR 6
  • Instructor: Patricia Brown

Notes: This course focuses on dance inspired by West African and other African regions, the Caribbean, and the Americas. It is rooted in a communal environment and is supported and accompanied by a live musician/drummer. Students continue building on fundamental principles and technique, including more complex polyrhythmic aspects of the movement, while deepening the inter-connected relationship with the drums. They also create in-class dance projects and presentations. Spring semester. (1 credit)

Fall 2017

AMST 384-01

Langston Hughes: Global Writer

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: David Moore

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENGL 384-01 and INTL 384-01*

The great African American writer Langston Hughes (1902-1967) is best known as the poet laureate of the Harlem Renaissance. But his career was vaster still. He was a Soviet screenwriter, Spanish Civil War journalist, African literary anthologist, humorist, playwright, translator, social critic, writer of over 10,000 letters, and much more. This course engages Hughes's full career, bridging race and global issues, politics and art, and makes use of little-known archival materials. Cross-listed with English 384 and International Studies 384. (4 credits)

ANTH 246-01

Refugees/Humanitarian Response

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: *First Year Course only; first day attendance required* This writing-intensive seminar uses anthropology to situate the experiences of refugees and other forced migrants within a global framework of conflict and humanitarian response. Through analysis of select case studies, we will probe the complex interplay of social, historical, political, and economic factors that are invoked to explain modern refugee-producing conflicts. We will consider how refugees act and are acted upon in these settings and in their aftermath. We will examine critically the ways refugees are defined and described qualitatively and quantitatively, as such discourse determines access to certain entitlements and influences humanitarian and governmental responses. We will consider how refugees are defined in terms of time and space, yet simultaneously redefine time and space as transnational actors. Once we have a better understanding of the nature of the collective experience of war and its effects on refugees and others, we will consider issues of power, ethics, and human rights embedded in humanitarian responses to conflict by examining the roles of those who engage in humanitarian work in U.S. and international settings. Our scope of inquiry includes humanitarian workers broadly conceived, including journalists, human services providers, government workers, researchers, faith-based organizations, and others. In addition to probing the ways that outsiders react to refugee concerns, we will also examine indigenous institutional coping mechanisms—such as family and religion—that facilitate social reconstruction in times of transition. The format of the course will be in-depth discussion, lectures, guest speakers, films, and a field research project that will involve cultural life history interviews with an individual engaged in humanitarian work. This course fulfills the Internationalism and Writing (Argumentative) general education requirements. It also counts a Foundational course for the Human Rights and Humanitarianism Concentration, as a Tier II course for the African Studies Concentration, and as an elective for the minor or major in Anthropology. The course may count as an elective for other Interdisciplinary departments.


ANTH 246-02

Refugees/Humanitarian Response

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: This course provides an overview of issues related to refugees and humanitarian response in U.S. and international settings. Students explore the meaning of "humanitarian" and inherent issues of power, ethics, and human rights in responses to conflict by examining the roles of those who engage in humanitarian work. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)


ANTH 394-01

Children and Youth in Africa

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Hilary Chart

Notes: With approximately 60% of the population (and over 600 million people) under the age of 25, Africa is undoubtedly the world’s youngest continent. Much has been made of this “youth bulge,” which is alternately referred to as a ticking time bomb of political and economic instability, or a unique advantage for those wishing to tap new markets or accelerate development. Rather than just explaining or evaluating the merits of Africa’s young population, however, this course challenges students to learn from the lived experiences of Africa’s young people, who are important and creative social actors (at home, in school, on the job, and in popular culture, art, and politics!). They are also, however, compelling objects of intensive intervention (especially those efforts aimed at girl children, orphans, and victims of famine and war), and we will consider some of the many ways efforts to “save” African young people variably empower, limit, or otherwise complicate their lives. We will approach children and youth not as fixed categories, but as open questions—fluid designations that differ over time and place, identities that are flexible and strategically claimed. Drawing on ethnographic sources, memoirs, fictional accounts, film, and popular representations, this course is also designed to help students think critically about the dynamic and problematic connections through which Africa’s young people are shaping and being shaped by the rest of the world. Children and Youth in Africa also counts as a Tier 1 African Studies course.

ENGL 384-01

Langston Hughes: Global Writer

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: David Moore

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 384-01 and INTL 384-01*

The great African American writer Langston Hughes (1902-1967) is best known as the poet laureate of the Harlem Renaissance. But his career was vaster still. He was a Soviet screenwriter, Spanish Civil War journalist, African literary anthologist, humorist, playwright, translator, social critic, writer of over 10,000 letters, and much more. This course engages Hughes's full career, bridging race and global issues, politics and art, and makes use of little-known archival materials. Cross-listed with American Studies 384 and International Studies 384. (4 credits)

ENVI 477-01

Comparative Environment and Development Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with GEOG 477-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required*

A concern for the relationship between nature and society has been one of the pillars of geographic inquiry and has also been an important bridge between other disciplines. By the 1960s, this area of inquiry was referred to variously as "human ecology." Over the last decade, certain forms of inquiry within this tradition have increasingly referred to themselves as "political ecology." The purpose of this seminar is to review major works within the traditions of cultural and political ecology; examine several areas of interest within these fields (e.g., agricultural modernization, environmental narratives, conservation, ecotourism); and explore nature-society dynamics across a range of geographical contexts. Towards the end of the course we will explore how one might begin to think in practical terms about facilitating development in marginal environments. Cross-listed with Geography 477 and International Studies 477. (4 credits)

GEOG 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01; first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on agriculture. We will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Beyond agriculture, we will also examine other sectoral issues in relation to agriculture or as stand alone environmental concerns. These themes include: human population growth, consumption, biodiversity, climate change, and environmental health. We will be trying on a number of theoretical lenses from geography’s broad human-environment tradition (such as physical geography, cultural ecology, commodity chain analysis, political ecology, resource geography, the human dimensions of global change, hazards geography and environmental justice). In other words, I not only want us to explore a range of environmental issues, but also to grapple with theory and how this informs our understanding of the human-environment interface. (4 credits)

HIST 114-01

History of Africa to 1800

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: A study of the history of Africa before 1800, this course covers the major themes relating to the development of African societies and cultures from the earliest times. Students will engage with themes of state-building, trade and religion as catalysts for change and learn how historians have reconstructed the history of early Africa. This course will provide students with knowledge of specific case studies from North, South, East, West, and Central Africa. (4 credits)

INTL 282-01

Introduction to International Public Health

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Kata Chillag

Notes: This course introduces and explores the major health problems facing developing countries, and the main approaches to remediation. The course will place emphasis on the social, ethical, and political dimensions of international public health policies, programs, and research. The course considers the social determinants of health, and the need for public health programs to address the root causes of health inequities as well as illness itself. Different perspectives and approaches to health problems will be considered and debated, including occasional guest presentations and discussions with international public health professionals.

INTL 384-01

Langston Hughes: Global Writer

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: David Moore

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 384-01 and ENGL 384-01*

The great African American writer Langston Hughes (1902-1967) is best known as the poet laureate of the Harlem Renaissance. But his career was vaster still. He was a Soviet screenwriter, Spanish Civil War journalist, African literary anthologist, humorist, playwright, translator, social critic, writer of over 10,000 letters, and much more. This course engages Hughes's full career, bridging race and global issues, politics and art, and makes use of little-known archival materials. Cross-listed with American Studies 384 and English 384. (4 credits)

INTL 477-01

Comparative Environment and Development Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and GEOG 477-01; first day attendance required*

A concern for the relationship between nature and society has been one of the pillars of geographic inquiry and has also been an important bridge between other disciplines. By the 1960s, this area of inquiry was referred to variously as "human ecology." Over the last decade, certain forms of inquiry within this tradition have increasingly referred to themselves as "political ecology." The purpose of this seminar is to review major works within the traditions of cultural and political ecology; examine several areas of interest within these fields (e.g., agricultural modernization, environmental narratives, conservation, ecotourism); and explore nature-society dynamics across a range of geographical contexts. Towards the end of the course we will explore how one might begin to think in practical terms about facilitating development in marginal environments. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 477 and Geography 477. (4 credits)

MUSI 72-01

African Music Ensemble

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 06:45 pm-08:15 pm
  • Room: MUSIC 116
  • Instructor: Sowah Mensah

Notes: Register in person with the ensemble director. Check the Music Department website to see whether auditions are required.

POLI 242-01

Political Economy of Development

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 212
  • Instructor: Lisa Mueller

Notes: This course will help you answer questions about politics and economics in the developing world. For example: What explains global disparities in peace and prosperity? Is democracy good for the poor? Does foreign aid work? Our main objective is to use social science to describe and explain development outcomes. Although we will also address what can be done to solve problems such as poverty and civil war, this course will not provide any panaceas. If you finish the term unsatisfied and frustrated, you will have done something right! You will have begun to understand the complexity of development issues, which will equip you to contribute in a sophisticated way to ongoing scholarly and policy-oriented debates. (4 credits)

THDA 21-01

African-Based Movement I

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: 1550SM
  • Instructor: Patricia Brown

Notes: This African Based Movement course focuses on dance inspired by West Africa, as well as other regions of the continent, the Caribbean, Americas, and the African Diaspora at large. This physically rigorous class is rooted in a communal environment and is accompanied by a drummer. Students will learn African- based dance technique, characteristics, and the fundamental connection between the drums and the dance. They will also create in-class movement projects and presentations. Though this class may focus on traditional dance at times, it is not a tradition-specific class. All are welcome. (1 credit)

Spring 2018

ENGL 367-01

Postcolonial Theory

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: LIBR 250
  • Instructor: David Moore

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 367-01*

Traces the development of theoretical accounts of culture, politics and identity in Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean and related lands since the 1947¿1991 decolonizations. Readings include Fanon, Said, Walcott, Ngugi and many others, and extend to gender, literature, the U.S., and the post-Soviet sphere. The course bridges cultural representational, and political theory. Prior internationalist and/or theoretical coursework strongly recommended. (4 credits) Cross-listed with International Studies 367.

GEOG 243-01

Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This class seeks to go beyond the superficial media interpretations of the vast African continent. As geographers, students will attempt to place contemporary African developments in a historical and global context. The course provides a basic background in African history and geography, leading to discussion of advanced topics in contemporary African studies. The course takes a systematic rather than regional approach, examining sets of issues, rather than regions or countries of Africa. The course covers a broad range of topics, including: Africa in historical perspective; physical geography (physical landscapes, climate, vegetation, soils); human-environment interactions (forest degradation, desertification); population dynamics (population growth, distribution and mobility); culture and change (religion, modernization); development (ideology and economic development, Africa in the global economy); social geography (African women and development, education); medical geography (disease, health care and policy); agricultural development (traditional farming systems, cash crops, policy); urban economies (evolution of the urban structure, industry, housing); and political geography (democratization, conflict). (4 credits)

GEOG 363-01

Geography of Development and Underdevelopment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course introduces students to the geographic study of development around the world, with a particular emphasis on the Global South. The geographic approach emphasizes: the highly uneven nature of development; processes that link and differentiate various areas of the world; connections between development and the natural resource base; and the power relations inherent in development discourse. The course has three main sections: an introduction to development theory; an investigation of various development themes; and an intense exploration of what works and what doesn't in development practice. While much of the development literature has focused on failure, a specific aim of this course will be to uncover and interrogate success stories.

HIST 115-01

Africa Since 1800

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: This course is designed to introduce students to the history of Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It examines major themes relating to change in the colonial period such as European conquest and imperialism, the development of the colonial economy, African responses to colonialism and the rise of nationalist movements that stimulated the movement towards independence. Students will examine these themes by applying them to case studies of specific geographic regions of the continent. (4 credits)

INTL 282-01

Introduction to International Public Health

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Kata Chillag

Notes: This course introduces and explores major health problems facing those in low- and middle- income countries and in contexts of poverty and vulnerability regardless of where they occur. The course will explore the epidemiological, social, ethical, and political dimensions of public health policies, programs, and research. The course will grapple with challenging questions about the use of limited resources, the relationships between donors and recipients of aid, and what problems and public health approaches draw more attention and why. The course considers the need for public health programs to address the root causes of health inequities as well as illness itself. Different perspectives and approaches to health problems will be considered and debated, including occasional guest presentations.

INTL 367-01

Postcolonial Theory

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: LIBR 250
  • Instructor: David Moore

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENGL 367-01*

Traces the development of theoretical accounts of culture, politics and identity in Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean and related lands since the 1947-1991 decolonizations. Readings include Fanon, Said, Walcott, Ngugi and many others, and extend to gender, literature, the U.S., the post-Soviet sphere, and Europe. The course bridges cultural, representational, and political theory. Prior internationalist and/or theoretical coursework strongly recommended. (4 credits) Cross-listed with English 367.

MUSI 73-01

African Music Ensemble

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 06:45 pm-08:15 pm
  • Room: MUSIC 116
  • Instructor: Sowah Mensah

Notes: *Register in person with the ensemble director. Check the Music Department website to see whether auditions are required*


THDA 21-01

African-Based Movement I

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: 1550SM DANCE
  • Instructor: Patricia Brown

Notes: This course will focus on dance inspired by West Africa and other African regions, the Caribbean, and the Americas. It is rooted in a communal environment and is supported and accompanied by a drummer. Students will learn fundamentals of African based movement including characteristics, technique, and about the relationship between the drums and the dance. They will create in-class dance projects and presentations. Although the focus may be on traditional dance at times, this is not a traditional specific class.

THDA 22-01

African-Based Movement II

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Patricia Brown

Notes: This course focuses on dance inspired by West African and other African regions, the Caribbean, and the Americas. It is rooted in a communal environment and is supported and accompanied by a live musician/drummer. Students continue building on fundamental principles and technique, including more complex polyrhythmic aspects of the movement, while deepening the inter-connected relationship with the drums. They also create in-class dance projects and presentations. Spring semester. (1 credit)