Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

ANTH 101-01

General Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: This course is an introduction to the discipline of anthropology as a whole. It presents students with a theoretical grounding in the four major subfields: archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics. In this class the emphasis is on the holistic nature of the discipline. Students will be challenged with some of the countless links between the systems of biology and culture. They will explore key questions about human diversity in the past, present, and future.

ANTH 112-01

Archaeology and Human Origins

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: Introductory Course

Open to first year students. The origin and development of prehistoric peoples and cultures. The concepts, methods, and theories of prehistoric archaeology, human paleontology, and human biology as a framework for examining the fossils and artifacts left by humans. Course includes films and the use of casts and slides to illustrate concepts. (4 credits)


ANTH 223-01

Introduction to Archaeology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Andrew Overman

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 223-01*

This course introduces students to archaeology, the study of the material remains of human culture. Students will explore the history of the discipline and profession, its basic methods and theories, and the political and ethical dimensions of modern archaeological practice. Students learn to examine and interpret evidence using specific examples, from artifacts to sites to regions. Cross-listed with Classics 223. (4 credits)

ANTH 230-01

Ethnographic Interviewing

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes:

An introduction to ethnographic field interviewing learned in the context of individually run student field projects. Focuses on the anthropologist-informant field relationship and the discovery of cultural knowledge through participant observation and ethnosemantic interviewing techniques. (4 credits)


ANTH 241-01

Anthropology of Death and Dying

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: *Meets in the Chapel basement; permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course examines the dying process and the ways that humans beings come to terms with their mortality in different societies. We will learn how people die in major illnesses and critically analyze controversial issues regarding brain death, suicide, and euthanasia. We will survey funerary traditions from a variety of cultures and compare the social, spiritual, and psychological roles that these rituals play for both the living and the dying. We will examine cultural attitudes towards death; and how the denial and awareness of human mortality can shape social practices and institutions. Finally, we will consider issues regarding the quality of life, the opportunities and challenges of caregiving, and hospice traditions around the world. (4 credits)

ANTH 252-01

Photography: Theories and Practices of an International Medium

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with INTL 252-01 and MCST 252-01*

This course examines histories, theories and practices of photography, a medium that has transformed significantly since the daguerrotypes of the mid 19th century. In 1839, Daguerre’s invention was presented as “a free gift to the world.” This course will look at how that gift has been put to use in photographic cultures around the world in contexts as diverse as portrait studios in Yogyakarta, a history museum in Vietnam, French advertising, Soviet family albums and news imagery circulating worldwide. While we will pay careful attention to visual aesthetics, we will focus on photography as a documentary genre that has long been central to how individuals imagine the world beyond their experience. We will also be considering personal photographic archives such as family albums and scrapbooks and asking when private photographs become public representations. One central feature of the course will be learning about how scholars have thought about and through photography and discussing the complications of applying these theories transhistorically and cross-culturally. (Berger, Barthes, Benjamin, Sontag, Sekula, Strassler, Pinney, Tagg, Azoulay) Topics for discussion include debates around truth in photography and the politics of representation, photography’s relationship to history and changing institutional uses of photography, as well as different photographic cultures and their anthropological and sociological significance. Every year. (4 credits)

ANTH 253-01

Comparative Muslim Cultures

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice Rahaim

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 253-01*

This course is an introduction to the diverse lifeways of Muslims around the world, looking at how understandings and practice of Islam are shaped by social, economic, and political factors. It examines the Qur’an and hadith, and other authoritative texts that ground Islamic jurisprudence, and explores the diverse ways in which Muslims have understood and interpreted these teachings in locations across the world—such as Indonesia, the Middle East, South Asia, Europe and the United States – and at various points in history. The specific focus may vary with each offering, responding to instructor expertise and focus, emerging and volatile situations worldwide, or new advances in the field.

Cross-listed with International Studies 253. (4 credits)

ANTH 256-01

India and its Neighbors: The Anthropology of South Asia

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 256-01*

The following course is open only to students who have taken Anthropology 111 unless otherwise indicated.

Intermediate Courses. Introduces students to anthropological knowledge of the peoples and cultures of South Asia and to the ways in which Western knowledge of that region has been constructed. The course examines the historical and social processes that have shaped the culture and lifeways of the people who live on the subcontinent and that link the modern states of South Asia to the world beyond their frontiers. (4 credits)


ANTH 294-01

Sustainability and the Modern World

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: In the summer of 1989, the economist Julian Simon and the ecologist Garret Hardin faced off in an auditorium at the University of Wisconsin over the fate of the earth. Where Hardin was gloomy about the prospect, predicting that the demands of an increasing population would place natural resources under stress, Simon was unabashedly optimistic, arguing that human ingenuity would find solutions to the problems of human civilization. This course critiques both these sets of ideas, within an analytical framework that draws on anthropology, history and politics. The relationship of human populations to their environment is mediated by their culture, which shapes how, how much, and what we consume. Although human ingenuity can find technical solutions to the problems that face us, technology itself is ordered, managed and utilized by social and political systems. The trajectory of human societies throughout history is to become, politically, economically, and socially, increasingly complex over time, which in turn shapes how technology is developed and deployed to transform nature and help reproduce society. However, we live in a world that is more tightly integrated than ever before, which makes environmental stresses that were once localized in their impact into global problems, even as the complexity of our social and political organization, both locally and globally, militates against easy solutions.

The emergence of agriculture led to the development of centralized political systems and to an exponential increase in the human population, and eventually to an economic system based on perpetual growth requiring in turn a cultural-ideological system to generate a constant expansion of wants. By examining four inter-related factors that have shaped our modern condition—the rise of states, population growth, industrial food systems and the emergence of a ‘culture of consumption’—this course introduces students to a model through which to understand the modern world as an integrated whole based on inter-locking economic, political and socio-cultural systems. Given the tremendous stress placed on the environment by the operation of the global system—which has led in recent years to the development of the notion of the anthropocene, which argues that human beings do not merely impact the environment but are a geological force that changes the way the earth system works — can the world political and economic order endure in its present configuration? How might its transformation be achieved and what might that transformation look like? This course promises no answers, but will raise crucial and complex questions, and introduce students to a way of thinking synthetically and holistically (i.e, anthropologically) about them.

ANTH 333-01

The Language of Diplomacy

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Rogers, Shandy

Notes: *Cross-listed with FREN 333-01; application and permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; not open to ACTC students*

This interdisciplinary course, co-taught by faculty in Anthropology and French and Francophone Studies, will introduce students to the broad range of international institutions where French is one of the primary working languages. Language, as the basis for human cooperation, provides a vehicle for students to explore the connections between language, power, and human rights. To engage students from the outset with the lived experiences of those working in the larger diplomatic world, students will do a life-history interview with a professional to learn more about their career trajectory and the work that they do. We will further bring real-life scenarios into the classroom by watching and analyzing simulcast sessions in French from the International Criminal Court and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Throughout the course we will deepen our understanding of the historical and cultural dynamics within Europe over the past 150 years that gave rise to, maintain, and subvert the role of language in diplomacy. See the website of the Anthropology or French department for information on the both course application process, as well as the optional international Fieldtrip component for this course in Summer 2017. Cross-listed with French 333. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)

ANTH 342-01

Representing the World As It Is: Histories/Theories of Ethnographic Film

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with INTL 342-01 and MCST 342-01*

How can an experience of the world as it is be represented? What are the promises and challenges of transcultural filmmaking? This course will explore what has been called ethnographic, cross-cultural and transcultural cinema from several points of view. We will look at ethnographic film in terms of its geo-political, anthropological and cinematic origins, and then delve into its various forms and contemporary manifestations. We will examine some of the major films of the canon of ethnographic cinema, and look at the developments of several it its most renowned practitioners (Flaherty, Mead, Rouch, Marshall, Gardner, Asch, MacDougall). We will explore the shifting forms and representational strategies of ethnographic film and how these are linked to technological and ideological transformations. We will see how scholars inside and outside of anthropology have defined, criticized or challenged the project of ethnographic film, and how recent film and video makers, including those who traditionally have been the subject of the ethnographic gaze, have created new ways of visualizing experience for themselves and for others. (4 credits)

ANTH 358-01

Anthropology of Violence

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 208
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: Faced with the escalation of political and ethnic violence in the modern world, anthropologists have become increasingly aware of the need to address these realities which have forced a rethinking of the meaning of violence as a social and cultural phenomenon. This course interrogates the slippery concept of violence in the light of theoretical approaches from different disciplines. The course will begin with a discussion of how anthropologists have reexamined the concept of violence within the context of complex and large-scale societies. It will then address the preponderate weight that the concept of the state has played within the social sciences in interpretation of violence, followed by a consideration of how notions of community and cultural difference figure prominently in the ideology of conflict.

(4 credits)

ANTH 381-01

Emerging Infectious Diseases

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course examines the human determinants of infectious diseases from the Paleolithic to the present day using the combined frameworks of evolution, human ecology, critical history, and social epidemiology. We will consider the co-evolution of culture and disease: the ways that human subsistence, ecological disruptions, social inequalities, and demographic changes have created selective conditions for new infections, re-emerging infections, and antibiotic resistance. We will also address the social dynamics of current epidemics, and major controversies over biosecurity and bioterrorism. 4 credits

ANTH 387-01

Darwin and Evolutionary Thought

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: This course examines the influence of Charles Darwin on both the discipline of Anthropology and general scientific thought in the 20th century. It begins with an exploration of the emergence of modern evolutionary theory, its role in society, and how it is essential to the field of Anthropology. We consider some of the work of Darwin's predecessors, who laid the intellectual and scientific foundations that Darwin built upon, as well as those who adapted Darwin's concepts to theories of social change. Students also read and discuss some of the bigest debates surrounding the theory of Evolution by Natural Selection, both past and present. Finally, we look at the future of evolutionary theory in light of recent developments in molecular biology and the fossil record. (4 credits)

ANTH 392-01

Language/Diplomacy Field Trip

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Rogers, Shandy

Notes: *2 credits; co-registration in ANTH/FREN 333 required; cross-listed with FREN 392-01* This course is an optional two-week Study Away field trip to The Netherlands, France and Switzerland, scheduled for May 2017. It is designed to deepen students' understanding and appreciation of material covered in ANTH/FREN 333 (The Language of Diplomacy), and to provide direct exposure to the international institutions featured in immersive French language settings.

ANTH 394-02

Who Owns the Past? Legitimizing the Museum

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Sudharshan Seneviratne

Notes: The course examines the way we look at the past and how it was and is narrated in colonial and post-colonial museums across different geographical and cultural zones. Topics covered include the destruction of histories and memory, looting of cultural property, disenfranchisement of identities and the ethics of repatriation of artifacts. The course will undertake a study of politics of museums and their funding, debating and legitimizing parochial museums. Includes field trips to museums on heritage management and hands-on independent studies of museum planning and designing.

ANTH 394-03

Global Generosity

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice Rahaim

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 394-02* From Italian Mafia dons to famous American philanthropists; from the knitting of “trauma teddies” in Helsinki to gift shopping in London; and from ceremonial exchange rings in Melanesia to the present day global refugee crisis: this course will investigate how generosity is understood and practiced in global perspective. We’ll begin the semester by examining key debates surrounding reciprocity, gifts, and exchange, theories of altruism and generosity, and patron-client relations. We’ll then explore the birth of the “humanitarian spirit,” and the complicated ethics and politics of humanitarian intervention. We will compare diverse religious traditions’ approaches to giving, including Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, and Jainism. And we’ll explore contemporary debates surrounding volunteerism within sectarian and neoliberal political regimes.

ANTH 490-01

Senior Seminar

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Guneratne

Notes: The senior seminar is for anthropology majors who are working on their senior capstone project and is designed to help students develop that project for presentation. The seminar will also include reading of anthropological works, guest speakers and discussion of current controversies in the discipline. (4 credits)


Fall 2017

ANTH 101-01

General Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: This course is an introduction to the discipline of anthropology as a whole. It presents students with a theoretical grounding in the four major subfields: archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics. In this class the emphasis is on the holistic nature of the discipline. Students will be challenged with some of the countless links between the systems of biology and culture. They will explore key questions about human diversity in the past, present, and future.

ANTH 111-01

Cultural Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: Introductory Course

Open to first year students. The cultural perspective on human behavior including case studies, often illustrated by ethnographic films and slides, of non-Western and American cultures. May include some field interviewing. Includes the cross cultural treatment of economic, legal, political, social and religious institutions and a survey of major approaches to the explanation of cultural variety and human social organization. (4 credits)


ANTH 206-01

Endangered/Minority Languages

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Marianne Milligan

Notes: *Cross-listed with LING 206-01*

Language loss is accelerating at alarming rates. In fact, Linguists predict that only five percent of the six thousand languages currently spoken in the world are expected to survive into the 22nd century. In this course, we will examine the historical, political, and socio-economic factors behind the endangerment and/or marginalization of languages in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and North and South America. We will also concentrate on the globalization of English (and other major languages), which plays a primary role in language endangerment and marginalization. Additional topics include: linguistic diversity, language policy, multilingualism (in both nations and individuals), global language conflict, and language revitalization. Students will have the opportunity to learn first-hand about these issues by interviewing speakers of an endangered and/or minority language. Cross-listed with Linguistics 206. (4 credits)

ANTH 230-01

Ethnographic Interviewing

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes:

An introduction to ethnographic field interviewing learned in the context of individually run student field projects. Focuses on the anthropologist-informant field relationship and the discovery of cultural knowledge through participant observation and ethnosemantic interviewing techniques. (4 credits)


ANTH 240-01

Human Osteology and Paleopathology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: *First day attendance required*

The study of the human skeletal system is basic to the disciplines of biological anthropology, forensic science, medicine and even archaeology. This class will examine the fundamentals of osteology. It will also explore numerous pathological conditions associated with both infectious and non-infectious diseases in addition to those caused by traumatic events. Students will learn to identify and analyze human bone and pathological conditions of the skeleton to aid in the reconstruction of life histories from human remains. (4 credits)

ANTH 243-01

Psychological Anthropology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: *Cross-listed with PSYC 243-01*

This course explores the relationship between self, culture and society. We will examine and discuss critically the broad array of methods and theories anthropologists use to analyze personality, socialization, mental illnes and cognition in different societies. Our aim is to address questions related to the cultural patterning of personality, the self and emotions and to understand how culture might shape ideas of what a person is. We will also seek to understand how cultures define behavior as abnormal, pathological or insane, and how they make sense of trauma and suffering. Cross-listed as Psychology 243. (4 credits)

ANTH 246-01

Refugees/Humanitarian Response

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: *First Year Course only; first day attendance required* This writing-intensive seminar uses anthropology to situate the experiences of refugees and other forced migrants within a global framework of conflict and humanitarian response. Through analysis of select case studies, we will probe the complex interplay of social, historical, political, and economic factors that are invoked to explain modern refugee-producing conflicts. We will consider how refugees act and are acted upon in these settings and in their aftermath. We will examine critically the ways refugees are defined and described qualitatively and quantitatively, as such discourse determines access to certain entitlements and influences humanitarian and governmental responses. We will consider how refugees are defined in terms of time and space, yet simultaneously redefine time and space as transnational actors. Once we have a better understanding of the nature of the collective experience of war and its effects on refugees and others, we will consider issues of power, ethics, and human rights embedded in humanitarian responses to conflict by examining the roles of those who engage in humanitarian work in U.S. and international settings. Our scope of inquiry includes humanitarian workers broadly conceived, including journalists, human services providers, government workers, researchers, faith-based organizations, and others. In addition to probing the ways that outsiders react to refugee concerns, we will also examine indigenous institutional coping mechanisms—such as family and religion—that facilitate social reconstruction in times of transition. The format of the course will be in-depth discussion, lectures, guest speakers, films, and a field research project that will involve cultural life history interviews with an individual engaged in humanitarian work. This course fulfills the Internationalism and Writing (Argumentative) general education requirements. It also counts a Foundational course for the Human Rights and Humanitarianism Concentration, as a Tier II course for the African Studies Concentration, and as an elective for the minor or major in Anthropology. The course may count as an elective for other Interdisciplinary departments.


ANTH 246-02

Refugees/Humanitarian Response

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: This course provides an overview of issues related to refugees and humanitarian response in U.S. and international settings. Students explore the meaning of "humanitarian" and inherent issues of power, ethics, and human rights in responses to conflict by examining the roles of those who engage in humanitarian work. Offered occasionally. (4 credits)


ANTH 253-01

Comparative Muslim Cultures

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 404
  • Instructor: Jenna Rice Rahaim

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 253-01 and RELI 294-02*

This course is an introduction to the diverse lifeways of Muslims around the world, looking at how understandings and practice of Islam are shaped by social, economic, and political factors. It examines the Qur’an and hadith, and other authoritative texts that ground Islamic jurisprudence, and explores the diverse ways in which Muslims have understood and interpreted these teachings in locations across the world—such as Indonesia, the Middle East, South Asia, Europe and the United States – and at various points in history. The specific focus may vary with each offering, responding to instructor expertise and focus, emerging and volatile situations worldwide, or new advances in the field.

Cross-listed with International Studies 253. (4 credits)

ANTH 363-01

Anthropology of Development

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: The goal of this course is to develop an anthropological understanding and critique of development. It aims to examine both the discourse of development and its practice. The course focuses on the construction of the Third World as an "underdeveloped" area, and discusses the dominant theoretical paradigms of development and modernization. It assesses the reasons for the general failure of development programs based on these models to bring about meaningful and substantive change in societies in Asia, Africa and Latin America, and discusses possible alternatives to "development" as it is currently practiced. (4 credits)


ANTH 394-01

Children and Youth in Africa

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Hilary Chart

Notes: With approximately 60% of the population (and over 600 million people) under the age of 25, Africa is undoubtedly the world’s youngest continent. Much has been made of this “youth bulge,” which is alternately referred to as a ticking time bomb of political and economic instability, or a unique advantage for those wishing to tap new markets or accelerate development. Rather than just explaining or evaluating the merits of Africa’s young population, however, this course challenges students to learn from the lived experiences of Africa’s young people, who are important and creative social actors (at home, in school, on the job, and in popular culture, art, and politics!). They are also, however, compelling objects of intensive intervention (especially those efforts aimed at girl children, orphans, and victims of famine and war), and we will consider some of the many ways efforts to “save” African young people variably empower, limit, or otherwise complicate their lives. We will approach children and youth not as fixed categories, but as open questions—fluid designations that differ over time and place, identities that are flexible and strategically claimed. Drawing on ethnographic sources, memoirs, fictional accounts, film, and popular representations, this course is also designed to help students think critically about the dynamic and problematic connections through which Africa’s young people are shaping and being shaped by the rest of the world. Children and Youth in Africa also counts as a Tier 1 African Studies course.

ANTH 487-01

Theory in Anthropology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: This course introduces students to the broad range of explanations for social and cultural phenomena used by anthropologists since the emergence of the discipline in the 19th century. The course focuses on the development of three broad theoretical approaches: The American school of cultural anthropology, British social anthropology, and the French school that emerged from the work of Durkheim and his followers. The course also examines theoretical approaches such as cultural materialism, and symbolic and interpretive approaches to the study of culture. (4 credits)

Spring 2018

ANTH 111-01

Cultural Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: Introductory Course

Open to first year students. The cultural perspective on human behavior including case studies, often illustrated by ethnographic films and slides, of non-Western and American cultures. May include some field interviewing. Includes the cross cultural treatment of economic, legal, political, social and religious institutions and a survey of major approaches to the explanation of cultural variety and human social organization. (4 credits)


ANTH 111-02

Cultural Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Olga Gonzalez

Notes: Introductory Course

Open to first year students. The cultural perspective on human behavior including case studies, often illustrated by ethnographic films and slides, of non-Western and American cultures. May include some field interviewing. Includes the cross cultural treatment of economic, legal, political, social and religious institutions and a survey of major approaches to the explanation of cultural variety and human social organization. (4 credits)


ANTH 115-01

Biological Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: This class is a broad survey covering topics such as genetics, evolutionary mechanisms, adaptation, primate studies, the human fossil record, and human variation. All of these areas will be placed within the framework of the interaction of humans within their environment. The course is divided into three sections: human genetics, human ecology and primatology, human evolution and adaptation. (4 credits)

ANTH 223-01

Introduction to Archaeology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 223-01*

This course introduces students to archaeology, the study of the material remains of human culture. Students will explore the history of the discipline and profession, its basic methods and theories, and the political and ethical dimensions of modern archaeological practice. Students learn to examine and interpret evidence using specific examples, from artifacts to sites to regions. Cross-listed with Classics 223. (4 credits)

ANTH 239-01

Medical Anthropology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course examines issues of health, illness, and healing from a variety of anthropological perspectives. From a cross-cultural perspective, we will examine the diversity of beliefs about human health and sickness, and a variety of healing practices by which people treat them. From the perspective of critical epidemiology, we will wrestle with recurrent problems of socioeconomic inequalities, ecological disruptions, and their impact upon the differential distribution, prevention, and treatment of human diseases. (4 credits)

ANTH 241-01

Anthropology of Death and Dying

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course examines the dying process and the ways that humans beings come to terms with their mortality in different societies. We will learn how people die in major illnesses and critically analyze controversial issues regarding brain death, suicide, and euthanasia. We will survey funerary traditions from a variety of cultures and compare the social, spiritual, and psychological roles that these rituals play for both the living and the dying. We will examine cultural attitudes towards death; and how the denial and awareness of human mortality can shape social practices and institutions. Finally, we will consider issues regarding the quality of life, the opportunities and challenges of caregiving, and hospice traditions around the world. (4 credits)

ANTH 252-01

Photography: Theories and Practices of an International Medium

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Zeynep Gursel

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 252-01 and MCST 252-01*

This course examines histories, theories and practices of photography, a medium that has transformed significantly since the daguerrotypes of the mid 19th century. In 1839, Daguerre’s invention was presented as “a free gift to the world.” This course will look at how that gift has been put to use in photographic cultures around the world in contexts as diverse as portrait studios in Yogyakarta, a history museum in Vietnam, French advertising, Soviet family albums and news imagery circulating worldwide. While we will pay careful attention to visual aesthetics, we will focus on photography as a documentary genre that has long been central to how individuals imagine the world beyond their experience. We will also be considering personal photographic archives such as family albums and scrapbooks and asking when private photographs become public representations. One central feature of the course will be learning about how scholars have thought about and through photography and discussing the complications of applying these theories transhistorically and cross-culturally. (Berger, Barthes, Benjamin, Sontag, Sekula, Strassler, Pinney, Tagg, Azoulay) Topics for discussion include debates around truth in photography and the politics of representation, photography’s relationship to history and changing institutional uses of photography, as well as different photographic cultures and their anthropological and sociological significance. Every year. (4 credits)

ANTH 270-01

Cultural Resource Management

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 270-01*

Archaeology in the United States is no longer practiced exclusively by universities and museums. In fact, since the 1970s, the vast majority of archaeological projects undertaken involve individuals employed in either private industry or with the federal or state government. This shift toward cultural resource management (CRM) archaeology transformed the traditional role of archaeology practiced during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. So, what changed? This course explores the role of public archaeology in the United States through an examination of the laws and practices dictating the protection of historic properties, consultation with descendant communities, and the design of archaeological management plans. Cross-listed with Classics 270. 4 credits

ANTH 294-01

Urbanizing Africa

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Hilary Chart

Notes:

ANTH 294-02

World Healing Traditions

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ron Barrett

Notes: *First day attendance required*


ANTH 368-01

Life Histories/Cultures/Selves

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Dianna Shandy

Notes: This seminar focuses on the relationship between individuals and their culture. Students will record, edit, and analyze personal documents such as diaries, letters, interview transcriptions, and autobiographies. Analysis of life events such as childhood play activities, family meals, kinship relations, and modes of communication, will lead to the identification of cultural themes. (4 credits)


ANTH 394-01

Food and Culture

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes:

ANTH 394-02

Hope: Possible Futures in Impossible Times

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Gonzalez, Gursel

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 394-01; first day attendance required*


ANTH 490-01

Senior Seminar

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: The senior seminar is for anthropology majors who are working on their senior capstone project and is designed to help students develop that project for presentation. The seminar will also include reading of anthropological works, guest speakers and discussion of current controversies in the discipline. (4 credits)