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Spring 2017

CLAS 129-01

Greek Myths

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: This course studies some of the world's great storytellers┬┐the ancient Greeks. First, we read from translations of Greek poetry to become familiar with the key figures and events in mythology, including the Olympian gods and their origins, the major heroes, and the Trojan War. Then we explore more broadly the adaptable nature of these myths and the variety of forms in which the Greeks told stories, from epic and personal poetry to philosophy, drama, sculpture and vase painting. At the same time, we investigate the ways in which moderns have interpreted these stories. We analyze myths using Freud's psychoanalytical techniques, as folklore and ritual, and through theoretical perspectives including structuralism, new historicism and feminism. Finally, we investigate the later life of Greek myths, focusing on how and why these stories have been retold by the Romans, later European authors and artists, American film makers and playwrights, and science fiction writers. (4 credits)


CLAS 192-01

A History of Migration in the Middle East: From Beginnings of Islam to the Syrian Crisis

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Andrew Overman

Notes: *2 credits; counts for humanities general distribution* This course covers the movements of people in the early centuries of Islam. The rise of certain urban centers and towns and the demise of others is a feature of the transition from teh Byzantine period to the emergence of the Islamic empire. This was particularly true in the region of modern Syria, Palestine and iraq. Refugees, new settlements, and population shifts were a feature of this important period. This very region in our own age is also characterized by some of the same demographic shifts, the rise and fall of cities, and the emergence of a new refugee population. In this small seminar we will focus on these phenomena in the 16th-10th centuries. And we will focus on the current demographic and refugee crisis in Syria and Iraq. Students will work on responses to this crisis and how to engage our broader communities.

CLAS 194-01

Rhyming Worlds: Hebrew and Arabic Poetry through the Middle Ages

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: El Meligi, Goldman

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENGL 194-01* This course, taught in translation, examines the rich tradition of religious and secular poetry from the earliest examples of the Hebrew and Arabic languages through to the sophisticated literary expression of the medieval Andalusian era. Using a variety of literary theory and critical approaches we will read both standard biblical and Islamic poetry as well as lesser known erotic, pre-Islamic, and women poets. We will investigate the close linguistic and aesthetic relationship between Arabic and Hebrew literature, learn about the historical and socio-cultural contexts and literary environment of these Hebrew and Arabic poets, and become acquainted with other forms of art and modern literature related to and inspired by this poetry. Knowledge of Hebrew or Arabic not required, but certainly welcome. This course has been approved as a context course for all Classics major and minor tracks.

CLAS 212-01

Elementary Latin II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: This two-term sequence introduces the grammar and vocabulary of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Students learn through reading adapted passages, by breaking down grammatical structures into recognizable patterns, and through tutorials and drills. We aim to cover all basic grammar by the end of the year. In the second semester, students begin to read easy Latin such as the Bible, Pliny, Cornelius Nepos and/or Caesar. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 212-L1

Elementary Latin II Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: This two-term sequence introduces the grammar and vocabulary of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Students learn through reading adapted passages, by breaking down grammatical structures into recognizable patterns, and through tutorials and drills. We aim to cover all basic grammar by the end of the year. In the second semester, students begin to read easy Latin such as the Bible, Pliny, Cornelius Nepos and/or Caesar. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 214-01

Elementary Arabic II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 214-L1

Elementary Arabic II Lab

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 410
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 214-L2

Elementary Arabic II Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 410
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 218-01

Elementary Hebrew II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: An introduction to the language and literature of classical Hebrew. The study of grammar and vocabulary is supplemented with practice in oral recitation and aural comprehension. Basic biblical texts are analyzed and translated, including selections from the books of Genesis and Ruth. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 218-L1

Elementary Hebrew II Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 410
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: An introduction to the language and literature of classical Hebrew. The study of grammar and vocabulary is supplemented with practice in oral recitation and aural comprehension. Basic biblical texts are analyzed and translated, including selections from the books of Genesis and Ruth. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 218-L2

Elementary Hebrew II Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 410
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: An introduction to the language and literature of classical Hebrew. The study of grammar and vocabulary is supplemented with practice in oral recitation and aural comprehension. Basic biblical texts are analyzed and translated, including selections from the books of Genesis and Ruth. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 223-01

Introduction to Archaeology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Andrew Overman

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 223-01*

This course introduces students to archaeology, the study of the material remains of human culture. Students will explore the history of the discipline and profession, its basic methods and theories, and the political and ethical dimensions of modern archaeological practice. Students learn to examine and interpret evidence using specific examples, from artifacts to sites to regions. Cross-listed with Anthropology 223. (4 credits)

CLAS 294-01

Ancient Healing and Medicine

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Andrew Overman

Notes: This is a course studying and recovering ancient methods, traditional techniques, and the early scientific study of medicine. The ancient and classical world was full of healings and healers. These philosopher-physicians learned from studying ancient traditions, observing nature and the elements, and experimenting with natural forms of healing. Traditions about these early physicians were saved and copied century after century, and have been handed down to us. The wisdom of these ancient scientists and healers has been rediscovered and now plays a vital role as natural and traditional medicine is being integrated into modern medicine and treatments.

CLAS 332-01

Intermediate Latin: Poetry

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Mark Gustafson

Notes: A course in the poetic literature of the Republican and/or Augustan Ages with concentrated study on one or two authors. Students work toward grammatical and lexical mastery while learning about the forms, styles and cultural aspects of Latin poetry. Authors to be studied may include Plautus, Catullus, Horace, Vergil, or Ovid. May be repeated for credit. (4 credits)

CLAS 342-01

Intermediate Arabic II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course introduces students to more authentic texts and samples a variety of authors and genres from around the Arab world. (4 credits)

CLAS 342-L1

Intermediate Arabic II Lab

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 410
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course introduces students to more authentic texts and samples a variety of authors and genres from around the Arab world. (4 credits)

CLAS 342-L2

Intermediate Arabic II Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 04:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 410
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course introduces students to more authentic texts and samples a variety of authors and genres from around the Arab world. (4 credits)

CLAS 362-01

Intermediate Greek: Poetry

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: This fourth course in the ancient Greek language sequence involves extensive reading in works of ancient poetry. Students will work toward mastery of grammar and vocabulary while exploring the formal, artistic and cultural dimensions of poetic composition. Most often readings will be from the Homeric epics (Iliad or Odyssey), but other works may be taught, including tragedy, comedy or lyric. (4 credits)

Fall 2017

CLAS 111-01

Elementary Latin I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 003
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: This two-term sequence introduces the grammar and vocabulary of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Students learn through reading adapted passages, by breaking down grammatical structures into recognizable patterns, and through tutorials and drills. We aim to cover all basic grammar by the end of the year. In the second semester, students begin to read easy Latin such as the Bible, Pliny, Cornelius Nepos and/or Caesar. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 111-L1

Elementary Latin I Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 212
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: This two-term sequence introduces the grammar and vocabulary of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Students learn through reading adapted passages, by breaking down grammatical structures into recognizable patterns, and through tutorials and drills. We aim to cover all basic grammar by the end of the year. In the second semester, students begin to read easy Latin such as the Bible, Pliny, Cornelius Nepos and/or Caesar. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 113-01

Elementary Arabic I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: *First day attendance required*

In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 113-L1

Elementary Arabic I Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 113-L2

Elementary Arabic I Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 115-01

Elementary Greek I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: This two-semester program introduces students to ancient Greek, the language of Greece, Asia Minor, and the Hellenistic world, including several Jewish and early Christian writers. Students will learn the grammar and vocabulary necessary for reading Greek literature and documents of many periods. During the second term, students begin to read extended prose, such as passages from Plato, Xenophon, the New Testament or documentary sources. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs.

CLAS 115-L1

Elementary Greek I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 410
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: This two-semester program introduces students to ancient Greek, the language of Greece, Asia Minor, and the Hellenistic world, including several Jewish and early Christian writers. Students will learn the grammar and vocabulary necessary for reading Greek literature and documents of many periods. During the second term, students begin to read extended prose, such as passages from Plato, Xenophon, the New Testament or documentary sources. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs.

CLAS 115-L2

Elementary Greek I Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 003
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: This two-semester program introduces students to ancient Greek, the language of Greece, Asia Minor, and the Hellenistic world, including several Jewish and early Christian writers. Students will learn the grammar and vocabulary necessary for reading Greek literature and documents of many periods. During the second term, students begin to read extended prose, such as passages from Plato, Xenophon, the New Testament or documentary sources. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs.

CLAS 122-01

The Roman World

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 122-01*

This course introduces students to the Roman world, which at its height stretched from Britain to Iran, from Germany to Africa, and lasted well over a thousand years. Students will develop critical thinking skills while working with Roman literature in translation, art, architecture and other archaeological remains. The structure of the course is chronological, but we will examine major themes across time and space, which may include the development of Roman literature out of and in response to Greek culture; the effects of the civil wars and the resulting political change from a republic to a monarchy; the cultural, religious and/or military aspects of the Roman empire and its immediate aftermath; Roman conceptions of gender, sexuality, slave and free status, citizenship and/or ethnicity, and how these social categories were used to legitimize or exercise power. (4 credits) Cross-listed with History 122.

CLAS 194-02

Frenemies: Caliphate and Byzantine Empire in Late Antiquity

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: El Meligi, Overman

Notes: This course examines the interaction, commerce, and conflict between the Islamic Caliphate and Christian Byzantium from the origins of Islam in the seventh century to 1453 and the collapse of the Byzantine Empire. These two empires were bound together by shared space, common interests, and episodic distrust. They were Frenemies. The sources for this study are Byzantine and Islamic histories from the period, together with critical analysis of those sources. In addition and importantly the literature and art these two empires produced provide vital and illuminating sight into these bodies, including their view of one another. Counts for the Middle Eastern and Islamic Civilization concentration and as a context course for the Classics major or minor.

CLAS 202-01

Sanskrit and Religion in India

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 227
  • Instructor: James Laine

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 236-01, LING 236-01 and, RELI 236-01*

Like Latin and Greek in Europe, Sanskrit is a highly inflected language of scholarship and revered as the perfect medium for discourse on everything from science and sex to philosophy and religion. It flourished in its classical form after the age of the Buddha (5th century BC) and served as a scholarly lingua franca in India until the Islamic period. This course serves as an introduction to the grammar an script of Sanskrit, and we will advance to a point of reading simplified texts from the classical epic Ramayana.Students will be expected to attend class regularly and spend at least ten hours a week outside class studying the grammar and vocabulary. Without this sort of effort, no progress is possible in such a complex language. In addition to the rigorous study of the language, we will consider both the role of the language in classical Indian culture and religion, and some texts from the Ramayana, looking at both English translation and Sanskrit originals. Cross-listed with Asian Studies 236, Linguistics 236 and Religious Studies 236. (4 credits)

CLAS 231-01

Intermediate Latin: Prose

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Brian Lush

Notes: A thorough review of Latin grammar followed by a study of a Roman prose author or authors. Students build reading skills while gaining an appreciation for the literary and cultural aspects of Latin prose. Particular texts to be studied may include Petronius' Satyricon, the letters and/or speeches of Cicero, letters of Pliny, or Livy's History of Rome. (4 credits)

CLAS 237-01

Intermediate Hebrew I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: Hebrew prose selections from the Bible, Dead Sea Scrolls and Rabbinic parables. Translation of texts will be supplemented with grammar review. Students will gain facility with such tools as the lexicon, commentary and critical apparatus and will become familiar with critical trends in contemporary research. (4 credits)

CLAS 241-01

Intermediate Arabic I

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course focuses on expanding vocabulary and grammar through simple texts, dialogs and stories.

CLAS 241-L1

Intermediate Arabic I Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course focuses on expanding vocabulary and grammar through simple texts, dialogs and stories.

CLAS 241-L2

Intermediate Arabic I Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course focuses on expanding vocabulary and grammar through simple texts, dialogs and stories.

CLAS 260-01

Introduction to Ancient/Medieval Art

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: *Cross-listed with ART 160-01*

This course surveys the visual and material culture of Europe and the Middle East from the Paleolithic through the late Medieval period. We consider the material remains of Prehistoric Europe, the Ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, Etruria, and Rome; early Christianity, Judaism and Islam; and Early Medieval, Romanesque and Gothic Europe from a contextual perspective, in order to recover the meanings of works of art within the cultures that produced them. A special focus is placed on the appropriation of these objects and images in later Western culture. Cross-listed with Art 160. (4 credits)

CLAS 294-01

Iberian Frontiers: Convivencia and Conflict, 711 - 1492

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Rebecca Church

Notes: *Cross-listed with HISP 294-01 and HIST 294-03* Throughout the Middle Ages, as Christianity and Islam dominated parts of the Iberian peninsula, from the 8th to the 15th century, convivencia and conflict existed side by side. Where did people practice tolerance, and how and why? Where did they fight and why? How did the Jewish population fit in on either side? What life look like on the ground, in the narrow city streets, the gardens, the villages of al-Andalus and the Christian kingdoms? How did Iberia relate to the wider worlds of North Africa, France, and the Mediterranean? We'll use poetry, charters, and chronicles to explore how complex identities, cooperation, and, also, violence created porous borders along shifting frontiers.

CLAS 294-02

Trauma and Drama

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 003
  • Instructor: Brian Lush

Notes: *First Year Course only* "Trauma and Drama will focus upon the lasting psychological injuries depicted and explored in ancient Greek tragedy and epic poetry. Greek drama and epic poetry raise timeless and crucial questions about the effects of martial aggression and the toll that it takes upon both the victims of warfare and the combatants that suffer and inflict violence. We will pursue targeted readings of Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes, as well as explore the growing body of scholarship around how these authors respond to the aftermath and consequences of war. We will also seek systematically to draw connections between modern-day understandings of combat trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and injuries endured by familiar figures in the Greek mythic tradition (such as Achilles, Ajax, Medea, Odysseus, and Hecuba). The primary goal of these efforts will be to open new avenues of understanding between the distant past of ancient Greece and the present, as well as to foster a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by victims of war, systematic violence and institutional betrayal. Additionally, this course introduces first-year students to academic work and writing at the college level, and will seek to deepen students' familiarity with Macalester, its resources and its many opportunities. Class meets TR, 9:40 am - 11:10 am in Old Main 003 Writing designation: WA anticipated


CLAS 485-01

Advanced Arabic

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: A survey course of Renaissance and classic writers from around the Arab world. We explore social issues, witht the focus still on language acquisition.

CLAS 490-01

Senior Seminar

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: Andrew Overman

Notes: The Senior Seminar caps the experience of being a Classics major. Students in all three tracks (Archaeology, Civilization, and Languages) join together to explore the history of the discipline and its relationship to their own histories and future plans. Students learn about, draft and critique documents useful for their next steps, including resumes, personal statements and cover letters, along with discussing selected readings in a seminar setting. Each student also works with an advisor from the department to develop and execute a major piece of work in their chosen field, Majors who have completed the Senior Seminar have thus executed a substantive independent project and can articulate the place of their Classics major within their personal and professional development. For Classics majors only. (4 credits)

Spring 2018

CLAS 127-01

Women, Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: *Cross-listed with WGSS 127-01*

Cross-listed with Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies 127.

This course investigates contemporary approaches to studying women, gender and sexuality in history, and the particular challenges of studying these issues in antiquity. By reading ancient writings in translation and analyzing art and other material culture, we will address the following questions: How did ancient Greek and Roman societies understand and use the categories of male and female? Into what sexual categories did different cultures group people? How did these gender and sexual categories intersect with notions of slave and free status, citizenship and ethnicity? How should we interpret the actions and representations of women in surviving literature, myth, art, law, philosophy, politics and medicine in this light? Finally, how and why have gendered classical images been re-deployed in

the modern U.S.- from scholarship to art and poetry? (4 credits)

CLAS 129-01

Greek Myths

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Brian Lush

Notes: This course studies some of the world's great storytellers┬┐the ancient Greeks. First, we read from translations of Greek poetry to become familiar with the key figures and events in mythology, including the Olympian gods and their origins, the major heroes, and the Trojan War. Then we explore more broadly the adaptable nature of these myths and the variety of forms in which the Greeks told stories, from epic and personal poetry to philosophy, drama, sculpture and vase painting. At the same time, we investigate the ways in which moderns have interpreted these stories. We analyze myths using Freud's psychoanalytical techniques, as folklore and ritual, and through theoretical perspectives including structuralism, new historicism and feminism. Finally, we investigate the later life of Greek myths, focusing on how and why these stories have been retold by the Romans, later European authors and artists, American film makers and playwrights, and science fiction writers. (4 credits)


CLAS 194-01

Ancient Mediterranean and Middle East

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes:

CLAS 212-01

Elementary Latin II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: This two-term sequence introduces the grammar and vocabulary of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Students learn through reading adapted passages, by breaking down grammatical structures into recognizable patterns, and through tutorials and drills. We aim to cover all basic grammar by the end of the year. In the second semester, students begin to read easy Latin such as the Bible, Pliny, Cornelius Nepos and/or Caesar. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 212-L1

Elementary Latin II Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: This two-term sequence introduces the grammar and vocabulary of Latin, the language of the ancient Romans. Students learn through reading adapted passages, by breaking down grammatical structures into recognizable patterns, and through tutorials and drills. We aim to cover all basic grammar by the end of the year. In the second semester, students begin to read easy Latin such as the Bible, Pliny, Cornelius Nepos and/or Caesar. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 214-01

Elementary Arabic II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 214-L1

Elementary Arabic II Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 10:00 am-11:00 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 214-L2

Elementary Arabic II Lab

  • Days: F
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: In this two semester program, students learn to read, write and converse in Modern Standard Arabic, the form of Classical Arabic used in contemporary news media, documents, literature, education and religious practice in the many countries of the Arab world. The purpose of this course is to develop beginning students' proficiency and communication in the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 223-01

Introduction to Archaeology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 223-01*

This course introduces students to archaeology, the study of the material remains of human culture. Students will explore the history of the discipline and profession, its basic methods and theories, and the political and ethical dimensions of modern archaeological practice. Students learn to examine and interpret evidence using specific examples, from artifacts to sites to regions. Cross-listed with Anthropology 223. (4 credits)

CLAS 235-01

Elementary Greek II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: This two-semester program introduces students to ancient Greek, the language of Greece, Asia Minor, and the Hellenistic world, including several Jewish and early Christian writers. Students will learn the grammar and vocabulary necessary for reading Greek literature and documents of many periods. During the second term, students begin to read extended prose, such as passages from Plato, Xenophon, the New Testament or documentary sources. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 235-L1

Elementary Greek II Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:50 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: This two-semester program introduces students to ancient Greek, the language of Greece, Asia Minor, and the Hellenistic world, including several Jewish and early Christian writers. Students will learn the grammar and vocabulary necessary for reading Greek literature and documents of many periods. During the second term, students begin to read extended prose, such as passages from Plato, Xenophon, the New Testament or documentary sources. Students will also participate in tutorials and/or practice labs. (4 credits each semester)

CLAS 270-01

Cultural Resource Management

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: *Cross-listed with ANTH 270-01*

Archaeology in the United States is no longer practiced exclusively by universities and museums. In fact, since the 1970s, the vast majority of archaeological projects undertaken involve individuals employed in either private industry or with the federal or state government. This shift toward cultural resource management (CRM) archaeology transformed the traditional role of archaeology practiced during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. So, what changed? This course explores the role of public archaeology in the United States through an examination of the laws and practices dictating the protection of historic properties, consultation with descendent communities, and the design of archaeological management plans. Cross-listed with Anthropology 270. 4 credits

CLAS 294-01

CLAS Topics Course

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: STAFF

Notes:

CLAS 294-02

Medieval Mediterranean

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Rebecca Church

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 294-03* The Mediterranean, from 500 to 1500 CE, will be our focus. While the Romans called it mare nostrum (our sea), the Mediterranean became a shared space after the Roman Empire split into East (Byzantium) and West (Rome) and the Islamic Empire of the Umayyads enveloped all of the Levant, North Africa, and Iberia by the 8th century. Despite the divided polities, goods, and people--armies, mercenaries, courtiers, merchants, pilgrims, scholars, artisans--along with their ideas, moved easily across the water creating a mixed Mediterranean culture. All of the medieval cultures surrounding the Mediterranean were built on the cultures that preceded them, especially their Roman heritage. They were also springboards for the period of European expansion that followed. In this course we'll look at the geography, agriculture, literature, art, and religious beliefs found in the Mediterranean basin and engage the fundamental question, what is Mediterranean culture? Did it mean the same thing in Iberia, in Egypt, Western Europe, in Byzantium, the Levan.

CLAS 332-01

Intermediate Latin: Poetry

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Brian Lush

Notes: A course in the poetic literature of the Republican and/or Augustan Ages with concentrated study on one or two authors. Students work toward grammatical and lexical mastery while learning about the forms, styles and cultural aspects of Latin poetry. Authors to be studied may include Plautus, Catullus, Horace, Vergil, or Ovid. May be repeated for credit. (4 credits)

CLAS 338-01

Intermediate Hebrew II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Nanette Goldman

Notes: The final semester in the two-year survey of the Hebrew language from ancient to modern. Students will read selections from the Biblical books of poetry such as Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, and Psalms. The second half of the semester is devoted to modern conversational Hebrew. (4 credits)

CLAS 342-01

Intermediate Arabic II

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course introduces students to more authentic texts and samples a variety of authors and genres from around the Arab world. (4 credits)

CLAS 342-L1

Intermediate Arabic II Lab

  • Days: F
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Wessam El Meligi

Notes: This course introduces students to more authentic texts and samples a variety of authors and genres from around the Arab world. (4 credits)