Spring 2017   Fall 2017   Spring 2018  

Spring 2017

GEOG 113-01

World Regional Geography: People, Places and Globalization

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Not open to students who have already taken GEOG 111*

We live in a world where one needs to simultaneously understand the biophysical and cultural particularities of different regions as well as the global forces that connect and bind them together. No longer can we afford to explore issues in one place in isolation, or to theoretically cruise along at 10,000 meters in the sky with no regard for the unique dynamics of different regions. This course begins with an exploration of global flows and connections, and then takes us on a scholarly tour of the world, with stop offs in Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Asia and the Americas. Along the way we’ll systematically investigate major human geography themes such as population dynamics and migration, agricultural change, human-environment interactions, health and disease, economic change and development, urbanization, and cultural shifts. This course is an alternative to Geography 111 (Human Geography of Global Issue). Students should take one course or the other as an introduction to the field or the major. (4 credits)

GEOG 120-01

Environmental Geology

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: OLRI 175
  • Instructor: Kelly MacGregor

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 120-01 and GEOL 120-01*

The physical environment has begun to show signs of our earth's expanding population and the increasing need for natural resources. Geologic materials such as soil, water, and bedrock, and geologic processes such as earthquakes, volcanic activity, and running water often pose constraints on land use. This course is designed to introduce students to the relationship between humans and their geologic environment: the earth. We will focus on understanding the processes that shape the surface of the earth, and how these processes affect human activity. We will use current scientific methods to collect and analyze data. Topics include surface-water dynamics and flooding, groundwater and groundwater contamination, pollution and waste management, landslides, volcanic and earthquake hazards, and global climate change. Format: three hour block per week of local field excursions, lectures, and/or laboratory exercises; evaluation will be based on project reports and homework/classroom assignments, and one exam (final). Cross-listed with Geology 120 and Environmental Studies 120. (4 credits)

GEOG 120-L1

Environmental Geology Lab

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-11:10 am
  • Room: OLRI 175
  • Instructor: Kelly MacGregor

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 120-L1 and GEOL 120-L1*

The physical environment has begun to show signs of our earth's expanding population and the increasing need for natural resources. Geologic materials such as soil, water, and bedrock, and geologic processes such as earthquakes, volcanic activity, and running water often pose constraints on land use. This course is designed to introduce students to the relationship between humans and their geologic environment: the earth. We will focus on understanding the processes that shape the surface of the earth, and how these processes affect human activity. We will use current scientific methods to collect and analyze data. Topics include surface-water dynamics and flooding, groundwater and groundwater contamination, pollution and waste management, landslides, volcanic and earthquake hazards, and global climate change. Format: three hour block per week of local field excursions, lectures, and/or laboratory exercises; evaluation will be based on project reports and homework/classroom assignments, and one exam (final). Cross-listed with Geology 120 and Environmental Studies 120. (4 credits)

GEOG 225-01

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Holly Barcus

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-02

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Kelsey McDonald

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L1

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L2

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-12:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L3

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of the instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01;first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on the role of humans in changing the face of the earth and how, in turn, this changing environment influences humans. The course will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Students will explore the fundamentals of environmental science, economics, cultural and political ecology, as well as a number of sectoral issues related to human population growth, agriculture, water resources, biodiversity, forest resources, energy use, climate change, and environmental health. (4 credits)

GEOG 248-01

The Political Geography of Nations and Nationalism

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course investigates how nations and nationalism affect social identity and the organization of territory in our world. Political geography offers concepts and approaches to help us think through the complex intersections of people, place, and politics that constitute the struggle to create and maintain nation-states. Thus the first part of the course is devoted to enhancing your understanding of core concepts, such as nation, state, territory, sovereignty, scale, borders, and geographical imagination. The ultimate purpose of this first part of the course then is to assemble a framework for understanding why our contemporary organization of territory throughout the world looks the way it does. Equipped with these foundations, we explore topics in the second part of class that help you think critically about the stability of nations and the organization of territory into the nation-state system as well as challenges to these institutions. Toward this end, you will also conduct an independent research project on a single group's attempt to create a nation-state. Throughout the course, we will bring our investigations to bear on everyday life, exploring how nations and nationalism shape our world in dramatic and mundane ways. (4 credits)

GEOG 249-01

Regional Geography of Latin America

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 249-01*

This course explores one of the world's most vibrant regions, Latin America. Extending from the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego, this world region stretches across diverse landscapes, from tropical rainforests to the snowcapped peaks of the Andes, from mega-cities to empty deserts and plains. This variety of environments fosters great cultural diversity, as well: although the nations of Latin America share similar historical roots, each one has its own character and its own complex geography. This course explores the geography of Latin America through a combination of thematic and regional approaches. Major topics include physical geography and the natural environment; pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern history; race and identity; urbanism; agriculture and land use; major environmental problems; economy and development; international migration; Latino culture and identity in the U.S.; and the economic and cultural impacts of globalization. Along with such general themes, we will also examine the cultural geography of specific core regions, including The Caribbean, Mexico, Brazil, the Andean Countries, and the Argentine Pampas. Through projects that explore different elements of Latin America's cultural geography, students will get a close-up perspective on the region. (4 credits) Course cross-listed with Latin American Studies 249

GEOG 256-01

Medical Geography: The Geography of Health and Health Care

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: This course examines the geographical dimensions of health and disease, including global and domestic public health issues. Key approaches and themes include the human ecology approach to health; epidemiological mapping and spatial analysis; environmental health, including the environmental causes of cancer; the relationship among demographic change, economic development, and population health; the political economy of non-communicable health problems, such as lead poisoning and the "obesity epidemic"; the spatial diffusion of infectious diseases; the disease ecology approach to infectious and vector-borne diseases, e.g. malaria, West Nile virus, and Lyme disease; and the challenges of "global health" in the 21st century, with special emphasis on "emerging infectious diseases," such as HIV/AIDS, SARS, and Avian influenza. (4 credits)

GEOG 294-01

Introduction to Urban Ecology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 294-04* Urban ecology is both a concept and a field of study. It focuses on interactions between human, urban ecosystems and the built environment. With over half of the world’s population now living in cities, cities have assumed a critical role in shaping local, regional and global ecologies. In this course, we will examine the distinctiveness of the interconnected urban biophysical, socio-economic, and political processes. In order to disentangle the complexity of human-environment relations in cities, we will take an interdisciplinary approach and learn theories and concepts in natural science ecology, environmental studies, geography, urban planning, sociology, and public policies. We will also apply these theories and concepts to laboratory exercises, field research, and case studies. (This course also counts towards Urban Studies concentration.)

GEOG 341-01

City Life: Segregation, Integration, Gentrification

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 341-01*

Urban social geography is the study of social and spatial dimensions of city life. In this course, we will explore some of the ways in which urban society is organized geographically. We will also consider how the spatial patterns of urban life influence public policy issues in the American context. Topics covered in this course include causes of racial segregation, debates about gentrification, sustainable suburban development, the transition from government to governance in cities, and the delivery of urban services that affect the education, health and economic welfare of urban populations. Students will learn current research, engage debates about critical urban issues, and learn techniques useful for analyzing spatial patterns in the urban landscape. (4 credits)


GEOG 363-01

Geography of Development and Underdevelopment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: This course introduces students to the geographic study of development around the world, with a particular emphasis on the Global South. The geographic approach emphasizes: the highly uneven nature of development; processes that link and differentiate various areas of the world; connections between development and the natural resource base; and the power relations inherent in development discourse. The course has three main sections: an introduction to development theory; an investigation of various development themes; and an intense exploration of what works and what doesn't in development practice. While much of the development literature has focused on failure, a specific aim of this course will be to uncover and interrogate success stories.

GEOG 365-01

Urban GIS

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Laura Smith

Notes: *Permission of instructor required*

This course allows students to participate in a “real world” application of their GIS knowledge and skills in a collaborative research project setting. Project focus is on urban GIS and questions developed by and for neighborhoods and other community research organizations. Content of the course includes development of the research project, acquisition and utilization of data used in urban analysis, data manipulation and analytical techniques unique to urban GIS, and geographical data visualization. Laboratory work is required. (4 credits)

GEOG 365-L1

Urban GIS Lab

  • Days: TBA
  • Meeting Time: TBA
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: This course allows students to participate in a “real world” application of their GIS knowledge and skills in a collaborative research project setting. Project focus is on urban GIS and questions developed by and for neighborhoods and other community research organizations. Content of the course includes development of the research project, acquisition and utilization of data used in urban analysis, data manipulation and analytical techniques unique to urban GIS, and geographical data visualization. Laboratory work is required. (4 credits)

GEOG 375-01

Rural Landscapes and Livelihoods

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Holly Barcus

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required; cross-listed with ENVI 375-01*

This course introduces students to Rural Geography, a sub-discipline within Geography. Using a sustainable development framework this course emphasizes the linkages between human and physical landscapes through the evaluation of landuse and community change in rural areas throughout the US. We will explore the implications of demographic (including migration and immigration), economic, cultural, and environmental changes for rural environs using several case studies from across the US and Western Europe, including an overnight field trip to northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. Rural community strategies for adapting to and accommodating competing demands for water and landuse will be considered, including pressure for new housing developments, recreation opportunities (boating, fishing, hiking, biking), and conservation needs. Students will be exposed to theoretical and empirical approaches to rural development in different regional contexts, as well as problems associated with these development paradigms. We will explore the rapidly changing rural environments in a Global North context in order to deepen our understanding of the interconnectedness of human and physical systems more broadly. (4 Credits)

GEOG 378-01

Statistical Research Methods in Geography

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Laura Smith

Notes: *Course restricted to Geography majors only*

This course focuses on the statistical methods that geographers use to describe and analyze places and themes. Students will learn both descriptive and inferential statistical methods for use in geographical research, including exploratory data analysis techniques, spatial statistics, geographic sampling, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis. The course provides students with experience in the application of statistical methods to spatial problems through the use of statistical software. Students will also learn to evaluate and develop statistical research designs, including preparation and presentation of an original research project. (4 credits)

GEOG 394-01

Asian Cities

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 394-01; first day attendance required* Since the last century, Asia has experienced rapid urbanization. It is now home to over half of the world’s most populated cities. By 2010, the urban population in the Asia-Pacific region has surpassed the population of the United States and the European Union combined. In this course, we will focus on cities in East, Southeast and South Asia. We will first contextualize the rapid urbanization in the region’s changing political economy, and identify urban issues that are unique to this region. We will further explore different theoretical approaches to understand Asian cities; several of them challenge mainstream urban theories rooted in the experiences of West European and North American cities. Upon the completion of this course, students will acquire substantive knowledge on contemporary trends of urban development in Asia, and develop familiarity with related ongoing theoretical debates. (This course also counts towards Urban Studies concentration.)

GEOG 475-01

Medical Geography Seminar

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *Permission of instructor required*

A research seminar in which students conduct individual inquiry into problems in medical geography. Also knows as health geography, this is a growing subdiscipline in geography that stands out for its theoretical debates, methodological diversity, and engagement with other disciplines from the natural and social sciences (e.g. biology, biomedicine, ecology, epidemiology, sociology, economics, anthropology, critical theory), while always grounded in the traditions of geographical inquiry. Topics and approaches to be covered include historical paradigms in medical geographic thought; international health and development; disease ecology; emerging infectious diseases; the social determinants of health; place or neighborhood effects; environmental justice; spatial epidemiology; and critical approaches to health, the body, and power. Since this is a seminar course we will also emphasize developing your skills in scholarly research and writing, as well as learning how to evaluate and integrate insights from different disciplines. Note: completion of Geography 256 prior to registering for this seminar is highly encouraged. (4 credits.)

GEOG 494-01

Global Urbanism

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *First day attendance required* The 21st century is an urban century. Half of the world’s population now lives in cities, with the most rapid growth happening in the developing world. The globalized urban processes compel us to rethink existing urban theories as well as the very definition of the city. In this seminar, we will explore three strands of scholarly works that expand our knowledge about contemporary global urbanism. The first focuses on the scholarship of neoliberal urbanism, which prioritizes North American and Western European urban experiences and shapes the mainstream thinking of cities. The second consists of on-the-ground variegated contestations, which reveal diverse urban living experiences and propose alternatives to the capitalist urbanization process. Finally, there is the scholarship challenging mainstream urban theories with a different epistemological stance, seeking to re-conceptualize urbanization from the global South. In addition to studying these important ways of thinking about global urbanism, students will conduct individual research projects to develop deeper and more concrete understanding of the contemporary urbanization processes. Note: completion of GEOG 241, 261 or 294 (Asian Cities) prior to registering for this seminar is highly encouraged. (This course also counts towards Urban Studies concentration.) This is a geography senior capstone seminar.


Fall 2017

GEOG 111-01

Human Geography of Global Issues

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: David Lanegran

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course is an introduction to the global perspectives, basic concepts and fundamental questions of geography. It focuses on the ways through which all places on Earth are interconnected and how the human use of Earth's surface varies over space. Major topics covered will be the human perception of earth space and the ways people give order to space; the growth and distribution of human population; the localization and spatial characteristics of patterns of settlement and land use; geopolitics and colonialism; environmental geography; the geography of economic development and modernization; principles of the analysis of spatial diffusion; spatial aspects of retail marketing; the geographic analysis of selected issues in industrialized societies such as gender issues, racism, poverty, sport, and religion. (4 credits)

GEOG 203-01

Introduction to Urban Ecology

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: ARTCOM 102
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 203-01; first day attendance required*

Urban ecology is both a concept and a field of study. It focuses on interactions between humans, urban ecosystems, and the built environment. With over half of the world’s population now living in cities, cities have assumed a critical role in shaping local, regional, and global ecologies. In this course, we will examine the distinctiveness of the interconnected urban biophysical, socio-economic, and political processes. In order to disentangle the complexity of human-environment relations in cities, we will take an interdisciplinary approach and learn theories and concepts in natural science ecology, environmental studies, geography, urban planning, sociology, and public policies. We will use our campus and the Twin Cities as a “living laboratory” and apply these theories and concepts to laboratory exercises, field observation, case studies, and research on contemporary urban sustainability initiatives. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 203. 4 credits

GEOG 225-01

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 08:30 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Kelsey McDonald

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L1

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-12:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L2

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Days: R
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 108
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 232-01

People, Agriculture and the Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 232-01; first day attendance required*

This course introduces you to the study of human-environment interactions from a geographic perspective, with a special emphasis on agriculture. We will examine environmental issues in a variety of geographic contexts (developed and developing countries) and the connections between environmental problems in different locations. Beyond agriculture, we will also examine other sectoral issues in relation to agriculture or as stand alone environmental concerns. These themes include: human population growth, consumption, biodiversity, climate change, and environmental health. We will be trying on a number of theoretical lenses from geography’s broad human-environment tradition (such as physical geography, cultural ecology, commodity chain analysis, political ecology, resource geography, the human dimensions of global change, hazards geography and environmental justice). In other words, I not only want us to explore a range of environmental issues, but also to grapple with theory and how this informs our understanding of the human-environment interface. (4 credits)

GEOG 241-01

Urban Geography

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course seeks to explain the evolving pattern of cities across the earth in terms of the distribution and movement of resources and people. In addition, a careful analysis of the development and internal spatial structure of North American cities will be carried out. Much class time will be spent on discussion of contemporary urban problems such as segregation, unequal investment, and control of public space as well as attempts at their solution. We make extensive use of the Twin Cities as a case study. Field work required. (4 credits)

GEOG 242-01

Regional Geography of the US and Canada

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Laura Smith

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course explores the ways in which diverse groups of people interact with the natural environment to produce the contemporary landscapes and regional differentiation of the U.S. and Canada. The course emphasizes patterns of human settlement, economic activity, and land use, with special focus given to the development of Native American lands. Case studies and a field study to the Boreal Forest region of northern Minnesota will be used to demonstrate broad themes at a more personal scale. Fall semester. (4 credits)

GEOG 249-01

Regional Geography of Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: CARN 05
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *First Year Course only; cross-listed with LATI 249-01; first day attendance required* This course explores one of the world’s most vibrant regions, Latin America. Extending from the Rio Grande to Tierra del Fuego, this world region stretches across diverse landscapes, from tropical rainforests to the snowcapped peaks of the Andes, from mega-cities to empty deserts and plains. This variety of environments also fosters great cultural diversity: although the nations of Latin America share similar historical roots, each one has its own character and its own complex geography. This course explores the geography of Latin America through a combination of thematic and regional approaches. Major topics include physical geography and the natural environment; pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern history; race and identity; urbanism; agriculture and land use; major environmental problems; economy and development; international migration; Latino culture and identity in the U.S.; and the economic and cultural impacts of globalization. Along with such general themes, we will also examine the cultural geography of specific core regions, including The Caribbean, Mexico, Brazil, the Andean Countries, and the Argentine Pampas. Since this is a first-year course, we will also emphasize developing your skills in written and oral communication, scholarly research, and information literacy. Through research projects that explore different elements of Latin America’s geography, students will get a close-up perspective on the region.

Class meets TR, 8:00 am - 9:30 am in Carnegie 05

Writing designation: WA

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor.


GEOG 250-01

Race, Place and Space

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 250-01; no first year student allowed* This course is built at the crossroads between critical race studies and urban sociology, and draws on important strains within cultural studies, WGSS, and critical/postmodern geography. We will investigate our own personal cognitive maps and social locations, including our complicity in dominant spatial and racial logics. Lectures, assignments, and activities encourage an understanding of the creation and on-going production of space and scale, and develop insight into racialized communities and identities as sites of conflict, struggle, and potential solidarity rather than fixed categories of representation or consumption. A segment of the course will focus on St. Paul and the impact of the Vietnam War, looking particularly at the construction of Hmong and other Southeast Asian American communities and identities. This course requires prior exposure to at least one of the following areas: American Studies, human geography, sociology of race/ethnicity, or urban studies.

GEOG 256-01

Medical Geography: The Geography of Health and Health Care

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course examines the geographical dimensions of health and disease, including global and domestic public health issues. Key approaches and themes include the human ecology approach to health; epidemiological mapping and spatial analysis; environmental health, including the environmental causes of cancer; the relationship among demographic change, economic development, and population health; the political economy of non-communicable health problems, such as lead poisoning and the "obesity epidemic"; the spatial diffusion of infectious diseases; the disease ecology approach to infectious and vector-borne diseases, e.g. malaria, West Nile virus, and Lyme disease; and the challenges of "global health" in the 21st century, with special emphasis on "emerging infectious diseases," such as HIV/AIDS, SARS, and Avian influenza. (4 credits)

GEOG 261-01

Geography of World Urbanization

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *First day attendance required*

We now live in a world where the majority of the population already lives in cities. And yet every year, hundreds of millions of people continue to move into cities to pursue a better future. The contemporary social, economic, and political changes are intrinsically linked to divergent urban processes across the world. This paramount shift poses important theoretical and empirical questions to our age. This course uses the critical perspective of “global urbanism” to both contextualize and connect different urban experiences across places. We will introduce various urban settings and demonstrate how complex relations between urbanization, globalization, and economic development produce spatial unevenness and social inequality. We will study the dominant paradigm of world and global cities, which prioritizes development trajectories of cities in the global North, and discuss contesting views focusing on “ordinary cities” from the global South. Drawing on case studies in the developed and less-developed world, we will also learn how to apply the relational comparative urbanism approach as well as regionally based theoretical perspectives to comprehend the diverse urban landscapes around the globe. (4 credits)


GEOG 261-02

Geography of World Urbanization

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *First Year Course only; first day attendance required* We now live in a world where the majority of the population already lives in cities. And yet every year, hundreds of millions of people continue to move into cities to pursue a better future. The contemporary social, economic, and political changes are intrinsically linked to divergent urban processes across the world. This paramount shift poses important theoretical and empirical questions to our age. This course uses the critical perspective of “global urbanism” to both contextualize and connect different urban experiences across places. We will introduce various urban settings and demonstrate how complex relations between urbanization, globalization, and economic development produce spatial unevenness and social inequality. We will study the dominant paradigm of world and global cities, which prioritizes development trajectories of cities in the global North, and discuss contesting views focusing on “ordinary cities” from the global South. Drawing on case studies in the developed and less-developed world, we will also learn how to apply the relational comparative urbanism approach as well as regionally based theoretical perspectives to comprehend the diverse urban landscapes around the globe.

Class meets MWF 12:00 pm- 1:00 pm in Carnegie 105

Writing designation: WA anticipated

Living arrangements: Single gender rooms, co-ed floor.


GEOG 262-01

Metro Analysis

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 107
  • Instructor: Laura Smith

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course discusses the foundations of American urban life and metropolitan development today, and examines how and why urban housing markets operate as they do within American metropolitan regions. Topics covered in the course include: the metropolitan economy, land use patterns, urban housing supply and demand, the geography of urban housing markets, suburbanization, transportation, and public policy debates. By the end of the course, students will have mastered some of the methods used to describe metropolitan organization and change, and be able to analyze how changes in the economy and society relate to metropolitan land use. Fall semester. (4 credits)

GEOG 364-01

GIS and Community Partnerships

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 109
  • Instructor: Holly Barcus

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 394-01; permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

In this course we collaborate with a local partner to collect, analyze and present geospatial information. Our primary tool is a Geographic Information System. Through meetings and discussions with our partner, we develop a plan for data collection and analysis and then work collaboratively to finish the project. This course may include field excursions to local sites as well as significant time devoted to working in groups and individually. We focus on the basics of project management as well as technical skills. In previous semesters we have collaborated with partners engaged in natural resource management, urban studies, and geographic education. Topics covered in the course include data collection, data quality and metadata, data structures, visualization, and spatial analysis and modeling. Lab section is required. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week required. (4 credits).

GEOG 370-01

Advanced Cartography and Geovisualization

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: CARN 109
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

In our increasingly visual culture, displaying, analyzing and interpreting data visually is becoming more important than ever. Governments, non-profits, marketing agencies, corporations and activits are striving to communicate with the public using data visualization. Geovisualization adds a spatial component to data visualization. Geovisualization is both a process for displaying data and an interdisciplinary field of study that develops new methods and tools for data visualization. Cartography plays an important role in geovisualization, lending design principles and techniques to this new and emerging field of study. This course is a combination of discussions on current topics and hands-on lab exercises and projects based on geovisualization methods and advanced cartographic techniques. Discussion and lab topics may include cartography, typography, geovisualization, spatio-temporal mapping, interactive mapping, interface design and usability, web mapping, 3D and animated mapping, critical cartography and location-based services. Esri's arcGIS suite and online open source software are used to complete lab assignments.

GEOG 370-L1

Advanced Cartography and Geovisualization

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: CARN 109
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

In our increasingly visual culture, displaying, analyzing and interpreting data visually is becoming more important than ever. Governments, non-profits, marketing agencies, corporations and activits are striving to communicate with the public using data visualization. Geovisualization adds a spatial component to data visualization. Geovisualization is both a process for displaying data and an interdisciplinary field of study that develops new methods and tools for data visualization. Cartography plays an important role in geovisualization, lending design principles and techniques to this new and emerging field of study. This course is a combination of discussions on current topics and hands-on lab exercises and projects based on geovisualization methods and advanced cartographic techniques. Discussion and lab topics may include cartography, typography, geovisualization, spatio-temporal mapping, interactive mapping, interface design and usability, web mapping, 3D and animated mapping, critical cartography and location-based services. Esri's arcGIS suite and online open source software are used to complete lab assignments.

GEOG 377-01

Qualitative Research Methods

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *First day attendance required* Social scientists use qualitative methods to understand the ways in which societal associations operate and how people experience, contribute to, or try to change these associations. Qualitative methods are thus concerned with analyzing processes and experiences. This course trains students to use qualitative research methods to collect data, analyze it, draw authoritative conclusions, and observe professional research ethics. The course emphasizes how qualitative methods contribute to scientific research and how ethical treatment of research participants affects the practice of qualitative research. Above all, the course focuses on training students to conduct qualitative research that contributes to our understanding of human geographies. Students will develop these skills by engaging in a semester-long research project for a client. Participation in this project will help you learn how to plan, prepare, and carry out a qualitative research project on a deadline. In 2017, we will be working with the Union Park District Council in St. Paul, helping to support an ongoing cultural asset mapping project by working with residents on their community place-making efforts.

GEOG 477-01

Comparative Environment and Development

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 06A
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 477-01 and INTL 477-01; first day attendance required*

A concern for the relationship between nature and society has been one of the pillars of geographic inquiry, and has also been an important bridge between other disciplines. By the 1960s, this area of inquiry was referred to variously as “human ecology” or “cultural ecology.” Over the last decade certain forms of inquiry within this tradition have increasingly referred to themselves as “political ecology.” The purpose of this seminar is to review major works within the traditions of cultural and political ecology; examine several areas of interest within these fields (e.g., agricultural modernization, environmental narratives, conservation, ecotourism); and explore nature-society dynamics across a range of geographical contexts. Towards the end of the course students will explore how one might begin to think in practical terms about facilitating development in marginal environments. Note: Completion of GEOG 232 prior to registering for this seminar is strongly encouraged. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 477 and International Studies 477. (4 credits)

GEOG 478-01

Cities of the 21st Century: The Political Economy of Urban Sustainability

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; cross-listed with ENVI 478-01; first day attendance required*

The purpose of this course is to understand the practices and concepts that constitute the movement for sustainable cities and investigate the ways in which urban sustainability initiatives are generated and how they vary geographically. The course adopts a political economy perspective to trace the complex interactions of institutions, politics, and economic systems that shape initiatives for more sustainable cities. Students will work in the first part of the course to enhance their understanding of core concepts and best practices that constitute the professional field of sustainable urban development and assemble a framework for analyzing the ways in which sustainability initiatives come to fruition and approach the idea of sustainability in a particular way. Equipped with these foundations, we then analyze case studies in the second part of course that focus on the meaning of sustainability, its practice internationally, and the ultimate impact of these practices on ecological balance, economic sustainability, and social equity in the urban environment. Toward these ends, students will conduct a semester-long senior capstone research project that investigates a particular urban sustainability initiative in the world by tracing the political economy of its creation and considering its impact on society, economy, and environment. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 478. 4 credits.

Spring 2018

GEOG 111-01

Human Geography of Global Issues

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course is an introduction to the global perspectives, basic concepts and fundamental questions of geography. It focuses on the ways through which all places on Earth are interconnected and how the human use of Earth's surface varies over space. Major topics covered will be the human perception of earth space and the ways people give order to space; the growth and distribution of human population; the localization and spatial characteristics of patterns of settlement and land use; geopolitics and colonialism; environmental geography; the geography of economic development and modernization; principles of the analysis of spatial diffusion; spatial aspects of retail marketing; the geographic analysis of selected issues in industrialized societies such as gender issues, racism, poverty, sport, and religion. (4 credits)

GEOG 113-01

World Regional Geography: People, Places and Globalization

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *First day attendance required*

We live in a world where one needs to simultaneously understand the biophysical and cultural particularities of different regions as well as the global forces that connect and bind them together. No longer can we afford to explore issues in one place in isolation, or to theoretically cruise along at 10,000 meters in the sky with no regard for the unique dynamics of different regions. This course begins with an exploration of global flows and connections, and then takes us on a scholarly tour of the world, with stop offs in Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Asia and the Americas. Along the way we’ll systematically investigate major human geography themes such as population dynamics and migration, agricultural change, human-environment interactions, health and disease, economic change and development, urbanization, and cultural shifts. This course is an alternative to Geography 111 (Human Geography of Global Issue). Students should take one course or the other as an introduction to the field or the major. (4 credits)

GEOG 225-01

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Holly Barcus

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L1

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Days: T
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 225-L2

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-12:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ashley Nepp

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course provides an introduction to cartography, visualization, and analyses of geospatial data, as well as hands-on experience in a lab with a powerful computer information system. Students will learn the basics of mapping/cartography (e.g. scale, projections, map design) and Geographic Information Systems. Students will create maps with commonly used digital data (e.g., aerial photographs, census boundaries, digital elevation models, etc.), and master basic methods of spatial analyses. Both concepts and techniques will be taught in this course. Hands-on assignments include classification of demographic data and query/analysis of vector and raster data. One and one half laboratory hours per week required.

GEOG 243-01

Geography of Africa: Local Resources and Livelihoods in a Global Context

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This class seeks to go beyond the superficial media interpretations of the vast African continent. As geographers, students will attempt to place contemporary African developments in a historical and global context. The course provides a basic background in African history and geography, leading to discussion of advanced topics in contemporary African studies. The course takes a systematic rather than regional approach, examining sets of issues, rather than regions or countries of Africa. The course covers a broad range of topics, including: Africa in historical perspective; physical geography (physical landscapes, climate, vegetation, soils); human-environment interactions (forest degradation, desertification); population dynamics (population growth, distribution and mobility); culture and change (religion, modernization); development (ideology and economic development, Africa in the global economy); social geography (African women and development, education); medical geography (disease, health care and policy); agricultural development (traditional farming systems, cash crops, policy); urban economies (evolution of the urban structure, industry, housing); and political geography (democratization, conflict). (4 credits)

GEOG 248-01

The Political Geography of Nations and Nationalism

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course investigates how nations and nationalism affect social identity and the organization of territory in our world. Political geography offers concepts and approaches to help us think through the complex intersections of people, place, and politics that constitute the struggle to create and maintain nation-states. Thus the first part of the course is devoted to enhancing your understanding of core concepts, such as nation, state, territory, sovereignty, scale, borders, and geographical imagination. The ultimate purpose of this first part of the course then is to assemble a framework for understanding why our contemporary organization of territory throughout the world looks the way it does. Equipped with these foundations, we explore topics in the second part of class that help you think critically about the stability of nations and the organization of territory into the nation-state system as well as challenges to these institutions. Toward this end, you will also conduct an independent research project on a single group's attempt to create a nation-state. Throughout the course, we will bring our investigations to bear on everyday life, exploring how nations and nationalism shape our world in dramatic and mundane ways. (4 credits)

GEOG 258-01

Geography of Environmental Hazards

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 258-01; first day attendance required*

The study of environmental hazards stands at a key point of intersection between the natural and social sciences. Geography, with its focus on human-environment interactions, provides key analytical tools for understanding the complex causes and uneven impacts of hazards around the world. We will explore the geophysical nature and social dimensions of disasters caused by floods, droughts, earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, tornadoes, hurricanes, and wildfires. For each of these hazard types, we apply theoretical concepts from major hazards research paradigms, including quantifying the human and economic impacts of disaster; assessing, managing, and mitigating risk; and reducing the impacts of disaster, not only through engineering works but also by reducing social vulnerability and enhancing adaptive capacity. Looking into the future, we will discuss how global-scale processes, such as climate change and globalization, might affect the frequency, intensity, and geographical distribution of environmental hazards in the decades to come. Cross-listed as Environmental Studies 258. (4 Credits)


GEOG 320-01

Asian Cities

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: I-Chun Catherine Chang

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 320-01; first day attendance required*

Since the last century, Asia has experienced rapid urbanization. It is now home to over half of the world’s most populated cities. By 2010, the urban population in the Asia-Pacific region has surpassed the population of the United States and the European Union combined. In this course, we will focus on cities in East, Southeast and South Asia. We will first contextualize the rapid urbanization in the region’s changing political economy, and identify urban issues that are unique to this region. We will further explore different theoretical approaches to understand Asian cities; several of them challenge mainstream urban theories rooted in the experiences of West European and North American cities. Upon the completion of this course, students will acquire substantive knowledge on contemporary trends of urban development in Asia, and develop familiarity with related ongoing theoretical debates. In addition, students will conduct individual research projects to develop deeper and more concrete understanding of the contemporary urbanization processes in Asia. Cross-listed with Asian Studies 320. 4 credits

GEOG 341-01

City Life: Segregation, Integration, and Gentrification

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Daniel Trudeau

Notes: *First day attendance required; cross-listed with AMST 341-01*

Urban social geography is the study of social and spatial dimensions of city life. In this course, we will explore some of the ways in which urban society is organized geographically. We will also consider how the spatial patterns of urban life influence public policy issues in the American context. Topics covered in this course include causes of racial segregation, debates about gentrification, sustainable suburban development, the transition from government to governance in cities, and the delivery of urban services that affect the education, health and economic welfare of urban populations. Students will learn current research, engage debates about critical urban issues, and learn techniques useful for analyzing spatial patterns in the urban landscape. (4 credits)


GEOG 363-01

Geography of Development and Underdevelopment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: William Moseley

Notes: *First day attendance required*

This course introduces students to the geographic study of development around the world, with a particular emphasis on the Global South. The geographic approach emphasizes: the highly uneven nature of development; processes that link and differentiate various areas of the world; connections between development and the natural resource base; and the power relations inherent in development discourse. The course has three main sections: an introduction to development theory; an investigation of various development themes; and an intense exploration of what works and what doesn't in development practice. While much of the development literature has focused on failure, a specific aim of this course will be to uncover and interrogate success stories.

GEOG 368-01

Health GIS

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*

This course builds on skills learned in the introductory Geographic Information Systems (GIS) course, focusing explicitly on geospatial techniques used for analyzing problems in public health. Through lectures, discussions, hands-on labs, and collaborative group work, students will learn to use advanced GIS tools to visualize and analyze public health issues, including: health disparities; neighborhood effects on health; spatial clustering of disease events, such as cancers; environmental health and environmental justice; infectious and vector-borne disease; and accessibility of populations to health care services. The course builds skills in spatial thinking, statistical and epidemiological reasoning, logical inference, critical use of data, geovisualization, and research project design. Students will be required to complete a final independent project on a topic of their choice. Lab section registration is required. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week required. (4 credits)

GEOG 378-01

Statistical Research Methods in Geography

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Kelsey McDonald

Notes: *First day attendance required; Geography majors only*

This course focuses on the statistical methods that geographers use to describe and analyze places and themes. Students will learn both descriptive and inferential statistical methods for use in geographical research, including exploratory data analysis techniques, spatial statistics, geographic sampling, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis. The course provides students with experience in the application of statistical methods to spatial problems through the use of statistical software. Students will also learn to evaluate and develop statistical research designs, including preparation and presentation of an original research project. (4 credits)

GEOG 394-02

Adv Geospatial Analysis: A Case Study of Dengue Fever Risk on the Island of Hawaii

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Kelsey McDonald

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; first day attendance required*


GEOG 475-01

Medical Geography Seminar

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Eric Carter

Notes: *First day attendance required*

A research seminar in which students conduct individual inquiry into problems in medical geography. Also knows as health geography, this is a growing subdiscipline in geography that stands out for its theoretical debates, methodological diversity, and engagement with other disciplines from the natural and social sciences (e.g. biology, biomedicine, ecology, epidemiology, sociology, economics, anthropology, critical theory), while always grounded in the traditions of geographical inquiry. Topics and approaches to be covered include historical paradigms in medical geographic thought; international health and development; disease ecology; emerging infectious diseases; the social determinants of health; place or neighborhood effects; environmental justice; spatial epidemiology; and critical approaches to health, the body, and power. Since this is a seminar course we will also emphasize developing your skills in scholarly research and writing, as well as learning how to evaluate and integrate insights from different disciplines. Note: completion of Geography 256 prior to registering for this seminar is highly encouraged. (4 credits.)

GEOG 479-01

Migrants, Migration and the Global Landscape of Population Change

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Holly Barcus

Notes: *First day attendance required*

Castles and Miller argue that we are living in the age of migration -- a period in history when a greater proportion of the human population is on the move than ever before. This course examines migration through a geographic lens seeking to elucidate the connections between theory and the changing and complex lived experiences of migrants. We will consider different approaches to studying migration including primary migration theories, the analyses of major flows, and micro models of individual decision-making behavior, life course, and livelihood perspectives and the implications of these movements for both sending and receiving communities. This course is organized as a senior capstone seminar. As such, we utilize readings, discussion, lectures, guest speakers and local events to enhance our understanding of the many dimensions and perspectives inherent in study of migratory movements, at scales ranging from global to local. (4 credits)