Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

ECON 113-01

Financial Accounting

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: Accounting is the language of business. One of the objectives of this course is to learn that "language." The emphasis will be on understanding financial statements both for profit and non-profit organizations. International accounting, ethics and investment decisions are also covered. This course is designed for students who desire an understanding of the elements of accounting as a component of a liberal arts education as well as for those who would like to study further in accounting or business. Counts for Group B elective. (4 credits)

ECON 116-01

Organizational Leadership

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: This course will combine a theoretical background with hands-on experience that will permit a student to begin their career-long development of their leadership talent. The traditional model of a great leader was one that was tough, visionary and determined. Today scholars of leadership have argued that a great leader is self-aware, motivated, empathetic and skilled socially. Which model is right? Are there factors common to all great leaders? We will learn from Aristotle, Winston Churchill, Steve Jobs, Ernest Shackelton's ill-fated trip to the South Pole, and the latest scholarly research. Extensive use will be made of case studies from the Harvard MBA program and guest speakers. (4 credits)

ECON 119-01

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-02

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-03

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: *First day attendance required*

A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-04

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: *First day attendance required*

A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 194-01

Business Negotiations

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 226
  • Instructor: Joyce Minor

Notes: Business Negotiations will cover frameworks useful in negotiating business agreements, but the negotiating skills learned can be helpful in many settings. Starting with the classic text “Getting to Yes”, students in this course will learn to implement a principled approach to negotiating by focusing on the true interests of the negotiating parties, brainstorming to find ways to improve the outcome of all parties, and identifying and defusing the most common “dirty tricks” of unprincipled negotiators. In class, students will practice negotiating each week, in a series of one-on-one and multi-party negotiating exercises. Case studies will be discussed and alumni will be invited to share negotiating experiences. This course counts as a Group B elective.

ECON 221-01

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes: This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 221-02

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes: This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 225-01

Comparative Economic Systems

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 225-01*

This course examines the workings of economic systems from the perspective of the incentives facing the firm and consumer. The course provides an introduction to the economics of information and organization which is used to evaluate resource allocation under the specific institutional environment of different economic systems. Our understanding of the incentive system is then used to evaluate the overall economic system. The focus of the course is primarily on the U.S. economy, Japan and the former Soviet Union/Russia. As time permits the course may examine China, Germany and Central Europe. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. Cross-listed with International Studies 225. (4 credits)

ECON 294-01

Introduction to Entrepreneurship

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MARKIM LOWER
  • Instructor: Kate Reiling

Notes: *Course not available to those taking Social Entrepreneurship (INTL 294-02/SOCI 294-03) during the fall 2016 semester* This course focuses on theories and applications of Entrepreneurship to identify opportunities and solve problems around the world. Students will learn contemporary methodologies used in startup companies and early stage organizations including: Lean Startup, Human Centered Design, Design Thinking, and Value Proposition Canvas. In addition, students will spend the semester working in teams to apply the methodologies to identify a problem and develop a solution. For their final project, students will prepare a plan for their solution and present it to an external audience. This course is open to those who are interested in social entrepreneurship as well.

ECON 294-02

Health Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: The field of health economics applies microeconomic theory to the study of health care, drawing on concepts from public, labor, and development economics and industrial organization. The healthcare industry is one of the largest in the US, representing nearly 18% of GDP and comprising a large share of the typical household budget. The role of government regulation in healthcare is significant and unique to the industry. This class will review topics relevant to the healthcare and health insurance industries in the US, other developed countries, and developing nations including the determinants of demand, pricing of healthcare services, the role of insurance and its reforms, incentives and hurdles for health technology innovations, and the role of health in economic development. We will also examine the traditional methods for evaluating healthcare services including cost benefit and cost effectiveness analysis. This course will count as a 200E elective.

ECON 356-01

Capital Markets

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 150
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: The structure, operation, regulation and economic role of financial markets and institutions; fundamental security analysis and present-value techniques; forecasts of earnings and analysis of yields on stocks and bonds; the portfolio theory and characteristic lines, betas and mutual-fund ratings; futures and options markets. This course counts as a Group A elective. (4 credits)


ECON 361-01

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 361-02

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 371-01

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: This course develops in detail theories of the determination of national income, employment and the price level. The foundations and mechanics of neo-classical and Keynesian models of the aggregate economy are studied and modern syntheses of these approaches are explored. Considerable attention will be paid to current behavior of the national economy. (4 credits)

ECON 371-02

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Cuneyt Orman

Notes: This course develops in detail theories of the determination of national income, employment and the price level. The foundations and mechanics of neo-classical and Keynesian models of the aggregate economy are studied and modern syntheses of these approaches are explored. Considerable attention will be paid to current behavior of the national economy. (4 credits)

ECON 381-01

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: *Students that register for ECON 381-01 must register for ECON 381-L1*

This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-02

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: *First day attendance required; students that register for ECON 381-02 must register for ECON 381-L2*

This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L1

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L2

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 394-01

Game Theory

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes: ‘Game Theory’ is the study of situations in which agents’ outcomes depend not only on their own actions, but also on the actions taken by others; and in which all participants understand this fact and take account of it their decision making. This course will introduce students to the basic ideas and applications of game theory. We will study models of games in extensive (tree) and normal (strategic) form, equilibrium concepts that include optimally randomized strategies, signaling and beliefs, the effects of reputational considerations in repeated games, bargaining games, investment hold-up problems, mediation, and incentive constraints. The course will highlight applications of game theory to economic analysis, but will also include examples taken from other disciplines. Additional topics may be included as time and student interest dictate. Counts as Group E elective. Prerequisite: ECON 361.

ECON 420-01

Quantitative Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: ARTCOM 202
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes: This course provides a formal, hands-on exposition of modern macroeconomic theory using dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models. (4 credits)

ECON 457-01

Finance

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: This course concentrates on developing and applying economic principles to the decision making process of the firm. Typically the course is taught from the viewpoint of the financial manager of a firm (profit or non-profit). Traditional corporate finance topics will be covered, including: cash flow management, sources of capital, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and financial structure. Recent theoretical developments in the capital asset pricing model and portfolio theory also will be examined. Actual case studies of financial decision making often are included in the course. (4 credits)

ECON 490-01

Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: *Cross-listed with PSYC 490-01*

This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas. Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. Cross-listed with Psychology 490. (4 credit)

ECON 494-01

Economics of Public Policy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: By taking this course, students will learn to interpret and conduct technical economic analysis of public policies. Students will apply their knowledge of microeconomic theory and econometrics to study the economics of controversial and important policies that might include those relating to climate change, illegal (and legal) drugs, health care, anti-poverty programs, redistribution via the tax system, public transit, immigration, education, and minimum or living-wage laws. Attention will be paid to understanding the technical details used in cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis. While the course usually focuses on examples from the United States, it presents tools and frameworks that are applicable in any context. The course grade will be based on group and individual presentations and policy briefs relating to specific policies, substantial homework sets, and a capstone-level research project. The project consists of a policy, econometric, or theoretical analysis of a public policy chosen by the student. This course will count towards the Group E 400s level elective for the economics major. It is a capstone course. Prerequisites: ECON 361, ECON 371, and ECON 381.

Fall 2017

ECON 113-01

Financial Accounting

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: Accounting is the language of business. One of the objectives of this course is to learn that "language." The emphasis will be on understanding financial statements both for profit and non-profit organizations. International accounting, ethics and investment decisions are also covered. This course is designed for students who desire an understanding of the elements of accounting as a component of a liberal arts education as well as for those who would like to study further in accounting or business. Counts for Group B elective. (4 credits)

ECON 113-02

Financial Accounting

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 100
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: Accounting is the language of business. One of the objectives of this course is to learn that "language." The emphasis will be on understanding financial statements both for profit and non-profit organizations. International accounting, ethics and investment decisions are also covered. This course is designed for students who desire an understanding of the elements of accounting as a component of a liberal arts education as well as for those who would like to study further in accounting or business. Counts for Group B elective. (4 credits)

ECON 119-01

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-02

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-03

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes: *First day attendance required*

A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-04

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-05

Principles of Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *First Year Course only*

A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-06

Principles of Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: *First Year Course only*

A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 221-01

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Felix Friedt

Notes: This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 221-02

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Felix Friedt

Notes: This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 229-01

World Economic History

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: This course presents a broad overview of world economic history. It uses concepts and models developed in Principles of Economics to explore how the interplay between geography, institutions, and technology has influenced material living standards from the Stone Age to the present. In particular, we will study the causes and consequences of long-term structural forces such as the agriculture, industrial and informational revolutions, the Malthusian trap and demographic transition, slavery, globalization, and the rise of government. We will also explore more cyclical phenomena such as wars, financial crises, economic depressions and hyper-inflations. Students will learn how economic historians use evidence to make sense of the past and the role economic history plays in guiding current policy debates. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. Offered once per year. (4 credits)

ECON 256-01

Intro to Investment Banking

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 150
  • Instructor: Joyce Minor

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course will provide a one semester overview of investment banks. The role of equity capital markets, debt capital markets, research, sales and trading, and investment banking will be covered. Basic corporate finance techniques will be introduced. Current financial issues in the business world will be reviewed. Classroom work, case studies, and outside speakers will be utilized. The key objectives of this course are for students to obtain a solid understanding of the various disciplines within the investment banking field and to prepare themselves for interviews and internships. The course is well suited for students who are contemplating a career in investment banking, banking, or corporate finance. This course counts as a Group B elective and does not serve as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 294-01

The Economics of Sports

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Vasant Sukhatme

Notes:

ECON 294-02

Development, Environment, and Sustainability

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 110
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: *This course approaches the processes of economic, social, and technological change in developing countries in light of these constraints. The challenges of poverty reduction and redistributive economic growth are deeply intertwined with the way in which we manage and allocate natural resources. Without careful attention to sustainability principles we could easily see welfare gains erased in the medium-term. This course takes a systems approach to thinking about processes of international sustainable development and questions how these transformation processes are or are not economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable.*


ECON 353-01

Managerial Accounting

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 101
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: Planning is the key to business success. How do firms plan for the future? Setting objectives and budgets. Evaluating and rewarding employee performance. Controlling inventory, cash budgeting, and capital budgeting. Extensive use of case studies and group work. This course counts as a Group B elective. (4 credits)


ECON 361-01

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 206
  • Instructor: Vasant Sukhatme

Notes: Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 361-02

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Vasant Sukhatme

Notes: Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 371-01

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes: This course develops in detail theories of the determination of national income, employment and the price level. The foundations and mechanics of neo-classical and Keynesian models of the aggregate economy are studied and modern syntheses of these approaches are explored. Considerable attention will be paid to current behavior of the national economy. (4 credits)

ECON 371-02

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes: This course develops in detail theories of the determination of national income, employment and the price level. The foundations and mechanics of neo-classical and Keynesian models of the aggregate economy are studied and modern syntheses of these approaches are explored. Considerable attention will be paid to current behavior of the national economy. (4 credits)

ECON 381-01

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-02

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L1

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 10:10 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L2

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 309
  • Instructor: Gary Krueger

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 405-01

Industrial Organization

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 214
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: This course will extend beyond the conventional structure-conduct-performance framework of industrial organization to focus on the theoretical models that inform the discipline and their empirical applications. In particular, students will use microeconomics and game theory to study models of imperfect competition and understand the implications for consumer welfare. We will analyze firm behavior and strategic interactions such as price discrimination, predatory pricing, limit pricing and investment under different market structures. We will also discuss various public policies that affect the structure of markets and the behavior of firms, specifically regulation, deregulation and antitrust laws. Every year. (4 credits)

ECON 426-01

International Economic Development

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: *Capstone*

This course will apply the tools of economic analysis to gain an understanding of economic development problems and their solutions. Patterns of economic development in an historical and dynamic context will be examined. The central role of agriculture and the problem of technological change in agriculture will also be examined. Other topics will include neo-classical growth models, domestic and international economic policies, international trade, foreign aid, external debt, technology transfer, rural-urban migration and income distribution. (4 credits)

ECON 444-01

Honors Seminar

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 305
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *Capstone*

An honors seminar to enhance the senior capstone requirement.


ECON 485-01

Empirical Finance

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: *Capstone*

This class concentrates on applying econometric techniques and computer programming to empirically test major financial theories. The econometric techniques used in the class include but is not restricted to OLS, GLS, GMM, Maximum Likelihood method, Nonparametric method, panel data models (random effect model, fixed effect model, pooled regression, etc.), time series models (VAR, ARMA, ARMAX, GARCH, etc.). Main programming language used in the class is Matlab, while R and STATA may also be used occasionally. Major finance topics tested in the class include market efficiency, portfolio theory, stock selection models, market microstructure, anomalies in the financial markets, calendar effects, etc. (4 credits)

ECON 490-01

Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 304
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: *Cross-listed with PSYC 490-01; Capstone course*

This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas. Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. Counts as a Group E elective for the major. Cross-listed with Psychology 490. (4 credit)

Spring 2018

ECON 113-01

Financial Accounting

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: Accounting is the language of business. One of the objectives of this course is to learn that "language." The emphasis will be on understanding financial statements both for profit and non-profit organizations. International accounting, ethics and investment decisions are also covered. This course is designed for students who desire an understanding of the elements of accounting as a component of a liberal arts education as well as for those who would like to study further in accounting or business. Counts for Group B elective. (4 credits)

ECON 116-01

Organizational Leadership

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jeff Evans

Notes: This course will combine a theoretical background with hands-on experience that will permit a student to begin their career-long development of their leadership talent. The traditional model of a great leader was one that was tough, visionary and determined. Today scholars of leadership have argued that a great leader is self-aware, motivated, empathetic and skilled socially. Which model is right? Are there factors common to all great leaders? We will learn from Aristotle, Winston Churchill, Steve Jobs, Ernest Shackelton's ill-fated trip to the South Pole, and the latest scholarly research. Extensive use will be made of case studies from the Harvard MBA program and guest speakers. (4 credits)

ECON 119-01

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-02

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-03

Principles of Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 119-04

Principles of Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Felix Friedt

Notes: A one-semester introduction to the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomic analysis. Microeconomics deals with consumers, firms, markets and income distribution. Macroeconomics deals with national income, employment, inflation and money. (4 credits)

ECON 221-01

Introduction to International Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Felix Friedt

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course explores the theoretical foundations and empirical realities of international trade flows, commercial policies (tariffs, quotas, etc.) and international finance. The course emphasizes the welfare implications of international trade and commercial policies and links these to discussion of disputes over international trade agreements. The international finance portion of the course covers the foreign exchange market, balance of payments analysis and an introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Recommended for students majoring in international studies. This course counts as a Group A elective and serves as a prerequisite for ECON 361. (4 credits)

ECON 233-01

Health Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Samantha Cakir

Notes: The field of health economics applies microeconomic theory to the study of health care, drawing on concepts from public, labor, and development economics and industrial orgainzation. The healthcare industry is one of the largest in the US, representing nearly 18% of the GDP and comprising a large share of the typical household budget. The role of government regulation in healthcare is significant and unique to the industry. This class will review topics relevant to the healthcare and health insurance industries in the US, other developed countries, and developing nations including determinants of demand, pricing of healthcare services, the role of insurance and its reforms, incentives and hurdles for health technology innovations, and the role of health in economic development. We will also examine the traditional methods for evaluating healthcare services including cost benefit and cost effectiveness analysis. Group E Elective. (4 credits)

ECON 238-01

Introduction to Entrepreneurship

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Kate Reiling

Notes: This course focuses on theories and applications of Entrepreneurship to identify opportunities and solve problems around the world. Students will learn contemporary methodologies used in startup companies and early stage organizations including: Lean Startup and Human Centered Design methodologies and the Business Model Canvas framework. Students spend the semester working in teams to apply the methodologies to identify a problem and develop a solution. For their final project students will prepare a plan for their solution and present it to an external audience. This course is open to those who are interested in social entrepreneurship as well. Group B elective. Note: Not available to students who took Social Entrepreneurship during the fall 2016 semester. (4 credits)

ECON 294-01

Money and Banking

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes:

ECON 294-02

Introduction to Labor Economics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes:

ECON 356-01

Capital Markets

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: The structure, operation, regulation and economic role of financial markets and institutions; fundamental security analysis and present-value techniques; forecasts of earnings and analysis of yields on stocks and bonds; the portfolio theory and characteristic lines, betas and mutual-fund ratings; futures and options markets. This course counts as a Group A elective. (4 credits)


ECON 358-01

Introduction to Securities Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Joyce Minor

Notes: This course will primarily focus on equity securities analysis (stocks) from the perspective of institutional (Wall Stree) investors. Topics will include industry analysis and forecasting, financial statement analysis, fundamental company analysis and valuation methods. Students will form industry groups and will each research a company in that industry. Students will build complete historical and projected financial statement models in Excel. The end product of the course will be a company report written by each student. This course counts as a Group B elective. (4 credits)

ECON 361-01

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 361-02

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Methodology of economic science; theory of consumer behavior; theory of the firm; market structure and price determination; factor markets and income distribution; general equilibrium analysis; market failure. Not open to first-year students except by permission of the instructor. (4 credits)

ECON 371-01

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: This course develops in detail theories of the determination of national income, employment and the price level. The foundations and mechanics of neo-classical and Keynesian models of the aggregate economy are studied and modern syntheses of these approaches are explored. Considerable attention will be paid to current behavior of the national economy. (4 credits)

ECON 371-02

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Mario Solis-Garcia

Notes: This course develops in detail theories of the determination of national income, employment and the price level. The foundations and mechanics of neo-classical and Keynesian models of the aggregate economy are studied and modern syntheses of these approaches are explored. Considerable attention will be paid to current behavior of the national economy. (4 credits)

ECON 381-01

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: *Students that register for ECON 381-01 must register for ECON 381-L1*

This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-02

Introduction to Econometrics

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: *Students that register for ECON 381-02 must register for ECON 381-L2*

This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L1

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 381-L2

Intro to Econometrics Lab

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Amy Damon

Notes: This course investigates the methods economists use to test theories and conduct economic forecasts. This course will provide the student with the ability to design, conduct, and evaluate empirical work in economics and other social sciences. The primary focus of the course is on the final project that consists of a research paper that will integrate library research, economic theory, and econometric analysis. The course will take a "hands on" approach as much as possible with weekly use of the microcomputer in class. (4 Credits)

ECON 394-01

Game Theory

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Lucas Threinen

Notes:

ECON 431-01

Public Finance and Public Policy

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Sarah West

Notes: By taking this course, students will learn to interpret and conduct technical economic analysis of public policies. Students will apply their knowledge of micro- and macroeconomic theory and econometrics to study the economics of controversial and important policies. Sample policy areas might include climate change, illegal drugs, health care, anti-poverty programs, affirmative action, income inequality, income redistribution via the tax system, public transit, immigration, education, gun control, and minimum or living-wage laws. While the course usually focuses on examples from the United States, it presents tools and frameworks that are applicable in any context. The course grade will be based on group and individual presentations and policy briefs relating to specific policies, at least one exam, homework sets, and a capstone-level research project. The project consists of a policy, econometric, or theoretical analysis of a public policy chosen by the student. This course will count towards the Group E 400s level elective for the economics major. It is a capstone course. (4 credits)


ECON 457-01

Finance

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Liang Ding

Notes: This course concentrates on developing and applying economic principles to the decision making process of the firm. Typically the course is taught from the viewpoint of the financial manager of a firm (profit or non-profit). Traditional corporate finance topics will be covered, including: cash flow management, sources of capital, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and financial structure. Recent theoretical developments in the capital asset pricing model and portfolio theory also will be examined. Actual case studies of financial decision making often are included in the course. (4 credits)

ECON 490-01

Behavioral and Experimental Economics

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Pete Ferderer

Notes: *Cross-listed with PSYC 490-01*

This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas. Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. Counts as a Group E elective for the major. Cross-listed with Psychology 490. (4 credit)