Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Fall 2017

BIOL 285-01

Ecology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Laura Phillips-Mao

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01;first day attendance required;ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the study of ecological theory and processes. The subject of this course is the natural world and the current and past processes that have shaped it. Taking a systems approach, major ecological patterns and processes are described and proposed underlying mechanisms are investigated through readings, field and laboratory studies. The impact of humans on natural systems is also examined. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab each week. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 285. (4 semesters)

ENVI 150-01

Climate and Society

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: OLRI 301
  • Instructor: Louisa Bradtmiller

Notes: *First day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of the instructor*

Seasonal and annual patterns of temperature and precipitation influence the development, success and collapse of civilizations. Regional climate determines numerous things about how humans adapt to survive there, including the type of shelter needed, the length of the growing season, and the availability/scarcity of freshwater. Using a combination of scientific and historical records, this course will provide a brief introduction to the climate system and will then focus on how changes in climate affected several societies throughout history. In the latter part of the course we will discuss observed global warming in the modern world, what the potential benefits and consequences of it may be, and whether or not there are lessons to be learned from our ancestors. (4 credits)

ENVI 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with GEOG 232-01; first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on agriculture. We will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Beyond agriculture, we will also examine other sectoral issues in relation to agriculture or as stand alone environmental concerns. These themes include: human population growth, consumption, biodiversity, climate change, and environmental health. We will be trying on a number of theoretical lenses from geography’s broad human-environment tradition (such as physical geography, cultural ecology, commodity chain analysis, political ecology, resource geography, the human dimensions of global change, hazards geography and environmental justice). In other words, I not only want us to explore a range of environmental issues, but also to grapple with theory and how this informs our understanding of the human-environment interface. (4 credits)

ENVI 234-01

U.S. Environmental History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *Cross-listed with HIST 234-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of the instructor*

People have always had to contend with the natural world, but only recently have historians begun to explore the changing relationships between people and their environment over time. In this course, we will examine the variety of ways that people in North America have shaped the environment, as well as how they have used, labored in, abused, conserved, protected, rearranged, polluted, cleaned, and thought about it. In addition, we will explore how various characteristics of the natural world have affected the broad patterns of human society, sometimes harming or hindering life and other times enabling rapid development and expansion. By bringing nature into the study of human history and the human past into the study of nature, we will begin to see the connections and interdependencies between the two that are often overlooked. Fall semester. (4 credits)

ENVI 234-02

U.S. Environmental History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *First Year Course only; cross-listed with HIST 234-02; first day attendance required* People have always had to contend with the natural world, but only recently have historians begun to explore the changing relationships between people and their environments over time. In this course, we will examine the variety of ways that people in North America have shaped the environment, as well as how they have used, labored in, abused, conserved, protected, rearranged, polluted, cleaned, and thought about it. In addition, we will explore how various characteristics of the natural world have affected the broad patterns of human society, sometimes harming or hindering life and other times enabling rapid development and expansion. By bringing nature into the study of human history, and the human past into the study of nature, we will begin to see the connections and interdependencies between the two that traditional history often overlooks.

Class meets MWF, 10:50 am - 11:50 am in Olin Rice 300

Writing designation: WA


ENVI 285-01

Ecology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Laura Phillips-Mao

Notes: *Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on April 28th with permission of the instructor*

An introduction to the study of ecological theory and processes. The subject of this course is the natural world and the current and past processes that have shaped it. Taking a systems approach, major ecological patterns and processes are described and proposed underlying mechanisms are investigated through readings, field and laboratory studies. The impact of humans on natural systems is also examined. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab each week. Cross-listed with Biology 285. (4 credits)

GEOG 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01; first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on agriculture. We will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Beyond agriculture, we will also examine other sectoral issues in relation to agriculture or as stand alone environmental concerns. These themes include: human population growth, consumption, biodiversity, climate change, and environmental health. We will be trying on a number of theoretical lenses from geography’s broad human-environment tradition (such as physical geography, cultural ecology, commodity chain analysis, political ecology, resource geography, the human dimensions of global change, hazards geography and environmental justice). In other words, I not only want us to explore a range of environmental issues, but also to grapple with theory and how this informs our understanding of the human-environment interface. (4 credits)

GEOG 249-01

Regional Geography of Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *First Year Course only; cross-listed with LATI 249-01; first day attendance required* This course explores one of the world’s most vibrant regions, Latin America. Extending from the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego, this world region stretches across diverse landscapes, from tropical rainforests to the snowcapped peaks of the Andes, from mega-cities to empty deserts and plains. This variety of environments also fosters great cultural diversity: although the nations of Latin America share similar historical roots, each one has its own character and its own complex geography. This course explores the geography of Latin America through a combination of thematic and regional approaches. Major topics include physical geography and the natural environment; pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern history; race and identity; urbanism; agriculture and land use; major environmental problems; economy and development; international migration; Latino culture and identity in the U.S.; and the economic and cultural impacts of globalization. Along with such general themes, we will also examine the cultural geography of specific core regions, including The Caribbean, Mexico, Brazil, the Andean Countries, and the Argentine Pampas. Since this is a first-year course, we will also emphasize developing your skills in written and oral communication, scholarly research, and information literacy. Through research projects that explore different elements of Latin America’s geography, students will get a close-up perspective on the region.

Class meets TR, 8:00 am - 9:30 am in Carnegie 05

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor.


GEOL 260-01

Geomorphology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 175
  • Instructor: Kelly MacGregor

Notes: Geomorphology is the study of physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur on the surface of a planetary body. We will be examining the processes that turn solid rock into transportable material, the transport mechanisms themselves (whether beneath glaciers, down hillslopes, or in rivers), and the patterns of deposition, many of which are unique to the processes that created them. These processes range from the very large (volcanism and mountain-building) to the microscopic (frost cracking of rock, soil creep, and chemical weathering along mineralogic grain boundaries). Some processes occur frequently across geographic boundaries and throughout geologic time (like rainsplash), while others are stochastic in nature and dramatic in their geomorphic signature (like glacial outburst floods). We will focus on the roles of rivers, glaciers, and mass movements in shaping landscapes, but will examine wide-ranging landscapes such as arid environments and coastal regions. The study of current surface processes on the Earth will be examined with an eye toward understanding the evolution of landscapes over geologic timescales. (5 credits)

HIST 234-01

U.S. Environmental History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of instructor*

People have always had to contend with the natural world, but only recently have historians begun to explore the changing relationships between people and their environment over time. In this course, we will examine the variety of ways that people in North America have shaped the environment, as well as how they have used, labored in, abused, conserved, protected, rearranged, polluted, cleaned, and thought about it. In addition, we will explore how various characteristics of the natural world have affected the broad patterns of human society, sometimes harming or hindering life and other times enabling rapid development and expansion. By bringing nature into the study of human history and the human past into the study of nature, we will begin to see the connections and interdependencies between the two that are often overlooked. Fall semester. (4 credits)

HIST 234-02

U.S. Environmental History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 234-02; first day attendance required*

People have always had to contend with the natural world, but only recently have historians begun to explore the changing relationships between people and their environment over time. In this course, we will examine the variety of ways that people in North America have shaped the environment, as well as how they have used, labored in, abused, conserved, protected, rearranged, polluted, cleaned, and thought about it. In addition, we will explore how various characteristics of the natural world have affected the broad patterns of human society, sometimes harming or hindering life and other times enabling rapid development and expansion. By bringing nature into the study of human history and the human past into the study of nature, we will begin to see the connections and interdependencies between the two that are often overlooked. Fall semester. (4 credits)

LATI 249-01

Regional Geog of Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *First Year Course only; cross-listed with GEOG 249-01; first day attendance required* This course explores one of the world’s most vibrant regions, Latin America. Extending from the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego, this world region stretches across diverse landscapes, from tropical rainforests to the snowcapped peaks of the Andes, from mega-cities to empty deserts and plains. This variety of environments also fosters great cultural diversity: although the nations of Latin America share similar historical roots, each one has its own character and its own complex geography. This course explores the geography of Latin America through a combination of thematic and regional approaches. Major topics include physical geography and the natural environment; pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern history; race and identity; urbanism; agriculture and land use; major environmental problems; economy and development; international migration; Latino culture and identity in the U.S.; and the economic and cultural impacts of globalization. Along with such general themes, we will also examine the cultural geography of specific core regions, including The Caribbean, Mexico, Brazil, the Andean Countries, and the Argentine Pampas. Since this is a first-year course, we will also emphasize developing your skills in written and oral communication, scholarly research, and information literacy. Through research projects that explore different elements of Latin America’s geography, students will get a close-up perspective on the region.

Class meets TR, 8:00 am - 9:30 am in Carnegie 05

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor.


Spring 2018

ANTH 115-01

Biological Anthropology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 06B
  • Instructor: Scott Legge

Notes: This class is a broad survey covering topics such as genetics, evolutionary mechanisms, adaptation, primate studies, the human fossil record, and human variation. All of these areas will be placed within the framework of the interaction of humans within their environment. The course is divided into three sections: human genetics, human ecology and primatology, human evolution and adaptation.

ANTH 369-01

Food and Culture

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Arjun Guneratne

Notes: This course is an introduction to the anthropology of food, focusing on how food creates community and shapes identity, class and gender. The course also covers the transition from foraging to agriculture, the role of particular foods in the making of the modern world, and the nature of the modern industrial food system. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101 or ANTH 111

BIOL 285-01

Ecology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Laura Phillips-Mao

Notes: *First day attendance required; Cross-listed with ENVI 285-01; ACTC student may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the study of ecological theory and processes. The subject of this course is the natural world and the current and past processes that have shaped it.  Taking a systems approach, major ecological patterns and processes are described and proposed underlying mechanisms are investigated through readings, field and laboratory studies. The impact of humans on natural systems is also examined. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab each week.

ENVI 285-01

Ecology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: OLRI 250
  • Instructor: Laura Phillips-Mao

Notes: *Cross-listed with BIOL 285-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on Friday, December 1st with permission of instructor*

An introduction to the study of ecological theory and processes. The subject of this course is the natural world and the current and past processes that have shaped it. Taking a systems approach, major ecological patterns and processes are described and proposed underlying mechanisms are investigated through readings, field and laboratory studies. The impact of humans on natural systems is also examined. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab each week.

GEOG 243-01

Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This class seeks to go beyond the superficial media interpretations of the vast African continent. As geographers, students will attempt to place contemporary African developments in a historical and global context. The course provides a basic background in African history and geography, leading to discussion of advanced topics in contemporary African studies. The course takes a systematic rather than regional approach, examining sets of issues, rather than regions or countries of Africa. The course covers a broad range of topics, including: Africa in historical perspective; physical geography (physical landscapes, climate, vegetation, soils); human-environment interactions (forest degradation, desertification); population dynamics (population growth, distribution and mobility); culture and change (religion, modernization); development (ideology and economic development, Africa in the global economy); social geography (African women and development, education); medical geography (disease, health care and policy); agricultural development (traditional farming systems, cash crops, policy); urban economies (evolution of the urban structure, industry, housing); and political geography (democratization, conflict).