Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

ASIA 171-01

Art of the East II: Japan

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *Cross-listed with ART 171-01*

This course examines the art, architecture, and visual culture of Japan, spanning a broad temporal frame from the ancient Neolithic era to our own contemporary moment. We will discuss a diverse array of art and objects from ancient Jomon pottery, Shinto shrines, and print media to Buddhist sculpture, painting practices during World War II, anime (cartoons) and manga (comics). In addition to learning methods of formal visual analysis, students will gain insight into how these artworks, spaces, and objects articulated complex artistic, social, economic, political, and religious trends. Through this course, students will develop skills to reflect critically on the production of narratives of Japanese culture, interrogating concepts such as tradition, hybridity, authenticity, commodity, sexuality, nationalism, and militarism. Cross-listed as Art 171. (4 credits)

ASIA 256-01

India and its Neighbors: The Anthropology of South Asia

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 256-01*

Introduces students to anthropological knowledge of the peoples and cultures of South Asia and to the ways in which Western knowledge of that region has been constructed. The course examines the historical and social processes that have shaped the culture and lifeways of the people who live on the subcontinent and that link the modern states of South Asia to the world beyond their frontiers. (4 credits)


ASIA 275-01

The Rise of Modern China

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 275-01*

A study of leading institutions and movements of nineteenth- and twentieth-century China. Major emphases include the impact of Western imperialism, the transformation of peasant society through revolution, the rise of Mao Tse-Tung, and the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. Special attention will be given to U.S.-China relations. (4 credits)


ASIA 294-02

Rethinking Sexualities through Japan: Love/Desire from the PreModern to the Present

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Grace Ting

Notes: *Mandatory film screenings on Wednesday (7-9 pm, ~1-2 hours) for about 1/2 of the weeks of the semester; cross-listed with JAPA 294-01 and WGSS 294-05* What does the desire for “Japan” have to do with the canonization/reading of works about so-called romantic love? How do the power dynamics of early modern Japanese homoeroticism challenge our ideas of male homosexuality? Why have Japanese writers and other cultural producers so brilliantly envisioned certain relationships and forms of intimacy over time? Taught in English for students with no background in Japanese culture, this course is an overview of stories of unrequited affection, passion, erotic desire, jealousy, and other tropes of “love and desire.” As a main premise of the intersectional conception of the course, we will examine how Japanese poetry, fiction, theater, and film about “love” intersect with longings for tradition, the nation, and/or hierarchies of race and class. General questions addressed during the course include the following: How is desire constructed in different narrative forms and historical/cultural contexts? What language do we use to describe sexualities and gender roles from a different time and place? How can we challenge U.S.-based, contemporary concepts of gender roles and sexual identities? What do we possibly take for granted with our assumptions concerning the most intimate ways in which we relate to others? What hierarchies of intimacies do we create? This class is relevant for students interested in Japanese culture and history. Students with a general interest in gender and sexuality are very welcome. Please note that there will occasionally be graphic imagery involving sex and violence appearing in texts. The structure of the class usually works as follows: A short introductory lecture, then an hour of discussion. There will be a mandatory film screening on Wednesday evenings (7-9 pm, about 1-2 hours) for about ½ of the weeks. Contact instructor for syllabus.

ASIA 378-01

War Crimes and Memory in East Asia

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 378-01*

This course's main goal is to introduce evidence of the major crimes and atrocities during World War II in East Asia such as the Nanjing Massacre, biochemical warfare (Unit 731), the military sexual slavery ("comfort women") system, the forced labor system, and inhumane treatment of POWs. The course will also help students understand the contemporary geo-political and socio-economic forces that affect how East Asians and Westerners collectively remember and reconstruct World War II. (4 credits) Cross-listed with History 378

ASIA 394-01

Asian Cities

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 394-01; first day attendance required* Since the last century, Asia has experienced rapid urbanization. It is now home to over half of the world’s most populated cities. By 2010, the urban population in the Asia-Pacific region has surpassed the population of the United States and the European Union combined. In this course, we will focus on cities in East, Southeast and South Asia. We will first contextualize the rapid urbanization in the region’s changing political economy, and identify urban issues that are unique to this region. We will further explore different theoretical approaches to understand Asian cities; several of them challenge mainstream urban theories rooted in the experiences of West European and North American cities. Upon the completion of this course, students will acquire substantive knowledge on contemporary trends of urban development in Asia, and develop familiarity with related ongoing theoretical debates. (This course also counts towards Urban Studies concentration.)

Fall 2017

ASIA 140-01

Introduction to East Asian Civilization

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 140-01*

This course introduces the cultures and societies of China, Japan and Korea from the earliest times to the present day. Primarily an introductory course for beginners in East Asian civilization, this course considers a variety of significant themes in religious, political, economic, social and cultural developments in the region. (4 credits)

ASIA 170-01

Art of the East I: China

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *Cross-listed with ART 170-01*

This course introduces the art and visual culture of China from the Neolithic era to the twenty-first century. Through this survey, students will engage with a broad array of media, from jade carvings, Buddhist cave painting, calligraphy and monumental landscape paintings to ceramics, modern graphic media, and contemporary installations. Lectures and readings will teach methods of formal visual analysis as well as the historical context of each work. While examining the specific cultural, social, economic, and political functions of Chinese art and objects, we will think critically about different ways in which scholars write the artistic history of China. Fall semester. (4 credits) Course cross-listed with Art 170.

ASIA 236-01

Sanskrit and Religion in India

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 227
  • Instructor: James Laine

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 202-01, LING 236-01 and, RELI 236-01*

Like Latin and Greek in Europe, Sanskrit is a highly inflected language of scholarship and revered as the perfect medium for discourse on everything from science and sex to philosophy and religion. It flourished in its classical form after the age of the Buddha (5th century BC) and served as a scholarly lingua franca in India until the Islamic period. This course serves as an introduction to the grammar an script of Sanskrit, and we will advance to a point of reading simplified texts from the classical epic Ramayana.Students will be expected to attend class regularly and spend at least ten hours a week outside class studying the grammar and vocabulary. Without this sort of effort, no progress is possible in such a complex language. In addition to the rigorous study of the language, we will consider both the role of the language in classical Indian culture and religion, and some texts from the Ramayana, looking at both English translation and Sanskrit originals. Cross-listed with Classics 202, Linguistics 236 and Religious Studies 236. (4 credits)


ASIA 254-01

Japanese Film and Animation: From the Salaryman to the Shojo

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: Arthur Mitchell

Notes: *Cross-listed with JAPA 254-01;weekly film screenings TBD*

This course surveys the history of Japanese film from the "golden age" of Japanese cinema to the contemporary transnational genre of anime. While introducing methodologies of film analysis and interpretation, it develops knowledge of how major works of Japanese film and animation have expresed and critiqued issues of modern Japanese society. In doing this, we trace the development of two related archetypes: the middle-class salaryman and the adolescent girl (shojo). These figures - as well as their incarnations as cyberpunks and mecha-warriors, sex workers and teen rebels - help us explore Japanese film's engagement with the strictures of middle-class society, the constrained status of women, fantasy and escapism, sexuality and desire. Weekly screenings and discussion will be supplemented by readings in film theory and cultural criticism. Directors include Ozu Yasujiro, Akira Kurosawa, Oshima Nagisa, Miyazaki Hayao, Anno Hideaki, and Hosoda Mamoru. No prior knowledge of Japanese required. Cross-listed as Japanese 254. (4 credits)

ASIA 255-01

China on Screen

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Xin Yang

Notes: *Cross-listed with CHIN 255-01; film screenings Monday evening 7-9pm, Neill 226* From Kongfu Panda to the Great Wall, “China” is imagined in a variety of (problematic) ways in transnational cinema. What contribute to the global imagination of China? This course is an overview of China on the silver screen. It examines how Chinese films represent the development and transformation of Chinese identity. Topics under discussion include: how masculine and feminine virtues became emblems of a nation striving for modernity; how films were politically appropriated for socialist construction; how the revolutionary past has been cinematically framed, remembered and critiqued in the post-Mao era; and how China’s deep tradition was consciously or unconsciously re-created and revised as a spectacle to engage the curious gaze of the global market.The course starts from the silent film period and extends to the fifth generation directors, underground filmmaking, and the revival of martial arts genre in the greater China area. Feature films from mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong will be screened and discussed. Secondary articles and books are also assigned in conjunction with the films. The course is organized thematically and moves chronologically. No prior knowledge of China or Chinese is required.

ASIA 294-01

Embodiment and Subjectivity in Later Chinese Art

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *Cross-listed with ART 294-01* The development of art and identities in China over the last 400 years has been, literally, revolutionary. This class explores the inherent relationship between material practices and shifting subjectivities, that is the resonance between the physical external world and internal, thinking subject. During this time, ranging from the Manchu rule of the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) to the 21st century, we see the dynamic development of modern subjectivities, evolving cultural connoisseurship, ethnic tensions, new definitions of citizenry, and counter-movements led by cynical agitators. Art and design played a critical role in these developments, functioning as a symbolic language through which identities and communities could form. This class draws on themes such as gender, sexuality, militarism, ethnicity, and commodity culture as well as theories of embodiment by scholars such as Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Paul Crowther to delve into the rich resonance between representation and identity formation. Students will not only learn to look closely at and write critically about a variety of media including paintings, calligraphy, prints, films, posters, performance art, and installations, but will also relate this historical cultural production to contemporaneous artistic, social, and political discourses. In the process, we will complicate notions of “Chinese” art and “Chinese” identity in Asia and on the global stage.

ASIA 378-01

War Crimes and Memory in East Asia

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 378-01*

This course's main goal is to introduce evidence of the major crimes and atrocities during World War II in East Asia such as the Nanjing Massacre, biochemical warfare (Unit 731), the military sexual slavery ("comfort women") system, the forced labor system, and inhumane treatment of POWs. The course will also help students understand the contemporary geo-political and socio-economic forces that affect how East Asians and Westerners collectively remember and reconstruct World War II. (4 credits) Cross-listed with History 378

Spring 2018

ASIA 111-01

Introduction to Asian Studies

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Rivi Handler-Spitz

Notes: This course explores the history of the idea of Asia and how that concept and region have been explicated both in the West and in China, Japan, and India. We examine Buddhism, Confucianism, and Hinduism, religious and philosophical traditions that have been seen as unifying Asia, and consider how those traditions have been used to address contemporary problems like human rights, economic development, and security. The course traces historical relationships among Asian nations and regions involving cultural borrowing, trade, conquest, and colonialism have shaped contemporary Asia, and considers how under globalization, boundaries separating people, cultural artifacts, and capital have become porous, giving new meaning to the notion "Asia." (4 credits)

ASIA 171-01

Art of the East II: Japan

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: Kari Shepherdson-Scott

Notes: *Cross-listed with ART 171-01*

This course examines the art, architecture, and visual culture of Japan, spanning a broad temporal frame from the ancient Neolithic era to our own contemporary moment. We will discuss a diverse array of art and objects from ancient Jomon pottery, Shinto shrines, and print media to Buddhist sculpture, painting practices during World War II, anime (cartoons) and manga (comics). In addition to learning methods of formal visual analysis, students will gain insight into how these artworks, spaces, and objects articulated complex artistic, social, economic, political, and religious trends. Through this course, students will develop skills to reflect critically on the production of narratives of Japanese culture, interrogating concepts such as tradition, hybridity, authenticity, commodity, sexuality, nationalism, and militarism. Cross-listed as Art 171. (4 credits)

ASIA 258-01

Gender and Sexuality in China

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Xin Yang

Notes: *Cross-listed with CHIN 258-01 and WGSS 258-01*

How are masculinity and femininity defined and transformed in modern and contemporary Chinese culture? How is the culturally constructed gender related to a larger social context? Through a rigorous analysis of the content and structure of modern and contemporary novels and films, this course examines the literary representation of gender and sexuality and its reltaion to the tumultuous social transformations, and engages with a variety of themes including: May Fourth enlightenment, anti-Japanese war, Socialist constructino, the Cultural Revolution, and the liberalization of the post-Mao era. This course seeks to help students develop critical views of Chinese society and culture from gendered perspective, and gain familiarity with major authors, genres, and literary movements. This course assumes no prior knowledge of China or Chinese, and all reading materials are in English. Cross-listed with Chinese 258 and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 258. (4 credits)

ASIA 260-01

Narratives of Alienation: 20th Century Japanese Fiction and Film

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Arthur Mitchell

Notes: *Cross-listed with JAPA 260-01*

The sense of being out of place in one's society or one's nation, estranged from one's self or the world - this is the feeling that has motivated many of the narratives of modern Japanese fiction. Through stories of precocious adolescents, outcast minorities, vagabond women, disillusioned soldiers, and rebellious youth, this course examines the social implications of narrative fiction (including film, anime, and manga) within the context of modern Japanese history. While introducing methods of literary analysis and developing a familiarity with major works of Japanese fiction, the course aims to cultivate an understanding of how stories can be used to engage and think about the quandaries of modern society. We will explore the way these narratives express marginal experiences, rethink the foundations of human and societal bonds, and articulate new ways of being in the world. Works covered include stories by Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Kawabata Yasunari, Oe Kenzaburo, Mishima Yukio, and Murakami Haruki, as well as films by Akira Kurosawa, Koreeda Hirokazu, and Otomo Katsuhiro. No knowledge of Japanese required. Cross-listed with Japanese 260. (4 credits)

ASIA 274-01

The Great Tradition in China before 1840

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 274-01*

A study of the traditional culture and society of China from earliest times to the eighteenth century, when the impact of the West was strongly felt. The course will be based on detailed study of selected significant themes in Chinese history. Lecture/discussion format. (4 credits)


ASIA 275-01

The Rise of Modern China

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 275-01*

A study of leading institutions and movements of nineteenth- and twentieth-century China. Major emphases include the impact of Western imperialism, the transformation of peasant society through revolution, the rise of Mao Tse-Tung, and the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. Special attention will be given to U.S.-China relations. (4 credits)


ASIA 277-01

The Rise of Modern Japan

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 277-01*

Japan's rapid industrialization in the latter part of the nineteenth century, and its phenomenal rise as the number two economic power in the world after the devastation wrought by World War II, have led many scholars to declare Japan a model worthy of emulation by all "developing" nations. After an examination of feudal Japan, this course probes the nature and course of Japan's "amazing transformation" and analyzes the consequences of its strengths as a nation-state. Considerable study of Japanese art, literature, and religion will be undertaken and American attitudes toward the Japanese and their history will also be examined. (4 credits)


ASIA 315-01

U.S. Imperialism from the Philippines to Viet Nam

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 315-01 and HIST 315-01; no first year students allowed*

In this discussion-based seminar, we will examine U.S. Global presence through the lenses of empire, diaspora, and transnationalism. We will look specifically at

U.S. involvement in the Philippines and Viet Nam from 1898 to 1975 as moments of military occupation and cultural domination, as well as turning points for U.S. nation-building. What is "imperialism" and how is it different from "hegemony"? How did U.S. imperial adventures in Asia help to recreate a Western geographic imaginary of the "East"? How did they reshape or reconfigure "American" positions and identities? Under what circumstances were former imperial subjects allowed to generate racialized communities? To what extent are memories of U.S. conflicts in Asia cultivated, proliferated, twisted, or suppressed? What lessons can be garnered for the contemporary historical moment? Other topics for exploration include: internment, transracial adoption, commemorations of war, and anti-imperialist/anti-war movements. Cross-listed with American Studies 315 and History 315. (4 credits)

ASIA 320-01

Asian Cities

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 320-01; first day attendance required*

Since the last century, Asia has experienced rapid urbanization. It is now home to over half of the world’s most populated cities. By 2010, the urban population in the Asia-Pacific region has surpassed the population of the United States and the European Union combined. In this course, we will focus on cities in East, Southeast and South Asia. We will first contextualize the rapid urbanization in the region’s changing political economy, and identify urban issues that are unique to this region. We will further explore different theoretical approaches to understand Asian cities; several of them challenge mainstream urban theories rooted in the experiences of West European and North American cities. Upon the completion of this course, students will acquire substantive knowledge on contemporary trends of urban development in Asia, and develop familiarity with related ongoing theoretical debates. In addition, students will conduct individual research projects to develop deeper and more concrete understanding of the contemporary urbanization processes in Asia.