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Spring 2017

HIST 115-01

Africa Since 1800

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: This course is designed to introduce students to the history of Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It examines major themes relating to change in the colonial period such as European conquest and imperialism, the development of the colonial economy, African responses to colonialism and the rise of nationalist movements that stimulated the movement towards independence. Students will examine these themes by applying them to case studies of specific geographic regions of the continent. (4 credits)

HIST 137-01

From Confederation to Confederacy: US History from Independence to Civil War

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: In the Plan of Union prepared during the 1754 "Albany Convention," Anglo-American colonists met to consider uniting as a loose confederation for their common defense and to ally with the Iroquois confederacy. That plan failed, but a later experiment in unity succeeded when the united colonies declared independence. Nevertheless, social, cultural, and ideological differences persisted, and the union formed in 1776 was tried and tested before finally fracturing with the secession of South Carolina, precipitating the Civil War. In the intervening years, Americans grappled with how they should govern themselves, who should be included in the polity, and how society should be organized. Reformers considered the controversial issues of women's rights, the role of Native Americans within the US, and the place of slavery in a nation founded on the precept that "All men are created equal." This course covers the periods of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the early national and antebellum periods, before concluding with the Civil War. It also considers the global causes and consequences of the war and the rise of the new United States. We will also analyze the construction of the myth and historical memory of Alexander Hamilton, the founding father who has captured the imagination of people in the modern U.S. Through a study of the recent biography of Hamilton along with the music and stage production of Hamilton, we will consider both the biographical and mythical Alexander Hamilton in order to understand his era and our own.

HIST 180-01

Going Global: The Experiment of World History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 215
  • Instructor: Karin Velez

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 194-02*

What broad patterns do we see repeated across human cultures and eras? How do current international concerns shape the way we perceive these pattersn, and retell the past? This course is an introduction to the youngest and boldest experiementers in the discipline of history: global historians. We follow these trail-blazers to every corner of the planet and across the grandest expanses of time, all the way from the emergence of Homo sapiens to present day. Such a sweeping survey of human history invites us to look beyond chronological, national, cultural and geographic boundaries. It also forces us to sharply rethink the methodology of traditional historians. Throughout our critical survey of world history we will assess the usefulness (and potential outdatedness) of the concepts of civilization, empire, revolution, and global networks. This course fulfills the global/comparative requirement for the major. Offered every year. (4 credits)

HIST 181-01

Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 181-01*

This course offers a general survey of the complex and heterogeneous region we somewhat reductively term Latin America. It follows a roughly chronological approach, beginning with the eve of encounter and continuing through the contemporary era. Discussions will consider themes such as the institution and legacy of colonialism, the search for new national identities, and the onset of modern racial and political strife. The course will emphasize the import of global economic, political, and cultural trends on the formation of the region. No prerequisites. Offered every year. (4 credits). Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 181.

HIST 222-01

Imagining the American West

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 222-01*

The American West is central to the construction of America’s identity and popular culture. The mythology of the American West, built on a narrow foundation of Euro-American settlement and conquest, is critical to understanding the role of the West in the national narrative of American history. Using a variety of materials, including films, art and photography, literature, and historical sources, this course will examine how writers, artists, actors, settlers, and government officials, among others, shaped the creation of the mythic West. This course will investigate what – and who – is and is not considered part of this mythology, as well as the ways in which these constructs attempted to make sense of the diverse populations converging in the West. Cross-listed with American Studies 222. (4 credits)

HIST 226-01

American Indian History since 1871

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 401
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 226-01*

This course examines Native American history since 1871. We begin with an introduction to indigenous history before 1871, characterized by centuries of Euro-American attempts to colonize and Christianize, to assimilate Native bodies and allot Native lands. We will then analyze the ways in which Native Americans have continualy fought to sustain their cultures, languages, and religions, as well as their political and socio-economic structures, throughout the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Focusing on themes such as Native resistance to the development of U.S. federal policies and the proliferation of Native culture, we will also consider the shifting nature of Native American sovereignty and the importance of indigenous identity in regards to the experiences of Native Americans. Cross-listed with American Studies 226. Spring semester. (4 credits)

HIST 237-01

Environmental Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Erik Kojola

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 237-01 and ENVI 237-01*

Poor and minority populations have historically borne the brunt of environmental inequalities in the United States, suffering disproportionately from the effects of pollution, resource depletion, dangerous jobs, limited access to common resources, and exposure to environmental hazards. Paying particular attention to the ways that race, ethnicity, class, and gender have shaped the political and economic dimensions of environmental injustices, this course draws on the work of scholars and activists to examine the long history of environmental inequities in the United States, along with more recent political movements-national and local-that seek to rectify environmental injustices. Cross-listed with American Studies 237 and Environmental Studies 237. (4 credits)

HIST 251-01

Pirates, Translators, Missionaries: Between Atlantic Empires

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: NEILL 215
  • Instructor: Karin Velez

Notes:

HIST 275-01

The Rise of Modern China

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 275-01*

A study of leading institutions and movements of nineteenth- and twentieth-century China. Major emphases include the impact of Western imperialism, intellectual and cultural changes, the transformation of peasant society through revolution, the rise of Mao Tse-Tung, and the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, and the rise of China as a world power. Special attention will be given to China's international relations. (4 credits)

HIST 281-01

The Andes: Race, Region, Nation

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 281-01*

This course provides a survey of Andean history with an emphasis upon the formation of collective identities. Class discussion will treat continuities and divergences between the Andean colonial and post-colonial experiences, especially the intersection between racial and regional tensions and their impact upon the emergence and construction of nation-states. Recent topics explored have included the role of landscape in Andean culture, Incan and neo-Incan cultural mythologies, the conflation of racial and class identities in the twentieth century, violence and guerrilla movements, urbanization, and the various shades of indigenismo. (4 credits). Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 281.

HIST 294-04

In Motion: African Americans in the United States

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 011
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: In Motion is an introduction to modern African American History from slavery to contemporary times. In Motion emphasizes the idea that both African Americans and the stories of their lives in the United States are fluid, varied and continually being reinterpreted. Rather than a strict chronological survey, this course is organized thematically. Some of the important themes include movement/mobility; work/labor; resistance to systems of oppression; gender/sexuality; culture/performance; politics/citizenship; and sites of (re)memory. In this course, students will read important historical texts, both primary and secondary, engage in discussion, and write essays that ask them to critically engage the history of African Americans in the US. Potential readings include texts such as W.E.B. Du Bois’ classic work The Souls of Black Folk, Audre Lorde’s Zami, Jeanne Theoharis’ The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks and excerpts from more contemporary African American texts such as Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Between the World and Me and Claudia Rankine’s Citizen.

HIST 294-06

Governing the Body: Health, Eugenics, and Population Control in Global Perspective

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Jessica Pearson-Patel

Notes: Concerns about health and population transcend both temporal and geographic boundaries. These are problems that have preoccupied governments, colonial armies, international organizations, and individual families throughout history. While disease has affected populations from the earliest days of human civilization, doctors and politicians in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries developed new and different ways of governing bodies. This course traces the dramatic shift from a concern about the transmission of infectious diseases to an overriding fear about the “quality and quantity” of families, workers, and soldiers. Using a global/comparative approach, we will explore themes such as the history of epidemic disease control, population policy and eugenics, and the creation international health organizations.

HIST 294-09

The Hundred Years War, 1337-1453: Age of Upheaval

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: CARN 204
  • Instructor: Cameron Bradley

Notes: The Hundred Years War began as a conflict between England and France, but it ultimately involved all of western Europe, and catalyzed far-reaching changes throughout medieval society. This course follows the war from causes to conclusion, with particular emphasis on the war’s social, cultural, and political effects. We will examine the experiences of those who took part, the impact of the war on non-elites, ideas about chivalry and rulership, and the development of national identities, while situating the war in the context of the tumultuous later Middle Ages.

HIST 294-10

Europe in the Era of World War

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Jessica Pearson-Patel

Notes: Between 1914 and 1945 two world wars left an indelible mark on European culture, society, politics, and economy. This course explores various facets of wartime and interwar Europe, focusing on themes and topics such as collaboration, resistance, occupation, genocide, daily life, gender, war and empire, and the changing relationship between Europe and the US.

HIST 353-01

Oceans in World History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Karin Velez

Notes: Between 1450 and 1850, people started to venture farther outward into oceans that had previously been understood as dangerous and hostile environments. This course takes the Age of Sail as a starting point to track changes in human approaches to boundless waters. We will consider two questions in particular: How have oceans functioned as a means of global integration rather than division? How are historians using oceans to further the study of world (versus regional) history? Readings will cover and compare the Atlantic, pacific, and Indian Oceans, and address themes of diaspora, port cities, banditry, trade, and imperial encounters. Every other year. This course fulfills the global/comparative requirement for the history major. Every other year. (4 credits)

HIST 378-01

War Crimes and Memory in East Asia

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 378-01*

This course's main goal is to introduce evidence of the major crimes and atrocities during World War II in East Asia such as the Nanjing Massacre, biochemical warfare (Unit 731), the military sexual slavery ("comfort women") system, the forced labor system, and inhumane treatment of POWs. The course will also help students understand the contemporary geo-political and socio-economic forces that affect how East Asians and Westerners collectively remember and reconstruct World War II. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement. (4 credits)

Cross-listed with Asian Studies 378

HIST 379-01

The Study of History

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: This advanced course is required for majors. It examines the various forms of analysis used by historians through a study of different kinds of historical texts and sources. It provides an opportunity for students to develop the skills and habits of thinking essential to practicing the discipline of history. This course invites students to address some of the myriad questions and controversies that surround such historical concepts as "objectivity," "subjectivity," "truth," "epistemology," and thereby to develop a "philosophy" of history. At the same time, it stresses the acquisition of such historical tools as the use of written, oral, computer and media sources and the development of analytical writing skills. The subject matter for study changes each year. Recent themes of the course have been memory, empires, and class formation. (4 credits)

HIST 394-01

Science, Empire, and Visual Culture

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 394-01; prerequisite of one History course or permission of instructor* This advanced seminar investigates the ongoing feedback loop between scientific measurement, techniques of visualization, and global empires in the early modern and modern world. Beginning with the expansion of optical science in the late medieval era and the development of “linear” perspective in the Renaissance, the ability to measure, describe and visualize distant geographical realms became a crucial ally to the knowledge and administration of empire. The course will focus particularly on the interaction of these forces during imperial and scientific exploration, especially during the 18th and 19th centuries. Case studies will include astronomical, botanical, and geographic studies in the early modern French and Spanish Atlantic empires, the Napoleonic survey of Egypt, the American journeys of Alexander von Humboldt, the Great Surveys of the US West and 19th-century polar expeditions. In each case, we will consider the relationship between measurement, visualization, collection, display, aesthetics, technology and coloniality.

HIST 394-03

Public History in Action: Rondo Digital History Harvest

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 394-02* This digital history practicum is a hands-on workshop where students will work collaboratively to put on a signature national program called a History Harvest. Created by historians at the University of Nebraska Lincoln, History Harvest is a collaborative, community-based approach to history. The shared experience of giving is at the heart of the History Harvest concept. The project makes invisible histories and materials more visible by working with and within local communities to collect, preserve and share previously unknown or under-appreciated artifacts and stories. Initial "harvests" have taken place in a series of communities across the Great Plains region. At each “harvest,” community-members are invited to bring and share their letters, photographs, objects and stories, and participate in a conversation about the significance and meaning of their materials. Each artifact is digitally captured and then shared in this free web-based archive for general educational use and study. This class will begin by examining the history of Saint Paul’s Historic African American community, Rondo, which was devastated by the development of highway I-94. We will also consider the local and national dimensions and consequences of this tragic event. Since the devastation of their physical community, African Americans who once lived in this vibrant neighborhood have been working collectively to make sure Saint Paul remembers this history and that something like this never happens again. The class will collaborate with community partner, Rondo Avenue, Inc. to implement a History Harvest during spring 2017. After the History Harvest event students will digitally process all of the artifacts in order to make them available to the wider Saint Paul community. No digital skills required but students should know that collaboration, flexibility, and enthusiasm are encouraged for this fun community-based course!

HIST 394-04

Public History in Action - Remembering Rondo: Archives

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Rebecca Wingo

Notes: *Course appropriate for First Years; cross-listed with AMST 394-03* This course has two main foci: archives and digital history. First, we broadly examine the “archive” as records of the past. We will interrogate the role of the archive in preserving and interpreting our knowledge, and explore how institutionalized archives preserve some pasts and repress others. We will cover a wide range of fields to study archives, including public history, museum studies, Indigenous studies, gender studies, and African American history. Concentrating specifically on the latter, our second focus will center around a hands-on archival project in partnership with Rondo Avenue, Inc. (RAI). The Rondo neighborhood in St. Paul is a historically Black neighborhood that was intentionally bifurcated by the construction of I-94 in the 1960s to create a diaspora of the community there. We will read old newspapers produce by and for the neighborhood (preserved on microfilm) and mine them for old business advertisements. We will then plot the businesses on a map and generate timelines of businesses for each address. In addition to producing this map for RAI, students are required to produce a final research paper examining the economic trends of the Rondo neighborhood.

Fall 2017

HIST 114-01

History of Africa to 1800

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: A study of the history of Africa before 1800, this course covers the major themes relating to the development of African societies and cultures from the earliest times. Students will engage with themes of state-building, trade and religion as catalysts for change and learn how historians have reconstructed the history of early Africa. This course will provide students with knowledge of specific case studies from North, South, East, West, and Central Africa. (4 credits)

HIST 122-01

The Roman World

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 12:00 pm-01:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Beth Severy-Hoven

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 122-01*

This course introduces students to the Roman world, which at its height stretched from Britain to Iran, from Germany to Africa, and lasted well over a thousand years. Students will develop critical thinking skills while working with Roman literature in translation, art, architecture and other archaeological remains. The structure of the course is chronological, but we will examine major themes across time and space, which may include the development of Roman literature out of and in response to Greek culture; the effects of the civil wars and the resulting political change from a republic to a monarchy; the cultural, religious and/or military aspects of the Roman empire and its immediate aftermath; Roman conceptions of gender, sexuality, slave and free status, citizenship and/or ethnicity, and how these social categories were used to legitimize or exercise power. (4 credits) Cross-listed with Classics 122.

HIST 140-01

Introduction to East Asian Civilization

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 140-01*

This course introduces the cultures and societies of China, Japan and Korea from the earliest times to the present day. Primarily an introductory course for beginners in East Asian civilization, this course considers a variety of significant themes in religious, political, economic, social and cultural developments in the region. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement. (4 Credits)

HIST 181-01

Introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 181-01*

This course offers a general survey of the complex and heterogeneous region we somewhat reductively term Latin America. It follows a roughly chronological approach, beginning with the eve of encounter and continuing through the contemporary era. Discussions will consider themes such as the institution and legacy of colonialism, the search for new national identities, and the onset of modern racial and political strife. The course will emphasize the import of global economic, political, and cultural trends on the formation of the region. (4 credits). Meets the global and/or comparative history requirement. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies 181.

HIST 194-01

Influential Indians: A Biographical Approach to American Indian History

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *First Year Course only*


HIST 194-02

Sex, Love, and Gender in History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: CARN 105
  • Instructor: Jessica Pearson-Patel

Notes: *First Year Course only* This First-Year Course will use a global/comparative approach to introduce students to the ways that historians think about sex, love, and gender. We will explore themes such as sex and war, the role of the state in shaping people’s intimate lives, the intersections between gender, race, and social class, changing courtship practices, and the ways that the politics of sex and gender shaped the evolution of empires and nations. We will also consider how different sexualities and gender roles mapped onto different urban spaces, exploring prostitution in nineteenth-century London and Paris and the evolution of LGBTQ communities in New York and Berlin. Students will engage with a wide variety of historical sources, ranging from memoirs, poems and novels, art, film, and photography and will engage with a range of theoretical approaches to thinking about sex and gender. This course will emphasize critical reading and analysis skills and will also introduce students to the basic tenets of historical research and writing. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement.

HIST 219-01

In Motion: African Americans in the United States

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 219-01, first day attendance required*

In Motion is an introduction to modern African American History from slavery to contemporary times. In Motion emphasizes the idea that both African Americans and the stories of their lives in the United States are fluid, varied and continually being reinterpreted. Rather than a strict chronological survey, this course is organized thematically. Some of the important themes include movement/mobility/migration; work/labor; resistance to systems of oppression; gender/sexuality/culture/performance; politics/citizenship; and sites of (re)memory. While the course is geographically situated in the United States, we will also consider African American life, culture, thought and resistance in global perspectives. In this course, students will read important historical texts, both primary and secondary, engage in discussion, and write essays that ask them to critically engage the history of African Americans in the US. Cross-listed with American Studies 219. 4 credits.

HIST 229-01

Narrating Black Women's Resistance

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: MAIN 001
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: * Cross-listed with AMST 229-01 and WGSS 229-01; first day attendance required*

This course examines traditions of 20th century African American women’s activism and the ways in which they have changed over time. Too often, the narrative of the “strong black woman” infuses stories of African American women’s resistance which, coupled with a culture of dissemblance, makes the inner workings of their lives difficult to imagine. This course, at its heart, seeks to uncover the motivations, both personal and political, behind African American women’s activism. It also aims to address the ways in which African American women have responded to the pressing social, economic, and political needs of their diverse communities. The course also asks students to consider narrative, voice and audience in historical writing, paying particular attention to the ways in which black women’s history has been written over the course of the twentieth century. Cross-listed with American Studies 229 and Women's and Gender Studies 229.

HIST 234-01

U.S. Environmental History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: NEILL 400
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 234-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of instructor*

People have always had to contend with the natural world, but only recently have historians begun to explore the changing relationships between people and their environment over time. In this course, we will examine the variety of ways that people in North America have shaped the environment, as well as how they have used, labored in, abused, conserved, protected, rearranged, polluted, cleaned, and thought about it. In addition, we will explore how various characteristics of the natural world have affected the broad patterns of human society, sometimes harming or hindering life and other times enabling rapid development and expansion. By bringing nature into the study of human history and the human past into the study of nature, we will begin to see the connections and interdependencies between the two that are often overlooked. Fall semester. (4 credits)

HIST 234-02

U.S. Environmental History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room: OLRI 300
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *First Year Course only; cross-listed with ENVI 234-02; first day attendance required*

People have always had to contend with the natural world, but only recently have historians begun to explore the changing relationships between people and their environment over time. In this course, we will examine the variety of ways that people in North America have shaped the environment, as well as how they have used, labored in, abused, conserved, protected, rearranged, polluted, cleaned, and thought about it. In addition, we will explore how various characteristics of the natural world have affected the broad patterns of human society, sometimes harming or hindering life and other times enabling rapid development and expansion. By bringing nature into the study of human history and the human past into the study of nature, we will begin to see the connections and interdependencies between the two that are often overlooked. Fall semester. (4 credits)

HIST 250-01

Science, Magic and Belief

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Basit Hammad Qureshi

Notes: Events of the distant European past continue to shape our modern attitudes towards religion, magic and science. How did people in the sixteenth- and seventeenth- century Atlantic world use these frameworks to make sense of the world around them? In this course we will journey back to the period of the "Scientific Revolution" to investigate how and why people began to distinguish sharply between the three systems. Who lost, and who profited, from this transition? What similarities between religion, magic and science persisted? To understand this turning point, we will compare contemporaneous cases of individuals who practiced magic, science and religion and ran afoul of authorities. Their trials highlight how the three spheres began to diverge. Cases we will consider might include the 1633 trial of Galileo, and the 1663 witchcraft trial of Tempel Anneke in Germany. We will also substantially explore medieval conceptions of scientia, religio, and magia, locating early modern developments within a broader sweep of pre-modern history. This course fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for the major.

HIST 251-01

Pirates, Translators, and Missionaries: Indian Ocean World Connections

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: Though this course has in previous semesters focussed on case studies of interlocutors who moved between the Spanish, Aztec, English, French, Kongolese and Portuguese empires of the early modern period and considered various conflicting primary source accounts, this semester we will be focussing on interlocutors from the Swahili Coast through the Melaka Straits and beyond. The integral role of Islam will be examined in addition to the creation of various Creole communities of the Malagasy, East Africans, and European renegades of Madagascar and surrounding islands. Traders who followed the monsoon winds of the Indian Ocean established distinctive Swahili communities blending Indian, Arabian and Bantu African languages and belief systems on the coast. Using primary source documents from captains’ logs, ships’ manifests and trading records of individuals we will examine how individual actions contributed to the creation of complex identity in this historical space of coastal transshipment points such as Kilwa, Malindi, Moqdishu, Hormuz, Calicut, Madras, Melaka and Guangzhou.

HIST 261-01

Making History: Russian Cinema as Testimony, Propaganda, and Art

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room: OLRI 270
  • Instructor: Julia Chadaga

Notes: *First Year Course only; cross-listed with RUSS 261-01* Throughout history, we have turned to storytelling to make sense of our world. We tell stories about the past to document and explain phenomena, to justify our political and social agendas, to create connections, and to give life meaning. In the twentieth century, Russia helped introduce the world to a spectacular new form of storytelling—film—and used it to alter previous narratives in the hope of reshaping the future. In this course, we will look at written and cinematic representations of Russian history, from medieval times to the post-Soviet era. One task of the course will be to articulate how storytelling in film differs from historiography and fiction. Another will be to show how politics, power relations, technology, and aesthetics have shaped film depictions of key historical events. We will analyze the films as narratives about real events, as vehicles of propaganda, and as imaginative works of art. The course will consist of mini-lectures, class discussion, and weekly film screenings. All films will have subtitles, and no knowledge of Russia or Russian history is required.

HIST 294-01

Vodou and Santeria: African Diasporic Religious History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 111
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: *Cross-listed with RELI 294-01* How did a complex religious pantheon come to represent bad Hollywood zombie movies and New Orleans-style voodoo dolls? In this course, we will find out by investigating the history of complex religious practices such as Haitian Voudou, which originated with West African Vodou and Kongolese religious practices as the slaves from these regions were brought to the island of Hispaniola during the trans-Atlantic slave system and changed over time as people continuously interacted across the Atlantic world. We will also explore other African-based religions. For example, the orisha religions of Yoruba peoples in West Africa came to places such as Brazil and Cuba at various points in both the legal and illicit slave trading periods. Peoples of African descent experienced a bricolage of cultural impacts and remade themselves in the Americas but did not forget ties to the homeland. Religions such as Christianity and Islam also inserted themselves into these communities and emerged intertwined. The movements of Africans and their descendants came to North America adapting and adopting even more of their practices to meet specific needs. We will learn about the values, attitudes and norms that historically shaped the cultures of peoples across the Atlantic. The Caribbean, Brazil and West Africa, will be our primary focuses. Specifically, you will come to understand the complexity of religious practices commonly known as Santeria, Candomble, Vodou, Palo Mayombe, Ifa, and Hoodoo, among others. By placing these systems in an appropriate historical context, we will identify and analyze key elements, biases and influences that shape the disciplines of History and World Religions. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement.

HIST 294-02

Cold War Latin America

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 294-02* During the Cold War, Latin America was a decidedly “hot zone.” This class examines the reasons for this phenomenon, reviewing both internal and external pressures such as the region’s sociopolitical instability and its conflictive relationship with the United States. The class will examine some of the more dramatic moments of the Latin American Cold War, including the overthrow of Jacobo Arbenz in Guatemala, the Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions, and the Dirty Wars in Chile and Argentina. In addition, we will engage less-discussed elements of the Latin American Cold War such as its important role in fostering transhemispheric solidarities, the creative possibilities of Cold War cultural production, the emergence of a youth counterculture, and the many attempts by Latin Americans across the political spectrum to reject the premise of the Cold War altogether. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement.

HIST 294-03

Iberian Frontiers: Convivencia and Conflict, 711-1492

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room: NEILL 216
  • Instructor: Rebecca Church

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 294-01* Throughout the Middle Ages, as Christianity and Islam dominated parts of the Iberian peninsula, from the 8th to the 15th century,convivencia and conflict existed side by side. Where did people practice tolerance, and how and why? Where did they fight and why? How did the Jewish population fit in on either side? What life look like on the ground, in the narrow city streets, the gardens, the villages of al-Andalus and the Christian kingdoms? How did Iberia relate to the wider worlds of North Africa, France, and the Mediterranean? We'll use poetry, charters, and chronicles to explore how complex identities, cooperation, and, also, violence created porous borders along shifting frontiers.

HIST 294-04

Public History:African American Life - Past, Present and Future

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room: NEILL 304
  • Instructor: Harris, Sturtz

Notes: *Permission of instructor required; applications are due April 28 at noon. The application form is available at: https://goo.gl/Pz0E2Y; cross-listed with AMST 294-01* This course introduces students to theories and practices of Public History – the ways that people understand and make use of the past in our everyday lives – by focusing on one topic, that of African American History.

Public History now encompasses museum studies, archival management, historic preservation, historical archaeology, oral history, and cultural resources management; but on a larger scale Public Historians acknowledge the multiple ways that we all preserve knowledge about the past and make meaning from the sources we use in our everyday lives. Expressions of historic memory occur in popular historical forms like community celebrations, archival collections, commemorative sites, family reunions, museum exhibits, and even video games, among many others. In this course, students learn about the ways that Public History is practiced, the rationales for undertaking this study, and the skills available to them in meeting their goals.

With the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture during the past year, the Public History of African Americans has attracted sustained attention in the popular press, in museum circles, and in academic disciplines. In this course, students will examine the theory and practice of Public History, including museum work, archives, public memory, and oral history. They will then proceed to consider how African American History has been presented (or omitted) from the larger narrative of North American/U.S. History. The course will include an examination of the politics of creating and building the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) and the interpretive dimensions of presenting that History to the wider public.

Participants must commit to a four-day field trip to Washington, D.C. during fall break and to some outside of class, on-site activities during the semester.


HIST 294-05

Uses and Abuses: A History of Drugs, Addiction, and Recovery in the U.S

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Amy Sullivan

Notes: After a brief but essential global history of drugs, this course will focus primarily on the 20th century to the present. We will examine histories of substance use and abuse, temperance and prohibition, the “War on Drugs,” the shifting concept of addiction as a moral failing to addiction as a treatable disease, as well as study the history of the recovery movement. This course is not intended to be an exhaustive, comprehensive history of the subject—but will provide you with a solid base from which to explore other aspects of this fascinating and contentious chapter in human history. The books and readings are intentionally interdisciplinary and will center on an intersectional approach to drugs as they relate to various groups and sectors of society—race, gender and class will be integrated and noted throughout.

HIST 294-06

Race and Immigration in Europe

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Jessica Pearson-Patel

Notes: This course will explore the way that questions of race have shaped European society and politics, as well as the ways that immigration has created the uneasily multi-cultural Europe that we know today. We will explore topics such as the origins of immigration policy in interwar Europe, anti-Semitism and the Holocaust, race and empire, post-colonial immigration from Africa and Asia, the place of Islam in European society, the emergence of anti-immigration political movements on the extreme right, and we will end the course with a discussion of the current migration crisis in Europe. This course will give students a historical as well as a contemporary perspective on questions of race and immigration in European society. In addition to our readings of leading scholars in this field, we will engage with historical documents, literature, and film, as well as with contemporary European news coverage.


HIST 294-08

Technology and the Environment in the Pre-Modern World

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Basit Hammad Qureshi

Notes: *Cross-listed with ENVI 294-02* From volcanic activity to viral pandemics, from flooding rivers to invasive fauna, every human society has had to face material, ecological, climactic, and other such challenges particular to its environment. In this interdisciplinary course, we will investigate how human societies in the pre-modern world developed different sorts of technologies to confront and adapt to the challenges presented by their environments. Drawing upon a diverse array of sources, including glacial ice core data and saints’ lives, we will explore how human technologies changed local environments in both intended and unintended ways. Environmental consequences presented new challenges that required further technological adaptation, fundamentally shaping trajectories of societal development from classical China to medieval Europe, from ancient Oceania to the Americas. In studying the formative relationship between technology and the environment in pre-modern global contexts, we will arrive at a more informed understanding of the emergence of the modern world. For our purposes in this course, “technology” will include not only physical tools but also political-cultural ideologies, systems of government, religions, scientific theories, and techniques of domestication. “Environment” will similarly be defined broadly: climate, physical geography, biosphere, and urban settlements. This course fulfills the global and/or comparative history as well as the pre-1800 requirements for the major.

HIST 294-10

The Once and Future King: Arthur in History, Literature and Art

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room: MAIN 002
  • Instructor: Basit Hammad Qureshi

Notes: Stories of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table have captivated audiences for over a thousand years. In this interdisciplinary course, we will examine a diversity of historical artifacts, literary texts, and artistic works that engage with Arthurian lore. We will approach each instance of such “Arthuriana” as a construct particular to its own time and place of production. Indeed, like most classics, the Arthurian legend endures not because of the allure of its original form but because of its fundamental adaptability. Camelot was, is, and will continue to be a stage on which societies play out their hopes, fears, and everything in between. Our goal, therefore, will be to illuminate and understand how contemporary social, cultural, and political agendas have shaped and, in turn, have been shaped by each compelling incarnation of Arthur’s court. Course topics will span the gamut of Arthurian tradition: from medieval Welsh folklore re-imagining the post-Roman “Dark Ages” to T.H. White’s modern saga responding to the horrors of World War II; from Sir Thomas Malory’s compendium reflecting the Wars of the Roses (the medieval inspiration for ‘A Game of Thrones’) to Monty Python’s satirical musings on a millennium of chivalry and flesh wounds.

HIST 294-11

Get in Formation: Black Protest Music

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MUSIC 228
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *First day attendance required; appropriate for First Years; cross-listed with AMST 294-02, MUSI 294-02 and, WGSS 294-01* Throughout African American history, people of African descent in the United States have always utilized the tools at their disposal to resist oppression. This includes music. Music heals, empowers, and exposes--joy, pain, love, anger, happiness, suffering and hope. Using a black feminist, intersectional lens, this course is a topical introduction to various traditions within African American music from the enslavement period until the present. Not meant to be exhaustive, the course will examine the connections between music and major turning points in African American social, cultural, and political history. The course also pays special attention to the ways in which race, class, gender, and sexuality impact the creation, interpretation, performance, and reception of black protest music.

HIST 378-01

War Crimes and Memory in East Asia

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room: MAIN 010
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 378-01*

This course's main goal is to introduce evidence of the major crimes and atrocities during World War II in East Asia such as the Nanjing Massacre, biochemical warfare (Unit 731), the military sexual slavery ("comfort women") system, the forced labor system, and inhumane treatment of POWs. The course will also help students understand the contemporary geo-political and socio-economic forces that affect how East Asians and Westerners collectively remember and reconstruct World War II. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement. (4 credits)

Cross-listed with Asian Studies 378

HIST 381-01

Transnational Latin Americas

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with INTL 381-01 and LATI 381-01*

Examines critical and primary literatures concerning the transnational, hemispheric, Atlantic, and Pacific cultures that have intersected in Latin America since the early colonial era, with a particular focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement. (4 credits) Cross-listed with International Studies 381 and Latin American Studies 381

HIST 490-01

Senior Seminar in History

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 08:00 am-09:30 am
  • Room: MAIN 009
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: The senior seminar is taught every fall on themes that cross chronological and geographic lines. Past themes have included Memory, Migration, Gender and Micro-History. (4 credits)

Spring 2018

HIST 115-01

Africa Since 1800

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes: This course is designed to introduce students to the history of Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It examines major themes relating to change in the colonial period such as European conquest and imperialism, the development of the colonial economy, African responses to colonialism and the rise of nationalist movements that stimulated the movement towards independence. Students will examine these themes by applying them to case studies of specific geographic regions of the continent. (4 credits)

HIST 137-01

From Confederation to Confederacy: US History from Independence to Civil War

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: In the Plan of Union prepared during the 1754 "Albany Convention," Anglo-American colonists met to consider uniting as a loose confederation for their common defense and to ally with the Iroquois confederacy. That plan failed, but a later experiment in unity succeeded when the united colonies declared independence. Nevertheless, social, cultural, and ideological differences persisted, and the union formed in 1776 was tried and tested before finally fracturing with the secession of South Carolina, precipitating the Civil War. In the intervening years, Americans grappled with how they should govern themselves, who should be included in the polity, and how society should be organized. Reformers considered the controversial issues of women's rights, the role of Native Americans within the US, and the place of slavery in a nation founded on the precept that "All men are created equal." This course covers the periods of the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the early national and antebellum periods, before concluding with the Civil War. It also considers the global causes and consequences of the war and the rise of the new United States. We will also analyze the construction of the myth and historical memory of Alexander Hamilton, the founding father who has captured the imagination of people in the modern U.S. Through a study of the recent biography of Hamilton along with the music and stage production of Hamilton, we will consider both the biographical and mythical Alexander Hamilton in order to understand his era and our own. 4 credits.

HIST 180-01

Going Global: The Experiment of World History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Rebecca Church

Notes: What broad patterns do we see repeated across human cultures and eras? How do current international concerns shape the way we perceive these pattersn, and retell the past? This course is an introduction to the youngest and boldest experiementers in the discipline of history: global historians. We follow these trail-blazers to every corner of the planet and across the grandest expanses of time, all the way from the emergence of Homo sapiens to present day. Such a sweeping survey of human history invites us to look beyond chronological, national, cultural and geographic boundaries. It also forces us to sharply rethink the methodology of traditional historians. Throughout our critical survey of world history we will assess the usefulness (and potential outdatedness) of the concepts of civilization, empire, revolution, and global networks. This course fulfills the global/comparative requirement for the major. Offered every year. (4 credits)

HIST 209-01

Civil Rights in the US

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 209-01*

The course examines the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. In the class, students will analyze key people, issues, events, and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power. Throughout the semester, students will read a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to illuminate the activities and life stories of individual participants as well as the broad historical forces that characterized this long era of insurgency.

HIST 222-01

Imagining the American West

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 222-01*

The American West is central to the construction of America’s identity and popular culture. The mythology of the American West, built on a narrow foundation of Euro-American settlement and conquest, is critical to understanding the role of the West in the national narrative of American history. Using a variety of materials, including films, art and photography, literature, and historical sources, this course will examine how writers, artists, actors, settlers, and government officials, among others, shaped the creation of the mythic West. This course will investigate what – and who – is and is not considered part of this mythology, as well as the ways in which these constructs attempted to make sense of the diverse populations converging in the West. Cross-listed with American Studies 222. (4 credits)

HIST 226-01

American Indian History since 1871

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 226-01*

This course examines Native American history since 1871. We begin with an introduction to indigenous history before 1871, characterized by centuries of Euro-American attempts to colonize and Christianize, to assimilate Native bodies and allot Native lands. We will then analyze the ways in which Native Americans have continualy fought to sustain their cultures, languages, and religions, as well as their political and socio-economic structures, throughout the 20th and into the 21st centuries. Focusing on themes such as Native resistance to the development of U.S. federal policies and the proliferation of Native culture, we will also consider the shifting nature of Native American sovereignty and the importance of indigenous identity in regards to the experiences of Native Americans. Cross-listed with American Studies 226. Spring semester. (4 credits)

HIST 237-01

Environmental Justice

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Christina Manning

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 237-01 and ENVI 237-01; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of the instructor*

Poor and minority populations have historically borne the brunt of environmental inequalities in the United States, suffering disproportionately from the effects of pollution, resource depletion, dangerous jobs, limited access to common resources, and exposure to environmental hazards. Paying particular attention to the ways that race, ethnicity, class, and gender have shaped the political and economic dimensions of environmental injustices, this course draws on the work of scholars and activists to examine the long history of environmental inequities in the United States, along with more recent political movements-national and local-that seek to rectify environmental injustices. Cross-listed with American Studies 237 and Environmental Studies 237. (4 credits)

HIST 274-01

The Great Tradition in China before 1840

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 10:50 am-11:50 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 274-01*

A study of the culture and society of China from earliest times to the eighteenth century, when the impact of the West was strongly felt. The course will feature themes in Chinese history, including the birth of the Great Philosophers, the story of the Great Wall, the making and sustaining of the imperial system, the Silk Road and international trade and cultural exchange, the emergence of Chinese Buddhism and Neo-Confucianism, Genghis Kahn and his Eurasian Empire, the splendid literary and artistic achievements, the Opium War and its impact on modern China. Lecture/discussion format. (4 credits)

HIST 275-01

The Rise of Modern China

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 275-01*

A study of leading institutions and movements of nineteenth- and twentieth-century China. Major emphases include the impact of Western imperialism, intellectual and cultural changes, the transformation of peasant society through revolution, the rise of Mao Tse-Tung, and the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, and the rise of China as a world power. Special attention will be given to China's international relations. (4 credits)

HIST 277-01

The Rise of Modern Japan

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Yue-him Tam

Notes: *Cross-listed with ASIA 277-01*

Japan's rapid industrialization in the latter part of the nineteenth century, and its phenomenal rise as the number two economic power in the world after the devastation wrought by World War II, have led many scholars to declare Japan a model worthy of emulation by all "developing" nations. After an examination of feudal Japan, this course probes the nature and course of Japan's "amazing transformation" and analyzes the consequences of its strengths as a nation-state. Considerable study of Japanese art, literature, and religion will be undertaken and American attitudes toward the Japanese and their history will also be examined. (4 credits)

HIST 294-01

Revolutionary Women in Latin America

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 294-01*


HIST 294-02

Afro Latin American History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Ernesto Capello

Notes: *Cross-listed with LATI 294-02*


HIST 294-03

Medieval Mediterranean

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-10:40 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Rebecca Church

Notes: *Cross-listed with CLAS 294-02* The Mediterranean, from 500 to 1500 CE, will be our focus. While the Romans called it mare nostrum (our sea), the Mediterranean became a shared space after the Roman Empire split into East (Byzantium) and West (Rome) and the Islamic Empire of the Umayyads enveloped all of the Levant, North Africa, and Iberia by the 8th century. Despite the divided polities, goods, and people--armies, mercenaries, courtiers, merchants, pilgrims, scholars, artisans--along with their ideas, moved easily across the water creating a mixed Mediterranean culture. All of the medieval cultures surrounding the Mediterranean were built on the cultures that preceded them, especially their Roman heritage. They were also springboards for the period of European expansion that followed. In this course we'll look at the geography, agriculture, literature, art, and religious beliefs found in the Mediterranean basin and engage the fundamental question, what is Mediterranean culture? Did it mean the same thing in Iberia, in Egypt, Western Europe, in Byzantium, the Levan.

HIST 294-04

Museums and Memory: American Indians in Public History

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 01:10 pm-02:10 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Katrina Phillips

Notes:

HIST 294-05

Women, Gender, and the Family in Contemporary Europe

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 01:20 pm-02:50 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jessica Pearson-Patel

Notes:

HIST 294-06

Public Health in Africa from Empire to Ebola

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jessica Pearson-Patel

Notes:

HIST 294-08

African Resources

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Tiffany Gleason

Notes:

HIST 294-09

Power, Authority, and the Legacy of Rome in Europe and the Middle East, 400-1700

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 02:20 pm-03:20 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Basit Hammad Qureshi

Notes:

HIST 294-10

Medievalism and Modernity: Reinventing the Middle Ages, 1300 to Present

  • Days: MWF
  • Meeting Time: 03:30 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Basit Hammad Qureshi

Notes:

HIST 315-01

U.S. Imperialism from the Philippines to Viet Nam

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Karin Aguilar-San Juan

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 315-01 and ASIA 315-01; no first year student allowed*

In this discussion-based seminar, we will examine U.S. Global presence through the lenses of empire, diaspora, and transnationalism. We will look specifically at

U.S. involvement in the Philippines and Viet Nam from 1898 to 1975 as moments of military occupation and cultural domination, as well as turning points for U.S. nation-building. What is "imperialism" and how is it different from "hegemony"? How did U.S. imperial adventures in Asia help to recreate a Western geographic imaginary of the "East"? How did they reshape or reconfigure "American" positions and identities? Under what circumstances were former imperial subjects allowed to generate racialized communities? To what extent are memories of U.S. conflicts in Asia cultivated, proliferated, twisted, or suppressed? What lessons can be garnered for the contemporary historical moment? Other topics for exploration include: internment, transracial adoption, commemorations of war, and anti-imperialist/anti-war movements. Cross-listed with American Studies 315 and Asian Studies 315. (4 credits)

HIST 343-01

Imperial Nature: The United States and the Global Environment

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 09:40 am-11:10 am
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Chris Wells

Notes: *Cross-listed with AMST 343-01 and ENVI 343-01; first day attendance required; ACTC student may register on the first day of class with permission of the instructor*

Although the United States accounts for just five percent of the world's population, it consumes roughly twenty-five percent of the world's total energy, has the world's largest economy, and is the world's largest consumer and generator of waste. Relative to its size, its policies and actions have had a significantly disproportionate impact on global economic development and environmental health. Mixing broad themes and detailed case studies, this course will focus on the complex historical relationship between American actions and changes to the global environment. Meets global and/or comparative history requirement. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies 343. (4 credits)

HIST 350-01

Race, Gender, and Medicine

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: This seminar-style class will examine the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality in the history of medicine and health in the U.S. Our diverse topics for study will include the history of eugenics, sexuality, midwifery, cultural/spiritual healing methods, pandemics, race- and gender-based ailments, medical experiments (such as the birth control pill and the Tuskegee syphilis experiment), gender reassignment and sex-testing in the Olympics, and the disease vs. moral model of addiction.

HIST 376-01

Public History: Community Engagement

  • Days: M
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Crystal Moten

Notes: This course introduces students to the ways history is being practiced in the public sphere. We will examine a wide array of topics that fall under the rubric of public history including the study of archives, museums, and oral histories. The course may also consider historical reenactment, commemoration, digital history, and the preservation of historical sites. As we explore these topics we will be asking larger questions about who practices history, the role of audience, and the relationship between history and memory. (4 credits)

HIST 379-01

The Study of History

  • Days: TR
  • Meeting Time: 03:00 pm-04:30 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Linda Sturtz

Notes: This advanced course is required for majors. It examines the various forms of analysis used by historians through a study of different kinds of historical texts and sources. It provides an opportunity for students to develop the skills and habits of thinking essential to practicing the discipline of history. This course invites students to address some of the myriad questions and controversies that surround such historical concepts as "objectivity," "subjectivity," "truth," "epistemology," and thereby to develop a "philosophy" of history. At the same time, it stresses the acquisition of such historical tools as the use of written, oral, computer and media sources and the development of analytical writing skills. The subject matter for study changes each year. Recent themes of the course have been memory, empires, and class formation. (4 credits)

HIST 394-01

Decolonization

  • Days: W
  • Meeting Time: 07:00 pm-10:00 pm
  • Room:
  • Instructor: Jessica Pearson-Patel

Notes: